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Unread 2017-02-09, 02:42 AM   #1
JDLM
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Default The next wireless standard is officially "5G," and it has a logo



The next standard for wireless connectivity has been in development by the 3GPP cellular standards group for some time now, and won't be ready for a while yet - at least not until 2018. But now the group has officially adopted "5G" as the name going forward, and created the above logo for it.
Why is this important, you ask? Mostly because it's called 5G, and not another iteration of the existing 4G LTE branding. This should make it easier for general consumers to understand, as opposed to the recent LTE Advanced and LTE Advanced Pro standards.
The technology itself is still years away from rolling out, with the 5G Phase 1 specifications due sometime in late 2018. While the exact definition has not been finalized, 5G is expected to focus more on higher capacity than the faster speeds 4G introduced. This should help tremendously, especially with smartphones becoming more accessible and the Internet of Things trend taking off.
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Unread 2017-02-09, 08:18 AM   #2
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I'm sure Sprint will be the first to roll it out, and the "5G" speeds will be comparable to Verizon and AT&T's 3g speeds.
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Unread 2017-02-09, 04:08 PM   #3
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My job keeps tell my coworkers and I that 5G is coming and we should kiss our families good bye as we will be busy as all get out. Haven't heard anything else.
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Unread 2017-12-21, 11:38 AM   #4
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The first real 5G wireless standard is official


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Every carrier is clamoring to roll out a 5G network, or at least something they can reasonably market as 5G. After a long, long development period, the 3GPP wireless governance organization has released the first official 5G standard, known as 5G NR. Formalizing the 5G standard gives carriers and hardware makers the pieces they need to begin moving full speed ahead toward a 5G future. Maybe we can get this transition done without anyone re-branding their 4G service as 5G.

The final technical details of the 5G NR will be available later this week when the full standard specifications are released (the documents will be available on the 3GPP portal). For now, we know it will cover wireless bands from 600MHz all the way up to millimeter wave signals in the 50GHz range. Sprint is making sure everyone knows its 2.5GHz band is included in 5G NR, which makes it the largest holder of sub-6GHz 5G spectrum.
It's up to carriers and hardware makers to get 5G support up and running. Some carriers have already announced intentions to roll out 5G networks in the next year or two, but consumer implementations will take time. Even when we do get 5G hardware, it probably won't live up to the hype right away. 4G was supposed to allow for 100Mbps when moving and 1Gbps when stationary, and that still hasn't happened. 5G is expected to support theoretical speeds in the tens of gigabits per second. It may even become a viable replacement for wireline home internet service.
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Unread 2018-01-29, 10:30 AM   #5
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[Update: Ajit Pai responds] White House security document proposes a nationalized 5G wireless network




Billions of devices, from phones and tablets to self-driving cars and connected dishwashers, are thirstily awaiting the rise of 5G wireless connectivity, and the big wireless carriers are scrambling to bring these powerful new networks to market. According to documents obtained by Axios, however, AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile might be nudged out of the race to 5G—not by an industry competitor, but by the U.S. government.
The National Security Council has circulated a proposal to nationalize the country's 5G wireless capacity into a single network in order to protect U.S. digital infrastructure from foreign security threats and to keep pace with China's rate of wireless network development.
The big wireless carriers would not be entirely left in the dust. If 5G connectivity were nationalized, the carriers would then be able to "rent" access to the network, and then compete over other aspects of their services. Axios reports that the carriers' reactions to the idea have been "mixed," though T-Mobile, being very un-carrier-y, leans more in favor of nationalization due to their desire to see a "level playing field." This assumes that everyone gets charged the same for access, which is by no means guaranteed.
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The proposal also weighs the benefits of allowing the carriers to continue with their own 5G rollouts in order to keep from unnecessarily disrupting the existing market, but the concern is that this path would take too long and cost too much.
A page scanned from the NSC proposal.

The "G" in 5G is for "government"?

There are a lot of hand-wavy elements to this proposal, which is less a detailed plan-of-action than an informed musing on a big idea ("hey guys, what if we..."). It includes some guesswork about how much all this new infrastructure would cost ($200 billion for fiber? Maybe?), as well as speculation as to how this would be deployed. It posits ideas such as giving early preference to rural communities for an assumed "revenue stream" and new "air and space" layers for remote locations and emergency access.
The impact on consumers is addressed primarily in terms of what 5G enables—what the NSC document is calling the "Massive Internet of Things"—but there's no discussion of what consumers will actually be paying for or how. Three years from now, when you go into a carrier store to buy the Samsung Galaxy S12 Plus Quad-Folding VR Holo-Phone, will you also be paying for a data plan, or will it be just another public utility? (All those VR Holo-Phone selfies will eat up a lot of data.)
There is a fixation on China in the proposal, both as a competitor and as the "dominant malicious actor in the Information Domain," and, tellingly, there is no mention of Russia's incursion during the last election. The document makes the odd claim that "telecommunications manufacturers have all but disappeared," and foresees Chinese companies Huawei and ZTE to be the only manufacturers of radios to avoid a decline in the coming years.
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Can this achieve liftoff?

As it says in the proposal, nationalizing American 5G is a "moonshot." It's significant that there's any serious discussion about turning the Information Superhighway (ask your parents) into the National Highway System (ask your grandparents). But just like the highway system, we'd all be relying on the government to keep the network running at peak performance.
It also seems politically infeasible. Republicans would likely revolt over the idea of the nationalization of anything whatsoever, while progressives and Democrats might bristle at the idea of the state having so much more power over Americans' communications than they already do.
And frankly, if the carriers aren't all in favor of nationalization, then it's likely that a majority on the Federal Communications Commission wouldn't be either, and it's the FCC that's calling the shots on wireless spectrum. It's a moonshot that could crash and burn on Ajit Pai's desk.
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Unread 2018-02-01, 11:10 PM   #6
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We are doing a lot of sprint 2.5’s at work right now. Don’t think any of them are on air yet as they’ve just been put up. But we have about 100 to do. I believe there are 2 other contractors installing as well.
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Unread 2018-02-02, 09:16 AM   #7
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Sounds pretty damn socialist for the gov't to control the wireless network!

I don't mind the idea, and it could potentially drop rates (potentially). it should give us a much more regular, stable connection. My issues would be two fold:

1. maintenance. Do we leave it up to the states? We see how roads are between states and it would be less than optimal for wireless networks that need to communicate down pipelines crossing state boarders if a state is broke AF and lets the infrastructure decay

2. Big Brother. The government controlling the data transfer infrastructure gives the NSA even more spooky power in recording everything we're doing... at least in regards to wireless communications.
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