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Unread 2014-07-19, 04:48 PM   #1
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Unread 2014-07-26, 12:35 PM   #2
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Egregious/Replete With/These Lesions
http://slipknot1.com






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Unread 2014-07-28, 08:07 PM   #3
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Unread 2014-08-01, 05:18 PM   #4
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Unread 2014-08-01, 05:23 PM   #5
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Definitely has an older Slipknot feel.
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Unread 2014-08-05, 07:59 PM   #6
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Unread 2014-08-30, 01:23 AM   #7
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Slipknot Reveal Details of New Album ‘.5: The Gray Chapter’






Slipknot Envision 'Melancholy' Album in Wake of Bassist's Death
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Slipknot fans, the long wait is nearly over. The metal band’s fifth studio album -- their first in more than six years -- will be released Oct. 21 on Roadrunner Records.
Titled 5: The Gray Chapter, the new set is Slipknot's first since 2008's "All Hope is Gone,” which reached No. 1 on the Billboard 200, Rock, and Alternative Charts. And it marks the outfit's first release without founding bassist Paul Gray, who died in 2010 from an accidental overdose of morphine and fentanyl.
If the first two tracks from the Gray Chapter are anything to go by, Slipknot haven't mellowed with age. First single "The Negative One" dropped earlier this month. Its chilling companion video was directed by band member Shawn “Clown” Crahan, and has quickly generated more than 2.5 million individual hits on YouTube.
A second track, "The Devil In I," is now online. Its audio-clip is closing-in on one million hits.
In support of the new release, Slipknot will hit the road for a U.S. tour starting Oct. 25 at Knotfest in San Bernardino, Calif. Organizers of Australia’s Soundwave festival recently announced Slipknot would headline the 2015 trek alongside the likes of Faith No More, Soundgarden and Slash. Joey Jordison, who had been with the band since its inception in 1995, won't make either trip. He split with the act late last year.
.5: The Gray Chapter Tracklisting:
1. "XIX"
2. "Sarcastrophe"
3. "AOV"
4. "The Devil In I"
5. "Killpop"
6. "Skeptic"
7. "Lech"
8. "Goodbye"
9. "Nomadic"
10. "The One That Kills The Least"
11. "Custer"
12. "Be Prepared For Hell"
13. "The Negative One"
14. "If Rain Is What You Want"

Special Edition Bonus Tracks
15. "Override" (Bonus Track)
16. "The Burden" (Bonus Track)





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Unread 2014-08-30, 11:18 AM   #8
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The Negative One was good. The Devil In I kinda sucks to be honest.
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Unread 2014-09-06, 01:41 PM   #9
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Is This First Glimpse Of SLIPKNOT Singer COREY TAYLOR's New Mask?


As with every album cycle, the members of SLIPKNOT are expected to unveil brand-new masks to coincide with the release of their fifth studio CD, ".5: The Gray Chapter", which will arrive on October 21 via Roadrunner. What appears to be the first glimpse (sort of) of SLIPKNOT singer Corey Taylor's new mask can be found in the just-released trailer for the band's "Prepare For Hell Tour". Check it out below.
Prior to the release of SLIPKNOT's last studio album, 2008's "All Hope Is Gone", SLIPKNOT revealed their new onstage outfits which were described at the time as "creepier" and "more intricate" than ever, with one mask reminiscent of that worn by horror film character Hannibal Lector. Some of SLIPKNOT's "All Hope" masks were markedly different from their previous versions, while others changed only a little.
SLIPKNOT last month released "The Devil In I", the first official single from ".5: The Gray Chapter". It follows "The Negative One", which was issued earlier the same month. "The Devil In I" is more melodic and features cleaner vocals from Taylor, who told The Pulse Of Radio what the song is about. "'The Devil In I' is really about the war inside yourself," he said. "Trying not to give into defeatism, trying not to give into negativity, trying not to give up basically. It's a struggle. It's one of the hardest thing you can do, is to give in to that side of yourself."

".5: The Gray Chapter" features 14 tracks for the record plus two bonus cuts, including "Sarcastrophe", "Killpop", "The One Who Kills The Least", "Be Prepared For Hell", "Nomadic", "Lech" and more.
The title seems to be a reference to bassist Paul Gray, who died in May 2010. The new disc is the band's first since his death.
Yet to be revealed is the identity of the band's new drummer although reports have suggested that SLIPKNOT has recruited Jay Weinberg to play on the new album and tour. Weinberg is the son of Max Weinberg, longtime Bruce Springsteen and the E STREET BAND drummer. There are also rumors that SLIPKNOT is no longer working with Donnie Steele, the group's original guitar player who has been playing bass for SLIPKNOT since the band resumed touring in 2011.
SLIPKNOT announced in December 2013 that it had parted ways with Jordison. The band has not disclosed the reasons for Jordison's exit, although the drummer issued a statement in January saying that he did not quit the group.
The second edition of SLIPKNOT's Knotfest event will take place on October 24-26 in San Bernardino, California. More than two dozen acts will join the headliners, including FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH, VOLBEAT, OF MICE & MEN, IN THIS MOMENT, HELLYEAH, ATREYU and many others.
Support on SLIPKNOT's "Prepare For Hell Tour" will come from KORN and KING 810.
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Unread 2014-09-10, 05:26 PM   #10
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SLIPKNOT's New Drummer And Bassist Will Wear Same Freshly Designed Mask


In a brand new interview with "Loudwire Nights" host Full Metal Jackie, SLIPKNOT frontman Corey Taylor was asked if the band has been brainstorming about creating the right onstage persona for its new drummer prior to the release of SLIPKNOT's fifth studio album, ".5: The Gray Chapter", which arrives on October 21.
"We wanted to make something that still looked unified but still stayed with the spirit of what the band is all about," Corey replied. "Instead of trying to find something that was individualistic, we designed — well, [percussionist] Clown designed a mask that the drummer and the bass player will both wear. On one hand, they get a mask, but at the same time, it's not the individual mask that we in the band use. We knew that any attempt to do anything like that might be taken as disrespectful, but at the same time it's part of the way of moving, getting past the hardest steps, which is just moving on. So, we decided that we would come up with a mask that works for both the bassist and the drummer and that's what they'll wear on stage."
The first official single from ".5: The Gray Chapter", called "The Devil In I", has just entered the Top 20 at rock radio.
The album is the first without bassist Paul Gray, who died in May 2010, and drummer Joey Jordison, who was dismissed in 2013.
The identity of SLIPKNOT's new drummer is still a secret, although it is widely believed to be Jay Weinberg, son of longtime Bruce Springsteen drummer Max Weinberg.
It is also rumored that SLIPKNOT is no longer working with Donnie Steele, the group's original guitar player who has been playing bass since they resumed touring in 2011.
A new video teaser for SLIPKNOT's upcoming "Prepare For Hell" tour has given us a glimpse of Taylor's new mask. The band traditionally unveils brand new variations on its trademark masks and onstage outfits for every touring cycle, with the masks for 2008's "All Hope Is Gone" tour — the last time the group came out with new gear — much different from previous versions.
Taylor told The Pulse Of
Radio
that he's relieved the long wait for a new SLIPKNOT record is about to end. "You know, we're really excited about new music," he said. "We're excited about the next chapter, you know. Obviously it's a bit subdued, but at the same time, you know, it's still very much in the spirit of what we want and it's time for the next chapter."
Tickets for the "Prepare For Hell" tour, which will also feature KORN and KING 810, went on sale Friday (September 5). The trek kicks off on October 29 in El Paso, Texas, just a few days after the group's two-day Knotfest event is held in San Bernardino, California.
SLIPKNOT announced in December 2013 that it had parted ways with Jordison. The band has not disclosed the reasons for Jordison's exit, although the drummer issued a statement in January saying that he did not quit the group.
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Unread 2014-09-12, 08:19 AM   #11
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http://www.thedevilini.com
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Unread 2014-09-12, 03:56 PM   #12
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Unread 2014-09-13, 01:32 AM   #13
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Is JAY WEINBERG The New Drummer of SLIPKNOT?


Who? Me??

Update: We have heard from a few anonymous sources that Jay is in fact the drummer.
When we posted our choices for 10 possible replacements for Joey Jordison of Slipknot how the hell did we forget to include Jay Weinberg? Jay comes from drumming royalty being the son of Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band drummer Max Weinberg.
Also, I know for a fact the dude is a huge Slipknot fan. About 10 years ago, when I was interning for Roadrunner, I was lucky enough hang out backstage where I saw Max and a very young Jay (he must've been 13 or 14 at the time) gushing with members of the band.
Anyway, WolverineKills, a site that makes its name for starting summer festival lineup rumors just posted that they "received word" that Jay is the new drummer for the band:
While we cannot confirm this to be true (only the band can do that) we can verify that Jay left his former band Against Me! in January.
Ok, everybody can verify that. Where is your proof?
It is interesting to know he left that band in 2012, before Joey Jordison was kicked out/parted ways with Slipknot. While we have no evidence to support this rumor we decided to pass it along as we think there is a good possibility this rumor will turn out to be true.
So their proof is that he left his previous band, Against Me!, right before Joey quit. That's quite a reach. I tried to contact Jay but haven't heard back.
The only reason I am even posting this is because I think it makes sense that the band would ask Jay. He has experience preforming in high-pressure environments touring with the E Street Band before and he clearly loves Slipknot and loves playing on a grand stage. I guess only time will tell if this is rumor is true or not.
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Unread 2014-09-13, 01:34 AM   #14
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New SLIPKNOT Bassist's Identity Revealed?



The new SLIPKNOT bassist, who is featured in the band's just-released video for the song "The Devil In I", is believed to be Alessandro "Vman" Venturella, who has served as a guitar tech for MASTODON, FIGHTSTAR and COHEED AND CAMBRIA and was also a member of KROKODIL.
A recent interview with Venturella can be found at MusicRadar.com.
A side-by-side comparison of Venturella's distinctive hand tattoo and that from the person posing as SLIPKNOT's new bassist in the "The Devil In I" video can be seen above.
SLIPKNOT is rumored to be no longer working with Donnie Steele, the group's original guitar player who has been playing bass since they resumed touring in 2011.
The identity of SLIPKNOT's new drummer is still a secret, although it is widely believed to be Jay Weinberg, son of longtime Bruce Springsteen drummer Max Weinberg.
SLIPKNOT singer Corey Taylor confirmed earlier this week that the band's new drummer and bassist will both wear the same generic mask onstage.
SLIPKNOT's fifth studio album, ".5: The Gray Chapter", will be released on October 21 via Roadrunner. It is the band's first album without bassist Paul Gray, who died in May 2010, and drummer Joey Jordison, who was dismissed in 2013.
SLIPKNOT announced in December 2013 that it had parted ways with Jordison. The band has not disclosed the reasons for Jordison's exit, although the drummer issued a statement in January saying that he did not quit the group.
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Unread 2014-09-13, 01:36 AM   #15
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Let's Examine The New SLIPKNOT Masks



Next Page

Earlier this morning, we post the new Slipknot music video, "The Devil In I." It was the first time Slipknot's new drummer and bassist were featured in a music video with them. It was also the first time we have seen the new Slipknot masks that will carry on through this current album cycle. One immediate takeaway from me: the masks are really cool. So I thought it would be fun to take some screenshots and examine all the masks. I literally sat there trying to grab the clearest shots of these masks frame by frame, so let's explore…
#8 – Corey Taylor

Are Slipknot even doing numbers anymore? I don't know, but Corey Taylor was naturally the most prominently featured member of the band so we have the best look at his mask. Taylor's mask comes in two iterations, one with the face on and one with the face off, definitely an improvement over his previous mask:

Old mask for reference:
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Unread 2014-09-13, 01:38 AM   #16
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#6 Shawn "Clown" Crahan

I think Clown has the coolest mask upgrade. To be fair, his masks were always the creepiest, but he's really outdone himself this time. I would not want to wake up to that face staring at me. You also kind of get a darker look at Mick Thompson's updated, but still relatively unchanged mask.

Old mask for reference:

#7 Mick Thompson

Speaking of Mick, his masks typically do not change much from album to album, because it already looks so brutal and the pattern continued…

Old mask for reference:

#4 Jim Root

It's hard to notice much change in Jim's mask as well, other than perhaps less mask near the chin area to make room for his massive beard:

Old mask for reference:

#5 Craig "133" Jones

Has anybody figured out what this guy does in the band yet? His masks basically never change. It's hard to notice a difference between this and his previous mask:

No need for reference.
#0 Sid Wilson

The award for second coolest mask upgrade goes to DJ Sid Wilson, for sure.

Last mask for reference:

#3 Chris Fehn

Chris's mask got a shiny metallic upgrade:

Old mask for reference:
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Unread 2014-09-13, 01:39 AM   #17
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Let's Examine The New SLIPKNOT Masks


The first we see of the new members is them being wheelchaired into being killed. These masks, which we learned look identical, kind of remind me of the Scarecrow in the new Batman films.

## New Drummer

Towards the final half of the video, we finally got to see the new drummer, and if this isn't Jay Weinberg, then my name isn't Robert Pasbani. The mannerisms, the hair length and the body frame are all signs that point to the new drummer indeed being Jay. It was hard to get a still shot of the dude because he's constantly moving, but here's the best I could do:

## New Bassist

While we're sitting here talking about a new drummer, it seems like Slipknot may also have a new bassist. Previously, original guitarist Donnie Steele was filling in but it might not be the case anymore:

Update: Well somebody thought those hand tattoos looked familiar. An anonymous tipster informed MetalSucks that Alessandro Venturella who has done tech work for Mastodon & Architects, as well as playing in Krokodil and SiKTH is the dude. Check out the hand tattoo:
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Unread 2014-09-14, 02:41 PM   #18
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FUCK YESSSSS
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Unread 2014-09-14, 07:41 PM   #19
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I've been wearing the guys out at work with the negative one! Pretty excited for the album!!
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Unread 2014-09-18, 07:21 PM   #20
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Unread 2014-09-29, 11:33 PM   #21
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Slipknot: “This Band Is An Anomaly”




When you’re one of the world’s biggest bands, with legions of followers eagerly anticipating your latest release, there’s already plenty of pressure. But when you’re about to embark on your first album cycle without two of your key members, that pressure increases tenfold. This is now the case for Slipknot.
But despite the twin pressures of bringing two newcomers into a machine that’s been rolling for almost two decades, while also honouring a beloved fallen member, Slipknot guitarist Jim Root recalls the making of .5: The Gray Chapter as an experience that was not only wholly positive, but cathartic and therapeutic.
We recently caught up with Jim, who spoke to us over the phone from his home in Florida, in the midst of rehearsal sessions with the band’s new bassist. As well as taking us behind the scenes of the new album, Jim opened up on the band’s anticipation for the upcoming Soundwave 2015 and the future of Slipknot.
Music Feeds: New album, new tours, new members. How’s life in the Slipknot camp at the moment?
Jim Root: Life in the Slipknot camp is pretty damn good right now. I used to be really hesitant and reluctant and resistant to say such things [laughs] Actually, everything’s pretty cool. But I don’t want to jinx it and I don’t want to…. usually when I feel like everything’s going good that’s when something really fucked up happens. So, I’m gonna say it’s all shitty, everything sucks, blah! [laughs]
MF: Corey mentioned how you and Shawn got the ball rolling on the songwriting process. Are you able to elaborate on that and take us behind the scenes a bit?
JR: Sure. We’d been talking about doing a new record for quite some time, we just didn’t really know when. I mean, to give you sort of a whole synopsis, the whole us touring started to see if we could see do it without Paul, continue the healing process and then see what we could do after that, see if that could lead us into doing a record.
And so time went by and we were touring for a while and got to the point where we knew it was time to do a record and we wanted to do a record. So we pushed forward and started thinking about that and talking about that and we kind of had to wait for other bands’ tour cycles to wrap up and all that stuff.
It kept getting pushed back and pushed back and people in the band kept getting a little more antsy and a little more frustrated and a little more like, ‘What the fuck’s going on?’ And then finally I had enough, I was like, ‘This is stupid. We’ve been putting this off for over two years now. It’s time to get back to it and do what it is we’re put on this earth to do.’
And in conversations with Clown and with management and with the record label, it was definitely time. So, in November I sat down and kind of went to work. And then I’d finish arrangements and bounce them down and send them to Clown and that was it, that’s where the ball started rolling. That’s when everything else started to unfold, but basically in November 2013 is when I started demoing and inviting people into my garage.
MF: Was there a particular song or perhaps a moment during the writing process where it felt like you’d regained or picked up momentum?
JR: No, not really. It’s kind of weird, I mean, I was feeling pretty good about everything that was coming out even in the raw demo phase when it was just me sitting in my garage. I could really hear it and I had a good vision for everything and everything seemed to make sense. So if everything makes so much sense to me right now, it can only get better.
About the time that the rest of the band showed up to the studio and we really started hammering through things is when everything really, even given the circumstances, started feeling very normal.
MF: Did you guys go into the studio specifically wanting to make a tribute to Paul or did it happen organically?
JR: I think that was always in the back of our mind. I don’t think we necessarily planned on making it that way. I mean, Paul was a huge part of our lives and a huge part of the band, so he’s always gonna be a part of everything we do. I guess the way I look at it is every record we do from here on out is pretty much gonna be a tribute to Paul.
MF: What was the mood like during this album process considering what this album meant and it also happening in the wake of Joey’s departure and your departure from Stone Sour?
JR: It was definitely an interesting vibe at the studio. It created a lot of different layers and dynamics. There was a lot of emotions going on. It was a lot of shit that normally happens to Slipknot, which is a very abnormal band anyway, so anything that’s abnormal is normal for us.
It was really good though. I think it was really positive given the circumstances of everything that we go through and everything that we put ourselves through, which is two different things. I think it just tends to bring us together more as a band. We end up communicating more and working together a little closer. I think it’s all positive and therapeutic in sort of a dysfunctional way.
MF: Considering the fact that Slipknot have made great albums under emotional duress before, was there something you learned during previous sessions that aided you this time around?
JR: No, not really. My biggest fear is that because of all the emotional roller coasters that we get put through and we put ourselves through, I’m just worries that in some ways I’m becoming pretty emotionally vacant [laughs] Learning how to cut off different parts of my psyche or my mind or my feelings, which is kind of scary in some ways. Whatever, hopefully I won’t turn into Dexter Morgan. I do live in Florida.
MF: Are you able to comment on Joey’s departure at all?
JR: Not really and only because I haven’t spoken to him and I don’t really think it’s fair to him to really talk about until I’ve at least spoken to him. I love the guy to death and we’re just going through some shit. I haven’t spoken to him since October of last year, so I’d rather not say anything until there comes a time where I see him and talk to him or whatever.
MF: And your egress from Stone Sour, you’ve said that it maybe happened for the best?
JR: I mean, I’ve said that to friends and everything but I still haven’t talked to certain guys in that band either, so I really don’t know what they were thinking or a hundred percent of the reason why they made the decision that they made. I mean, it was basically put to me over a phone call and I thought that was pretty lame. Whatever, it is what it is. Onward and upward. I think I have a little bit of a different opinion on how music should be done anyway. Maybe it is for the better.
Written by Greg Moskovitch on 28th September, 2014
Watch: Slipknot – The Devil In I


MF: Was there ever a moment where you felt like a new Slipknot album might not happen?
JR: There’s always a moment [laughs] That’s the other thing about this band is every time we do a record, I feel like it’s gonna be the last record we’ve ever done, you know what I mean? There’s so many guys in this band, so many different mentalities, it’s tough with this group of people.
MF: Did you feel like there was a lot more pressure on you guys this time around, like this had to be your Sgt Pepper’s and your White Album in one?
JR: I never felt any pressure, the whole time we working on this. For whatever reason, to me, everything felt very natural and very calm. Outside of the emotions I was feeling and going through, the actual process of writing was pretty therapeutic.
I feel the pressure when we’re done and we’re out of the studio and it’s getting ready to get put out there and it’s out of our hands. That’s when all of a sudden I have the stark realisation of, ‘Oh fuck, we’re done. There’s no more work that I can do it on. There it is world.’ That’s when I kind of start tripping out a little bit.
MF: How do you feel the new members acclimated to the Slipknot recording process?
JR: I think they did really well considering the circumstances that were thrown at them. We threw the book at the drummer, we fuckin’ put him through the ringer. He did not have it easy. But he was up to the challenge with everything that we threw at him. He took it all and props to him for that.
The bass player was a little bit of a different situation, because we kind of had a little bit of a revolving door of dudes coming in and out and trying things. Even Donnie came into the studio for a while and it just to a point where we were struggling looking for somebody and then the right guy presented himself sort of at the last minute. It worked out pretty cool.
MF: Have you been impressed with the way fans immediately began analysing the Devil In I video to find clues about the new members? They sort of treated it like the Zapruder film.
JR: [laughs] I sort of try to stay away from seeing what the fans… I have a hard time with any sort of criticism, not because I have some huge ego or anything like that. This is the most personal record I’ve ever done, it’s probably the most deeply involved record that I’ve done so it kind of crushes me a little bit when somebody doesn’t get it or they’re comparing it to something else.
It kind of makes me throw my hands up in the air, so I haven’t paid too much attention to all that type of shit. I like to keep my world positive. There’s enough negativity kicking around.
MF: You guys have Knotfest kicking off next month. Have you started rehearsals already?
JR: Yeah, actually, I am rehearsing at my house with our new bass player right now. He just flew in and we’re just going through some stuff and refreshing things and learning some of the old songs from the set that he’s never played before and then tomorrow the drummer will be here and I’ve got a little drum set set up in my house and we’re just gonna have a little three-piece jam here till we get together with the rest of the guys in the band in October.
MF: Do you know what the setlists for the upcoming shows will be like? Will it be an even split of new songs and fan favourites?
JR: Yeah, it’s gonna be… I mean, I’m not sure how the headlining set will be, because we haven’t really discussed the headlining set, but for Knotfest we’re doing two nights so we almost have two completely different setlists for both nights. I mean, there’s a couple of songs that we repeat from night to night, but for the most part they’re pretty drastically different.
I think we’re playing four of the new songs. By the time we do Knotfest the album will be out so hopefully people will be a little more familiar with the tunes on the new record.


MF: That brings us to Soundwave. It seemed like we had the official announcement for the album and the Soundwave lineup drop within a short space of time. Did you guys know you wanted to return to Australia as part of that tour?
JR: Absolutely, we always wanna come back, or at least I always wanna come back to Australia. Australia’s one of my favourite places on this planet to visit. And tours like Soundwave, they’re an experience to not just be able to play most of the major cities in Australia, but to have a couple of days off in all of them too… when you’re on tour, you don’t get a chance to really absorb the places you go.
But because of the way that tour was routed I was able to go snorkelling in the Indian ocean and I was able to take a ferry across the Sydney Harbour or whatever and go out to an island and eat dinner. I mean, there’s just so much you can do when you have that amount of time and it’s really awesome and it made me pretty passionate about Australia.
MF: Was it a band decision to keep exclusive to the festival? Can Aussie fans expect a return for a headline tour at some point?
JR: I definitely wanna come back there for a headlining tour, because I’ve heard and I’m not sure if this is true, but I’ve heard that Perth is not happening anymore for Soundwave.
MF: That’s true, yeah.
JR: Yeah, which I think is kind of a bummer, because I really like Perth a lot. Obviously, we’ve got a couple years at least of touring ahead of us so I’m sure the powers that be are putting their heads together to figure out how we can make it cost effective to be down in Australia and do a proper headlining tour on our own and make it so we’re not just spending money to be down there.
Fuck, I would love to do that. I mean, we haven’t been able to do a headlining tour down there in quite some time. Probably, shit, since the first record cycle, you know? So every other time we come down there it’s always a festival. I’d like to do both, that would be ideal.
MF: The way you guys have utilised the internet over the past couple of months has been nothing short of impressive. Do you feel like this could become a blueprint for other bands to promote their albums or would it really only work for Slipknot because you guys are such a singular entity?
JR: That’s a tough one, man, because the internet is really like the Wild West. It’s really hard to gauge what’s gonna happen and you never know what kind of shit’s gonna go viral or what’s gonna catch on or what the wave of sensation will be.
For us, we just simply wanted to go dark, because we’re at a day and age now where you can get on your social media and you can see what your favourite rockstar is eating for breakfast or if they’re dropping their kids off at school or they’re tweeting about current events, it just seems like it’s kind of taken a lot of the mystery and a lot of the what makes what we do special, away.
It makes everyone mere mortals again, which is cool. It’s nice to be in tune with what people that you admire do, but at the same time I think there’s something to be said about having a little anonymity and not knowing what’s going on so it may work for other bands, I don’t know.
For us, it was cool to just sort of take ourselves out of it for a while. And it just seemed to make sense with everything that’s going just to kind of shut off and tune out.
MF: How democratic have the decisions in the promotional campaign been? Has it all been spearheaded by Shawn and a couple of other members or has it been the result of group brainstorming sessions?
JR: It’s mainly Shawn that does a lot of that type of stuff. I kind of tend to concentrate on writing music and working in the studio and that side of things. Shawn really dives deep into the art, the photographs for the album, the art layout, art design, directing videos, things like that. I’m sure he’s probably working very closely, hand-in-hand, with out internet people and I’m sure that nothing happens without him putting it out there or saying, ‘Yeah, let’s do that.’
And that’s not to say that he’s not a creative force when it comes to writing music either, he writes a lot of the more Blur 13-esque stuff that makes it to the record and that’s a lot of my favourite stuff that we do.
MF: How is Slipknot’s future looking at the moment? Are you guys thinking years ahead or just focusing on getting the album out and this tour done?
JR: I don’t really know, ’cause like I said, now we’re back to having nine guys in the band and what people say and what people do are two different things. For me personally, I’m looking into the future of this band and that’s part of the reason I’m where I’m at is because of this band. Well, the whole reason I am where I’m at now is because of this band and I think for the legacy of Paul and all the time we’ve spent together it would be a shame to throw it all away.
But having said that, this band is an anomaly and we never what’s gonna happen and so we tend to just take things day by day, but everything’s looking really good right now and we’re getting along really well and everybody’s talking and we’re communicating. And I think that’s only gonna get better as we hit the road. We haven’t done a proper headlining tour since All Hope Is Gone. So this’ll definitely be something that’ll tell us a lot about our future, this album cycle.
MF: Corey’s described the new album as Vol. 3 meets Iowa. Would you agree with that summary?
JR: I don’t know if I would agree with that, because I don’t like to compare anything we do to anything that we’ve done or necessarily to anything else. I think that creates an expectation, you know what I mean? And I don’t like to put those expectations out there.
I know when I was younger, bands would say, ‘Oh, we’re coming back out with a new record and it’s gonna be like our second record’, and I’d hear their new record and it wasn’t anything like their second record and I was a little bit disappointed and I’m like, ‘Well, if they never would’ve said anything, I never would’ve had this expectation.’
So I don’t know what I would compare to this record to, I would just say it’s an evolution and it’s sort of a testament to where we’re at right now.
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Unread 2014-10-01, 01:02 PM   #22
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Review: Slipknot — .5: The Gray Chapter



Rated:

4.5/5


There’s something almost unreal about listening to the new Slipknot album for the first time. Not so much the music itself (though some of that is indeed quite the mind-fuck, as well), but rather the fact that it even exists in the first place. After Paul Gray’s tragic and untimely passing in 2010, the question of whether or not the ‘Knot would ever actually make another record without their fallen bassist and co-founder has lingered—and the possibility of it happening somehow seemed even more remote with the departure of drummer Joey Jordison last December.
And yet, six years after the release of ‘All Hope Is Gone,’ the fifth Slipknot studio album is finally here. And even without the creative input (and fearsome rhythm section) of Gray and Jordison, it still sounds like a motherfuckin’ Slipknot record. The chunky, dirt-displacing low-end growl of “The Devil In I,” the pugnacious thrash of “Skeptic,” the relentless attack of “The Negative One,” the brief but tantalizing flash of ’80s shred in “Nomadic,” and the darkness that permeates the whole enterprise like a thick swamp fog—these are just some of the many elements of classic ‘Knot that are present in this intense 14-track missive.
The band has characterized ‘.5: The Gray Chapter’ as a cross between ‘Iowa’ and ‘Vol.3: (The Subliminal Verses),’ at least in terms of musical approach, and it does indeed contain both the raw aggression of the former and the artistic reach of the latter. But rather than beat a crisis-driven retreat to a musical comfort zone, Slipknot reveal an encouraging willingness here to stretch themselves even further. Opening track “XIX,” for example, is a masterpiece of unresolved tension consisting mostly of disconcerting samples, a haunting viola drone, and Corey Taylor’s anguished (and very loudly mixed) vocals. After nearly three minutes of build-up, Taylor yowls like a trap door has just opened under him, and you immediately expect the full band to come crashing in together—but instead, there’s only weird sawing noises, bells, and animal sounds underlining the space where Taylor’s voice used to be. “Kill Pop” starts out with Taylor crooning over an atmospheric electronic groove, and ends with him screaming his guts out over a Metallica-esque rave-up. “The One That Kills the Least” features ringing, Cure-like guitars, layered vocals, and a crunching verse that leads into a soaring and melodic chorus. “Custer” begins with an intentionally smarmy Taylor monologue (“Listener aggression is advised,” he purrs) then explodes into one of the album’s most punishing cuts. “Cut, cut, cut me up and fuck, fuck, fuck me up” Taylor implores, again and again, before the track screeches to a halt.
Despite his corporeal absence, Paul Gray is very much present and accounted for on this album, and not just in its title. Musically, the band’s new bassist and drummer are very clearly (and very capably) following the same thrusting rhythmic template that Gray forged with Jordison, but Gray is also quite clearly there in the lyrics, obliquely or otherwise. Taylor has made it no secret that many of the songs on here are about Gray’s death and the multitude of emotions that the band continued (and continue) to experience in the wake of his passing, and the righteous fury of “Skeptic,” “Lech,” and “Nomadic” seems to be directed at him. But the grudging sense warmth and hope at the heart of the ballad “Goodbye” could have also been inspired by Gray’s death, and by the galvanizing effect it ultimately had upon his bandmates. “Maybe we can all recognize a moment of sadness,” Taylor sings. “Maybe we can finally agree on a sane point of view.”
It is to Slipknot’s great credit that they acknowledge Gray’s memory on ‘.5: The Gray Chapter,’ but it’s also to their credit that they don’t try to sugarcoat their loss, anger or grief anywhere on the album. For all their masks and uniforms, the emotions at the heart of Slipknot’s music have always been real and raw, and as they—and the audience that’s grown up with them—have no doubt discovered, the youthful angst that fired their early records has nothing on the grim realities of adulthood. From that deep well of pain, another great Slipknot record has emerged. DAN EPSTEIN
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Unread 2014-10-01, 10:28 PM   #23
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SLIPKNOT's JIM ROOT: We Put The New Drummer 'Through The Wringer'



SLIPKNOT's fifth album, ".5: The Gray Chapter", will be released on October 21 via Roadrunner. It's the band's first CD without founding drummer Joey Jordison, who was fired in 2013, and late bassist Paul Gray.
The identities of the band's new bassist and drummer have not yet been revealed, but both appeared — disguised in the same newly designed mask — in the video for "The Devil In I", the first single from the new album.
Nonetheless, it is widely believed that the new bassist is Alessandro "Vman" Venturella, who sports the exact same tattoo on his hand that was spotted on the hand of the new bassist in the video. Venturella has served as a guitar tech for MASTODON, COHEED AND CAMBRIA and others, while also playing in the band KROKODIL.
SLIPKNOT's new drummer is thought to be Jay Weinberg, son of longtime Bruce Springsteen drummer Max Weinberg.
Asked how he feels the new members acclimated to the SLIPKNOT recording process, guitarist Jim Root told Australia's Music Feeds: "I think they did really well considering the circumstances that were thrown at them. We threw the book at the drummer, we fuckin' put him through the wringer. He did not have it easy. But he was up to the challenge with everything that we threw at him. He took it all and props to him for that. The bass player was a little bit of a different situation, because we kind of had a little bit of a revolving door of dudes coming in and out and trying things. Even Donnie [Steele, the group's original guitar player who played bass with SLIPKNOT since they resumed touring in 2011] came into the studio for a while and it just to a point where we were struggling looking for somebody and then the right guy presented himself sort of at the last minute. It worked out pretty cool."
Root also spoke about the way fans immediately began analyzing the "The Devil In I" video to find clues about the new members. He laughed and said: "I sort of try to stay away from seeing what the fans… I have a hard time with any sort of criticism; not because I have some huge ego or anything like that. This is the most personal record I've ever done, it's probably the most deeply involved record that I've done, so it kind of crushes me a little bit when somebody doesn't get it or they're comparing it to something else. It kind of makes me throw my hands up in the air, so I haven't paid too much attention to all that type of shit. I like to keep my world positive. There's enough negativity kicking around."
Asked if he was able to comment on Joey's departure at all, Root said: "Not really, and only because I haven't spoken to him and I don't really think it's fair to him to really talk about until I've at least spoken to him. I love the guy to death and we're just going through some shit. I haven't spoken to him since October of last year, so I'd rather not say anything until there comes a time where I see him and talk to him or whatever."
SLIPKNOT frontman Corey Taylor said in a new interview with Metal Hammer that firing Jordison in 2013 after 18 years was "one of the hardest decisions" the group ever made, adding that Jordison is "in a place in his life" which is "not where we are."

Taylor said he could not get into specifics for legal reasons, but admitted, "It's when a relationship hits that T-section and one person's going one way and you're going the other. And try as you might to either get them to go your way or try and go their way, at some point you've got to go in the direction that works for you. This is me speaking in the broadest terms, with respect to Joey. I guess to sum it up, it was one of the hardest decisions we ever made."
Taylor said that the band is "happy right now and we hope that he is… He's just in a place in his life, right now, that's not where we are."
The singer would not answer whether drug use played a role in Jordison's dismissal, and confessed that he had not been in touch with his former bandmate. Taylor said, "I haven't talked to Joey in a while, to be honest. That's how different we are. It's not because I don't love him and I don't miss him. And it is painful; we talk about him all the time, but at the same time, do we miss him or do we miss the old him? That's what it really comes down to."
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Unread 2014-10-02, 01:42 PM   #24
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SLIPKNOT's .5: The Gray Chapter Review: Track-By-Track First Impressions



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Since the first teaser for Slipknot's .5: The Gray Chapter went up on July 15, speculative postings and supposed "insider knowledge" has been running amok. Who was going to take the place of recently fired drummer Joey Jordison? Who would fill the mighty shoes of the late, great Paul Gray? Would the band still be able to bring it like they used to after six years of silence? While the answers for the first two questions have been all but confirmed across the great expanse of the Internet, I personally can answer the last question- Slipknot can bring it just as hard as they used to and then some, but with the acrid grace and brutal maturity of musicians who know how to sharpen their proverbial knives and efficiently kill with them just as well.
This review is pretty straight forward in terms of layout. I'm going to go track by track in the order they appear in on the album, excluding the two bonus tracks considering I don't have them, and then give my overall impression of the album at the bottom. Deal? Deal.
Let's get to it!
1) XIX

"XIX" opens up with a distorted bagpipe-sounding keyboard patch, a glockenspiel and an acoustic guitar in the background. Corey Taylor's vocals come in over the eerie soundscape alongside muted drums quietly keeping the beat and Taylor's voice just sounds strained in a fed up, pissed off way. "XIX" is interesting because it keeps building on a lot of additional instrumentation, volume increases and layered vocal harmonies seeping into frame. The main scratchy, sickening soundscape remains constant and you can almost feel Taylor glaring at you. It seems like Slipknot is trying to make you feel uneasy and scared with this track.
The song builds and builds, edging toward total paranoia, and finally arrives at… nothing. Everything falls apart and you're left with the original soundscape in extreme disrepair. It’s you're expecting something to jump out at you from behind a curtain. You reach toward it and there's nothing behind it, but you're pretty sure there's someone breathing down the back of your neck now.
2) Sacastrophe

"Sarcastrophe" picks up where "XIX" left off in terms of mood. There’s light percussion, effected clean guitars and a bubbling static noise. Things pick up with the addition of cymbals and distorted guitars. Then, out of nowhere, a drum fill and you're thrown into the midst of Corey Taylor growling his fucking face off. The heaviness arrives in the same way the band did heaviness on their debut record- plenty of heft in terms of a traditional metal band, but with more percussion going on and the added madness of DJ electronically adding layers of insanity.
It’s immediately noticeably that this is not the Slipknot you think you're getting. This is a Slipknot that is righteously pissed off. There's blasts, there's tremolo-picked riffs and there's non-conventional breakdowns that include sampling and keyboard work and aren't drum centric. There's a strange, airy quality to the heaviness of this song. It's not this laser-focused precision that's cut and dry. It’s haunting, terrifying and larger than life. It's as if Slipknot were this spectral being here to kill you, but slowly… painfully.
3) AOV

"AOV" is driving in the same way the members of Amon Amarth are just kind of vikings. The combination of double bass and percussive attacks on the downbeats give the song a militaristic stomping quality while guitars simply drive like tanks through your speakers and keyboards sound the air raid sirens as if it were the end of days. There's a big hooky chorus that pops up between the bursts of violence that's going to get stuck in your head, and that's just the first half of the song. What surprised me was the interlude toward the middle of the track.
During the interlude, the majority of the band fades off and featured prominently, providing the melody aside from a tinkling piano and dreamy, swirling guitars, is the bassist. I'd go as far as calling this a bass solo. It’s melodious and has a sense of direction in that it touches on what the guitars are doing in the background but doesn't stick to them. With the band still mourning former bassist Paul Gray, I wasn't sure if this was going to be Slipknot's …And Justice For All.
It is not.
4) The Devil In I

Everyone knows this song already, so I'll keep it brief. This is straight up classic Slipknot via their Iowa days with a heavy dose of that unsettling heaviness I’ve mentioned. It's also the slowest song up to this point (barring the introductory track) and I'd even say the least heavy.
Do not underestimate how much heavier this band has gotten.
5) Killpop

The intro to "Killpop" brings back that "XIX" phantasm keyboard sound along with plodding drums doubled up by what sounds like an electronic drum kit. The best way to describe "Killpop" is a ballad co-written by Satan himself and someone who is just totally empty inside. It's cold, it's slow and it seems to deal with drugs, the issue of addiction and someone taking advantage of them. "Killpop" is interesting because it relies on keyboards and alternative percussion as the main focus the song, barring the blistering guitar solo and blastfest in last forty seconds of the song.
As a quick refresher, Craig "133" Jones is listed as doing media and sampling in the band, Sid Wilson on turntables and Chris Fehn on percussion for the group. The trio has always been a part of the group's sound and a big part of the live show, but they shine in a huge way here. After listening to the record in full, I can honestly say the three have a big hand in .5: The Grey Chapter terrifying. In fact, they’ve the backbone to two of the five songs we've looked at so far!
6) Skeptic

There's a lot of references to someone dying and some else being arrested for it in “Skeptic.” I’m near positive this one is directly about Gray’s death. The chorus of the is particularly touching in both inflection as well as lyric, reading-
"The world will never see another crazy motherfucker like you.
The world will never know another man as amazing as you.”
"Skeptic" is an interesting song musically. It starts off with the typical Slipknot stomp and then launches into a Soilwork-worthy melodic death metal chorus, even using a pre-chorus section twice in two different formats that gets blindingly fast and uses a lot of chromatic, dissonant tonal work. "Skeptic" opens up the sonic space a lot throughout its runtime to be filled out entirely by (we assume) Jay Weinberg's drumming, giving the song this very punk rock feel with grindcore sense of anger.
7) Lech

“I know why Judas wept, motherfucker.” Those are the words that seem to boil out of Taylor’s mouth at the beginning of “Lech.” There’s no instrumentation backing him up, there’s nothing. This is between you and Taylor, and so help you he’s going to make sure you heard him.
“Lech” takes the punk feel of “Skeptic” and heaviness of “AOV,” and marries them into the sound of ten thousand soldiers with Doc Martens and six-foot mohawks curb stomping everything. There’s a few passages in the song that use effect-laden guitars that sound like broken machines and even some glitched audio that serves as a vehicle for the band to essentially make sure you’re feeling the violence. At this point, I’m noticing the main focus of Slipknot’s songwriting seems to be the flow of energy in a song- how can they make people feel something during this song, or beat the shit out of each other or even we make their pain evident.
That attention is obvious and well noted.


Goodbye

The bass is high up in the mix again, the creepy synths are back and there’s orchestral bells, timpanis and what sounds like a choir that got all of it’s treble and high mid frequencies stolen. The first half of the song is an ambient ballad and then about half way through the band takes the themes from the first half and transposes them onto guitars, drums, and everything else we’ll define here as the “traditional metal band.” It’s cool to hear the original themes go from these airy instruments onto heavily distorted guitars, not necessarily because it translates well, but because the contrast works amazingly to close out the song. Everything gets faster, heavier, darker and louder until there’s a brief band unison and then silence.
I’m glad this wasn’t a ballad. It would have worked just fine as a ballad, but this is Slipknot in 2014 on .5: The Gray Chapter. Fuck the rules.
This is probably a good place to mention the differentiation between keyboard patches and samples used on the record. While a lot of them are indeed terror-inducing and generally have this feel to them that can be described accurately as “nausea-inducing,” each song that uses them in whatever massive instrumental arsenal being employed uses them differently. It’s as if the sounds are tailored to each song, which harkens back to the notion that this record was meticulously written.
9) Nomadic

All this talk of the “new Slipknot heaviness” goes right out the window on this one. If you told me this was a song from Iowa that was just a little too weird to be included on the record, I would believe you. The main riff is this chunky stop-and-go kind of thing that breaks out into an odd, somewhat off-kilter melody in the chorus. “Nomadic” is a really straight forward song that employs probably some of the strangest melodies the band has used up to now. It has this seasick, chromatic feeling to it with low-toned spoken word parts here and there and another ripping guitar solo.
It’s the chorus that gets me more than anything else in this song. That angular riff that Taylor’s singing over has this counterpoint quality going for it with the riff underneath and it’s just infectious. If you could hear the instrumental version of this song, there are points where most vocalists would be left scratching their heads wondering what would fit overtop. Then again, most vocalists aren’t Corey Taylor.
10) The One That Kills The Least

“The One That Kills The Least” starts off with a riff that should signal something heavy, but instead the song stays mid-paced and gets pretty anthematic and slow touring the chorus. For some reason this song reminds me of “The Heretic Anthem” at a slower tempo, or basically any of the lighter songs from Vol. 3. The kicker to this song is that even though it’s slow, it has this anxious feeling like it wants to speed up at every turn, but just keeps backing down instead.
One of the cooler aspects of this song is the recurring guitar theme. There are a few variations of it presented throughout, both as low-down riffs and higher-up melodies or leads, but in the end it’s all still this descending pattern that seems to trip over itself initially and then tumble into place. Upon my first listen through the album I was floored at just how much fantastic guitar work there is throughout the album, with “The One That Kills The Least” being the song that finally made it click that both Mick Thomson and Jim Root are ridiculously capable at their instruments.
11) Custer

“Custer” starts off quickly with the band playing a hooky unison riff before breaking down into a bass drum, distorted bass and the occasional tom. Enter Corey Taylor, who starts off with a seemingly Lamb of God-influenced spoken word section before going flat out lunatic status. Right as the song explodes, there’s a quick change back to spoken word and then this four-on-the-floor chant that has everything come crashing down around you and ends on a scream that decays a little more every time it echoes off into the depths of the abyss.
This is the song that will have every single person at every single concert screaming at the top of their lungs for the chants before beating the everliving shit out of each other for the remainder of the song. This is the song you’re going to be blasting in your song when it comes on and scaring the piss out of the poor grandmother in the Buick next to you. There aren’t too many components to this one. It’s a pounding sound that takes on that electronica aesthetic of beating you submission.
12) Be Prepared For Hell

Another interlude, but it’s interesting. There’s distorted speaking in the beginning that sounds like a distant voice in a tiled chamber while something is intermittently being crunched around you. That atmosphere gives way to a singular, theremin-sounding keyboard (which was there in the first place but quieter) with a much louder voice that seems to add pitches into its timbre as it continues speaking. Other than that, it’s just a break between songs.
13) The Negative One

Another song we’re all familiar with. “The Negative One” is actually a really solid example of what this album is all about and showcases a lot of the sounds I’m referencing here. It has that classic Slipknot stomp to it, it has all the hallmark DJ sounds, screeches and scratches from their earlier days and it has the hellishly nimble drumming you’re going to hear non-stop throughout the record.
I know Slipknot said “The Negative One” wasn’t technically a single off the record, but it’s a great representation of the record. Not necessarily what the whole record sounds like considering how varied it is, but it gives a pretty good idea.
14) If Rain Is What You Want

“If Rain Is What You Want” is a slow burner and an excellent end to a record. It builds slowly upon the blocks of muddy guitars and vocals that seem to be sung through a blanket up to the full band mournfully culling the apocalypse one last time. Everything you have heard up to this point on the record in terms of instrumentation and mood is encompassed in this one. Whether that was purposely done or everything just happened to fit is a mystery, but much like the rest of the record everything seems to have been planned out in terms of its place in this sonic portrait.
The song isn’t trying to crush you to death anymore- the rest of the record has done that just fine. Instead, this is the song that plays over the montage as they find your body and eventually lower you into the ground as the frame widens and everything goes skyward. Even as the song reaches the apex of heaviness, there’s a very sorrowful quality to it that floats down into noise and one last verse sung before its lights out and once for all.
Overall Impression

If it hasn't been made abundantly clear by now, let me reiterate the irrefutable fact that .5: The Gray Chapter is an extremely coherent album that will please fans who have waited and probably garner multitudes of new ones. The sequencing of songs on the record ensures a smooth listen, the writing is impeccable, the lyrics range from straightforward and emotional to sinister and cryptic and the new members fit into the group perfectly and even shine through with their musical personalities.
To sum it all up, .5: The Gray Chapter is an album that retains the classic Slipknot sonic signature while adding new flourishes and finishes the stroke with a solid stab right through the paper.
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Unread 2014-10-03, 08:10 PM   #25
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And one thing we didn't!


5 things we learned from hearing new Slipknot album The Gray Chapter

Plus, one thing we didn't...

Rich Chamberlain (Rhythm Magazine)14 hours ago
A new Slipknot album is always going to be an event, but this really is something else. A whole lot has changed in the six long years that have passed since the 'Knot's last record, All Hope Is Gone. They're two founder members down, for a start: Paul Gray, of course, tragically passed away in 2010, and Joey Jordison, the diminutive percussive powerhouse, was ousted last year.
So, there's plenty of added spice to make this more than just another album. In fact, this record is such an event that it doesn't come to us - we go to it.
Rhythm headed down to Warner's swanky Kensington HQ for a date with the album, so here's what we learned (and didn't learn) from hearing it...
1. The mystery drummer

Ok, so we start with the one thing we didn't learn - who the hell is playing drums?!
While rumours persist that former Against Me drummer Jay 'son of Max' Weinberg is the man at the kit, there has been no confirmation from the Slipknot camp, and it seems that the band have no plans to officially unveil the identities of their new drummer or bass player.
2. They're not hiding the mystery man's playing

Whoever it is at the kit, they have done an incredible job. It would have been easy for Slipknot to have come out and hidden their new drummer's work beneath Corey Taylor's roar and the monstrous guitar work of Jim Root and Mick Thomson, but instead, the new boy is put right up front and centre and basically told to give it his best. It's a brave move - Jordison is so adored that the playing by his replacement on this record will be picked apart - but we think it's one that pays off.
3. This guy brought his A game

The real drumming action starts on the record's second track, Sarcastrophe. It's got the lot, kicking off with big, high-pitched toms, before an almighty wave of crashes. Then we're in, off and running amidst a flurry of fills and a punchy, Lars-esque (don't worry, we're talking Black album rather than St Anger) kit sound.
We're smashed around the chops with pummeling double bass and scattergun fills all over the kit, but there's plenty of light to go with the shade thanks to some neat snare, kick and hat interplay, something that becomes a theme that runs throughout the drum work on the record. This is the sound of a drummer keen to impress, and one who has the chops to back up his lofty ambitions.
4. It's lyrically dark

To be expected, but The Gray Chapter is most definitely a dark, uncomfortable listen when it comes to lyrics. Opener XIX is dark, brooding and - when it comes to drums - sparsely populated. Taylor gives us the first glimpse of the raw lyrical journey we're about to set out on by screaming, "Don't let this f***ing world tear you apart".
The shadow of Gray's loss clearly hangs heavily over the band. Skeptic is centred around the lyric, "The world will never know another man as amazing as you, the world will never know another crazy mother f**ker like you," while Goodbye's, "No one is bulletproof" could be a nod to either Gray or Jordison.
5. Musically, it's not quite so dark...

While The Gray Chapter may be punishing lyrically, it has its fair share of lighter musical moments. Stone Sour-ish melodic choruses dovetail with brutal, double kick-led verses on tracks like Killpop.
6. Joey will be missed

The six years between Slipknot records have been crushingly difficult for the band, and they sound like they're very much in transition. The new man at the kit has done an impressive job, but it could be argued that The Gray Chapter misses the spark of Jordison's signature drumming.
The Gray Chapter is released on 22 October.
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