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Unread 2014-10-28, 09:04 PM   #51
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SLIPKNOT's COREY TAYLOR Tries On His New Mask For LARRY KING (Video)



SLIPKNOT frontman Corey Taylor sat down with Larry King on the Emmy-nominated series "Larry King Now" and reflected on the death of the band's longtime bassist, Paul Gray, previewed the upcoming "Prepare For Hell" tour, and even tried on his new stage mask for Larry. Check out the clips below.
On how his band handled Gray's untimely passing and if he thinks Gray would have enjoyed SLIPKNOT's new album, ".5: The Gray Chapter":
"I think he would've loved it. We… I mean, it's essentially the story of the last four years — dealing with the aftermath of his death and all of us trying to kind of get back to a place where we wanted to make music again."
On a new movie that he will be producing:
"It's more of a supernatural kind of thing where it's... without giving too much away, it kind of deals with the purgatory, which I also think is very interesting."
".5: The Gray Chapter" is likely to sell between 100,000 and 110,000 copies in the United States in its first week of release, according to industry web site Hits Daily Double. The estimate was based on one-day sales reports compiled after the record arrived in stores on October 21 via Roadrunner. The chart will be unveiled on Wednesday, October 29.
SLIPKNOT's only competition for this week's No. 1 slot on The Billboard 200 chart appears to be Neil Diamond's "Melody Road", which is expected to shift between 70,000 and 80,000 in its first week of of release.

Read more at http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/sli...HfuQcawrg42.99
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Unread 2014-10-28, 09:09 PM   #52
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SLIPKNOT's New Lineup Performs Live For First Time: Pro-Shot Video Footage



SLIPKNOT's new lineup made its live debut last night (Saturday, October 25) as part of the band's Knotfest in Devore, California.
The group's setlist was as follows:
01. People = Shit
02. Eeyore
03. Disasterpiece
04. The Negative One
05. Sulfur
06. Eyeless
07. Wait and Bleed
08. Dead Memories
09. Before I Forget
10. Three Nil
11. Purity
12. Custer
13. Duality
Encore:
14. Spit It Out
15. Surfacing
Professionally filmed video footage of the entire concert can be seen below.
More than 20,000 people were expected to pack the San Manuel Amphitheater for Knotfest, which will close out Sunday with a second headlining set from SLIPKNOT, as well as turns from VOLBEAT, FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH and two dozen other acts.
SLIPKNOT's long-awaited fifth studio album, ".5: The Gray Chapter", caps a very turbulent period for the masked rockers in which they dealt with the death of Paul Gray and the firing of drummer Joey Jordison, both longtime members and songwriters.
Although the identities of their replacements have not been officially revealed, they are believed to be drummer Jay Weinberg and bassist Alessandro "Vman" Venturella.
".5: The Gray Chapter" is likely to sell between 100,000 and 110,000 copies in the United States in its first week of release, according to industry web site Hits Daily Double. The estimate was based on one-day sales reports compiled after the record arrived in stores on October 21 via Roadrunner. The chart will be unveiled on Wednesday, October 29.
SLIPKNOT's only competition for next week's No. 1 slot on The Billboard 200 chart appears to be Neil Diamond's "Melody Road", which is expected to shift between 70,000 and 80,000 in its first week of of release.
SLIPKNOT will head out on a headlining North American tour immediately following Knotfest, with special guests KORN.

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Unread 2014-10-28, 09:09 PM   #53
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Unread 2014-11-01, 10:39 PM   #54
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SLIPKNOT's COREY TAYLOR On JOEY JORDISON: 'We Just Weren't Able To Work Anymore'



SLIPKNOT singer Corey Taylor says that Joey Jordison was fired from the group in December 2013 because SLIPKNOT's founding drummer and the other members of the band "just weren't able to work anymore."
During an appearance on HATEBREED frontman Jamey Jasta's official podcast, "The Jasta Show", Taylor declined to go into specifics about the reasons for Jordison's dismissal, explaining: "There's legalities [that are involved which prevent me from talking about it], but at the same time — and people need to realize this — there's respect. I'm not gonna talk about Joey's life, because it's not my place, and people need to realize that. If Joey wants to talk about the situation, he can. I can only talk about how it pertains to this band, and the only way I've been able to sum it up — and this is the broadest term — is that sometimes you're on the same road, and you'll reach a T section, and sometimes you turn together, and sometimes you split. And this time we split. It was just that simple. We just weren't able to work anymore. And that's it."
After Jasta commended SLIPKNOT for being "all class" in interviews about the split with Jordison, Taylor continued: "I'm not gonna sit here and dog somebody that I spent 15 years building something amazing with — I'm not gonna do that. And the fans need to understand that. And I think for the most part most of them do, but there's always gonna be those people who just want a little more so they can talk shit. And that's the only reason why they want the full story — so they can talk shit."
Asked if SLIPKNOT missed Jordison's "tones and his style and his presence" during the making of the band's latest album, ".5: The Gray Chapter", Taylor said: "You know… That's a great question, by the way. And I'd never really thought about it until you just brought it up. Because, at the time, you're just kind of trying to get through it. You've got this idea of what the album could sound like. Everybody's really positive, so you're not ignoring it, but you're just kind of charging through. There are definitely times where you miss his ability to, kind of, see. But me and [percussionist] Clown and [guitarist] Jim [Root]… It was kind of like the times where you miss [late SLIPKNOT bassist] Paul [Gray] and what he brought to it, and everybody, kind of, had to fill in those blanks."
He continued: "Me and Jim are the first ones to say that we learned so much from working with Paul that we've been able to take his, I don't wanna call it 'method,' but the way he used to do things, and we've applied it to what we did. And it was kind of like that with [Joey]. Joey, for the most part, was definitely a general in the studio, because he had such a great mind for it and knowing how to get the right kind of sonics and how to do certain thngs, and what the other potential for, like, ear candy or intros and stuff like that. So you kind of have to fill that blank in as well."
Asked if SLIPKNOT was "cracking the whip" on the new drummer — believed to be Jay Weinberg, son of longtime Bruce Springsteen drummer Max Weinberg — in the studio while the band was recording ".5: The Gray Chapter", Taylor said: "We were kicking his ass. Oh yeah. But he was loving it, man. Ah, dude, he was so into it. 'Cause he's a fan, you know?! There was a part of him that was kind of pinching himself that this was happening, but then the other part of it was just like, 'Let's fucking do it.' So it was really, really cool."
Taylor recently told Metal Hammer magazine that he would not answer whether drug use played a role in Jordison's dismissal, and confessed that he had not been in touch with his former bandmate. Taylor said, "I haven't talked to Joey in a while, to be honest. That's how different we are. It's not because I don't love him and I don't miss him. And it is painful; we talk about him all the time, but at the same time, do we miss him or do we miss the old him? That's what it really comes down to."
The identities of SLIPKNOT's new bassist and drummer have not yet been revealed, but both appeared — disguised in the same newly designed mask — in the video for "The Devil In I", the first single from the new album.
Nonetheless, it is widely believed that the new bassist is Alessandro "Vman" Venturella, who sports the exact same tattoo on his hand that was spotted on the hand of the new bassist in the video.
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Unread 2014-11-01, 10:41 PM   #55
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Corey Taylor Reveals Reason for His Two-Piece Slipknot Mask






As Slipknot prep for the release of their highly anticipated album ‘.5 The Gray Chapter,’ frontman Corey Taylor is making the rounds promoting the effort. He recently stopped by the Las Vegas-based ‘Corey Taylor Talks’ show [The female host is no relation to the Slipknot frontman] and opened up about the group’s new masks, the drama behind the leak of their current bassist’s identity, Stone Stour and a lot more.
The Slipknot frontman discussed the band’s new masks and the meaning behind them. “People like me, Clown, Sid and a couple of others, we change ours drastically. Because, for me, the mask is a representation of the person on the inside, and nobody stays the same over time – that’s my belief,” Taylor explained. “With every album, my mask has evolved, so this one, specifically, is supposed to represent the person behind the mask, but then the person behind that person, which is one of the reasons why it’s two pieces, and you can peel the one off, and it’s still a representation. So it’s almost like having two different faces, but it’s the same person.”
There’s plenty of duality going on, as the singer also talked about the differences between his two bands — Slipknot and Stone Sour. “Both help me achieve wonderful things,” says Taylor. “With Slipknot there is a psychosis there for better and for worse I have to deal with, a lot of rage and a lot of issues and it helps me positively figure it out, it helps me channel that and make a great vicious noise at the same time maintaining who I am.”
He continued, “Stone Sour is kind of the other side of that coin. It’s much more personable and I don’t want to say lighter because there’s definitely a lot of heavy stuff to it but it allows me to show my more garrulous side or goofball side.” Taylor concluded, “I can go from playing in front of 150,000 people with Slipknot and then doing a club show with Stone Sour for 800 people and I get the same joy out of it.”
Stone Sour recently returned to the studio to begin recording a covers album, which is expected to be released next year.
Meanwhile, Slipknot will release ‘.5: The Gray Chapter’ on Oct. 21. The disc is available for pre-order at Amazon or iTunes. The band will kick off their upcoming tour at Knotfest in San Bernardino, Calif. on Oct. 25 and 26. Check out all their tour dates here.
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Unread 2014-11-02, 08:17 PM   #56
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Slipknot’s latest chapter a welcome progression

Legendary metal group returns with the best of their sonic identities



Just like their comrades in Anonymous, there seems to be more to Slipknot than meets the eye. Beneath the maniacal grotesquery, some perverted sense of self must be decipherable only through buying albums. There must be some hidden agenda behind the band’s “maggot” mosh pits, which can only be uncovered by buying concert tickets. And finally, there must be a reason why the cover of their second album is a giant triceratops.
All of these mysteries and more just must be in “.5: The Gray Chapter,” the band’s fifth album, because, nearly two decades into their career, they can’t just be doing it for the money…right?
As usual, Slipknot makes their best impression when vocalist Corey Taylor transforms into his Cookie Monster rapper alter ego, spitting rapid-fire growls over guitar riffs. One such moment occurs in “The Negative One,” when Taylor insists “the centipede’s pulling on the mechanism/ unearthing scars of the cataclysm.” Here, metal flexes its muscles of metaphor; Taylor may well be the next Shakespeare.
Even if listeners can’t understand these phrases, they taste good like cookies, and that’s all that really matters. But when Slipknot softens up, they resemble PBS, trading the gnarly Cookie Monster for less appetizing veggies.
“AOV” could have been the explosive single of “.5: The Gray Chapter” if not for the hollow chorus. Taylor’s crooning about a “watered-down excuse” seems oddly poignant; the track lacks the climatic melody of “Psychosocial” and fails to capitalize on its verses. In this song and others, it is unclear whether more guitar presence would enhance or detract from Slipknot’s conflicting qualities of creepiness and melody, elements which demand different instrumental strengths.
Redemption takes the form of the hurricane-like chorus of “Nomadic,” in which the aggressive winds of vocal growls and drum crescendos intricately surround and balance the message of emotional uncertainty conveyed through Corey’s pensive lyricism and a brooding guitar riff.
This balance is increasingly what Slipknot and other metal groups need to maintain large but polarized fan bases. Slipknot ventured from rage-riddled riffs and roars on their sophomore album “Iowa” to anthemic melodies on “Vol. 3: The Subliminal Verses.” Their latest two releases see the band trying to please fans of each album.
Though there may be mellow or cheesy moments in songs like “Killpop” and “The Devil in I,” Slipknot’s dark-carnival identity remains entrenched throughout “The Gray Chapter,” resulting in a fairly cohesive, but varied identity.
Keyboards and turntables, half-human, half-monster growls, and methodically chaotic song structures all contribute to the oxymoron which is Slipknot. Though events like the annual carnival-concert Knotfest represents the band capitalizing on their fans’ wallets, profit is deserved when a sound like Slipknot’s survives a decade-and-a-half without becoming diluted or skin-deep. Masks are not just fronts for the Iowan metal-heads; the music itself is teeming with layers of cryptic, creepy fun.
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Unread 2014-11-02, 09:32 PM   #57
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Slipknot: “We needed the time to grieve”

After a protracted break, the band are back with their first record in over half a decade.

By Sarah Jamieson on 20th October 2014

For the better part of the last twenty years, Slipknot have built their name on chaos and carnage. A band with an undisputed reputation for destruction and pitch-black darkness, the Iowa collective have used their previous four albums to become renowned as a fearful musical force. So much more than just another metal group infringing on public consciousness, they were shocking, they were controversial, and at times, they felt almost inhuman.
It was four years ago when their bassist Paul Gray passed away and everything changed for the band. Before hiatuses had come and gone, threatening to end the reign of Slipknot, but the group had never had to deal with anything like this. For the first time, the band had to take off the masks, and let themselves be human in the eyes of the public. They had to learn how to heal.
“There was a time when there was no guarantee that we were gonna carry on,” begins the band’s frontman Corey Taylor, ahead of the release of their long-awaited fifth record ‘.5: The Gray Chapter’. “Not because we didn’t want to, but because we weren’t sure what it meant without him. He was the heartbeat of this band, and in a lot of ways, he was the gel that kept this band together. We’re all so different, in so many different ways, not just with musical tastes but as people, that the music is one of the reasons that we stay together and we’re as strong as we are, and Paul was a huge part of that. He was the one thing that we all had in common when we were first coming around. For us, it was about [discovering] what this would be without him.”


“Paul was the heartbeat of this band, and in a lot of ways, he was the gel that kept this band together.”
Corey Taylor

After Gray’s death, the band would spend some time back out on the road (“that was our language to each other; it was playing that music and being able to talk like that, and that help us to get back on our feet”) but their future was still uncertain. In fact, it was only over the last twelve months - and following the departure of drummer Joey Jordison, citing personal reasons - that the band finally felt ready to consider beginning their new record.
“I think it was important on two levels,” says Corey, of the time they waited. “One, we needed the time to grieve, and to kinda make peace with the fact that this had happened, and it is what it is. We were all dealing with our own internal battles, basically. A lot of that is on the album. In one way, we just needed time to heal, and on the other hand, we’ve never done anything that we didn’t want to do. Outside forces might’ve felt like, ‘You need to go in and do something’, but we’ve never felt like that. We’ve always written our own destiny and steered our own ship in a lot of ways. We knew that we weren’t gonna be pushed - positively or negatively - into doing something that we didn’t feel was time to do. At the same point, we didn’t know what story we wanted to tell. By taking that time and allowing ourselves to naturally get to the point where we wanted to go in and make this music was really important, not just for the health of the music, but for the health of the band.”




Heading into the studio was a very different experience for the band. Knowing that they simply needed to put their heads down and walk in, making the album became much more about communicating with one another. “I think it was just, ‘Let’s just do it. Let’s just go in and see what happens.’ We had a lot of great demos floating around that were really good, really dark but with a lot of potential. I think you can prepare all you want, but until you get in there, you never know what’s gonna happen. It was more of, let’s get in, let’s reconnect, let’s see what happens, let’s be there for each other.
“In a lot of ways, it was the best thing that we could do because we found ourselves talking more and more about what we had all gone through, because everyone deals with everything so differently, and we had never talked about, even though we had been on the road. It always seemed as though we’d been in gig mode. This really allowed us that private time, that personal time to be able to talk about what we were all going through that day. We all ended up in my house the day we lost Paul, and it was a really heavy day. It was the first time that we had seen each other in a while, and for it to be for those reasons… None of us talked, there was just a lot of emotion. So, for us to sit in the same room again and to talk about the things we had been going through, and the things that had clung to us we had never really made peace with, was really, really healthy.”




For any band – any person – losing someone so close is a heartwrenching experience, but when it came to Slipknot, it was that much harder to handle. As a group who have become so well known to the masses for their crass sense of humour, their explicit content stickers, their ferocious anger, they also had to approach emotion and sentimentality with a certain caution. “I mean, there’s always that danger,” remarks Taylor, of keeping the balance. “As you get older, the intensity with which you approach music changes, obviously. But with this album, it wasn’t really a challenge because we’ve never held anything back. We’ve always tried to go above and beyond, so for us, it was just about making sure that the subject matter of the song - whatever song we were working with - conveyed that emotion.”

“Each song was a piece of the puzzle and a story to tell.”
Corey Taylor

“Without the album being a concept album per se, the album really is the story of the last four years for us. Whether it’s a song like ‘Goodbye’, which is really all about the day we were sitting in my house, the day we lost Paul and the deep, deep sadness that comes into it, or there are songs about Paul on there, which are a celebration of his spirit. There are songs about the anger that we all felt, not only towards Paul for losing him - which is a very human thing to feel - but also towards ourselves; about that almost-guilt, the angry guilt of ‘Was there something else I could’ve done?’ You’ll keep yourself awake nights thinking about stuff like that. Each song was a piece of the puzzle and a story to tell, and it was all about making sure that we channelled that, didn’t filter anything and made sure it was exactly the kind of emotional beat that we wanted to feel.”
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Unread 2014-11-03, 11:18 AM   #58
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Unread 2014-11-16, 03:14 PM   #59
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SLIPKNOT's COREY TAYLOR Talks New Masks: 'This Band Evolves With Every Album'



DJ Metallic of Metal Mania Radio recently conducted an interview with SLIPKNOT singer Corey Taylor. You can now listen to the chat below.
Speaking the changes in the SLIPKNOT bandmembers' masks, Corey said: "With every album, some of us have evolved our masks more dramatically than others, but there's always a difference, they've always changed a little bit, and this album is no exception. I mean, I think mine and Clown's and Sid's have changed the most, because it's evolution."
He continued: "This band evolves with every album, and it just makes sense that our masks [would as well], because we're not the same people. It's not something that we sit down and we talk about as a group, we just kind of do it. As unified as we all are, the mask is really something that we trust each other to do individually and we trust them to do the right representation."
Taylor added: "The idea for mine really came from what I wanted to reflect with this: the mask behind the mask that sits on the human, basically. So, for me, it made sense to make it two pieces, and you can peel one off and there's still a mask there. To me, it represents the layers of the soul and how we deal with things like loss and regret and guilt and anger and sadness — like, the deepest sadness. So you put a mask on over the mask, and, to me, that was the physical representation of that.
"The reason that we're having the bass player and the drummer have not identical masks, but fairly similar, is because they're not officially in the band yet. You earn your spot in this band. And I know I've caught a lot of flak for saying that, but that's the way it is. Right now they're playing with us. They're not a part of the band yet; they're playing with us. But we'll just see what happens.
"In this band we've earned every drop of what we have, and that's the way it should be. So for the bass player and the drummer, they earn their spot in this band. And when the time comes and we do another album, they're still with us and they're hanging in there and they're doing really well, we'll let them do their own thing. But for now, it's more important to show them that if you earn your spot, you can get to that level, and that's why we did it."
SLIPKNOT's new album, ".5: The Gray Chapter", sold around 132,000 copies in the United States in its first week of release to land at position No. 1 on The Billboard 200 chart. The CD arrived in stores on October 21 via Roadrunner.
".5: The Gray Chapter" caps a very turbulent period for the masked rockers in which they dealt with the death of Paul Gray and the firing of drummer Joey Jordison, both longtime members and songwriters.
Gray died in 2010 from a drug overdose, while Jordison was let go last December, just before SLIPKNOT began recording the new album.
Although the identities of their replacements have not been officially revealed, they are believed to be drummer Jay Weinberg and bassist Alessandro "Vman" Venturella.
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Unread 2014-12-02, 11:58 PM   #60
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Slipknot won’t do a Kiss over masks



Corey Taylor says his band could play without costumes - but believes they never will
Corey Taylor believes Slipknot will never follow Kiss down the route of abandoning their stage costumes.
Gene Simmons and co abandoned their trademark makeup in 1984 before putting it back on a decade later. And while Taylor says his band could easily perform without their masks, he doesn’t believe they ever will.
The frontman tells HTZ-FM: “I don’t think we’d want to. I always think back to when Kiss took the makeup off. I know why they did it – they kind of hit a wall and it was time to evolve.
“But for us, the masks always evolve and our look always evolves. We don’t feel that pressure to take them off because we allow ourselves to roll with the times and to change with the albums.
“So even though I think we could, I don’t think we will. Because it’s not just about the masks – it’s about everything.”
Taylor reflects that no one told him what the masks represented when he joined Slipknot in 1997. That gave him the opportunity to create his own reasons.
“For me, the mask represents the person inside, who may or may not have a voice,” he says. “Or you may not have the courage to give that person a voice because it may be too controversial.
“If you don’t give that person a voice it gets held back, then all of a sudden it overcompensates and takes over for the rest of you. That’s what it became to me, and that’s what it means to me to this day.”
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Unread 2015-01-06, 03:51 PM   #61
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SLIPKNOT's JIM ROOT Explains Why He Ended Up Playing Bass On Some Of '.5: The Gray Chapter'



SLIPKNOT guitarist Jim Root confirmed to MusicRadar.com that he played bass on "six, maybe seven tracks" on the band's latest studio album, ".5: The Gray Chapter", following the 2010 passing of SLIPKNOT's original bassist, Paul Gray. "I can't even remember which [songs I played bass on]; I'd have to sit down with the guy who played bass on the other tracks to find out."
He continued: "Some of the lines were taken from the demo versions that I recorded in my garage, because they were moody, and had a unique vibe that was too hard to recreate. 'Goodbye' uses the full bassline that Corey [Taylor, vocals] recorded for his demo.”
Asked if it was always his intention to play bass on the record, Root said: "I was prepared to do it if it had to be done, but I didn't want to do it. Both the bandmembers and, according to management, our fans, wanted to see somebody in there."
He continued: "No one will ever replace Paul, and Paul will always be a part of what we're doing. But for me, if we're going to have a guy onstage, then it should be all or nothing."
Root added: "There was a speck of me that out of respect for Paul didn't want somebody new to play everything. But at the same time, if we're moving on in this way, why hold on to things? I also didn't want to play bass because of the workload. I was already writing most of the songs, so that's a lot of playing, arranging and layering just for guitar."
A disgruntled former drumtech for SLIPKNOT last month revealed the identity of the band's newest members by posting a picture of a backstage call sheet on Instagram.

The sheet, posted by Norm Costa, shows the names Jay Weinberg, their new drummer and Alessandro Venturella, the bassist. While the sheet doesn't point out who is who, Venturella's identity was pretty much revealed by accident in SLIPKNOT's music video for "The Devil In I", where Venturella's hand tattoos were visible.
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Unread 2015-01-06, 08:14 PM   #62
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SLIPKNOT Hope To Record New Album Right After Touring



Slipknot usually like to take their time between releases. Fans waited four years between 2004's Vol. 3: The Subliminal Verses and 2008's All Hope Is Gone. Then, another six years between the latter and 2014's .5: The Gray Chapter. Obviously the six year wait was due at least in part to the death of bassist Paul Gray. By that math, it seems like we'll be waiting a whole eight years between .5: The Gray Chapter and the new stuff.
Fortunately, in a recent interview with Music Radar, guitarists for the group Jim Root and Mick Thomson assure fans they won't have to wait until the next decade for new music. They're hoping to make a new record once they're off the touring cycle for .5: The Gray Chapter and avoid that wait time. According to Thomson:
“This record had a weird songwriting process. We ended up in the studio sooner than we had intended. Jim and Corey had a bunch of stuff demo’d, and other stuff came together in the studio.
"But we didn’t have an ‘all-in-the-same-room’ jamming thing that we hoped for. But we didn’t need it. The first two records, we wrote shit together in a basement. Now everyone has identical Pro Tools setups on their laptops, so we can work on stuff while we’re touring.
"It enables us to have songs in the can already before we go in a studio to work on a new album. We hope to do our next record sooner after touring .5. We don’t want to spend the same amount of time between albums as we’ve done with the last two.”
Root also chimes in, saying the writing process for the record after will probably be a little different given the weird circumstances for the last one:
"When you had Paul and Joey writing, you had to find your place. They didn’t write a lot of material for All Hope Is Gone, so more of my songwriting came out. With .5 it seems like I basically did the whole record. That’s why last November, I really put my nose to the grindstone and put together enough arrangements so that we could finally get going.”
I guess with all eyes on them now after releasing such a sick record, the expectations from fans are high! Not that it seems like the band is capable of failing at this point.
Although, one big wildcard is frontman Corey Taylor and his other band, Stone Sour. They are on hiatus right now, but once Slipknot is done touring I'm assuming Taylor would want to work with his other band. This might be an interesting time for Slipknot.
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Unread 2015-01-16, 11:19 PM   #63
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Slipknot: ‘It’s a war of art – and we win every time’

From tragic deaths to acrimonious departures, extreme metallers Slipknot have endured six years that would have destroyed most other bands. But, with an extraordinary new album and world tour, they’re back and ‘real as hell’





Slipknot … Photograph: PR



In October 2014, Slipknot’s Corey Taylor was interviewed by someone he never expected to meet: not someone from the metal press, but the veteran US broadcaster Larry King. “It was fucking weird!” laughs Taylor. “He was an absolute gentleman, one of the coolest people I’ve ever met, but he’s talked to everyone, so it was like ‘No pressure, Corey!’ you know? His producer said that if he’s intrigued, he’ll go off script and he did that a lot after a while. That’s a hell of a compliment.”
Midway through the interview, which aired on King’s online talk show Larry King Now, Taylor produced his latest mask. When onstage the band all wear grotesque disguises, originally intended to reflect how they saw themselves and their music, and update them for every album cycle. There have been leather masks with giant protruding pins (Craig Jones), the grotesque clown (Shawn Crahan), a gas mask that has slowly mutated into a robotic skull (Sid Wilson). King’s expression – part confusion, part mild terror – said it all.
“I don’t know if you could see, but I put the mask on for him and I pulled that top part down … Oh man, his eyes!” Taylor laughs. “He was like ‘What the hell is that?’ Ha ha! It was a very cool experience. That’s Slipknot. Bending the zeitgeist to our will, as always.”
The reason Taylor was invited on to King’s show is simple: Slipknot, far from being some niche group beloved of gore-obsessed adolescents, are massive. They exploded on to the metal scene in 1999, combining the infectious simplicity of nu metal with the snarling, dissonant fury of death metal, and rose rapidly. First, they conquered the arena circuit – thanks, in part, to their devoted fans, the “maggots” – then the festival bills, becoming the biggest metal band since Metallica. When Slipknot hit the UK later this week, they will be playing to sold-out arenas.
The band’s path to success has been littered with obstacles, especially in the period between the release of their fourth album, All Hope Is Gone, in 2008, and their latest, .5: The Gray Chapter, late in 2014. In May 2010, one of Slipknot’s founding members – bassist and songwriter Paul Gray – died following an accidental overdose of morphine and fentanyl. Then in late in 2013 the band abruptly announced the departure of drummer, founder and songwriter Joey Jordison, only for Jordison to tell the world that he had been as surprised as anyone outside the band to learn of his departure.

During those years, speculation among media and fans was rife and hinged on whether or not Slipknot could credibly continue without Gray and Jordison, and whether Taylor would take control of the band and drag them in the more radio-friendly direction favoured by his other band Stone Sour (“A lot of people think I’m the asshole behind the wheel,” Taylor notes. “I’m not, but you just have to roll with it.”) In the end, .5: The Gray Chapter picked deftly up from where the band had left off, exhibiting plenty of the usual chaos and cacophony, but balanced by increasingly refined melodies.
“After Paul died, it was important to find the mindset where we wanted to make another album,” Taylor says. “That’s why we took so long to get to that point. The first shows we did were about trying to get back on our feet. We were like toys in the box, all loose and trying to find the right pieces. It felt like the more we went out and toured, the closer we got and the more we’d lean on each other. But everyone had to go through their own process of dealing with it before we could finally land on the same page. Once we did that, it became a sense of, ‘What is this going to mean? What is it going to be?’ and I think we rose to the occasion really well.”
By turns euphoric and harrowing, brutal and tender, .5: The Gray Chapter is an extraordinary record that went straight to No 1 in the US and Japan and several other countries (it reached No 2 in the UK). No other band has ever taken such wilfully extreme and menacing music to the top of the charts anywhere in the world. For instance, the album’s lead single, The Negative One, offered the markedly daytime radio unfriendly message: “I hope you live / To see the day / When your world comes up in flames / And as you die / You see my face / You’re the only one to blame.”

“No one’s more surprised by our success than we are, believe me,” Taylor says. “If you sat down and drew this up as a play, in sports terms, it would blow up in your face. People have been trying to paint us into a corner and keep us down, because we scare the shit out of the rest of the industry. We do what we want and we say what we want. If a few people don’t understand us … well, it’s a war of art, in a lot of ways, and we win every time. I don’t fucking know why, but one of the reasons is that we back it up, and we’re as real as hell.”
To truly understand Slipknot’s appeal, you really need to see the band’s live show. Slipknot gigs are an eye-frying spectacle and a skilfully executed exercise in controlled mayhem and dark imagination. The band have often stated that they represent “a lifestyle” rather than just a hatful of musical ideas, and the way their diverse, multigenerational audience sings along with every word of songs such as Duality (“I have screamed until my veins collapsed / I’ve waited as my time’s elapsed / Now, all I do is live with so much hate”) or Surfacing (“Fuck it all! / Fuck this world! / Fuck everything that you stand for!”) confirms that there is substance and soul behind the cartoonish masks and outsider bravado.
“It can’t just be fucking nuts all the time,” Taylor says. “There’s got to be something behind the eyes. That’s what we’ve done so well. We’ve created something really artistic that can just turn on you at any second. It’s like having that gorgeous dog … it’s your pet, you love that fucking dog, it goes everywhere with you, but you never know when you’re gonna wake up and its teeth are around your fucking neck. That’s Slipknot.”
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Unread 2015-06-09, 10:16 AM   #64
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Watch Slipknot's New "Killpop" Video, Directed by Clown

Corey Taylor recently broke down the cut from '.5: The Gray Chapter,' and now it's got a 'knot-worthy visual

Slipknot's been riding a wave with late 2014's .5: The Gray Chapter, their first album in six years. Today the band keeps it going with the music video for "Killpop," above. The gritty, twitchy, clip is a typical Slipknot masquerade party, but it's actually directed by Shawn Crahan, a.k.a. Clown, one of the band's percussion-pounders.

More: The 19 Best Nu-Metal Hits of All Time

The "Killpop" video premiered at Blabbermouth, which noted that vocalist Corey Taylor recently spoke to Michigan radio station WGRD 97.9 FM about the track, saying:
"You know, what's funny [is] over the last few weeks, I've really gotten everyone's interpretation of what that song means to them, and it's nowhere near what I wrote about. So it's kind of interesting to hear people's interpretations of what I'm singing about. And I'll be honest with you: the song is my reflection on my relationship with music. That's who the 'she' is. And not just music, but the music industry in general. So there's a love-hate relationship there that really kind of comes into view. There's the old adage, 'Be careful what you wish for,' and, 'Be careful doing what you love, because sometimes it will turn on you.' And, you know, anytime you mix something that you love and business, you're gonna find the rusty cracks in there that piss you off. So that song, really, is about how much I still love making music, but also how much I just hate the business side, the numbers side, the people in the suits who try to run stuff, and having to deal with them and having to learn how to talk to them. And, you know, it's frustrating sometimes, but it is what it is. And luckily, we got a great song out of it, and we were able to really paint something really cool with it and just be able to put it out there for people to dig."



Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhJh5_6MuCk
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Unread 2015-07-16, 11:23 PM   #65
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COREY TAYLOR Opens Up For The First Time About SLIPKNOT's New Members

SLIPKNOT frontman Corey Taylor has opened up for the first time about the the band's new members, saying that the group's live performances have gotten "consistently better" since SLIPKNOT's current lineup made its concert debut last October.
Up until now, the members of SLIPKNOT had declined to name the musicians who are playing drums and bass on SLIPKNOT's current tour, despite the fact that their identities were revealed as drummer Jay Weinberg and bassist Alessandro "Vman" Venturella by a disgruntled former drumtech for SLIPKNOT who posted a picture of a backstage call sheet on Instagram.
During an appearance on the latest installment of the "Talk Is Jericho" podcast, Taylor talked in depth about SLIPKNOT's latest additions, saying: "[Touring with the new members has] been killer. It's been really, really good. It's been cool to watch them come out of their shells too. Because, at first, they weren't sure how far to go. I mean, that's the respect level… They're so respectful and they dig what we're doing so much that they don't wanna cross any boundaries. But they're having a really good time. So we were, like, 'Let's step it up. It's time. It's time. Start to get into it.' And Alex, our bass player, he's so into it that he's started to kind of come up to the front, really started to own it. Jay's just started to take it up. And, yeah, man, it's been really good. So every show has just gotten consistently better and better and better. Last night, we hadn't played in seven weeks, and we went on stage and, I mean, we could stop on a dime. It was incredible! And I'm talking about three songs that we hadn't played live — we had just rehearsed [them] a couple of times — and, dude, it was on!"
Weinberg, the son of Bruce Springsteen drummer Max Weinberg, joined SLIPKNOT as the replacement for founding drummer Joey Jordison, who was fired from the band in 2013. Taylor praised his former bandmate while describing Jay's contributions to SLIPKNOT. He said: "One of the great things about Joe was his capacity for the unexpected. 'Cause he could… Sometimes he could vibe on where we were, and he could either ramp it up or bring it down. So you really learned to play together. You didn't learn to play to that meter. You learned to play together. Jay is so consistent, and you don't realize how much you miss that until you get it. But he can still do all the crazy stuff — the reverse paradiddles and all that weird drum stuff. So it's cool. There are benefits to both."
He continued: "I have been lucky enough to jam with so many different drummers over the years that you really start to see that every drummer is different. They may be playing some of the same parts, but it's so different, because it's their thing."
According to Taylor, SLIPKNOT didn't hold any drummer auditions before deciding to work with Weinberg shortly prior to the recording sessions for the band's latest album, 2014's ".5: The Gray Chapter".
"It's kind of cool, the way it all came together," Corey said. "It was almost kesmit, to be honest. 'Cause we didn't try out a lot of people. I mean, honestly, Jay was the only dude we tried out; he worked so well. He's been a fan since he was eight years old."
He continued: "We were sitting down trying to think of what to do next. And I can't remember if it was Clown [SLIPKNOT percussionist Shawn Crahan] or [SLIPKNOT manager Cory] Brennan. They sat us down [and were], like, 'You've gotta see this video.' 'Cause we all knew Jay, 'cause he had been coming… We would see him backstage with his dad. [We would say], 'How are you doing? How's everything going? Oh, you're playing drums? Cool. Keep it up.' And Joey was a huge influence for him. So, all of sudden, we start seeing these videos of Jay playing, and we were, like, 'Whoah!' So, what we did was we booked a studio — and I won't go too much into the background of it — we booked a studio, we didn't even tell him what it was about. We just told him… We weren't even the ones telling him. We just told him, 'Be at this place with a set, at this time, for an audition.' And then we all walked in. And [he was, like], 'Huh. Huh. Ehhhhhh…' And we started going through tunes, and he knew every tune. The ones he didn't, he knew half of it. It was insane. And that's how that started."
SLIPKNOT guitarists Jim Root and Mick Thomson reportedly handled most of the bass duties on ".5: The Gray Chapter", with some help from Venturella and former touring bassist Donnie Steele. Taylor spoke about how SLIPKNOT eventually decided to hire Venturella to finish out the record and join the band on the road. He said: "[The way] Vman [came into SLIPKNOT] was a little different [from the way Weinberg did], because we had a couple of people that we were looking at and that we had actually worked with, and it just wasn't vibing. Nothing against them technically — it just wasn't vibing. And I think Jim was actually the one who said, 'For now, let's bring Vman in. He can handle it.' 'Cause the dude is a ripper. A lot of people don't know that. We met him through MASTODON, so we've known him a long time, and Jim knew just how good he was. So he came in, and he just started handling it. And he's so easy to hang out with. He's such a great dude. And it just got better and better and better and better and better. And the question got brought up towards the end of the album. It was, like, 'What are we gonna do live?' And we were, like, 'What do you mean? He's coming with us.' It was a slower burn for him, because we had tried a couple of other people. But it worked so well that it was just, like, 'Okay, this is it.' And then it was trial by fire, 'cause now you're jumping out of the airplane. The first gig was Knotfest in front of 25,000 people. That was their first gig. But it came off, man, and it's just gotten better. It never gets easier, but it's gotten better."
SLIPKNOT's original bassist Paul Gray passed away in May 2010 from an accidental overdose of drugs.
SLIPKNOT announced its split with Jordison in December 2013 but did not disclose the reasons for his exit. The drummer subsequently issued a statement saying that he did not quit the group.
Weinberg was previously in the punk band AGAINST ME! and left under less-than-friendly circumstances. AGAINST ME! singer Laura Jane Grace tweeted last fall, "Dear SLIPKNOT, good luck with that. #shitbag."
image: http://assets.blabbermouth.net.s3.am...st2014_638.jpg
image: http://assets.blabbermouth.net.s3.am...st2015_638.jpg
image: http://assets.blabbermouth.net.s3.am...nd2014_638.jpg
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Unread 2015-08-11, 05:26 PM   #66
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COREY TAYLOR Says JAY WEINBERG And ALEX VENTURELLA Are Playing 'With' SLIPKNOT, But Are Not 'In' The Band


Scott Penfold of Loaded Radio recently conducted an interview with SLIPKNOT singer Corey Taylor. You can now listen to the chat at this location. A couple of excerpts follow (transcribed by BLABBERMOUTH.NET).
On the vibe within SLIPKNOT with new members Jay Weinberg (drums) and Alessandro "Vman" Venturella (bass):
Corey: "It's really good, man. The vibe is great. I can't say enough great things about those kids. They're so passionate about what they do. They still love the music just as much as we do. And they're absolutely dedicated to the pursuit of perfection. Not perfection itself, because you'll never [stop chasing] that thing, but the pursuit of it. And that's what this band is all about. It's all about making sure that you do everything in your ability to make sure that [you put on] the perfect show for whatever audience is in front of you. And plus, they're just great dudes — really, really good guys who I really genuinely love hanging out with. And you put all of that together, and it just feels like SLIPKNOT. It's really, really cool."
On whether people can now officially say that Jay Weinberg is the new drummer of SLIPKNOT:
Corey: "Well, he's the drummer with SLIPKNOT. Nobody gets in or out right now. But it's like I've always said, though… Everybody asks, 'Are they in the band?' And I keep telling [them] this: they're with the band; they're with us right now. That's because you're not given anything in this band — you earn everything in this band. So, you know, we'll see what happens in the next couple of years."
On SLIPKNOT possibly making a concept album next time around:
Corey: "Yeah, that's still something that we're talking about. And we're actually talking about taking it even further and maybe making it something that kind of fires on all the cylinders — almost like 'Purple Rain' or 'The Wall', where there's a narrative and a movie and music that goes along with it. So we're really talking about a very grand concept right now that can be really, really cool in the long run. But that's still a few years off in the distance. I've got a handful things that I'm doing, Clown's [Shawn Crahan, percussion] got stuff he's gonna do, Jim's [Root, guitar] got stuff he's gonna do. So, right now, we're just kind of putting the ideas into reality. And then we'll see what happens in a few years."
On SLIPKNOT possibly making a horror movie to go along with the upcoming concept album:
Corey: "It's something that we've always talked about — doing a movie, but what would it be? Obviously, everyone would think that it would be more horror than anything else, but at the same time, for us, it's more about the psychological thriller than it is the horror. This would be something to make you think, and it probably would scare you, but at the same time, it would absolutely be something dazzling and artistic, and hopefully fun. And I know that's a very strange concept, but it'd be something that people would really, really get into. So we're definitely thinking about an idea, and I've got some great ideas that I'm trying to flesh out in my head. But we'll see what happens."
On whether he keeps in contact with former SLIPKNOT drummer Joey Jordison:
Corey: "I haven't talked to Joey since we parted ways. He hasn't reached out to me, I haven't reached out to him. It's just kind of there right now. I've said in the press and stuff that I wish him all the best. It's unfortunate that we had to part ways, but it was just the way things are right now. Could I see myself working with him in the future? I don't know, to be honest. I really don't know."
SLIPKNOT's "Summer's Last Stand" tour kicked off on July 24 in West Palm Beach, Florida, and will wrap up on September 5 in Dallas.
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Unread 2015-11-07, 06:28 PM   #67
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COREY TAYLOR: SLIPKNOT Parted Ways With JOEY JORDISON 'Because Of Necessity'

Living Out Loud - LA recently conducted an interview with SLIPKNOT and STONE SOUR singer Corey Taylor. You can now listen to the chat using the SoundCloud widget below. A couple of excerpts follow (transcribed by BLABBERMOUTH.NET).
On SLIPKNOT's split with drummer Joey Jordison in December 2013:
"I mean, it was hard at first. Nothing worth doing is ever easy right out of the gate. When we parted ways with Joe, it was honestly because of necessity; he was going one way and we were going another, and we just couldn't go that way anymore. And honestly, that's all I can really say about it. But I can tell you that starting to move on without him was one of the most difficult things we've ever done. I mean, just as hard, in a lot of ways, as trying to move on without Paul [Gray, late SLIPKNOT bassist]. But, like anything, it takes those first couple of steps, and then it gets a little easier. It doesn't get better by any means, by any stretch of the imagination, but it gets easier. With the new guys [drummer Jay Weinberg and bassist Alessandro 'Vman' Venturella], it's really kind of a 2.0 kind of situation, where it's the second phase of SLIPKNOT's career, basically. And it's different. In a lot of ways, it's more fun, but in a lot of ways, it's bittersweet; it really is. Because you've got two dudes who you kind of went to the trenches with, and you stood on shoulders to kind of get to where you were, and then you lose one and then you have to split with another. And it's hard, man. It's difficult at times. Because you've got two great dudes who you're jamming with right now, but they don't understand a lot of the sacrifice and the toil that went into a lot of it. But at the same time, they have such respect not only for the band, but the music and what we're doing, because they're fans — they started out as fans and they grew up listening to us. So they have absolute respect for what this band is and what it stands for. And they have never asked for too much, stepped on the wrong toes… They are very respectful, and that's huge for us. Coming from Iowa, respect is a big thing, and they have shown it at every stage of the way. So that, in a way, has also made it a little easier for us."
On whether SLIPKNOT felt any pressure while making last year's ".5: The Gray Chapter" album:
"This band is… It's just very unique, and it always has been. There's still a lot of people out in the world who just don't understand what this band is about, and that's kind of fine, because as long as we know, it doesn't matter what anybody else thinks. And I think in a lot of ways, that's why we've been as resilient as we have been. Because we're very aware of what the identity of the band is. Just because a lot of people have a misconception of what this band is about, it doesn't change how we feel about it. And when you have that kind of strong foundation, everything else just kind of balances. We were nervous going into the studio, sure, but we knew we were going to do something special right out of the gate. It might not have been what people expected, but at the same time, we're a band that, if we're not happy with something, we don't release it — straight up. If we don't back it, we're not putting it out there. That's not say that, in retrospect, some of our stuff has been… To us, hindsight is always 20/20, so you look back at some of the stuff you've done and you're, like, 'Hmmm… I don't know about that.' But, for us, in the moment, it's what we're all about. So there wasn't a lot of pressure. It was more pressures for us that we put on ourselves, just to make a great album that we would wanna listen to. We really never paid attention to the outside stuff. It's never gotten in. I mean, that's one of the reasons why we recorded 'Iowa' the way we did, and it's also one of the reasons why we turned around and did 'Vol. 3' the way we wanted fo — just because we wanted to do it that way. So, for us, we've always been very resilient, and maybe, again, this is the reason that we work the way we do. Coming from the Midwest, we've never shied away from hard work — ever. It's one of the reasons why we dug our heels in right out of the gate and were able to establish ourselves on the first album. It's because we never shied away from the work, 'cause that's what it's all about. But the other side of that is that this band is so different. I can't describe what this band is. It's never been easy for me to describe, because, on paper, we should never have made it in the first place. I mean, it's true: we never should have. People should have looked at us and just been, 'What in the fuck is going on here?' On paper, we don't sell four million copies of the first album. It just doesn't make any sense. But this band is different, and we beat all the odds. And I think that's why we continue to beat the odds — because we're just different, man…. Whether you look at this band as theatrical or creative, there's just something that resonates with this band. And whether people hate us or love us, they respect the fact that, after sixteen years, we're still doing it, and we're still doing it bigger than we ever did. I mean, it's insane."
On how he manages to stay involved with so many different projects:
"It's exhausting sometimes, but I'm also the guy that, if I'm not into it, I don't do it — straight up. If I can't find my satisfaction in something, then I pass on it. I've turned down so many different things — different opportunities, different projects and whatnot — just because not only could I not find my place in it, but also because I just don't have the time. And I know that if I don't have the time, I'm not gonna be able to do something to the best of my ability. So, as crazy as it is, I'm able to do a lot of different stuff because I actually have the time to kind of focus on it — whether it's writing books or making albums or touring, or whatever. And honestly, I've gotten to a point in my life where I can afford to bring my family with me, which is a whole different thing. So it's very, very rarely that I don't have my family with me, so I'm very lucky in that respect. And that helps. Just having them to come home to, whether it's walking from the stage to the bus, or pulling up and getting them to bed, it's all good."
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Unread 2017-03-03, 11:02 AM   #68
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Corey Taylor Has Joined the Songwriting Process for New Slipknot Album, Clown Confirms!

The percussionist thinks music they've written so far is amazing, Corey Taylor's opinion remains unknown.




5


Shawn "Clown" Crahan confirmed that Corey Taylor has joined the songwriting process of the new Slipknot album, the follow-up to 2014's ".5: The Gray Chapter."
Chatting with WRIF, the percussionist noted (via Blabbermouth): "We're writing as a band, and with Corey as well. Yes, we're off, and we're off for a while - for a long while.

"Corey's doing what he does, which is Stone Sour, which is awesome. And he's living that life, which is awesome, 'cause he does it really well and loves it - it's his art. So he does that and we're writing. We're beginning to write some music for Slipknot for the new record. He's aware of it - so while we're writing, he's getting songs."
Saying that fans shouldn't expect any new material for a while, Clown added: "But we're not just gonna sit around... some of us aren't just gonna sit around, because we've done that for 20 years. We just feel like writing.

"We've had so much fun writing 'The Gray Chapter' and people that started writing together during this album cycle never wrote together in 15 years, so things are a little bit different and it's amazing and it's fun, and we have a good time.
"We don't need big, fancy studios or stuff to write. We can just go to each other's houses and write, you know what I mean? Does that mean we're in the studio? Why would we go in the studio and just spend a bunch of money right now? No. We're writing, though. We're writing for the new record, and Corey gets songs. We have a lot of stuff already that we wrote out on the road for the last three years. We have songs that we've written that are amazing."

Stay tuned...
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Unread 2017-06-23, 11:19 AM   #69
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Corey Taylor: Slipknot ‘Ain’t Doing S–t for Two Years,’ Wants to Write ‘Violent’ and ‘Uncomfortable’ New Album


Raphael Dias, Getty Images
Slipknot have wrapped up the touring cycle for 2014’s standout effort, .5: The Gray Chapter, which yielded anthemic new cuts like “The Negative One” and “The Devil in I” among others. With frontman Corey Taylor‘s focus currently on Stone Sour‘s forthcoming album, Hydrograd, and subsequent tour, he’s clued fans in as to how long they’ll have to wait on Slipknot to release their next record and what musical direction he’s looking to take on it.
“Nothing’s going on,” Taylor told Metal Wani (audio below) when asked about Slipknot’s current status. “We ain’t doing s–t for two years. I’m doing Stone Sour. Clown‘s doing his movie thing. Everybody’s kind of doing their own thing right now. So we’re just kind of letting ourselves have some time away, which is cool. Sometimes you just have to do that — sometimes you have to go away and let people miss you. So that’s what the plan is right now — just us kind of hanging out, letting everybody kind of catch their breath and then we’ll figure it out from there.”
Regarding the next Slipknot album, Taylor expressed, “I know I want to write something violent, to be honest. I want to do something that feels uncomfortable. I want go somewhere where we haven’t been in a long, long time. I don’t know what that means, but I think when I hear it, I’ll know what it is.”
With this promise, it seems to be a guarantee Taylor and co. won’t draw any more “Nickelback lite” comparisons. Chad Kroeger, frontman for the Canadian rock powerhouse, threw the diss at Stone Sour in a recent interview, irked by comments made by Taylor about Nickelback in the past. He also went on to call Slipknot a “gimmick” because they wear masks onstage. Taylor later fired back and also told Metal Wani he felt Kroeger’s move was simply to get attention, adding, “I think it’s just him being really sad in his life and, honestly, I wish him well, but you went about the wrong way to try to get some attention, buddy.”
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Unread 2017-08-05, 12:37 AM   #70
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Slipknot
Clown On New Slipknot Progress: “We’re Not Going To Wait Around For Corey Taylor To Say That He’s Ready”


Though frontman Corey Taylor isn’t expected to focus on anything Slipknot related for two years, the various other members of the band continue to make progress with the group’s next album. Percussionist Shawn “The Clown” Crahan recently told NME of their status with it:
“I will give you this – we have decided to do things differently. Our label had been bought and sold, people who used to give me advice are gone now, we’re still standing. We’re not going to wait around for Corey Taylor to say that he’s ready, no one’s going to wait for me to finish directing a movie, the same thing goes if someone wants to go out on tour with someone else.”
“Every three or four months we’ve been getting together and we’ve been writing for up to 30 days. Currently, we have about 27 pieces of work – about seven or eight are completed. They’re not completed songs, that’s far from the truth. That’s where people start fighting over Corey Taylor not being there or Jim wanting to do something else. We as artists have demanded that we get together every three or four months and blow our brains out with art. We’ve been trying to create as much art as possible.”
He further said that members of the band will be reconvening in September for another round of writing sessions:
“For the three years we toured we were writing and recording the whole time. We’ll be getting together in September. Corey Taylor is doing his thing right now with Stone Sour, and when he’s done, he’ll need a little time off. He’s always done that. Then he’ll be right back in it, writing Slipknot songs and lyrics.
A lot of us are meeting up in September to start working on those 27 pieces of music and we’re going to add to that. Our goal is to get to somewhere where it feels like we could have a double album. Whether or not we’ll get to that, I have no idea. It’s almost an impossible thing to arrive at because you have to have so much music and pick what’s right.
But I would like to have a double album and I would like to have a concept album. I’ve been speaking to Corey and Jim and we’re not just going to ‘do it’, we’re not going to be contrived. It has to be right, it has to work for all of us.”
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Unread 2018-04-28, 07:03 AM   #71
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Slipknot confirms 2019 release for new album?


Slipknot has seemingly confirmed a 2019 release for the band's next album.



On their Twitter, Slipknot shared a photo of an unmasked Corey Taylor and Shawn "Clown" Crahan looking coyly at the camera. The photo is captioned simply "2019."
In a recent interview with Billboard, Taylor said he and Slipknot were aiming for a 2019 release for the album, but added that the timetable was "speculation" at that point.
Whenever the new album arrives, it'll be the follow-up to 2014's .5: The Gray Chapter, which was Slipknot's first without late bassist Paul Gray.
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Unread 2018-06-04, 11:51 AM   #72
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COREY TAYLOR: NEW SLIPKNOT LYRICS ARE ‘MOST I’VE SHARED’ IN YEARS




Slipknot and Stone Sour frontman Corey Taylor was the latest guest on Full Metal Jackie's weekend radio program. The singer spoke about his relationship with Ozzy Osbourne, his son playing Slipknot music with Clown's son, the next Slipknot album, Rammstein & more.

Stone Sour are going to be touring with Ozzy later on this year. Slipknot began its touring life on Ozzfest then eventually partnered together on Ozzfest meets Knotfest. Personally and professionally, what makes touring with Ozzy so special?



Well, from a fan’s standpoint, he’s the reason that I do this, in a lot of ways. I quote Dizzy Gillespie, “No him, no me.” Basically, he was the first larger than life singer that really made me love heavy metal. Whether it was [Black] Sabbathor his solo stuff, I can just remember being the biggest Ozzy fan on the planet. So, as a fan, it’s pretty crazy. To realize that not only do I get to tour and work with Ozzy on so many different levels, but also, to socialize with him personally.

And it blows my 13-year-old self away — it’s pretty crazy. On a professional level, it’s one of those things where you kind of hope and dream that one day you would be on that level, or at least be associated with it, let alone said in the same breath. And to feel like I have accomplished that in some way, is very humbling and makes me realize just how lucky I am to be able to do what I do.

Slipknot and Stone Sour are both full-time bands. Physically and creatively, there must be times when that's an exhausting schedule for you. For you, what's the personal necessity of having both?

Personally, it allows me, musically, to be able to create at will. The best way to kill your creativity is to put boundaries or limits on what you can and can’t do. And because I have these two fantastic bands, I am able to do anything that comes to mind musically. It just feels like the gloves off, just across the board. If I want to do something slow and light, like "Saint Marie," I can do it. If I want to do something destructive and chaotic, like "AOV," I can do it. For me, it has made my musical aspirations as big as the horizon basically.

From a personal standpoint, I get to partake in every sort of frontman persona I’d like to. With Slipknot, I can get on my inner madman. And with Stone Sour, I can get on my inner class clown. And both are me. Like, I have always maintained the fact that you can't have one without the other. So it makes sense for me to be powering these two huge bands.

Guitarist Josh Rand has been dealing with some personal issues that aren't unfamiliar to you. How much of a hand do you have in assisting in the recovery side of addiction, not only within your immediate circle but also a more general larger sense?

When it comes to stuff like that, all you can really do is offer advice offer a shoulder to lean on. You never want to make somebody feel like if they aren’t doing it your way, then it’s not going to work. The key to sobriety is always what works for you, what is best for you. And there are several different ways to do it. So for me, it’s just about being there, making sure and reinforcing the idea that if you need a hand, if you need someone to talk to, if you need that kind of reinforcement, then I’m here.

I’ve been through it, I know the drill. I can offer advice, I can offer ways and solutions. But that’s all you can do, at the end of the day, your sobriety is your own heavy lifting. So just being there as a friend is really sometimes all you need. And the great things is being able to be there for each other. Offering that reinforces my own sobriety. Let's me know that I am still on the right path and hopefully trying to strive to be that person that I really want to be.

Stone Sour released an acoustic EP of Hydrograd songs for Record Store Day. As a singer what does performing acoustically enable you to do differently?

I love it. It's a great way to distill a song down to its very soul, to its essence. A lot of people don't realize, a lot of the stuff I write, I write on an acoustic. Almost everything that I've ever written, riffy rock, chorded stuff like that - it's written and worked out on an acoustic right out of the gate. So for us, it's cool to be able to show the acoustic side of it and show that there are so many different dimensions to so many different songs. One way that it's recorded doesn't mean it's the only way that it can be performed. For me, that just shows the versatility. It shows the multiple dimensions that you can get from songs or get from music or get from those different interpretations.

A new Slipknot album has been in the pipeline for a while with some talk of a release next year. What's different about not only the way you're going about writing it, but also with what you want to say with it?

Well, it's been a heavy couple of years for me personally. So I'm working out some things, personally for myself, which has been great. I've been able to grab ahold of some of the depression that I've been fighting and formulate the way that I want to describe it. So some of these lyrics are, to me, some of the best I've ever written. It's probably the most I've shared in years.

Hearing some of the guys in Slipknot read and react to some of the lyrics that I've been writing has been fantastic. I know Clown was like, just blown away by how open and raw it all felt. It felt like the old days. It felt like the beginning when it was just - we were the wound and the fans were the scabs. Trying to get it to heal and we were all trying to heal together. That's what this kind of feels like.

It's been great watching the process and getting involved with the process, finally. Hearing the music that Clown and Jim and Jay and Alex and everybody else in the band has been really working on, and being able to listen to it with fresh ears and come at it from different standpoints has been really fulfilling. It's been really, really good.

Your son Griffin has a band with Simon Crahan. What was that conversation like when your son tells you he's starting a band with Clown's kid?

The funny thing is he hit me up when they were going to audition Simon. He's like, I don’t know what's gonna happen. I was like, well I can tell you exactly what's going to happen. It's gonna be crazy and that's exactly what happened.

They rehearsed over at Clown's house and I went over to pick Grif up and me and Clown are standing basically in the room in his house where we wrote Iowa, the album, and we're watching them in another room, play songs that we had written after Iowa. It was like, this weird coming full circle and then him and I sharing a parental sense of pride, watching our kids do something that we loved and that they loved, and hopefully, we've passed down to them. It's been pretty rad.

The last time I actually had a chance to see Stone Sour was on the Rammstein show in Vegas, which was so awesome. I don’t know about you but I'm a huge Rammstein fan and that was - did you stay to watch Rammstein?

I caught a little bit of it. I was actually sick as a dog that day, so I saw a little bit of it. I'm friends with those guys, so getting to see Phil and those guys do the - the fire was so intense, I was just standing there going: how do they do it? That's coming from somebody in Slipknot, [laughs] for God's Sake. It was intense, man. They spare no expense when it comes to the show and that's why they're fans are so rabid when it comes to seeing their live show, man. I love it. It was incredible.

I recently watched a Rammstein documentary. I think it's an older one, but it's pretty hilarious talking about them coming up and coming to the US, not speaking any English but really sticking to their guns about what they wanted their live performance to be and not giving in and just doing a show without fire here, which is why the US has been deprived of Rammstein for so long over the years.

I'm hoping that as they see that they can put on their kind of shows now that we'll see a few more over in The States. I'm spoiled, I see them a lot during the festival season.

Which is like, the big --

I get to see the fire. I rub it into my friends who are Rammstein fans as much as I can because they lose their minds. I'm like hey, it's not my fault, deal with it.

And how incredible - I mean, they played Download - I guess it was like, I don’t know maybe two years ago and it was just a reminder of - they're singing in German and no matter where you go people just lose their minds and have no idea what they're saying.

Not one drop. I know a little bit of the little - a few of their songs, but other than that I have no idea what they're saying. I know "ich vill" means, I will and that's about it. After that, [laughs] it gets weird.

Thanks for Corey Taylor for the interview. Pick up Stone Sour's latest album, 'Hydrograd,' here and keep up with the band on Facebook. Find out where you can hear Full Metal Jackie’s weekend show here.
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Unread 2018-06-22, 11:18 AM   #73
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SLIPKNOT's Next Album Will Be 'Iowa' Levels Of Heavy, Says COREY TAYLOR






Corey Taylor has said that SLIPKNOT fans should be should be expecting something "fucking dangerous" on the band's next album.
The new SLIPKNOT disc is tentatively due out in 2019 and will follow up 2014's ".5: The Gray Chapter".
"It's only in the demo stages right now," Taylor told Kerrang! magazine. "However, we have very serious, tentative plans — and I say that because the best way to make God laugh is to announce your plans out loud — to go into the studio at the beginning of next year and get this fucker going. We have 16 songs written right now, and they are fucking dangerous.
"I loved '.5', but this album, to me, makes '.5' look like nobody's business," he continued. "This is 'Iowa' levels of heavy. And I have to go out and tour this shit at my age — I can feel those songs in my back! I am really, really excited about it, and I talk to the guys in SLIPKNOT all the time. I talk to Clown either every day, or every other day. I've been talking to Jim, V-man, Jay, Mick, Craig, Chris, Sid. We're all really, really, really excited about this stuff, and it's coming together really fucking well. So be prepared for 2019 — which, weirdly, is the 20th anniversary of our first album. Shit's about to get fucking real again! So take that as you will."


Taylor recently told Full Metal Jackie's nationally syndicated radio program that the lyrics he's writing for the next SLIPKNOT LP are perhaps his most personal yet. The singer, who separated from his wife more than a year ago and has since gone public with a new relationship, said: "It's been a heavy couple of years for me personally. So I'm working out some things, personally for myself, which has been great. I've been able to kind of grab hold of some of the depression that I've been fighting and kind of formulate the way that I want to describe it. So some of these lyrics are, to me, some of the best I've ever written. It's probably the most I've shared in years."
Taylor added that the reaction from the other members of SLIPKNOT to the lyrics has been "fantastic," saying, "I know Clown was, like, just blown away by how open and raw it all felt. It felt like the old days."
Even though he's been on the road with STONE SOUR, Taylor said that "it's been great watching the process and getting involved with the process" of writing new SLIPKNOT songs, continuing, "Hearing the music that... everybody else in the band has been really working on, and being able to listen to it with fresh ears and come at it from different standpoints has been really fulfilling."
".5: The Gray Chapter" was released following a six-year hiatus during which founding SLIPKNOT bassist Paul Gray died and drummer Joey Jordison was dismissed.
".5: The Gray Chapter" sold around 132,000 copies in the United States in its first week of release to land at position No. 1 on The Billboard 200 chart. The CD arrived in stores in October 2014 via Roadrunner.
Gray died in 2010 from a drug overdose, while Jordison was let go in December 2013, just before SLIPKNOT began recording the last album.
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Unread 2018-10-18, 01:35 PM   #74
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COREY TAYLOR Says Next SLIPKNOT Album Will Include Band's 'Heaviest Song' To Date





Corey Taylor says that SLIPKNOT's upcoming album will contain the band's "heaviest song" to date. Asked by Metal Hammer magazine about the direction of the follow-up to 2014's ".5: The Gray Chapter", the singer said: "The way we've been describing it is, 'What if the guys who made 'Iowa' matured? What if the kids who made 'Iowa' grew up?' That's kind of the way we're looking at it because some of this shit is so heavy — but there's melody, there's really cool melancholic melody going on. Some of this shit is just so hard and dirty fast. It's fucking really good. It's also us at our most ambitious, our most experimental, also us doing what we fucking do best which is basically when everybody thinks they've got us figured out, we just smack them in the face with everything we've got."
Taylor added: "At a time when most bands are slowing down, I think we've written our heaviest song — one of them anyway — on this new album.
"It's going to be fucking crazy. People are going to shit their pants when they hear it."
Taylor recently told Spain's Resurrection Fest TV that SLIPKNOT's new disc will likely arrive next summer. "Right now, we have 20 songs that we've demoed," he said. "And they are really, really good. So it'll just come down to which ones come out the best, and we take that, we make the album out of that, put the album out. However, the way we're talking right now, we're trying to find ways that everyone can hear all the songs. So we'll put the album out, and then maybe we'll release something after that. It's something that we're really trying to think of — giving the audience more, giving the fans more of us. But it's gotta make sense — it's gotta be SLIPKNOT. It can't just be something that throw out there because we can; it's gotta have art, it's gotta have content, it's gotta have passion to it."


".5: The Gray Chapter" was released following a six-year hiatus during which founding SLIPKNOT bassist Paul Gray died and drummer Joey Jordison was dismissed.
".5: The Gray Chapter" sold around 132,000 copies in the United States in its first week of release to land at position No. 1 on The Billboard 200 chart. The CD arrived in stores in October 2014 via Roadrunner.
Gray died in 2010 from a drug overdose, while Jordison was let go in December 2013, just before SLIPKNOT began recording the last album.
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Unread 2018-10-31, 12:11 PM   #75
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Slipknot - All Out Life [OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO]

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Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLoYIBEZEfw
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