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Unread 2019-07-15, 02:07 PM   #11651
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The Pixel 4 was just spotted in the wild in another huge leak

We’re some three months away from the Pixel 4’s official launch, but we already know how the phone will look like, thanks to various leaks that determined Google a few weeks ago to actually share a teaser image of the phone’s rear side (seen above). That back panel also happens to incorporate the phone’s signature feature, a dual- or triple-lens camera that features a unique arrangement. We’re looking at a square camera module placed in the left corner of the phone, containing two primary lenses placed horizontally. On top of the two cameras, we have a third lens, while the flash module sits under the two cameras. In other words, you’d recognize this camera if you were to spot it in the wild


That’s exactly what happened in London, where a Pixel fan caught a glimpse of the Pixel 4 in use on London Underground, sharing the image below with 9to5Google:
Image Source: Luis Brian via 9to5Google
The handset is wrapped up in what appears to be a protective case that’s supposed to hide the square-shaped camera module. However, the lens placement is unique enough to let anyone familiar with Pixel 4 rumors that this is a Pixel 4 prototype unit.
This isn’t the first time we see an alleged Pixel 4 prototype in the wild, with a similar device having been spotted a few weeks ago, also in London.
Only one other type of phone will have a similar design this year, and that’s the iPhone 11 series. However, Apple will have a different lens arrangement on the iPhone 11, 11 Max, and 11R. The handset in the image above can only be the Pixel 4.
Like before, the person who took the photo did not catch a glimpse at the phone’s screen, but that doesn’t mean we expect any surprises from the Pixel 4’s display design.
Several leaks have revealed that Google will forgo the notch in favor of a uniform top bezel that will incorporate a dual-lens camera as well as other sensors that would bring 3D face recognition to the phone. A previous leak already showed us what the phone might look like:
Image Source: Slashleaks
Like in previous years, Google is expected to launch two new Pixel phones this fall, including the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL, both of them expected to drop at some point in October.
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Unread 2019-07-29, 03:08 PM   #11652
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Google spills all the beans on Pixel 4's face unlock and "Motion Sense" gesture tech


Google appears to be tired of the endless cycle of leaks and speculation when it comes to the Pixel 4. The company today has published a blog post and video showing off the upcoming phone's facial recognition tech, as well as gesture controls. We also get a tearaway view of the top of the Pixel 4 (pictured above) showing what that gap in previous leaks was for — a lot of things, it turns out.


Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnRbXWojW7c


Project Soli's radar-based motion sensors do make an appearance, with explicit gesture support for actions like skipping songs, snoozing alarms, and silencing phone calls — hopefully it works better than the hilariously bad implementation in the LG G8. Based on the video above, we might get some accompanying visuals with our gestures in the form of waves or pulses of light at the top of the display. It will also go by the name "Motion Sense" according to text included in Google's video, and it won't be available in all countries that get the phone. (Google may need individual government regulatory approval for Soli's radar tech.)
The facial recognition tech isn't radar-based, though (or, at least, it isn't solely radar-based). A "Dot Projector" paired with an infrared flood illuminator and IR camera fill out the sensors to the right of the earpiece — that last is supplemented by yet another IR camera on the left. Two IR cameras separated by a distance should allow for easy parallax-based depth information to be gathered. The system turns on thanks to Soli "as you reach for it" allowing it to unlock faster, "all in one motion" as Google claims. It will also work as a biometric authentication method with previously revealed APIs in Android Q for payments and apps. Google's method will also work "in almost any orientation—even if you're holding it upside down" which is more than we can say for some others.
Face data is only ever stored on-device in the Titan M security chip, according to Google. That means you don't need to be worried about it being stored by Google on your account or elsewhere online, where it could be subject to future hacks or leaks, making it more secure (even if biometrics should only ever be treated as usernames, not passwords, since they can't be changed).
Curiously, the tearaway image that Google has published showing all these sensors has a distinctly off-center earpiece (or "audio port"). It's probably just the results of a hasty photoshop, since it would otherwise disagree with previous CAD-based renders and screen protector leaks, but it is curious.
The images published also show that the Pixel 4 only has one front-facing camera, rather than the two in the Pixel 3 and 3 XL. It isn't clear if that means we'll get just a wide-angle camera or a standard front-facer, but Google did publish a paper recently on correcting for distortion in faces on wide-angle photos, so it's possible (if still speculative) that we could see a wide-angle only front camera, paired with a software zoom — assuming Google still wants to offer the different levels of selfie "zoom" it provided with two cameras on the Pixel 3.


Google is seriously stepping up its game when it comes to openly revealing details surrounding its upcoming Pixel 4, and it's a refreshing change, if not an entirely new approach to PR when it comes to phones. While it's nice to speculate based on leaks, it's a lot nicer to actually know what we'll see this fall, and it could influence those on the fence for the upcoming Note10.
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Unread 2019-07-31, 06:19 PM   #11653
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This Is The Galaxy Note 10+ In Aura White








Samsung's still-unannounced Galaxy Note 10+ has now been spotted leaking out in yet another color configuration in reportedly official renders of the flagship phablet. This time, the device is shown in a stark white coloration dubbed "Aura White."
By contrast to earlier leaks of the next-generation Note, there don't seem to be any gradients visible in Aura White. Instead, the company has opted for a variant that absorbs color without reflecting them back, giving the slim-bezel design an unreasonably clean aesthetic.
The new color does show some coherence with those aforementioned color leaks too. The now-standard Samsung S Pen stylus is coated in the same hue. The only areas where the design seems to step away from the color is in terms of a thin silver line surrounding the edge or the minuscule black bezel surrounding the display and camera housing.
Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ equals colors for days
The Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ will also, based on the details provided by the source, arrive in at least one color configuration that was already recently spotted for the smaller Galaxy Note 10. Namely, that's the pink-hued red color that was outed just a few days back.
Like the newest configuration, the 'red' tone doesn't feature any gradient either and the only areas that aren't drenched in the color are in the edges and bezel — giving the line, as leaked so far, a cohesive design regardless of what color is chosen.
Aside from the newest addition to the array of colors leaked in official renders, Samsung will also make this device available in Green and Black variations as well as a gradient-rich Silver version.
While Blue tones have become a staple for Galaxy flagships over the past few years, the latest colors round out the list of expected colors for this particular device based on previously leaked documents. So it's not out of the question that one of those will be seen but it's equally likely that this is the last color that will be leaked.
More to come in just a week's time
Samsung is expected to take the wraps off of its Galaxy Note lineup for 2019 on August 7 at an in-house event. So all of the leaks and rumors will probably be confirmed or rebutted soon enough. In the meantime, there have already been a significant number of other leaks about the company's next top-tier phablet.
For starters, the Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ will reportedly pack in either an Exynos 9825 chip built by its own chip division or a Snapdragon 855 or Snapdragon 855+. That's going to vary based on region, most likely following the previous trend of selling the Qualcomm variant in the US and China while other international regions see the Exynos chip.
Regardless of whether or not the device brings an in-house solution or one bearing Snapdragon branding, that will ship with a minimum of 8GB of RAM and 128GB storage with a 45000mAh capacity battery.
That's all expected to be packed in behind a Samsung-designed 6.75-inch 'Dynamic' AMOLED screen at a QHD+ resolution.
Samsung also plans to release a separate 5G variant, according to the most recent rumors, complete with 25W fast charging.
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Unread 2019-07-31, 08:51 PM   #11654
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Huge leak: This is the Galaxy Note 10+

We’re now exactly one week away from the official unveiling of Samsung’s new Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy Note 10+ flagship smartphones — not that they need an official unveiling at this point. Practically everything there is to know about Samsung’s upcoming new phablet duo has already leaked time and time again, from specs and features to pricing and even the release date. We know both new Galaxy Note 10 models will be powered by the upgraded Qualcomm Snapdragon 855+ processor, they’ll have new triple-lens rear cameras, and they’ll both sport large Super AMOLED screens with a hole-punch design similar to the Galaxy S10. Unlike the S10, however, the Note 10 and Note 10+ will both have a selfie camera that’s centrally positioned at the top of the screen.

Beyond all the details that have leaked, we’ve also seen the Note 10 and Note 10+ designs leak over and over again for the past few months. As many times as we’ve seen these phones though, it has almost always been in leaked press renders or digital drawings based on design files that were stolen from the factory where Samsung’s new Note phones will be manufactured. Actual photos of a Galaxy Note 10 series phone have only leaked one time in the past… until now, that is.

lmost exactly a month ago in late June, a few photos leaked that supposedly showed the Galaxy Note 10+ in the wild. The Note 10+, as you’ll recall, is the higher-end version of the Galaxy Note 10 with a larger display, a bigger battery, more RAM, and a few other additional features. Here’s one of those photos from last month’s leak:
As you can see in that leaked image, the Galaxy Note 10+ appears to be exactly what we’ve been expecting thanks to all the leaks and reliable reports out there. If that leak wasn’t convincing enough, however, we now have an additional leaked photo that reaffirms everything we’ve seen and heard.
With just one week to go until Samsung takes the stage at its Unpacked press conference in New York City, Twitter user @joeyswezz has posted what may be only the second leaked photo of the Galaxy Note 10+. The origin of the leaked photo is unclear and the tweet has since been deleted, but nothing is ever really gone on the internet. Here’s a screenshot of the tweet:

And here’s the leaked photo on its own:

We obviously can’t confirm anything with complete certainty, but the image definitely appears to show a genuine Galaxy Note 10+ handset in the wild. There are no surprises to be found, of course, but Android fans will undoubtedly enjoy taking a peek at this hotly anticipated flagship phone ahead of its official launch next week.

Samsung is expected to begin taking preorders for the Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy Note 10+ shortly after its press conference next Wednesday, and both phones are supposedly set to be released on August 23rd.
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Unread 2019-08-01, 12:32 PM   #11655
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Galaxy Note10 headphone dongle leaks, looks exactly as you'd imagine


The Galaxy Note10 is almost certain to be the first generation in the series to ditch the 3.5mm headphone jack. We've been told by our sources that Samsung will include a pair of AKG USB-C earbuds with every purchase to make up for the loss. It's also been said that dongles could also be in play here and, thanks to a leak, we're able to eye out what that dongle looks like.


Samsung Galaxy Note 10 (Plus) #donglelife









WinFuture editor Roland Quandt, who is renowned for his reporting on leaks, has posted images of a 3.5mm-to-USB-C dongle to his Twitter account, labeling it as destined for Galaxy Note10+ (or, in this mention, Plus).
While the pictures could tell the whole story, commenters immediately drew criticisms and comparisons to Apple's equivalent dongle, hoping that Samsung's will at least take on more wear and tear. We're also willing to bet that the regular Galaxy Note10 and the even-larger 5G version will get the dongle — for the sake of argument, imagine the backlash if they didn't.
And if that didn't already peak your visual intrigue, a member of the Underkg forums posted "in the wild" shots of what's supposed a Galaxy Note10 and Galaxy Watch Active 2 in use. Take a good look at those if you fancy them.
The smartwatch should be announced on August 5 while the Note10 is to debut on August 7. Catch up on all the developments with our story tracker.
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Unread 2019-08-03, 04:12 PM   #11656
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Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Better Value Than Note 9, According To Price Rumor

The Samsung Galaxy Note 10 and Note 10+ might actually represent better value for consumers than the previous entry in the series, based on newly leaked pricing from WinFuture's Roland Quandt. The newly rumored price for a 256GB variant of the standard Samsung Galaxy Note 10 is going to fall in at around $949. For the larger Samsung Galaxy Note 10+, the cost will be set at an MSRP of $1,099.
Those costs apply to the unlocked, U.S. variant of the devices, Mr. Quandt says.
Where's the value?
For the Samsung Galaxy Note 10+, the suspected price is notably higher than the Samsung Galaxy Note 9 started at, with a cost of $999.99 when it landed on August 24 of last year. The price of that earlier gadget went as high as $1,249.99 too. But that doesn't tell the entire story here, either.
Last year's models were, to begin with, launched at that price at just 128GB of storage. So users will be getting double the storage in the Galaxy Note 10+ for a comparable price. The smaller Samsung Galaxy Note 10, conversely, starts out at around $50 less for double the storage.
So there is value there even before factoring in the remaining expected specifications and design enhancements for the two gadgets.
With the Samsung Galaxy Note 10 in either the plus or standard version, users in the U.S. are also getting a Qualcomm-built Snapdragon 855 SoC — European regions will see an in-house Exynos 9825. That's coupled with a healthy 8GB RAM or 12GB RAM for the 'Plus' variant.
Differentiating the devices further, the Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ will deliver a 6.8-inch QHD+ Super AMOLED panel, in place of the FHD+ 6.3-inch Super AMOLED panel found on the smaller of the two phones. For both models, a 5G variant will be available as well.
A single in-display sensor is packed behind a hole-punch cutout in the display on either, while on the opposite side users will gain a three-sensor vertical camera array, likely similar to the one found on the Samsung Galaxy S10 series. It is expected the Galaxy Note 10+ will also pack in a ToF sensor for more advanced features.
Faster charging than previous devices, the now-standard S Pen stylus in a color to match the frame, Android 9 Pie with One UI overlay, and other new features will undoubtedly be a part of the package too.
The sole drawback to the new design seems to stem from the fact that leaks have hinted at the removal of the 3.5mm audio jack entirely from both devices. Instead, Samsung will reportedly include a USB-C adapter dongle for wired audio in the box at launch.
Right or wrong, we'll all know soon enough
Leaks about the new line of Samsung Galaxy Note devices have been heavily reported over the past months but the veracity of those won't be known until August 7. The South Korean tech giant is holding its event to launch the two new phones and their accessories just ahead of IFA 2019.
More information will certainly be made available about the specifics of both phones leading up to its sale — presumably in late August although exact carrier pricing won't be known until pre-orders kick off shortly after the event.
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Unread 2019-08-05, 03:16 PM   #11657
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Fossil reveals fifth-gen smartwatches with Wear 3100 CPU and extended battery mode



Fossil Group is one of the last manufacturers left keeping Wear OS afloat. Last year's Fossil Sport was perhaps the best Wear OS smartwatch yet, though the promised battery life improvements in the Wear 3100 chip still haven't materialized. Fossil is now bringing the Sport's features to its other watches, and adding a few more improvements on top.
The new fifth-gen Fossil Q smartwatches have nearly every bell and whistle that Wear OS can support, except for LTE connectivity (though that would make the watches much larger). They're equipped with Qualcomm's latest Wear 3100 processor, 1GB of RAM, a heart rate sensor, NFC for Google Pay, built-in GPS, Wi-Fi, waterproofing up to 30 meters, and even a speaker — that last feature was missing from the Fossil Sport, and it means you can take calls on the watch and hear responses from Google Assistant.

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Besides the new processor and speaker, the main improvements are 8GB of internal storage (instead of the 4GB most other watches have) and new battery modes. 'Daily Mode' is the default, 'Extended Battery' supposedly lasts multiple days while still showing notifications and tracking heart rate, 'Custom Mode' lets you tweak settings manually, and 'Time-Only Mode' only displays the clock. It sounds like 'Extended Battery' is the 'Sports Mode' that Qualcomm and Google promised nearly a year ago.
As usual, Fossil is releasing a handful of different watch styles with the same hardware. There's a nice mix of frame colors and band styles, ranging from the Sport-like black watch with a silicone strap to the jewel-encrusted gold model with a blush leather band. There's something for everyone, as long as you have large wrists — unlike the Fossil Sport, which came in 43 or 41mm versions, all the new watches are 44mm across.
All models will be priced at $295, which seems a bit pricey, especially with Samsung's Galaxy Watch Active being nearly $100 less. They'll go on sale August 5th on Fossil's online store, and in select Fossil retail locations. We should be getting one to review shortly, so stay tuned for our full thoughts.
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Unread 2019-08-07, 05:10 PM   #11658
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Pixel 4 specs leak: 90Hz "Smooth Display," 6GB RAM, and rumored DSLR camera attachment



Google doesn't pride the Pixel phones on being spec-forward, at least in terms of superlatives, but when it comes to digging up more tidbits on what the Pixel 4 and 4 XL have, those numbers and details do help us set the table for what to expect. Now, we're learning more about some key upgrades (and downgrades) to the battery, display, RAM, and cameras on the future phones.

The details, which come from a source reporting to 9to5Google, will likely bring some relief to the suspense about what exactly that "stove" in the back holds and to concern about the lack of memory being allotted to Pixels.
The Pixel 4 is said to come with a 5.7" 1080p+ display and a 2,800mAh battery — the screen's slightly larger than the Pixel 3, but the battery's slightly smaller. The Pixel 4 XL scales up to a 6.3" 1440p+ panel and a 3,700mAh cell — no change from the Pixel 3 XL's screen, but a good 8% bump in the power department. Those OLED screens will be branded as "Smooth Display" as they're said to have a maximum refresh rate of 90Hz — bringing the Pixels in line with the OnePlus 7 Pro, though not as rapid as the 120Hz found on the ASUS ROG Phone 2 and the Razer Phones. Of course, combining quicker refreshes with the Pixel 4's smaller battery might not lead to the best results, but we're waiting to see.
In addition to a 12MP selfie camera and a similar sensor on the rear, it's said that a 16MP telephoto camera will also be on that weird-looking back side. The cameras could be augmented by a "DSLR-like attachment" that Google is currently developing — though keep in mind that the third-party market has the lens attachment accessory covered pretty well.
After years of settling with 4GB of RAM, Google has opted to bump it up to 6GB for both phones this time around. It'll be tied with the Qualcomm Snapdragon 855, the Titan M secure enclave, and the usual 64GB and 128GB storage options.
The company is said to be continuing the three-year OS update pledge and will also apparently debut new features to Google Assistant exclusive to the Pixel 4 and 4 XL.
You can see all the developments posted so far for these phones with our story tracker right here. Expect Google to officially announce the Pixel 4 and 4 XL in October.
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Unread 2019-08-07, 05:19 PM   #11659
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Galaxy Note10 and Note10+: Specs, pre-order, pricing, features, and more



The Galaxy Note10 and Note10+ are finally here, and our handy guide will tell you everything you need to know about Samsung's latest and greatest smartphones.

Galaxy Note10 and Note10+ pre-order, pricing, and deals

The Galaxy Note10 and Note10+ are available for pre-order starting August 8th on Samsung's website as well as major US carriers. The official release date for the phone is August 23rd, though carriers have been known to ship pre-orders days ahead of the official "street" date for Samsung phones in the past.
The Galaxy Note10 will retail for $949 unlocked, while the Note10+ will be $1099. The Note10+ 5G will be available exclusively from Verizon for a limited time, and Samsung told us to expect similar pricing to the Galaxy S10+ 5G, which Verizon has confirmed, meaning a staggering $1299.
You probably want to know who has the best pre-order offers, and we're still compiling that information, but we believe Samsung will be giving crazy trade-in values (up to $600) for select phones based on previous leaks from the official website.


Galaxy Note10 and Note10+ specs


In the US, we'll be receiving the Qualcomm Snapdragon 855-powered version of the Note10 and 10+ - rumors of the 855+ didn't end up panning out. The short version is that the two phones are largely identical apart from their sizes, with some minor differences (like the lack of a microSD slot on the Note10 and faster charging on the Note10+) between the two.





Galaxy Note10 vs Note10+ compared: Which is better?


For the first time, Samsung has split the Galaxy Note into two distinct models. One, the cheaper (if you can call $950 "cheap") Galaxy Note10, is a fair bit smaller than Notes of the last couple years. The other, the Note10+ ($1100) is slightly bigger than last year's Note9, but by less than you'd think: it's just 0.8mm wider and 0.4mm taller than 2018's Galaxy Note9. Don't let the 6.8" display diagonal fool you, though: the Note10+ isn't nearly as gigantic as people would have you think. It's a smidge wider and taller than a OnePlus 7 Pro, but substantially thinner. It's a big phone, but it's not setting any records over here.
Between the Note10 and Note10+, there are some key differences to consider, and I'll outline them in the bullets below.
  • Display size and resolution: The Note10 has a 6.3" 1080p display, while the Note10+ has a 6.8" 1440p screen
  • microSD card slot: The Note10 doesn't have one. The Note10+ does.
  • RAM: The Note10 comes with 8GB of RAM, while the Note10+ comes with 12GB
  • Storage: The Note10+ will have a 512GB storage option in the US, the Note10 will not
  • Battery: The Note10 has a 3500mAh battery, the 10+ has a much larger 4300mAh one
  • Charging: Only the Note10+ supports ultra-fast 45W charging, the Note10 peaks at 25W. For wireless charging, the Note10 peaks at 12W, while the Note10+ maxes at 15W.
  • Cameras: The Note10+ is equipped with a "time-of-flight" depth sensing rear camera
  • Price: Obviously, the Note10 is cheaper ($950) than the Note10+ ($1100)

Samsung is banking on the addition of a microSD slot, faster charging, more RAM, a bigger screen and battery, and an extra rear camera convincing people to shell out an extra $150 for the Note10+. Is it worth it? I'd argue yes. Here's why.
First, the Note has always been a big phone, and anyone considering the newest iteration probably likes large devices. The Note10 is a substantial size reduction from 2018's Note9, while the Note10+ is just a touch larger. If you were OK with the Galaxy Note8 and Note9's size, the Note10+ isn't going to be too big for you - it's very similar.
Second, the Note10 really has some significant disadvantages I do think are worth considering. 25W charging is quick, but the Note10+'s 45W wired charging is going to be much quicker for short top-ups, and 45W USB-PD chargers aren't expensive. Add in that it has 25% quicker wireless charging (15W) than the Note10, and that's a real benefit. The lack of a microSD slot, less RAM, and a much smaller battery really don't make the standard Note10 look attractive at any price. At that point, a Galaxy S10+ will be much cheaper, has a much bigger battery, the same processor, and runs the same OS version.
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Unread 2019-08-07, 05:19 PM   #11660
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If you want to spend more money, Note10+ 5G!

No doubt, some of you are curious about Samsung's 5G plans for the Note10, and I can give you a rundown quickly. Verizon will be the exclusive US carrier for the Note10+ 5G temporarily, much as it was for the S10+ 5G earlier this year. Verizon will be charging the same $1300 for the Note10+ 5G as it did the S10+ 5G, curiously, though the 5G-ified Note won't have any real upgrades over its 4G counterpart. Samsung says you can expect the weight to increase by 2 grams, but otherwise, the Note10+ and Note10+ 5G are physically identical.
Other carriers will announce their Note10+ 5G plans later this year. Samsung wouldn't confirm if all four major US carriers will sell the device.
Galaxy Note10 and Note10+ hands-on and review


We don't have our Galaxy Note10 review unit yet, but we had a chance to try out the phone in a hands-on session last week. You can find that post here with more information.
In summary, the Note10 (and particularly Note10+) brings a lot of the same Samsung we've seen for the last two years to the table: an excellent screen, good cameras, the latest processors, and premium pricing. While I'm not ready to make the call yet, the Galaxy Note10+ seems like the winner of the two, and I believe it'll be the one to buy (even if it is pretty expensive). The smaller Note10 just doesn't do enough to justify existing in my mind, and I believe most buyers would be happier with an older and much cheaper S10 or S10+ than they will with the smaller Note device this year.
We'll have our full review up later this month, closer to the launch date of the Note10, so stay tuned.
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Unread 2019-08-07, 05:36 PM   #11661
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Hands-on: The Galaxy Note10 and Note10+ are bigger—and smaller—than ever before



As the company widely credited for inventing the Big Phone, Samsung has enjoyed years of dominance with its Galaxy Note line. But in 2019, the Note faces stiff competition from all sides: Apple, Huawei, OnePlus, and a growing cohort of Chinese phone manufacturers are all making big, powerful smartphones, and some of them are very, very good. Last week, I spent a morning with Samsung's newest take on its supersized smartphone formula, the Galaxy Note10 and Note10+.

A new Note in a new size

The biggest change for the Note in 2019 is the addition of a second Note model. This year, Samsung will offer its big smartphone in two sizes: really big, and less big. You'd be forgiven for thinking the "small" Note10 is the 'regular' Note and the "big" Note10+ a new super-sized variant. In fact, the $1100 Galaxy Note 10+ is far closer dimensionally to its predecessors, the Note8 and Note9, meaning it is the "regular" Note of the two. The $950 Note10 is smaller than even a Google Pixel 3 XL, and far closer in size to a standard Galaxy S10 (not even the S10+).
The $950 Note10 is smaller than even a Google Pixel 3 XL, and far closer in size to a standard Galaxy S10.
The more I considered this, the more confusing it became to me.
At first, I was intrigued by the small Note. A big phone, but smaller? Practical! But now, I'm struggling to justify its existence. Samsung believes there's an audience that wants a Note-brand device in a more "normal" smartphone size. And that's because they want... a stylus? I'm really not sure what the play here is. In order to create this scaled down Note, Samsung's had to make compromises I wouldn't call inconsequential. The battery is a full 800mAh smaller in the Note10 versus the Note10+, there's no microSD slot, and the Note10 doesn't support the same charging speeds as the 10+. While it still gets 25W fast wired charging and 12W wireless charging, the battery on this phone took a serious downsizing in order to make room for the S Pen and new triple rear camera array, and I'm not optimistic about that.
The Note10 is considerably smaller than the Note10+, and is actually fairly close to a Galaxy S10 in size.
It also doesn't lend itself to favorable comparisons. Earlier this year, Samsung launched the Galaxy S10 with a screen diagonal around 0.2" smaller than the Note10, with a 3400mAh battery. The Note10 adds 0.2" of screen but only boosts the battery by 100mAh, to 3500mAh. The Galaxy S10 does not have great battery life—it's mediocre at best—and it shares the same processor and OS as the new Note. This doesn't look like a recipe for success, especially with an asking price of $950. You can get a Galaxy S10 for hundreds of dollars less than that. You can even get an S10+, which bridges the Note10 and Note10+ for size, for hundreds less. They even have headphone jacks.
In short, the small Note10 really only makes sense to Note-diehards looking to downsize... which is extremely counter-intuitive given the Note has always been about being big. Then again, maybe Samsung knows something about its customers that I don't. It still seems like too little phone for too much money.


Big phone, less than big changes

This leaves us with the Note10+ to dissect, and while my time with the phone was limited, I didn't come away feeling like I'd have a ton more to learn about it. Samsung's software on the new Notes is basically identical to that on the S10 line. Sure, you've got some new token features for the S Pen: you can wave it around in the air to control camera functions (like switching from front to rear), as opposed to just being a shutter button. That's because the new S Pen has an accelerometer and gyroscope, which is cool, I guess. But this feels like another one of Samsung's for-the-sake-of-it features most owners will never realize is even there.
DeX can now run inside Windows or Mac OS as a window using just a USB-C cable to your Note10 - still no wireless version.
In terms of new features you might actually use, you'll be able to link your Note10 to your Windows PC wirelessly. You can receive notifications, reply to texts from the stock SMS app, and view recently-taken photos with the new Link to Windows feature. Samsung didn't have a working demo for us, but aside from the aforementioned features, you'll also be able to mirror your phone's screen to your laptop, which is pretty neat. Hopefully this gets backported to the Galaxy S10, as Link to Windows does sound legitimately handy. Samsung also briefly mentioned a local PC-to-phone game streaming app, but it won't launch with the phone, just a nebulous "later." Given Steam Link is out of beta, I'm not sure what kind of compelling extra functionality Samsung's homegrown take could bring to the table here. Finally, DeX is getting a long-needed upgrade allowing it work over a simple USB-C cable with Windows and Mac OS, living inside a window (so you can have an OS inside your OS, dawg).
The S Pen gets an accelerometer and gyroscope for 2019, helping operate basic camera controls via gesture.
But what about the specs? That's where the Note is supposed to shine, and in most ways, it does deliver. The 6.8" Quad HD OLED display will no doubt win very high praise, and to my eyes, it looks great. Samsung does screens like no one else. The O-hole cutout for the camera is going to be polarizing, as all display cutouts all polarizing. I can't say I was bothered by it. The large 4300mAh battery is respectable, and bests capacity among similar phones from Huawei and OnePlus—hopefully indicating good run times. 45 Watt fast charging is definitely a plus (though you'll have to buy a 45W charger separately), and I'll be eager to test it out with 3rd-party USB-PD chargers.
Internally, you've got the same Snapdragon 855 chip found in every high-end phone with this year, though Samsung has paired it with a staggering 12GB of RAM for maximum bragging rights. Storage will be 256GB or 512GB ($1200) for the Note10+, which is more than enough, and can be expanded via the microSD slot its smaller counterpart lacks.
Samsung's large S-line phone brings most of its annual innovation to the table. The Note increasingly feels like it's getting the scraps.
And, that's really it. Sure, there are some other minor changes: the rear telephoto camera appears to be new (thankfully, as the S10's is terrible), and I'll be testing it our when I receive our review unit later this month. There's also a Time-of-Flight depth-sensing camera on the rear, but Samsung told us it's just used for AR features—in other words, as a novelty.
If you're having a bit of "that's it?" feeling after reading this, I'm right there with you. It's gotten to the point where Samsung's large S-line phone brings most of its annual innovation to the table. The Note increasingly feels like it's getting the scraps. Certainly, there are improvements, but they're decidedly incremental. Maybe I'll feel better after spending some real quality time with the Note10+—maybe it needs to be fully experienced to be understood. But right now, I see another (very expensive) big phone in a world increasingly filled with big phones. It's going to take more than a nip-and-tuck to stand out.
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Unread 2019-08-07, 05:38 PM   #11662
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Charging the Galaxy Note10+ at its fastest speed will require a separate charger



If you're in the position where the biggest phone is the better phone for you, the Galaxy Note10+ will hit that mark for you — it's got a bigger screen with more pixels and it has a bigger battery than the normal Note. But if you really want to take advantage of the fastest rates you can get for your plus-sized phablet, you'll need to ditch the wall wart in the box and buy another one. Don't worry, we'll explain why and help you out.

Both the Note10 and Note10+ share the same charger and it's big step up from what pretty much every other Samsung phone has been able to do. The block can pull 25 watts, which is a whole 10 watts better than Samsung's previous Fast Adaptive charging technology... which is itself based on Qualcomm's Quick Charge 2.0, a standard that came out some 6 years ago. All in all, you're getting 40% more power during any time you have your Note10 plugged in.
But here's the drift: while the Note10 can support rates of up to 25 watts, the Note10+ can go up to 45 watts — perhaps due to its larger size which can help distribute the heat generated while charging. These speeds are allowed on products that comply with the latest revisions to the USB Power Delivery standard — in this case, the device outputting the charge and the device taking in the charge must be able to do so at a 15-volt potential and a current of 3 amperes.
So, if you want to play with some real power on your Note10+, you should look out for a charger that supports USB-PD revision 2 or revision 3 or see if it can support 15V/3A rates. From our standpoint, we recommend a charger from Nekteck — we've found its cables and chargers to deliver on their promised rates and are generally built well enough to handle more than your average wear and tear.
This 45W USB-C block is certified by the USB Implementers Forum (a good thing) and comes with a 6-foot cable. It's available from Amazon for $17.
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Unread 2019-08-07, 05:38 PM   #11663
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With the Note10, Samsung says goodbye to more legacy features - and a smartphone philosophy



Samsung's phones always have a little something for everyone. If you need extra storage for niche workflows or huge offline music collections, you could always pick up a Galaxy S or Note phone with microSD support, and even enjoy the anachronism of a headphone jack. That's Samsung's M.O.: build phones with everything. But over the years, that approach slowly began to change, and with the Note10, I think it's fair to say the Samsung "kitchen sink" smartphone is now firmly a thing of the past.

Outsiders looking in on Samsung's Galaxy phones have always had little things to envy. Even if the company's software isn't to your tastes, its phones pack in basically every feature they can, and not just in the sense of legacy persistence. Of course, when most phone manufacturers gave up on the headphone jack and expandable storage, Samsung continued to include them, but that's just the tip of the iceberg.
Every decent phone comes with support for NFC-based contactless payments, but how many of them support MST for near-universal use with older card readers? And while you can pair a fitness tracker via Bluetooth with most phones, can they read your heart rate without one? Give a recent Samsung flagship a dock and it can even mimic a desktop computer via DeX — with Linux available if you need it — and you can charge another device wirelessly with nothing but a Galaxy S10 via Wireless PowerShare.
Odds are most folks didn't use all the features present in the Galaxy S10 or Note9, and while these are all relatively tame concepts, they're nothing compared to Samsung's history and the early experiments with wild and gimmicky phone designs. Remember the Galaxy Beam and Galaxy Camera? We might be done with purpose-built hardware thrown like spaghetti on a wall, but Samsung's fundamental philosophy of including everything it can in a phone has been mostly unchanged. And while Samsung has slowly eliminated some of its most niche features, it seems that trend is now accelerating
Once upon a time, Samsung's phones used to include an infrared blaster for use as a remote control, though they lost that feature with the Galaxy S7. The notification light was also a trademark Samsung feature, but it was cut from the Galaxy S10 (though there were workarounds). Individually minor features like these have been introduced and subsequently cut as a slow but continuous trend — remember the gimmick that was Smart Stay? — but the pace of feature abandonment is picking up.
Samsung's Galaxy Note10 cuts several features present on earlier phones. Neither model will have a headphone jack — an unfortunate development in isolation — but the smaller phone also skips out on a microSD slot, and neither gets a heart rate sensor. The new Notes also forego one of Samsung's most recent developments from the Galaxy S10+, dual front-facing cameras. Both Notes have just one. The littler Note10 even scales back the display resolution to 1080p. While we've never had a smaller Note phone in the series to compare against, the previous S9/S9+ and S10/S10+ phones have shared Quad HD+ 1440p resolutions between sizes.
This feature loss has been a slow trend for years, but looking back, I think the Galaxy s10e was an indirect herald that the pace was about to pick up. The cut-down, more affordable version of the flagship skipped quite a few features like the heart rate monitor, a rear telephoto camera, and the new in-display fingerprint reader, but its "e" suffix clearly delineated it in most minds from the S10 and S10+. It was a Galaxy S phone, but it was separate from the "real" Galaxy S10 and S10+ as a response to the iPhone XR — closer to a mid-range device than a flagship. At the time, there were justifiable reasons it left out some details, like price.
But in the wake of the Note10, a clear path can be drawn: Samsung's dropping features faster than ever. This could be a response to slowed smartphone sales and a concern that the "enthusiast" audience which appreciates the added complexity of extra features isn't the right demographic anymore. The company's flagships used follow a clear philosophy: target the widest possible audience by including every feature (and gimmick) you realistically can — including all the minor benefits loved by tiny but vocal corners of the internet. That kitchen-sink approach was the defining characteristic of Samsung's flagship hardware for years, Or, at least, it used to be until today.
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Unread 2019-08-08, 02:37 PM   #11664
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Google Pixel 4 & Pixel 4 XL Will Join 90Hz Display Club: Rumor

It's August, and with just weeks to go before the unveiling of Google's next-generation Pixels, details leak about what to expect. Google is joining the 90Hz refresh rate club with the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL.
The 90Hz refresh rate will be given to both phones, a feature Google will call "Smooth Display." By bumping up the refresh rate to 90Hz, Google is taking Android gaming seriously, as are a some other OEMs such as OnePlus (OnePlus 7 Pro), Huawei (upcoming Mate 30 Pro rumored to have 90Hz refresh), ASUS (first-generation ROG Phone), and Razer (Razer Phone 2).
Aside from the 90Hz refresh rate, the Pixel 4 series will get a bump from 4GB of RAM to 6GB, which puts them on true flagship status. Sure, there are 8GB and 12GB RAM Android-powered smartphones on the market, but 6GB RAM qualifies for flagship status these days. 4GB of RAM are showing up in mid-range smartphones now, and it's been high time for Google to give its flagship phones flagship RAM.
90Hz refresh rates and 6GB of RAM will be met with two sizes, 5.7 inches and 6.3 inches (both OLED panels). The 5.7-inch Pixel 4 will have a Full HD+ resolution while the 6.3-inch display will have Quad HD+ resolution.
Something about Google providing the same resolutions for its models as Samsung provides for the Galaxy Note 10 series says that it's more than coincidental. It seems as though Android OEMs are starting to charge more for higher display resolutions than in years past.
As for cameras, the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL will sport 12MP and 16MP shooters on the back, dual rear cameras. The 12MP shooter will come with phase-detection autofocus while the 16MP camera is the telephoto lens. Google has already leaked the back of the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL back in June, showing off a square camera module designed for at least dual rear cameras.
There's little known about the selfie camera or cameras, but a concept render suggests there are five sensors at the top of the display on the front — a sign that Google could have dual selfie cameras there as well. OnLeaks has shown the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL to have extremely large "foreheads" but noticeably thinner "chins." There could be as many as five cameras on the Pixel 4 series.
Face Unlock and Motion Sense have been confirmed for the handset as new software features, so some of the five front sensors may be utilized to these ends.
Along the lines of excellent photography, rumor has it that Google is also preparing a DSLR accessory for the upcoming Pixels. With Google's track record in photography from the very beginning of the Pixel series, the camera accessory is sure to garner a lot of interest.
Finally, as for battery capacity, the smaller 5.7-inch Pixel 4 will house a 2,800mAh battery while the Pixel 4 XL will house a 3,700mAh battery. The smaller Pixel is getting a display size increase from 5.5 to 5.7 inches but is losing 115mAh of battery from the 2,915mAh battery in last year's Pixel 3. The Pixel 4 XL will retain the same 6.3-inch display size of the Pixel 3 XL but is getting a 270mAh bump from 3,430mAh to 3,700mAh.
Both models will feature Qualcomm's Snapdragon 855 chipset (not the Snapdragon 855 Plus, mind you), the same chipset Samsung has given to its Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy Note 10 Plus.
Last but not least, the Pixel 4 series will see some new Google Assistant features exclusive to Google's handsets, for now at least. It's a known fact that Google Assistant was once exclusive only to the original Pixel and Pixel XL but slowly started making its way to other Android-powered handsets and tablets. The upcoming Google Assistant features are expected to do the same.
The company's Project Soli chip, allowing for air gesture-based interactions, looks to arrive on the world market on these handsets as well. Google introduced Project Soli to the Android world back at Google I/O 2015 four years ago.
Google will announce the Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL at its fourth Made By Google event in October, as is the usual month for the Pixel event. The Pixel 4 series will be the first series to feature Google's upcoming Android 10.0 Q update.
Usually, Google unveils a new "sweet treat" statue to go with its new Android system update, so Android users anxiously await the crowning of the new sweet treat by which they will refer to their operating system for the next year.
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Unread 2019-08-09, 06:48 PM   #11665
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Android Q's Easter egg arrives in Beta 6, complete with hidden Picross puzzle





In years past, some of the Easter eggs hidden in major Android releases included a kitty collection game, a Flappy Bird clone with lollipops, and a Flappy Bird clone with marshmallows. Android Pie's Easter egg simply showed the letter 'P' with moving circles, but Android Q's is slightly more fun.
Android Q Beta 6 finally replaces the Easter egg from Pie with a new one, but for some unknown reason, it's only visible on the Essential Phone — Pixels on the new beta still have the Pie animation. Maybe the Essential Phone has a slightly-newer build than the Pixels, or perhaps this is something Essential itself put in (which would be a bit odd, but not impossible). We'll update this post if/when we figure out the reason.
Image credit: u/farmerbb on Reddit
The new Easter egg, which is still activated by holding down on the Android version from the Settings app, simply opens a page with 'Android 10' spelled out. You can move around the logo and numbers with your finger, and with the right positioning, you can combine the numbers to get the Android Q logo that Google has been using since the first beta. Cue the X-Files theme.
Image credits: u/farmerbb and u/FuzzyJump on Reddit
If you tap the screen a few times, a grid of squares appear, which seems to be a modified Picross puzzle. Solving it results in an Android system icon, like the volume up icon displayed in the last screenshot above. Kinda neat, but it's no Flappy Bird.
There's always the chance that the final Q Easter egg could be a little more fun, especially if the update will be named after a dessert like previous releases — the Easter eggs almost always reference the dessert in some way. The existing feature could also give more credibility to the idea that Google will drop the dessert names once and for all, which would be a shame, even if the themed statues were getting a bit boring.
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Unread 2019-08-11, 06:42 PM   #11666
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Possible Google Pixel 4 camera sample hints at incredible new feature





Google has already built up a pretty solid reputation in the smartphone camera department but the Pixel 4 should take things to the next level. It’s rumored to include an updated primary camera, a new telephoto alternative, and a mysterious third sensor. Reports also suggest a DSLR-like software implementation is being prepared and it now seems as though this may enable an incredible new feature.Is 20x zoom on the cards for the Pixel 4?


As spotted by YouTuber Brandon Lee from This is Tech Today, the Director of Design at Google, Claude Zellweger, recently posted a photo to his Instagram page which was shot inside the Google Design Studio. The company’s Creative Lead and Industrial Design Manager, Alberto Villareal, subsequently complemented Zellweger on his photo, to which he replied saying it had been shot at “20x zoom” on an unspecified Pixel device.

Despite boasting Super Res Zoom software, a Pixel 3 is simply incapable of producing a shot with this much clarity at a similar zoom level. Therefore, it wouldn’t be crazy to suggest that perhaps this photo has been taken on a pre-production Pixel 4 unit paired with the rumored DSLR-like feature.


The exact details of Google’s new camera software are yet to be reported but it seems like it could potentially be a game-changer for Pixel smartphones. After all, it’d instantly put the flagships in the same league as Huawei’s P30 Pro or the Oppo Reno 10x Zoom, both of which offer 5x optical zoom through a special periscope-like lens and 10x hybrid zoom. The Huawei P30 Pro also supports 50x digital zoom but this doesn’t exactly produce the best images.

The move would also put the Pixel 4 duo leagues ahead of Samsung’s Galaxy Note 10, which supports 2x optical zoom, and presumably the iPhone 11 or iPhone Pro, which should also offer 2x optical zoom.
What else will the Pixel 4 offer in the camera department?


In addition to this potential advancement in the software zoom department, the Pixel 4 is also expected to include several other upgrades that’ll be made possible by the new square-shaped camera module which is positioned in the top-left corner.

Per the latest information, Google’s next flagship will boast an updated 12-megapixel sensor on the rear that’ll act as the primary camera. Accompanying this should be an all-new 16-megapixel snapper which will reportedly be paired with a telephoto lens. It’s unclear at this stage what level of zoom this will support without the improved Super Res Zoom software, but it’ll likely be either 2x or 3x.






Accompanying these should also be an LED flash and what has previously been referred to as a ‘Spectral Sensor.’ Details about what this can do remain scarce but it could potentially capture information that isn’t available to the naked eye such as x-rays, ultraviolet, and infrared. The sensor may also capture depth data for individual pixels and better identify materials. Overall, the benefits could include better low-light photography and portrait images.
Google Pixel 4 & Pixel 4 XL specifications


The upcoming Pixel-branded smartphones are expected to arrive powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 855 paired with 6GB of RAM and the choice of 64GB or 128GB of non-expandable internal storage.

The Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL should launch with stock Android 10 Q pre-installed and new Google Assistant features. Regarding the battery, the small model should include a 2,800mAh capacity while the larger version may up this to 3,700mAh.

Completing the setups will reportedly be 5.7-inch and 6.3-inch AMOLED displays respectively. Both of these panels will support a 90Hz refresh rate but the resolutions will be different. Specifically, the Pixel 4 should offer a FHD+ (2280 x 1080p) resolution and the Pixel 4 XL will reportedly increase it to QHD+ (3040 x 1440p).
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Unread 2019-08-12, 02:25 PM   #11667
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LG G8X renders forecast waterdrop notch and in-display fingerprint sensor



The IFA 2019 trade show in Berlin is just around the corner, and we now know a little more about what to expect from LG. The South Korean OEM looks set to launch an updated version of the LG G8 from earlier in the year alongside the dual-screen V60 it teased last week. Renders of the LG G8X, as it will reportedly be marketed, are now circulating courtesy of leaker Steve H.McFly, better known as @OnLeaks.

Released in conjunction with Pricebaba, the CAD-based renders show the LG G8X with a glass rear panel identical in all but the fingerprint sensor to the original LG G8, with dual rear cameras accompanied by a flash. We can assume that the biometric scanner has been moved under the display, while it also looks like LG is doing away with the multiple-camera setup that enabled the poorly-received Air Motion gestures and 3D Face Unlock. This time, there's just a single front-facing camera within a waterdrop notch and a chin bezel that will look on the large side compared to other 2019 flagships.



The display is said to be 6.2 inches diagonally, which is marginally bigger than the screen on its predecessor. The overall dimensions of 159.3 x 75.8 x 8.5mm make for a longer and slightly thicker device. A familiar button setup consists of a power button on the right side with volume controls and a physical Google Assistant key on the left. There also appears to be an earpiece above the front camera, which suggests the display audio tech from the G8 might not have made it into this follow up. On the bottom side, the USB-C is naturally retained, as is the headphone jack.


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Unread 2019-08-12, 03:30 PM   #11668
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[Update: No DSLR hardware] Pixel 4 specs leak: 90Hz "Smooth Display," 6GB RAM

Google doesn't pride the Pixel phones on being spec-forward, at least in terms of superlatives, but when it comes to digging up more tidbits on what the Pixel 4 and 4 XL have, those numbers and details do help us set the table for what to expect. Now, we're learning more about some key upgrades (and downgrades) to the battery, display, RAM, and cameras on the future phones.

The details, which come from a source reporting to 9to5Google, will likely bring some relief to the suspense about what exactly that "stove" in the back holds and to concern about the lack of memory being allotted to Pixels.
The Pixel 4 is said to come with a 5.7" 1080p+ display and a 2,800mAh battery — the screen's slightly larger than the Pixel 3, but the battery's slightly smaller. The Pixel 4 XL scales up to a 6.3" 1440p+ panel and a 3,700mAh cell — no change from the Pixel 3 XL's screen, but a good 8% bump in the power department. Those OLED screens will be branded as "Smooth Display" as they're said to have a maximum refresh rate of 90Hz — bringing the Pixels in line with the OnePlus 7 Pro, though not as rapid as the 120Hz found on the ASUS ROG Phone 2 and the Razer Phones. Of course, combining quicker refreshes with the Pixel 4's smaller battery might not lead to the best results, but we're waiting to see.
In addition to a 12MP selfie camera and a similar sensor on the rear, it's said that a 16MP telephoto camera will also be on that weird-looking back side. The cameras could be augmented by a "DSLR-like attachment" that Google is currently developing — though keep in mind that the third-party market has the lens attachment accessory covered pretty well. (Update: Although 9to5 has yet to issue its own correction, the author of the original claim has since refuted this detail. The phone will instead have "DSLR software features for the camera app.")


After years of settling with 4GB of RAM, Google has opted to bump it up to 6GB for both phones this time around. It'll be tied with the Qualcomm Snapdragon 855, the Titan M secure enclave, and the usual 64GB and 128GB storage options.
The company is said to be continuing the three-year OS update pledge and will also apparently debut new features to Google Assistant exclusive to the Pixel 4 and 4 XL.
You can see all the developments posted so far for these phones with our story tracker right here. Expect Google to officially announce the Pixel 4 and 4 XL in October.


Update: 2019/08/12 9:20am PDT by Ryne Hager
No 'DSLR-like attachment' as originally claimed

Although 9to5Google has yet to issue a formal correction in its own coverage, in a podcast last week 9to5's Stephen Hall noted that his earlier claim that "Google is developing a DSLR-like attachment for the Pixel that may become an available accessory" is incorrect. His tipster reached out to explain that Google is actually just planning "DSLR software features for the camera app," which is quite a different thing from dedicated, multi-lens, detachable hardware.
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Unread 2019-08-13, 01:54 PM   #11669
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Google Pixel 4 Appears In The Wild With Its Large Forehead



The alleged Google Pixel 4 has just surfaced yet again. This time around, the leak comes from a UK-based blog, This Teen Tech. Do take this leak with a grain of salt, even though the design looks quite accurate.
This device features a rather large forehead, and almost no "chin", as previous leaks suggested. The placement of the front-facing camera also seems to be accurate. An earpiece is also visible here, as are those rounded display corners.
Unfortunately, only one image of the phone surfaced, so we can't see it from all angles. This is not the first time the Pixel 4 appeared in the wild, though. It surfaced a couple of times in both real life images and renders, so we know what to expect.
The Google Pixel 4 will come in two flavors, Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL. Both phones will ship with flagship processors, either the Snapdragon 855 or Snapdragon 855 Plus. Both devices will be made out of metal and glass, and include an in-display or side-facing fingerprint scanner. An optical in-display fingerprint scanner will probably be included.
Those two phones will probably look identical, save for the size difference. The "forehead" is that large because it will house an all-new 3D facial recognition system. In addition to that, the Project Soli radar chip will be included, a small speaker grill, and a selfie camera.
CAD-based renders that surfaced earlier confirmed the Pixel 4 design, pretty much. Google's logo will be placed on the back, along with cameras. Two rear-facing cameras will sit in the top-left corner of the phone's back. All the physical buttons will sit on the right, it seems.
A 3.5mm headphone jack will not be a part of the package, only a Type-C USB port. The Pixel 4 series is expected to have great cameras, just their predecessors, though not all details are known just yet.
Both phones are expected to sport at least 6GB of RAM, while Android Q will come pre-installed. Android Q will probably debut with these two smartphones, as far as a pre-installed variant is concerned.
Fast charging will be included in the package, as will wireless charging. The two phones are expected to arrive in October, though nothing has been confirmed just yet. Pre-orders are expected to kick off right after the event, while sales will pitch in a week or two after that.
The Google Pixel 3 series was kind of disappointing in terms of performance, so the Pixel 4 phones will hopefully change that. The Pixel 3 devices were full of odd bugs and performance issues, which is not common for Google's phones. The Pixel 3a series did improve things, but those two devices are only mid-rangers.
We do not know how much will the Pixel 4 series phones cost, but they won't be cheap. The Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL retailed for $799 and $899, respectively. You can expect similar price tags for the Pixel 4 devices, if not a bit higher, we'll see.
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Unread 2019-08-19, 01:43 PM   #11670
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[Update: Regulatory photos] Huawei's folding Mate X phone spotted in executive's hands with visible design tweaks



Huawei 's consumer division chief Yu Chengdong was spotted in an airport in China by reporter Li Wei apparently waving around a slightly redesigned version of the Huawei Mate X. The phone was previously delayed amid Huawei's drama with the US government, while Samsung was also having its own folding phone troubles. In the meantime, the company has made a few subtle tweaks to the as-yet-unreleased Mate X.

Above: Back of the Mate X as of February. Below: The back of the phone now.
Several changes are visible around back. Noticeably, there is what looks like another optical assembly in the bank of cameras. Previously Huawei had three cameras around the back, but XDA Developers has spotted that the camera specs on Huawei's site now list a time of flight sensor, so that's likely what the new module is for.
Previously, the long strip covering the camera assembly's bulkier edge and hinge area as appeared to be plain and glossy (although an accent with accompanying text on the back of the phone in February alluded to a carbon fiber composite build for the largest panels). These recent photos seem to indicate that those long strips are either now also carbon fiber, or have been textured to appear that way.
The shape of the button which triggers the catch for the folding mechanism has also been changed to be a bit wider and less oblong, with a red line set in it.

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It isn't clear if other aspects of the phone, like the display, may have been redesigned in the wake of Samsung's folding fiasco. One of the photos (first in the gallery above) shows some wavy lines in the display's reflection, and previously AP's David spoke of a seeing a pre-production unit with a "wavy plastic" display that looked "hugely compromised." Given the irregularities in that reflection, we might not be looking at substantial changes, although the resolution of these new real-world photographs leaves plenty to be desired.
While these photos don't point to substantial changes, as always, we'll just have to wait and see how the $2,600 Mate X ends up once it's actually (finally) released.
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Unread 2019-08-19, 01:43 PM   #11671
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Updated design swings through TENAA

The Mate X just popped up on Chinese regulator TENAA's site, with the same physical changes spotted before. Specs for the updated design are also included in with other regulatory details.

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The images agree with the version we saw in the executive's hands last month, showing the new larger folding mechanism release button and the addition of a new sensor in the camera cluster (likely the time of flight sensor added to the official spec sheet).
While carrier band support is sure to vary between markets, other specs listed in the TENAA filing include a 2.6GHz SoC, 4,400mAh battery and 8" 2480×2200 folding OLED display — nothing new outside a 100mAh smaller battery, but more confirmation that details weren't changed as a result of the physical tweaks. Physical size clocks in at 161.3×146.2×11mm and 300g. Other configuration options include 8-12GB of RAM and 128, 256, and 512GB storage sizes.
Neowin is reporting that the chipset powering the device may be bumped to a Kirin 990. The TENAA listing also states at least one color that the phone will come in: Star Blue. That's probably the version we see here.
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Unread 2019-08-22, 11:46 AM   #11672
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Android's iconic dessert names are going away, starting with Android 10

The last dessert to grace the name of a version of Google's Android operating system will officially be pie. At a meeting in the Android team's new office in Mountain View last month, we sat down with some of the Googlers responsible for handling Android's biggest rebrand since, well, Android.
Desserts have been a part of Android from (almost) the beginning. Android 1.0, a version of the software nobody ever really used, was internally known as Astroid, but every release that followed carried a desert. In total, Android had 14 (official) dessert-themed releases: Cupcake (1.5), Donut (1.6), Eclair (2.0-1), Froyo (2.2), Gingerbread (2.3), Honeycomb (3.0-2), Ice Cream Sandwich (4.0), Jelly Bean (4.1-3), KitKat (4.4), Lollipop (5.0-1), Marshmallow (6.0), Nougat (7.0-1), Oreo (8.0-1), to today's Android 9 Pie. With Android 10, that comes to an end. And that brings us to the other news: Android Q's official name is simply Android 10, which makes sense Google basically told us that it was in the last beta.
It wasn't lost on Google that the names have long been a part of Android fandom. Some people even went out of their way to visit and be photographed next to the famous statues Google commissioned for each named release, and the names have become a source of anticipation and spectacle. In the past few years, though, Google's enthusiasm for them does seem to have waned. Instead of themed versions of the iconic Android robot (known by many as the bugdroid), generic versions of the character were posed alongside sculptures of the named dessert, apart from a strange deviation with Oreo's superhero Android.
Just finding names of desserts has created more and more difficulty for the Android team, as not only were options dwindling, but global branding concerns were beginning to arise. Android is an OS used by billions people of people in every corner of the earth, and that resulted in some strange marketing considerations. For example, does someone in the Philippines know what nougat is? Has a person in Zimbabwe ever eaten a fruit pie? On the surface, I think Google has a point here: Android is a global brand, and it should be branded in a globally recognizable way. But I do find it stretches credulity — and evokes a particularly painful sort of political correctness — when Google suggests that Android's dessert names were somehow alienating people. Perhaps this makes sense from a very theoretical marketing exercise perspective, but Google isn't selling Android's name to anyone, and it's not selling the platform. I don't want to get too hung up on this, but of course the first question that needed to be answered about the change was "Why?," and well, that's the answer we got: inclusivity.
As the team explained the decision to us, I theorized what the more practical reasons for the change in naming strategy were, and I think there are three very big ones which are self-evident. First, it's really hard to find a good, easily-recognizable dessert that starts with "Q," a problem that only gets worse as you get farther along in the alphabet. Second, the number "10" provides a convenient point at which to change things up, given its significance (well, at least for those of us base-10 elitists). Third, you've only got so many letters — what happens after Z? Take all of these considerations together, and it becomes kind of clear Google wasn't going to find a better time to drop the desserts; the band-aid had to be ripped. It's also been increasingly clear that the attention Google has received for some of its more recent Android name choices hasn't been overwhelmingly positive. Risking such negative reactions — reactions that then become associated with Android and Google itself — really doesn't make any marketing sense.
Of course, in any greater sense, all of this is inconsequential. Google will keep releasing versions of Android, they will continue (for now) to have version numbers, and nothing about the philosophy of the platform itself will change as a result. I don't think anyone is going to switch to iOS because Android 10 doesn't have a dessert attached to it. That's not a real thing. And while I can empathize with those who are disappointed with Google's decision, I also find it a bit difficult to fathom having quite so much personally invested in this little ritual.
And while the dessert names are being retired, the iconic statues will be sticking around... sort of. Google has commissioned a giant number "10" (yes, really) that will sit in the lobby of the team's new office. Somehow I doubt it will have the charm of the Jelly Bean bugdroid, but then again, neither did the Pie statue.
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Unread 2019-08-22, 11:47 AM   #11673
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Android will look a little different in 2019, and the bugdroid is losing his body


After a sit-down with members of Android's brand design team in the company's new Mountain View office last month, the headline of this post was essentially what I came away with. Android's visual branding is changing as part of the release of Android 10, but that's in and of itself only a tiny part of Android, and it's really not changing a lot.

What I can tell you is it's a lot easier to give you some visuals, then explain what exactly is happening, so let's start with the pictures.

At the top you'll find Android's original wordmark from 2008, in the middle is the 2014 refresh, and on the bottom is the new 2019 branding Google just announced today. The font is a bit lighter (with a new lower-left radial curve), the logo is now officially black, and the bugdroid head will be featured more prominently with the logo going forward. It certainly looks a bit more modern.


The bugdroid himself is also getting some changes; namely, he's now just... a head. Google will continue to make the classic bugdroid design available under a Creative Commons license, but the official, branded version of the bugdroid is now without a body. He does do fun stuff with his antennae now, though.
You've gotta admit, he's kinda cute. As for the rest of the changes, we've got a new official branded color palette Google is working with, and the bugdroid (which Google officially calls "the Android robot") is showing off the latest shade of Android Green. It's a lighter, more blue green than the slightly-radioactive Android green of years past, and I like it. There are also new accent colors you can see in the image below.
You'll see these colors start to pop up on various Android-related websites Google publishes, as well as in signage and artwork Google uses at shows like MWC and CES in relation to Android. To be clear: this is not a color palette for the Android OS, it's a color palette for the Android brand. That means there are no imminent plans to re-skin Android in these shades, merely that Google will be using these colors in its Android-related marketing. It's possible apps and parts of the OS could opt to use them, but Google isn't saying if that's under consideration at the moment.


All in all, these are some small tweaks to the Android brand that most people probably won't notice - and that's fine! You can watch the video below to get a rapid-fire summary of the new visual identity.


Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2UDgpLz20M
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Unread 2019-08-27, 04:26 PM   #11674
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Google Considers Pixel Watch, With New Strap & Built-In Camera






Google is still considering building its own Pixel-branded watch and is now looking into including a camera under the display. That's based on a recently spotted patent from April, filed by the company with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The patent centers on the design of just such a watch and, in particular, the mechanism for attaching a watch strap. It also harkens back to an arguably more interesting Google patent approved today showing a smartwatch with an in-display camera.
The first patent applies more directly to how the proposed Google watch is worn on the wrist. Typically, modern watches utilize a set of quick-release pins that slip in or out relatively easily. Google's new patent shows the strap attaching via a clasp.
The claw-shaped mechanism sits at the end of the watchband, with a hinge on the lower segment. A button or screw is in place to quickly operate the hinge and apply or relieve pressure. That grasps or releases a specially-shaped 'concave member' Google has built into the underside of the watch casing.
How does this relate to the camera watch?

The overall design of the smartwatch in the watchband filing lines up with the above-mentioned newer Google patent. That's because the new patent features the same round design without any apparent physical buttons. Speculatively, that could mean that the search giant plans to use either touch-enabled edges similar to its Pixel-branded smartphones or a Samsung-like rotating bezel.
The outer edge of the watch is fairly standard. There's a slight bevel at the top, viewed from the side, and the same is mirrored along the bottom. The portion that would be pressed against the wearer's writs features a smooth curve transitioning to the flat segment. Aspects that might point to features such as heart rate measuring are blocked in the images by the watch's strap but the glass panel appears to sit flush with the housing.
More interesting is the fact that the other patent points to a wearable that features a large camera lens placed just below the display. It isn't immediately clear whether Google would place the camera with a punch-hole. It may have decided instead to allow captures through a semi-transparent display or through a specialized type of glass. Regardless, the camera is the primary component of the design patent.
A perfect companion for Google Pixel 4?

Now, there's no guarantee Google will ever bring its camera watch to market. It seems unlikely the patent is intended for licensing purposes but a patent doesn't guarantee a final consumer product.
There's also no way to know what resolution Google has planned or how the quality of photo and video captures would stand up if taken through the display panel. But, if the images are accurate to scale, that's almost certainly the direction Google is looking to go with this wearable.
Dimensions aren't provided for the watch shown in the design but the camera lens appears to take up around a third of the overall display area. Even though smartwatches tend to have a screen smaller than 1.5-inches in diameter, that's still a comparatively huge lens.
The sensor or sensors underlying that would be substantial too. That would make this watch a perfect companion to the Pixel series of smartphones from Google since the company has built a reputation for smartphone cameras. It could also bring a significant amount of functionality to the platform itself from video calling to selfie-snapping.











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Unread 2019-08-27, 04:30 PM   #11675
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Android 10 Is Releasing On September 3






After announcing the rebranding for Android Q last week, Google was pretty quiet about when Android 10 would be releasing.
Now, we're hearing that the release date is going to be September 3. This comes from PhoneArena who have received a few tips from people contacting Google Support asking that question.
There are two separate instances where Google Support reps have stated the September 3 date for releasing Android 10. Making it seem pretty likely that it'll happen that day.
Normally we would be taking this with a grain of salt, as support representatives don't always know what they are talking about and are often wrong.
But having two separate reps saying the same date, is likely not a coincidence.
A later release than usual

If Android 10 is indeed releasing on September 3 this year, that would mean a slightly later release than usual.
Google has in the past, released the new version of Android around mid-August. It usually happens ahead of IFA. This is how it has worked out since Google started doing open betas for Android, and releasing it before the Nexus/Pixel smartphone launch in October.
Which technically, it is still ahead of IFA, since that doesn't start until September 6 this year. But it is a few weeks later than usual.
Don't read to much into that though. A later release doesn't necessarily mean that Google is taking longer than expected to tidy up a few bugs and get Android 10 ready to go. It could also be part of Google's new plan for Android, with the whole rebranding thing.
Pixels will be first to get Android 10

No surprises here, the Pixel lineup will be first to get Android 10 when it does launch next month. That's one of the big reasons to get a Pixel anyways, is the fast updates.
It'll start with the Pixel 3 lineup, and then move to the Pixel 2 and Pixel smartphones. It'll likely happen all on the same day, or at least in the same week.
We could see some other manufacturers out there pushing out Android 10 rather quickly too. Essential and HMD Global (Nokia) are normally pretty fast with updates. And that's because they run a stock version of Android or Android One, which makes it much easier. Not to mention, both have been in the beta program for Android and had early access to the code.
September 3 is only about a week away. So we could be seeing that final version of Android 10 very soon. And that's going to be a pretty exciting time.
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