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Unread 2012-02-13, 02:55 PM   #1
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Default Kansas City Stockyards district has a new direction

New York art dealer to unveil a repurposed building Friday in the West Bottoms.





An effort to build a new hub for creative culture in the West Bottoms gets a big boost next week when a former New York art dealer opens a major gallery. The Bill Brady Gallery, opening Friday, is the first tenant in a building under renovation at 1505 Genessee St., in a section of the bottoms coming to be known as the stockyards district. The rest of the building is scheduled to fill up in the coming months with a winery operation, an architectural firm and an advertising agency.
Brady, a Kansas City native, has joined his landlords — developers Bill Haw and his son, Bill Haw Jr. — and another pioneering gallery owner, John O’Brien, in helping rebrand the area between Interstate 670 and Kemper Arena.
The renovation of the former Daily Drovers Telegram Building, and other plans on the Haws’ drawing boards, represent what O’Brien describes as a “creative think tank” taking shape in the area, one that could help provide alternatives to the proposed razing of Kemper Arena, for example, an idea that runs counter to the ethic of green repurposing.
In months of planning and consultation, the group has developed an ambitious vision for the district as a hub for creative people who love the idea of taking a derelict building and redesigning it to express their dreams. They have revived a green sign with livestock heads as a stockyards district logo along Genessee and created a Facebook page.
Three and a half years ago, O’Brien moved his Dolphin gallery, design and framing business from the Crossroads Arts District to 1600 Liberty St., a move seen at the time as a potential catalyst for growth nearby. O’Brien transformed a Butler-style industrial building into what many consider the best commercial gallery space in Kansas City.
Brady has done something similar with his part of the renovated building, using O’Brien, Elvis Achelpohl and Robin Beard as designers. The team has renovated a moldering warehouse space into a soaring 1,700-square-foot white box with 24-foot-high walls, perfect for huge contemporary paintings and sculptural installations.
It’s “the largest commercial gallery space in the Midwest,” O’Brien said, “not in terms of square footage but in terms of volume.”
Brady will put his space through its paces Friday with the opening of his inaugural exhibit, “East West Shift to the Middle.” The title refers to his successive moves — from New York’s East Village to the Chelsea neighborhood, and now, he says, “to the middle of America.” The exhibit will be the first of two group shows featuring artists from New York, Los Angeles and Kansas City.
On the same night, O’Brien’s Dolphin gallery, around the corner, will open an exhibit of works by prominent Kansas City artists, and the artist-run Plug Projects at 1613 Genessee St. will hold an opening for a multimedia exhibit.
The synchronized openings exemplify the synergy that O’Brien, Brady and the Haws hope will grow and be shared by new “creative class” businesses they want to attract.
And it’s already happening.
Bill Haw Jr. said he was surprised at how quickly tenants materialized for the rest of the three-story Telegram Building.
In April, Amigoni Urban Winery will open a tasting room and event space in the south side of the Telegram Building, moving and expanding from their current quarters in the Livestock Exchange Building down the street. O’Brien and his team are designing the tasting room and already have blocked in the bars and placed two of the 40 barrels of wine expected for the event space.
“The front is historic, the back is warehouse,” O’Brien said. “It’s a metaphor of what we’re dealing with in this neighborhood — polished and rugged.”
Architecture and industrial design firm KEM Studio will move in May from Midtown to the floor above Amigoni’s space, and Diamond Merckens Hogan advertising agency will occupy the third floor beginning in June.
KEM Studio’s Brad Satterwhite said he was initially attracted to the area by the building, which sits across the street from the modern-era headquarters of Butler Manufacturing Co. and its owner, BlueScope Steel.
“It’s so simple and honest with exposed concrete,” he said. “It’s got great natural light, and a great building owner who thinks sustainably so he invested in solar panels on the roof that will power the common areas. That relates to our ethos as a design firm.”
KEM Studio, which worked on the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art branch in the Crossroads and O’Brien’s West Bottoms gallery, is designing its own studio in the Telegram Building and the ad agency’s space above it.
That kind of hands-on participation by tenants, Satterwhite said, “gives everybody ownership in the area and the space.”
For him, the area is another huge draw, and he has very definite ideas about how it should go forward.
“The stockyards district has this totally authentic, unique feel that is quintessentially Kansas City,” he said. “It breathes this environment where you feel like there’s very few limits, and ultimate possibilities.
“It is real and feels real,” he added, “There’s nothing that’s contrived. For developers to maintain the authentic nature, it’s not that planning shouldn’t happen, it needs to happen in a way that stays true to what it was and what it can be.”
O’Brien concurs.
“Either you have something like Power & Light, created down from the top, or something that’s going to organically grow,” he said. “People are willing to come here and interpret. You have spaces where people can dream and put their own stamp on it.”
“It’s still kind of a blank slate,” the younger Haw said. “They want to avoid what they don’t like about other areas and team up with others of like mind. We want to be very thoughtful about what we build.”
Twelve years ago, Kansas City Star critic Scott Cantrell bemoaned Kansas City’s willingness “to settle for second-rate.”
“The attitude to design here so often seems to be, ‘Keep it cheap and unobtrusive,’ ” he complained. “And if in doubt, go for nostalgia.”
The stockyards district will offer a refuge from the exposed brick walls that were all the rage in the 1980s, and the ubiquitous and tiresome metal awnings that have become a cliché of urban redevelopment.
Kansas City’s creative community has a lot more confidence and sophistication, not to mention a much bigger buy-in, than it did nearly two decades ago when a small but committed group of artists and entrepreneurs launched the Crossroads Arts District.
“The Telegram Building casts everything in a new light,” Haw said.
He and O’Brien report a “swell of interest” in the area.
“Definitely word’s gotten out,” O’Brien said. “What Bill Brady is doing is on the radar. Now a lot of people are looking down here, seeking new ways to energize themselves in this economy and reinvent themselves.”
With Brady as an anchor, the district is already becoming a destination for out-of-towners.
In mid-April, a group of VIP collectors from the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, will visit the area. Bruce Hartman, director of the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art at Johnson County Community College, helped arrange the visit.
“I was contacted by Alison de Lima Greene, their curator of contemporary art,” Hartman said. “When I began describing spaces in the West Bottoms, she got very excited about that. She was familiar with Brady’s New York gallery, and his presence in the Bottoms cemented their interest in visiting the stockyards district.”
The gallery spaces rival many of those in New York, Hartman said, and the district’s “rich and colorful history” adds to the allure. “They’re interested in seeing what artists in the community are doing,” he said. “That’s one of the big motivations for visiting galleries.”
The Haws are planning a major addition to the stockyards district — a mixed-use building on what is now a parking lot between the Telegram Building and the Genessee Royale Restaurant to the south. Stockyards Place will have retail and restaurants on the first floor and residential and possibly office spaces above, Haw said.
“We’re trying to let the space tell us what it wants to be,” he said. “We’re conferring with architects now and hope to finalize a plan by summer.”
It may yet prove to be a long road to a major remaking of the whole West Bottoms, as envisioned in recent studies. But this central piece of the area has received a kick-start.
“I’m not sure there’s another city with this much potential so close to the urban core,” O’Brien said. “In 20 years, you may walk this neighborhood and see a lesson of how an urban core rebuilds.”
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Unread 2012-02-13, 03:02 PM   #2
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I like it. I'm down there quite often at my grandparents business at 13th & Liberty. It'll be nice for that area to get some new revenue/business/etc.
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Unread 2012-02-13, 03:02 PM   #3
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Would definitely be a plus for KC...especially with Kemper slated to be torn down.
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Unread 2012-02-13, 03:09 PM   #4
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Always good to see a long time client (Amigoni) and friends at KEM Studio making the push. Amigoni has been down there since they started their winery.
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Unread 2012-02-13, 06:37 PM   #5
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I love the west bottoms, KC has so many resources to be an epic city .... I just wish they'd use them. Glad to see a kickstart.
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Unread 2016-08-02, 12:19 PM   #6
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Kemper Arena to be named Mosaic Arena







The plan is to turn Kemper into a multi-level venue for amateur youth and adult sports. (Bill L

The name Kemper Arena will be no more. Soon, it will be known as Mosaic Arena.


The decision was made after Mosaic Life Care came to an agreement with Foutch Brothers, LLC, to become the naming rights sponsor of the historic Kemper Arena in downtown Kansas City.
“The commitment of Mosaic Life Care is a symbolic first step for our redevelopment of the former Kemper Arena. A partner like Mosaic will be a catalyst to launch our youth sports project in the Stockyards District,” said Steve Foutch, CEO of Foutch Brothers, LLC, in a press release.
In addition to the naming rights, Mosaic will open an on-site medical clinic in the facility that will be open to the public. Services will include sports medicine consultations, urgent care and massage therapy.
“Improving population health within the communities we serve and helping people individually adopt a lifestyle focused on health and wellness is the very core of how Mosaic Life Care is providing a new kind of health care,” said Mark Laney, MD, CEO of Mosaic Life Care, in a press release. “This partnership allows us not only to expand health-care services in this area slated for tremendous growth and development, but also supports our vision to transform communities."
City leaders opted to hand off Kemper to the private firm, Foutch Brothers. The firm wants to turn Kemper into an athletic center for youth and recreational sports, adding a second floor and balcony level.
The city has been spending $1 million a year to maintain the place, which is one reason they wanted to sell and cut out that cost.
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Unread 2016-08-02, 01:59 PM   #7
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WOW re-doing Kemper. Lots of people want it torn down.
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Unread 2016-08-02, 06:25 PM   #8
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Kemper is so ugly its awesome.
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Unread 2016-08-02, 10:01 PM   #9
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WOW re-doing Kemper. Lots of people want it torn down.
They should hold weekly or monthly drifting and autocross events in the parking lot while it is all decrepit.
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Unread 2016-08-03, 11:30 AM   #10
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Just emailed Kemper Arena about the possibility of holding a small motorsports event in their parking lot once a month, and they are actually interested.

Is anyone on here good at organizing stuff?
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Unread 2017-02-02, 06:12 PM   #11
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A final piece of the Mosaic: Arena incentives approved (plus, see new renderings)


The Planned Industrial Expansion Authority on Thursday approved one of the final pieces of the mosaic for the redevelopment of Kemper Arena as Mosaic Arena: public incentives.
By a 10-3 vote, the board approved an incentive package that includes a 10-year, 100 percent property tax abatement, followed by two years of 50 percent abatement. The abatements will cover the entire value of the arena and the improvements that will be made to it by developer Foutch Brothers LLC, which plans to convert the West Bottoms landmark into a two-level hub for youth and amateur sports. But Foutch Brothers has agreed to pay about $30,000 a year in property tax on the 10-acre site, which has been tax-exempt since the city developed the arena in 1974.
[IMG]https://media.bizj.us/view/img/10327468/street-view2*750xx2250-1266-0-117.jpg[/IMG] VIEW SLIDESHOW
5 photos


[IMG]https://media.bizj.us/view/img/10327475/pedestrian-street*120xx2000-1500-125-0.jpg[/IMG]


[IMG]https://media.bizj.us/view/img/10327479/track-level-view*120xx1467-1100-229-0.jpg[/IMG]


[IMG]https://media.bizj.us/view/img/10327481/upper-bowl-new-veledrome-wall*120xx1467-1100-229-0.jpg[/IMG]


[IMG]https://media.bizj.us/view/img/10327483/viewing-area*120xx1467-1100-229-0.jpg[/IMG]







Foutch Brothers LLC, the developer and architect for Mosaic Arena, provided this… more

Board member Reginald Bassa's motion for approval also called for PIEA issuance of industrial revenue bonds in the amount of $24 million, the estimated construction cost. The PIEA will bear no responsibility for repayment of the bonds, which will act as a vehicle for Foutch Brothers to receive a sales tax exemption on the purchase of building materials.
Steve Foutch, CEO of the Kansas City-based development firm, said he won't know how much the property tax abatements are worth until the county establishes a valuation for Mosaic Arena. He said the sales tax exemption will cover about $1 million of the total Mosaic Arena development cost, which has risen to $30 million because of tenants requesting pricier amenities.
Fortunately, those tenants are willing to pay for the increased costs through higher rents, said Foutch, who added that the project is about 40 percent preleased between the 20 percent preleasing for its 100,000 square feet of office space and 60 percent preleasing for its 12 basketball-sized courts.
Normally, public officials express concern that developers seeking incentives might be bringing in too much revenue from a project. But during Thursday's meeting, PIEA board member Vince Clark voted against the arena incentives after suggesting that Foutch's revenue projections looked "anemic" for a 420,000-square-foot facility.
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Unread 2017-02-03, 10:59 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matej View Post
Just emailed Kemper Arena about the possibility of holding a small motorsports event in their parking lot once a month, and they are actually interested.

Is anyone on here good at organizing stuff?
Have you gotten a hold of Rob with KC drift?
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Unread 2018-05-20, 12:26 PM   #13
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Kemper Arena will now be known as “Hy-Vee Arena” after grocery chain purchases naming rights
The arena is being re-purposed as an indoor sports facility

KANSAS CITY, Mo. —
The building formerly known as Kemper Arena, and for a short time Mosaic Arena, will now be known as “Hy-Vee Arena”.

It was announced Thursday that the grocery chain purchased the naming rights to the iconic building.


“The commitment of Hy-Vee is a symbolic step for our re-purposing of this historic facility,” said Steve Foutch, chief executive officer of Foutch Architecture and Development. “Hy-Vee embodies the criteria we set out in finding a naming rights partner and their reputation for excellence in customer service and community involvement is the ideal fit for our venue.”

The facility was sold to the Foutch Brothers development firm in Summer 2017 – the announced plans to invest more than $16 million into the arena to turn the landmark into a multi-purpose sports complex open to all ages and skill levels.

Some of the plans for the building include a track, multi-sport courts and fields, restaurants, and office and retail spaces.

The plans were to originally re-name Kemper Arena the “Mosaic Arena” for Mosaic Life Care, but Mosaic released its naming rights after Saint Luke’s Healthcare purchased the majority of its Kansas City health clinics.

In the announcement Thursday, officials said the Hy-Vee brand will be prominent inside and outside of the building, and featured on state-of-the-art video boards inside the arena.
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Unread 2018-05-20, 03:29 PM   #14
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