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Unread 2019-06-24, 01:21 PM   #51
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Reliability and Problems

Since the Palisade is not just a brand new car but a brand new model for Hyundai, not much is known about how reliable it is. What we do know, however, is that Hyundai’s overall reliability rankings are fairly high, with the brand earning a top ten spot in J.D. Power’s 2019 Vehicle Dependability Survey. Hyundai also has one of the industry’s best warranty programs, which includes a five-year or 60,000-mile full-vehicle limited warranty, a seven-year, unlimited-mileage rust warranty, and a 10-year or 100,000-mile limited powertrain warranty.








Price and Trims

Hyundai sticks with tradition for the Palisade and continues to undercut many of its competitors despite offering more options. A base front-wheel-drive SE costs $31,550, which is $140 less than the cheapest Telluride (not including destination). Opting for the SEL brings the price up to $33,500, while the range-topping Limited makes a big leap to $44,700, with destination for all models coming out to $1,045. Selecting all-wheel drive pushes the price of each model up by $1,700, bringing the SE to $33,250, the SEL to $35,200, and making the most heavily outfitted Palisade money can buy come out to $46,400.
Hyundai’s pricing logic is very sensical. Product planners figured that entry-level buyers are looking for the cheapest option available and don’t want to bother with packages, while Limited customers just want everything and don’t want to worry about an options list either. So Hyundai complied, giving SE customers a wide range of standard features including smart cruise control, forward collision alert, lane keep assist, driver attention warning, and rear cross-traffic alert, without offering confusing options. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto also come standard on the 8-inch touchscreen display, while SEL buyers get more standard features like heated front seats, rear-seat HVAC controls, blind spot collision avoidance, and cross-traffic alert.







SEL buyers can also opt for the Convenience Package for $2,200 or the Premium Package for $2,400, the former getting 20-inch wheels, auto-leveling rear suspension, 3rd row USB outlets, Hyundai’s rear occupant alert, and a 7-inch gauge cluster display, while the latter gets leather seats, LED headlights, a power 3rd row, and a heated steering wheel and 2nd row. Additional options include the $800 sunroof and $1,250 Driver Guidance option.
Stepping up to the Limited Palisade is an expensive move, but Hyundai tries to justify the price by adding Nappa leather seating, ventilation on the front and rear seats, a 10.25-inch wide touchscreen infotainment, a 12.3-inch digital gauge cluster, ambient lighting, a Harmon Kardon sound system, a dual panoramic sunroof, a surround-view monitor, a "blind view monitor” that projects what the Palisade’s side cameras are seeing onto the digital gauge cluster, and special 20-inch wheels.







Verdict: The New Number One

At the conclusion of our Telluride drive, we claimed that Kia’s three-row SUV was the new segment leader. And as its closely related sibling, the Hyundai Palisade sits right there with it. It was months ago at a Hyundai Veloster N drive that we heard the company’s product planners talk about the brand had taken over America. First, it tried to undercut the competition in terms of price. Next, it targeted quality by building robust vehicles backed by the industry’s best warranty program. And finally, it’s zeroed in on the emotional bond between a car and its driver with good designs and inspiring driving abilities. The Palisade is further proof that Hyundai has mastered that third area.
Unlike many of its competitors, even the more established ones, the Palisade excels in every area that counts. It offers optimum utility, luxury car comfort, a spacious and well-appointed cabin, plenty of standard features, and does so for a fraction of the price. And best of all, the Palisade has a cohesive soul that’s easy to fall in love with, solidifying our opinion that Korea's car brands are quickly becoming the segment leaders that the competition needs to beat. Look out, Japan, because Korea has put you on notice.



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Unread 2019-06-24, 03:57 PM   #52
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2020 Hyundai Palisade first drive: New standard-bearer?




Three proper rows of seating, a quiet, comfortable ride and aggressive pricing makes the new Hyundai Palisade the one to beat







Given the number of Highlanders, Explorers and Traverses clogging most metro freeways, it may come as a shock that Hyundai, one of the largest-selling brands in the U.S. has, until now, been missing a true midsize SUV in its lineup. It’s a glaring omission the automaker has raced to rectify, with the stopgap Santa Fe XL serving as a placeholder until a true, fully realized midsize SUV was ready. That product, the Palisade, will be arriving at Hyundai dealerships as you read this; you already may have spotted the related Kia Telluride on the road.
Regular Autoweek readers may remember I drove the Korean-market Palisade diesel in Seoul last fall and came away very impressed, with the caveat that our (relatively) high-revving gasoline V6 would likely deliver a very different experience from that torque monster. After spending a full day with the U.S. Palisade, I can confidently say the reality is better than I expected. More about that in a moment.




The 2020 Palisade cockpit is a comfortable place in which to spend time; Limited model shown with quilted leather






First, let’s recap the basics, as well as what changes for the 2020 Hyundai Palisade you’ll find at your local dealership. All models get three rows of seating, with capacity for seven or eight passengers, depending upon configuration and trim level. Sizewise, it’s right in line with the current Honda Pilot in length and width, while the Ford Explorer and Nissan Pathfinder are both a bit longer. Interior space benefits from the Palisade’s long 114.2-inch wheelbase, and the Hyundai tops its competition for second-row legroom and is bested only by the Explorer and Pilot in third-row legroom.


The main place our Palisade differs from the Korean-market model I drove earlier is the engine: U.S. models get a 3.8-liter direct-injected gasoline V6 coupled to an eight-speed automatic transmission. The V6 uses electronics and fancy valve control to perform a neat trick: When it can, it operates on what’s known as the Atkinson cycle, which generally means better fuel economy at the expense of low-end torque. But when torque is needed, during acceleration, towing or the like, the engine switches back to a conventional Otto cycle, which burns more fuel but gives good punch. With 291 hp and 262 lb-ft of torque, the Palisade’s V6 is in line with competitive non-turbocharged engines, and its 19/26/22 mpg city/highway/combined front-drive fuel economy rating is very competitive. Should you want the available all-wheel-drive system, it’s offered at all trim levels for an additional $1,700 plus a slight (19/24/21) fuel economy penalty.



















In keeping with its family focus, the Palisade is packed with standard safety and driver assist gear: Forward collision avoidance assist, driver attention warning, lane keeping assist and a rear occupant alert system are all standard across the board, though notably blind-spot assist and rear cross-traffic detection aren’t available on the Palisade SE. Higher trims get a blind-spot camera on both sides of the vehicle that uses the instrument cluster display to show a view whenever the turn signal is activated. There’s also an available in-car intercom that lets the driver communicate more easily with second- and third-row passengers or, conversely, use the “rear sleep mode” that mutes the driver’s audio in the back rows. The infotainment system works with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, and seven USB outlets ensure everyone can charge up.


Hyundai also paid attention to the light-duty towing needs of three-row SUV buyers. No, the Palisade isn’t intended to replace a full-size pickup, but it is rated to pull 5,000 pounds, and Hyundai reps pointed out that number is all day, every day, if need be. Every Palisade has a transmission cooler, trailer sway control and trailer hitch prewiring, with a hitch and load-leveling rear suspension available for the frequent towing club








The Execution



Moving from the Korean-market torquey turbodiesel to an Atkinson-cycle gas V6, I was expecting to like the U.S. Palisade from a packaging standpoint but be disappointed by its powertrain. My expectations were unfounded. Hyundai’s powertrain team did a fantastic job matching the 3.8-liter V6 and 8-speed automatic to our needs, and at no point did I legitimately miss the diesel engine (I can still pine for it, though).


Given the target market, let’s get the Palisade’s driving impressions out of the way and move on to the usability: As with my previous drive, the best description I can give is that the Palisade is a very easy vehicle with which to get comfortable. Sightlines are excellent with the exception of a large C-pillar blind spot when looking over one’s shoulders, and the driving position, controls and dynamics are going to make anyone shopping this segment happy. There’s simply nothing objectionable about the Palisade in any kind of daily driving or light off-road use.


Drop into the second row and that impression continues. I spent a half hour there and in the third row to get a feel for real-world comfort, and Hyundai again shows they’ve put a lot of thought into how passengers are going to use the Palisade. Seatbacks include a USB power port and a secondary mesh pocket sized for smartphones. Overhead air vents can be fully open, fully closed or closed with a ‘diffuser’ mode active, which allows conditioned air to reach passengers without blowing directly on them. And there’s room beneath the front seats for second-row passengers’ feet (less common than you'd think), which makes the space feel even larger than it is.









  • Base Price: $32,595
  • As-Tested Price: $36,245
  • Drivetrain: 3.8-liter V6, eight-speed automatic, FWD/AWD
  • Output: 291 hp @ 6,000 rpm; 262 lb-ft @ 5,200 rpm
  • Curb Weight: 4,284 lb
  • Fuel Economy (EPA City/Highway/Combined): 19/26/22 mpg (FWD)
  • Pros: Good-looking, well-mannered, do-everything family machine
  • Cons: None






Accommodations in the third row aren’t quite as plush, but with the sliding second row adjusted forward just a bit (but still with plenty of room for my six-foot frame), it was perfectly adequate for a half hour. It’s easy to climb back there too – all Palisades get a slick one-touch tilt/slide feature on the second row, plus convenient grab handles built into the third row. The same diffuser vents and USB ports are present too, so a pair of kids could each have their own row with room to spread out, and there’s still 18 cubic feet of cargo room behind the third row – think a couple of golf bags worth of room, more if you pack it tightly. If you don’t need the seating, the third row offers power folding capability on SEL models (standard on Limited); the presence of that handy feature is one major differentiator between the Palisade and its platform-mate, the Kia Telluride.



The Verdict
For the midsize SUV shopper, there’s quite honestly nothing I don’t like about the 2020 Hyundai Palisade, especially when price is factored in. Yes, there’s a tremendous amount of value here, but price shouldn’t be the key selling point – the Palisade would be a top-tier competitor even at a higher MSRP.
Hyundai had better have its plants ready to crank: The 2020 Palisade is going to be a best-seller for the brand, and the Pilot, Highlander and Explorer have a true competitor nipping at their heels.
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Unread 2019-06-24, 03:59 PM   #53
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2020 Hyundai Palisade Uses Silence, Luxury to Battle Explorer and Telluride

Peek inside Hyundai's new flagship and you'll find a lot of upscale features.






COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho—One question seems to lead any American family’s SUV purchase more than any other: Honey, is there room for the kids? The ubiquity of that inquiry means there’s always room for another three-row SUV in the marketplace, and the 2020 Hyundai Palisade is the latest.


Hyundai chose beautiful Coeur d’Alene in northwest Idaho to show off the largest of its seven SUVs, providing us far more time with the vehicle than during our previous exposure in Korea. The city’s eponymous 25-mile-long lake and pine-scented scenery seemed to call for a woodstrip canoe atop every Palisade, and a Boy Scout in each of this seven- or eight-person vehicle’s passenger seats. Instead, dissolute journalists piled inside, including into a third row that will accommodate normal-size adults but still trails the Chevrolet Traverse, 2020 Ford Explorer, or, especially, the mammoth Volkswagen Atlas for headroom and legroom.

Still, the Palisade never feels crowded, even if its sales segment is. A quick survey of rivals reveals all-new 2020 entries in the Explorer and Toyota Highlander, along with the Atlas, Traverse, Mazda CX-9, Subaru Ascent, GMC Acadia and Nissan Pathfinder. And don’t forget the Kia Telluride, even if Hyundai execs might prefer to, beset as they were by journalists’ leading questions over Kia’s high-style splashdown in the market. Suffice to say that Hyundai didn’t bring its Korean partner’s SUV to Idaho, where the Telluride might have recalled the fortunate sibling that got all the looks.
There’s nothing wrong with the Hyundai’s dignified styling, but not much that stands out, either. In Idaho and elsewhere, the Palisade may seem as unremarkable as a foil-wrapped potato. (In Hyundai fashion, it’s the stuffings inside that really count). Hyundai’s cascading corporate grille, size XXL, is bordered by a coffin-shaped brightwork frame. Handsome daytime running lamps “pierce” the upper fenders and thread through the bumper. Another chrome strip garnishes the side windows and descends along a body-color C-pillar. The rear view is easily the most copacetic, including low-set fender shoulders that accentuate a traditional, vertical SUV profile. As Hyundai designer Chris Chapman intended, it’s a major departure from softer, wedge-shaped Hyundais like the Tucson and Santa Fe.




Appropriately for the brand’s new flagship, the Palisade feels solid, quiet, and upscale throughout. Several hooplike structures buttress the cowl, liftgate, and doors, for a major jump in torsional stiffness versus the Santa Fe. That safety cage is designed for side and roof protection, as well as optimized for critical small-overlap front crash testing, and Hyundai expects top scores from both NHTSA and the IIHS. Hyundai says the Palisade is not only formed from 59 percent high-strength steel—versus just 25 percent for the new Explorer—but uses 19 hot-stamped components that reduce weight by requiring less metal overall. Structure optimized, Hyundai then looked to suppress sound like an obsessive librarian. Installed- and-injected foam fills the roof pillars and floor structure. A special floor stamping integrates an anti-vibration pad.
The work pays off with a serene cabin. That feeling is heightened with interior design that recalls the tasteful minimalism of VW’s Atlas, only with noticeably better materials. Design pays Hyundai’s usual homage to haughtier brands, including Mercedes-style metal dashboard switches and options such as Bentley-esque diamond-pattern leather on the door panels and a plush microfiber headliner. Simple console buttons manage Hyundai’s eight-speed, in-house automatic transmission, and they’re less vexing than Honda’s similar arrangement. That by-wire shifter eliminates a traditional lever, which saves cabin real estate and allows a floating bridge console with generous storage below. Another covered center bin gets clever cupholders whose outer rings pivot to open up more storage space.

Three available information-cluster displays top out with a sparkling, 12.3-inch digital TFT screen, appended to a 10.3-inch high-resolution infotainment display. Choose that system, and passengers can connect two Bluetooth devices for, say, simultaneous use of one phone and one streaming device. Those fancy driver’s gauges flash cool animations as you move through various driving modes. Most dramatically, crisp camera views of blind spots fill the left- and right-hand gauges when you engage the turn signals. Its execution improves upon Honda’s similar Lane Watch system: Hyundai’s monitors both sides, rather than the right side only, as with Honda’s. The displays are directly in the driver’s view, not on the center screen, and the system is directly tied to the Hyundai’s blind-spot monitor. All told, the top-shelf interface would look fully legit on an $80,000 SUV. A Harman/Kardon executive showed off the impressive, optional premium audio system designed for the Palisade, with 630 watts, 12 speakers, metal speaker grilles, and a subwoofer that eliminates the usual weighty, space-hogging enclosure. Instead, the system draws air from outside the car to drive the bass-pumping speaker. An available head-up display and Qi wireless charging further lift the luxury vibe.
The Palisade offers up to seven USB ports, including a pair smartly mounted on the inboard edges of front seats. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are aboard. A “Drive Talk” mode broadcasts the pilot’s voice to rear speakers to soothe or threaten wayward children, and a quiet mode shuts off the rear speakers to help them fall asleep, finally. Draft-free roof vents indirectly cool or heat the rear passenger quarters without blasting air on occupants’ heads. Most Hyundai “Smartsense” safety features are standard, including lane-following steering assist and adaptive cruising from 0 to 95 mph, with the ability to automatically match speed to prevailing limits. Taking inspiration from Audi, an optional radar-based system prevents passengers from flinging side doors open when there’s potential danger from an approaching vehicle.

As with the Kia, a one-touch button slides and pivots the second-row chairs to allow access to the way back, with captain’s chairs available on the SE and SEL and standard in the top-shelf Limited. Passenger space is generous in the first two rows, and there’s a useful 18 cubic feet of cargo room behind the second row, as much as in a Cadillac XTS’s trunk. Underfloor storage adds nearly two cubic feet of additional space. An available power-folding third row, which Hyundai says its research showed was a major selling point on the previous-gen Explorer, makes the Palisade only the second vehicle in the segment with that handy feature. Another clever feature lets owners choose two speed settings to close the tailgate, at either 6.0 or 4.5 seconds.
With the family strapped in, the Hyundai gets just enough motivation from a 3.8-liter, direct-injection V-6 with 291 horsepower and 262 lb-ft of torque. Figure roughly 8.0 seconds to 60 mph. That Alabama-built Lambda V-6 is upgraded to switch unnoticeably between Otto and fuel-saving Atkinson cycles. The EPA pegs mileage at 19/26 mpg in city and highway with front-wheel drive, and 19/24 with all-wheel drive.

AWD is a $1,700 option on all three trims, and its six driver-selectable modes include a Sport setting that sends more torque rearward. Standard Sachs dampers at all four corners help tame body roll and deliver a smooth suburban ride.
The eight-speed transmission performs yeoman duty as well, despite a tendency to settle into higher gears sooner than we care for. A set of metal paddle shifters, pleasingly tactile for a vehicle at this price, affords more direct control.
And the driving experience? If you’re grading on the easy curve of the three-row class, complaints can seem churlish. The Palisade tracks faithfully, and body roll is reasonably tamed. Like its Telluride cousin, there’s not a shred of road feel, but the Hyundai’s steering at least has some sinew, compared with the Kia’s annoying surfeit of power assist. Yet on fast climbs and descents through green Idaho hills that could have stood in for Tuscany’s, the Hyundai felt like the front-drive-based vehicle it is: Pushy, nose-heavy, and unengaging. Brake-based rear torque vectoring aims to correct oversteer or understeer, but we’ll be damned if we could feel anything at work. The Palisade is fully class-competitive, but it can’t touch the sporty personality of the Mazda, or even the Chevy that’s the class sleeper for agile handling.

Naturally, the Palisade brings a competitive price structure with three easy-to-shop trim levels. The Palisade starts at $32,595 for the SE, rises to $34,545 for the SEL, and moves to $45,745 for the swanky SEL. Standalone options include an auto-leveling rear suspension and Class II tow hitch for the Hyundai’s maximum 5,000-pound tow rating.
As noted, the family-bus depot is crowded. Even fans of the Korean approach must decide between the Palisade and Telluride. The Hyundai seems a bit swankier inside, but honestly? Park ’em side-by-side, and we’re probably going with the looker of the family.
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Unread 2019-06-26, 04:55 PM   #54
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2020 Hyundai Palisade Second Drive Review | We finally try it on U.S. soil

And find that it's a must-drive three-row family crossover



COUER d'ALENE, Idaho — You're going to hear the name 2020 Hyundai Palisade a lot in future three-row family crossover reviews. As in, "This interior just doesn't have the premium feel of the Hyundai Palisade" or, "This is more expensive than the Palisade, but you get less equipment." That's what comes from creating such a well-rounded entry that checks just about every box for would-be buyers of three-row crossovers.

Now, the Palisade may be new, but it's not like Hyundai has hit a home run in its first at-bat. The forgettable but reasonably competitive Veracruz hit the scene back in 2007, and was then replaced by the three-row Santa Fe (known as the XL for 2019). Both of those had common flaws: They were less spacious than their competitors, they weren't as good to drive, and their styling hardly made them stand out from the crowd.

All of that is corrected with the Palisade, but surpassing the bar set by Hyundais past was rightfully not the goal. Hyundai's newest three-row crossover is considerably bigger than the Santa Fe XL (3 inches longer, 3.6 inches wider, and there's 4.5 extra cubic feet behind the third row), but the more relevant feat is that it's now more spacious than many three-row competitors. It was something we noted when we compared its dimensions to the Subaru Ascent, Honda Pilot, Toyota Highlander and Mazda CX-9, but it's readily obvious when experiencing it in person. You can fit someone taller than 6 feet in each row simultaneously (your kids will therefore be that much more comfortable), including in the third row. The rearmost row of seating provides plenty of headroom and under-leg support (unlike the new Ford Explorer) thanks to a seat bottom that was raised considerably from where it was in the Santa Fe XL.

That was one of that SUV's key flaws, but so was its six-person capacity when equipped with the popular second-row captain's chairs. Adding an extra seat belt to the third row (along with extra width) allows for seven — that the standard second-row bench seat results in an eight-person capacity was of secondary importance, according to product planning manager Trevor Lai.



Another goal was to provide an enlarged cargo area, especially behind the third row. Lai says he and other product planners distinctly remember seeing Honda advertise that its previous-generation Pilot could fit a 75-quart cooler behind its third row. As such, they requested that engineers provided enough space for an 80-quart one. They got 100 quarts instead. That equates to two jumbo golf bags and multiple carry-on roll-aboard suitcases. A removable floor panel opens up additional space, which can also be used to stow the rolling cargo cover.

It's also not just a matter of space in the Palisade's two rear rows. There are two cupholders beside each outboard seat, air vents in the ceiling, and two USB ports in each rear row (SEL and Limited). The second-row seats slide forward by pushing one of two redundant buttons on the seat shoulder and at the base of the seat cushion. The resulting gap to the third row could be bigger, but there's a unique grab handle integrated into the C pillar that helps climbing inside. The third row's square-ish cupholders were also purposely shaped that way to serve double duty as a second grab handle to be used when climbing out. Thoughtful.

Admittedly, much of this packaging and rear-seat feature content is shared with the 2020 Kia Telluride, which utilizes the same platform. Indeed, if you look at their specs, it's pretty obvious they're fraternal twins. The Kia is just a wee bit more spacious due to its boxier rear shape. Feature content is awfully similar too, and if one's better to drive than the other, it would take a back-to-back drive to notice. Nevertheless, there are a handful of things the Palisade gets that the Kia does not. One is an available power-folding third row and the Limited's standard all-digital instrument panel that changes its design depending on drive mode. You also get a push-button electronic shifter that's refreshingly not gimmicky and genuinely serves a purpose by saving space on the center console, which provides Honda-like levels of clever small-item storage solutions.





Palisade right, Telluride left

Ultimately, the main differentiator with the Telluride is the Palisade's styling. Actually, there's plenty differentiating it from the rest of Hyundai's SUV lineup, as well. Senior chief designer Chris Chapman equates the styling of most manufacturer lineups to Russian nesting dolls — increasingly larger versions of the same look. By contrast, Hyundai is going for something more akin to a chess set *— each different, but sharing common elements. On this chess board, the Palisade is the king. You can see similarities in the grille shape and headlight cluster hidden within recesses below a thin strip of LED lighting. In the Palisade, though, that lighting cascades into that cluster and appears to slice behind body work. It's just one of several interconnecting elements, including the bright work surrounding the side windows and taillights.

Frankly, there's an awful lot going on in the Palisade — perhaps too much, especially with the chopped fender flares and the Limited's extra-shiny grille surround. The Telluride is cleaner and will probably age better, but in this moment, the Palisade projects a more premium vibe.

That's definitely the case inside, where there is a distinctly upmarket appearance that doesn't need to resort to giant swaths of fake wood trim to get the point across. There are handsome, textured trim pieces on the dash, doors and center console, along with soft-touch surfaces and high-quality switch gear. Now, there is "wood" trim in the Limited's tan interior, but it has lines seemingly etched into it to create a more modern look. Hyundai's designers say they were going for something that evoked "the serenity of a yacht." We don't own a yacht, so who knows if they succeeded, but at least the impressive Harman/Kardon audio system made Sirius XM's Yacht Rock Radio sound reasonably palatable.

The general dash layout is similar to what you'll find in the Telluride, as are the user-friendly tech interfaces. An 8-inch touchscreen is standard with a 10.25-inch one available (shown below), but unlike their placement in the Telluride, those adverse to the iPad-on-the-dash look will find the Palisade places them in a binnacle integrated with the instrument panel cowl. It's a classy look evocative of Mercedes' latest design, which is surely a matter of coincidence since Hyundai and Mercedes were simultaneously developing their respective looks. Classy minds think alike. You also don't lose much by opting for a lesser trim level — a Palisade should always seem a bit more stylish and ritzier inside than a comparably priced Pilot, Ascent or Explorer.



However, we wouldn't count on it being more responsive, comfortable or powerful when behind the wheel. Much like the Telluride, the Palisade offers a well-rounded driving experience free from bad habits, but also bereft of anything particularly memorable. Effectively, it reaches the bar set by the vast majority of buyers in the segment.

The 3.8-liter V6 engine produces plenty of power (291 horsepower, 262 pound-feet) and is reasonably efficient (an EPA-estimated 21 or 22 mpg combined) thanks to its ability to run on both the regular Otto and more efficient Atkinson cycles, but it ultimately produces acceleration on par with most other vehicles in the segment. The steering is precise and gains a little extra effort when in Sport mode, but it also doesn't keep you particularly engaged in the driving experience. Similarly, the suspension capably controls body motions, and the stock tires do a good job of gripping pavement (or even loose gravel), but again, those looking for more zest should seriously consider a Mazda CX-9 or the powerful new 2020 Ford Explorer.

During our first drive in northern Idaho, the suspension sopped up poor pavement well despite our test vehicle riding on 20-inch wheels. There was no impact harshness, and unlike similarly shod vehicles, the suspension wasn't overly springy to compensate for having less tire sidewall. Opting for a Limited or an SEL with the Tow Package brings a self-leveling rear suspension that compensates for extra-heavy loads or a towed trailer with special mechanically controlled rear shock absorbers. This is altogether another area where the Palisade eclipses the Santa Fe XL, which had a rather unsophisticated ride prone to crashing on its bump stops when loaded, and being thrown out of whack over mid-corner bumps.

Really, the Palisade is so completely superior to the Santa Fe XL that it doesn't actually seem like a replacement. Yet, it still possesses the same Hyundai hallmarks that have long attracted consumers to the brand: excellent value (you get more features at a price that starts at $32,595 and tops out at $47,445), a lengthy warranty (5-year limited, 10-year powertrain), excellent anticipated reliability (the old Santa Fe got top marks) and superior safety credentials (there's unmatched standard safety tech, and Hyundai says it anticipates a Top Safety Pick+ award from the IIHS, which would be consistent with its other models).

Admittedly, all of that is pretty much shared with Kia, so between the Palisade and Telluride, there'd be nothing wrong with beginning and ending a three-row family crossover search with these fraternal twins.
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Unread 2019-07-15, 01:04 PM   #55
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The 2020 Hyundai Palisade Is Kind of Astoundingly Luxurious



The 2020 Hyundai Palisade isn’t the bargain-basement large-medium three-row SUV I was expecting. Well, it is an eight-seat sport utility and it’s definitely not small. But it’s also really nice. The top-spec Limited version, actually, is almost shockingly luxurious. Hyundai is not messing around here.



(Full Disclosure: Hyundai flew me to Spokane, Wash. then drove me to Coeur d’Alene lake in Idaho, which, wow, what a place. It’s like Lake Tahoe but with more fancy coffee shops. I’m pretty sure a couple nights in my hotel room cost more than some of my cars. Food and drinks were also provided. Also, I drove the 2020 Palisade.)
What Is It?



We, as in The People, as in the American car-buying public, demand vehicles with lots of seats and cup holders. Also, a healthy suite of driver-assistance tech to make us feel fancy and just enough ground clearance to make us feel tough. It’s why people keep buying the Dodge Journey and why Hyundai has put this thing on sale.

The Palisade shares a platform with the Kia Telluride, but representatives from the company (Hyundai) insist the vehicles were independently developed despite sharing some technology. Kia is a subsidiary of Hyundai, but the companies don’t collaborate on product planning according to Hyundai’s people. I suspect the relationship between the two entities is complex, but that might be a blog for another day.
That car-buying public I just mentioned won’t care about who’s counting the beans to bring this car to life, and practically speaking, it doesn’t really matter anyway. So the Palisade is a comfortable family hauler designed to rival the Honda Pilot, Toyota Highlander, Ford Explorer, and yes, the Kia Telluride.

Specs That Matter



The Palisade has seven seats and about twice as many cup holders. Or, eight seats if you go for a bench in the second row. And there’s plenty of space for your crap even if there’s an ass on every perch.

The basic front-wheel drive Palisade SE books out at $31,550, with a 3.8-liter V6 engine making a claimed 291 horsepower and 262 lb-ft of torque. That’s hooked up to an eight-speed automatic you shift between park, drive, neutral and reverse with buttons on the center console. Once you’re underway, you can snap between gears with paddle shifters on the steering column but, I mean, it’s hard to imagine having a reason to do so.




Hyundai says that powertrain is tasked with moving 4,127 to 4,387 pounds of Palisade, plus passengers and cargo, depending on how it’s optioned. The whole vehicle’s 196.1 inches nose-to-tail, making it almost exactly the same size as the rivals I just mentioned. You could also say it’s pretty much between a Subaru Outback and a Chevy Tahoe.



Inside, the Korea-built Palisade claims 18 cubic feet of cargo space behind the third row, which is actually quite generous. There’s even a cool sub-trunk you can stash smaller items or the cargo cover in if you’re not using it. Put the third row down, and you get almost 46 cubic feet of very usable hauling space. Four substantial rolling suitcases would get swallowed up no problem, with plenty of air above to pile more things on top of them.

Fuel economy specs are 19 mpg city, 26 highway, and 22 combined. If you get all-wheel drive, that drops to 24 highway and 21 combined. Speaking of adding options, the $46,400 Palisade Limited AWD is the top of the heap and effectively Hyundai’s new flagship now that Genesis is its own automotive brand.

In between is the SEL AWD at $35,200 but that seems like a tough sell. Once you climb under the Limited’s soft suede-looking headliner (in a Hyundai!) and drink in the beautifully high-resolution TFT gauge cluster, it’s going to be pretty easy for a salesperson to seduce you into buying the top model.
Working with the all-wheel-drive powertrain is a pretty impressive multi-mode traction-control system. You can cycle manually between different settings for different road surfaces, or just leave in “auto” and let the car do the work. We watched a Palisade escape from a strip of ultra-slippery rollers as part of a demonstration, and the car seemed to do a pretty good job managing power to maximize traction where there essentially was none.
What’s Great




Every version of the Hyundai Palisade benefits from good proportions, well-utilized interior space, comfortable seats and a highly-accessible third row.

“The idea was to make the way-back seats easy enough to get in and out of that a kid could do it by themselves,” one of the many Hyundai employees I spoke to told me at the car’s launch party. That seems like a straightforward idea, but Hyundai’s execution is actually pretty slick.
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Unread 2019-07-15, 01:06 PM   #56
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The second-row seats have big, kid-friendly buttons on the outside shoulder–tap one and the seat swiftly leans and slides forward. I will say it seemed to work a lot better when you could push it with your other hand, so this video is a bit of an undersell, but you get the idea.
Plus, there are grab handles integrated into the interior plastics to give third-row exits some semblance of grace. But my favorite tiny feature is the seat belt holster. Both sides of the car have a little tab to accept the second row seat belt, so you can tuck it out of the way before you climb in or out of the Palisade’s third row.



As for actually occupying the way-back seat, it’s not terrible for a six-foot person like myself as long as you can stretch your legs up through the center aisle. But with a full car, it’s not set up to handle much more than kids stuck back there.

I already mentioned how sweet the soft headliner in the Limited is, but more people will probably be impressed by the top trim’s digital dashboard, which is extremely smooth and crisp.

On the road, the Palisade’s “Lane Follow” is like Lane Keeping (which you can also have) in that it helps the car treat a lane of highway like a train track, but it makes the assisted driving experience much smoother. Instead of just ping-pong in you off the edges of the lanes, Lane Follow is actually predictive and very actively locks the car in line.

Speaking of semi-autonomous functionality, if you ask it to, the Palisade will synchronize its cruise control speed with the speed limit, even as it changes, based on map data. Don’t worry, you can override it, but the car’s driving experience is so placidly banal no matter how fast you’re going that, honestly, you might as well just fly under the cops’ radar.
Also, get a load of these spring-loaded cupholders in the center console!


What’s Weak

Nobody asked the Hyundai Palisade to be a driving enthusiast’s car, but in the off chance you are wondering, the Hyundai Palisade is not a driving enthusiast’s car.



Whatever though, I wouldn’t consider that a glaring weakness when it comes to family hauling. The numbness between the road and the steering wheel isn’t egregiously disconcerting. It doesn’t feel unstable, or too-tall. And the vehicle never felt out-of-control despite the fact that there’s not really much sensation of feedback from the road.
What does put a dent in the Palisade’s aura of opulence is pretty apparent road noise, especially in the trims below the top Limited. At highway cruising speed, the wind is kind of oddly loud in the cabin.
I also would’ve liked to have seen a slightly higher fuel economy rating; the Palisade’s rivals have a bit of an edge there.

Otherwise, on a sunny afternoon drive over roads so smooth they could have made my ’75 Scout seems supple, there wasn’t a lot to dislike about this comfortable people-mover.
Early Verdict





The auto industry has been talking about the rise of quality Korean cars for years now, but even I was surprised here. Hyundai didn’t have to make this anything more than a big box with three rows. Again, Dodge is still selling the Journey just fine.
What got me was that among the already rising tide of Korean car quality, the Palisade actually does feel like another leveling-up of refinement and luxury. I seriously can’t get over how high-class the soft headliner is in the Palisade Limited, and the interior design in general really does have a distinctly lux-leaning ambiance that sets it apart from other popular vehicles in the segment.

In other words, the Palisade is a super comfortable family car with more room than most people probably need. So, it’s good. As long as your kids aren’t too scared of seeing the Predator pull up when it’s time to get them from school.



+

Lovely to ride in

-

A little intense to look at, and a bit thirsty

TL;DR

A worthy flagship; a great mix of nice materials and convenient features

Power

291 HP • 262 LB-FT

Weight

4,387 LBS

Price

$46,400 List








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Unread 2019-08-13, 06:11 PM   #57
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The line between mainstream and premium cars is getting thinner and thinner with each passing generation, to the point where even affordable hatchbacks are packed to the brim with comfort, convenience, safety and the latest technological features.

It’s only natural that the big players in today’s market, SUVs and crossovers, offer even more. And the Hyundai Palisade is one ride that tries to pass on as a luxury alternative at a very decent price. In the Limited top spec, the Korean SUV offers premium Nappa leather, dual sunroof, second-row captain’s chairs, a 10.25-inch infotainment system with standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, a fully-digital instrument cluster and much more, all for just $44,700.


The all-wheel drive system is a $1,700 option, but other than that, you’re good to go. The 3.8-liter V6 that delivers 291 hp and 262 lb-ft (355 Nm) of torque and is paired to an eight-speed auto ‘box, provides sufficient power. The cabin is well insulated, the ride is smooth, handling is safe and predictable and despite being almost as big as the Audi Q7, the Palisade doesn’t feel gargantuan, partially thanks to the new architecture, which is about 25 percent stiffer than the old Santa Fe XL..


There are some minor quibbles like the push-button gear selector that takes some time getting used to, but nothing major.


In fact, CNET’s RoadShow that drove the Limited spec with AWD went as far as claiming that the Palisade should worry some more expensive alternatives, adding that it could even get away with the Genesis badge in this grade.

Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2eSnsjG9hM
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