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Unread 2013-12-16, 09:39 PM   #126
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Shooting a gun with Google Glass looks frighteningly like a video game


Here's what it looks like to fire a weapon. Oh? You're not impressed? Right. I understand. Because every first person shooter video game that kids play these days looks exactly like this. Hell, to be honest, the video games might look even more realistic than real life (if that makes any sense).
YouTube user cheekflapperer took Google Glass to the gun range and showed it firing various weapons. It's frightening (and totally unsurprising) how much it looks like a video game.


Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gp39PdBbDL0
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Unread 2013-12-18, 10:57 AM   #127
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Google Releases Last Google Glass Update of the Year – Adds Hangouts, Wink, and Upload to YouTube Features




Each month, Google releases a software update to Google Glass which brings new features, bug fixes, and pretty much makes the device a little bit more functional as an everyday device. As it is now mid December, this will be the last update that Glass owners will see this year, numbered XE12.

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Unread 2013-12-18, 03:56 PM   #128
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These things are downright cool! I'm definitely looking forward to the day that these are feature packed, available to the public, and affordable!
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Unread 2014-01-01, 09:58 PM   #129
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Google Glass prescription lens pricing quietly announced






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If you’re wondering what those prescription lenses for Google Glass will cost, Rochester Optical has come through with an answer. The company, which is set to bring custom lenses to Glass frames, is noting via the Glass Explorers community on Google their pricing will start at $99. Perhaps more exciting is that preorders will start “shortly after” CES 2014, which ends January 10th.


Rochester sent out a questionnaire last week, which was an attempt to gauge what users would be looking for in custom lenses. Users were asked about materials, tinting, and all manner of options we’d get with normal lenses at an optometrist. Users are also given the option to choose the shape of the lenses, making for a truly unique experience.
Google has also committed to bring prescriptions to Glass, but theirs is a different process altogether. For them, the tech will be moved to another frame, which has its own set of give and take. On one hand, we get the frames we may want for daily use. On the other, it might be best to simply bring customization to Glass, rather than tech to existing eyewear.
Rochester hasn’t made clear how their lenses will sit with Glass, which is something we pondered on announcement. Their representative noted a “lens carrier/frames” assembly, but offered no additional details. They could simply create a prescription version of the clear shield which comes with Glass, or have another method altogether. The mock-up seen above seems to show lenses sitting in the Glass frame, but that’s not something that can easily be done with Glass, so we’re not sure what will happen. Rochester is saying all they need is your prescription, and there is no dismantling of Glass that needs to occur. We do know the price seems to be right, and prescription lenses have long been desired by Glass enthusiasts, so we’ll be excited to see what’s on offer after CES.
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Unread 2014-01-04, 06:19 PM   #130
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The Newest Google Glass App Is a Hyundai Sedan


Hyundai just announced the newest thing for Google Glass owners: the 2015 Genesis sedan. It's got 333 horsepower, seats five, and thanks to Blue Link cloud connectivity, you'll be able to lock, unlock or start the car from your face computer.

It seems like Hyundai may be the first automaker to bring Glass connectivity to market, promising the app will arrive upon the new car's launch (Mercedes has been tinkering, but hasn't nailed down a delivery date yet). In addition to the remote operations mentioned above, Hyundai says the Blue Link Glassware app will send push notifications when service is due, letting owners schedule service appointments in-app.
This isn't the first time Hyundai has sweetened its luxury offerings with the latest gadget: in 2010, the company put an iPad in the glovebox of every $60,000 Equus sedan, replacing the old-fashioned paper owner's manual. We just wonder whether this will lead to people taking creepshots with their cars. [Hyundai via The Verge]
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Unread 2014-01-07, 04:45 PM   #131
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Wetley creating custom-fit prescription lenses for Google Glass for $150







One firm doesn’t seem keen on waiting for Google to bring out a consumer-ready version of Google Glass before they begin offering custom lens services. Wetley has announced that they are creating custom frames and lenses for Google Glass that will allow prescription eyewear users to use Google Glass and, well, see at the same time.

The solution is a snap-in frame that attaches to Glass in a way that makes it easy and natural to use. You have a couple of different options for getting your Google Glass tricked out:
  • Pay $100 for the clip-on frame, and find a lens cutter willing to cut for it
  • Pay $150 for the clip-on frame and lens from Wexley themselves
Many people will likely opt for the Wetley-cut option for the sake of convenience. Their lenses are crafted out of a strong polycarbonate and coated using Crisal anti-reflective solution for an optimal viewing experience.
Folks interested can head to OpticsPlanet.com to order it. You’ll have to wait about 2-3 weeks for your order to be fulfilled, but we can’t imagine many will complain about that with so few options available as it is.
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Unread 2014-01-13, 06:01 PM   #132
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DriveSafe for Google Glass helps you stay awake behind the wheel






“OK Glass, keep me awake” is the phrase you’d use in the app we’re about to talk about. It’s called DriveSafe, a Google Glass app that acts as a road companion while you’re driving. The app’s primary purpose is to help you keep your eyes open behind the wheel while you search for a place to stop and rest. The app uses Google Glass’s various sensors to detect when you might be falling asleep, and will buzz you using the bone conduction speaker (or mono earbud) to keep you going.

Beyond that particular alert, you’ll also get functions for finding nearby rest stops in case you can’t handle being awake and need to take a roadside nap. We would never condone getting behind the wheel without proper rest, but if you find yourself in that situation then you’ll be glad to have something like DriveSafe available to you.
DriveSafe reminds folks that your safety is your own responsibility, and that you should take proper care behind the wheel. This handy little disclaimer at their website absolves them of any future accident that might occur:
DriveSafe is alpha software – it is not guaranteed to stop you from falling asleep while driving and should not be relied on to do so. DriveSafe is not liable for any accidents or injuries that may occur while using DriveSafe. Be sure to be well rested and comfortable before driving, and keep your eyes on the road (DriveSafe can be used simply with your voice).
They shouldn’t have to say that, but there it is anyway. I guess it’s not a terribly bad idea to have Google Glass on when you’re driving, eh highway patrolmen? Always practice safe driving folks, and try to put yourself in a position where you won’t need a handy little companion like this. We’ll be contacting the folks at DriveSafe to see how they use Google Glass’s sensors to detect whether or not you’re falling asleep. In the meantime, download it to your Google Glass unit if you’re interested.
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Unread 2014-01-13, 07:57 PM   #133
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google glass = fail. they need to just give it up.
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Unread 2014-01-21, 06:49 PM   #134
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Google Glass review: Where it’s awesome, where it’s not, and what needs to happen now



Wearables





I’ve been fortunate enough to use Google Glass in some form or another for months now, but just recently procured a pair of my own. Wired’s Mat Honan penned my favorite Glass review, and his words so similarly mirror my own overarching viewpoint that I’ll simply redirect you there if you’re looking to spend a hefty chunk of time reading. For the purposes of this article, however, I’m going to focus on brevity. I’ve just recently returned from a week at CES, where I used Glass during some portion of each day there, and I’ve reached a point where I feel comfortable opining on the unit’s strengths, its shortcomings, and my hopes for its future.

What Google Glass is awesome at:

  • Turn-by-turn navigation. This is Glass’ current “killer app.” Flashing photos and email cards in front of someone using Glass for the first time is cool, but dial up a map of a nearby street corner and you’ll almost certainly hear a positive adjective uttered by the wearer.
  • Being sunglasses. I ordered the Charcoal color a bid to be as understated as possible, and that decision proved doubly great once I realized that it shipped with a tinted sunglass add-on. Rocking these as sunglasses in the desert proved to weird people out much less than when using them sans shades.
  • Enabling spontaneous captures. I was boarding a relatively small aircraft a week ago, and the sun flare striking the plane’s body was perfect as I approached the boarding door. Thanks to Glass, I tapped the camera capture button and secured that moment. In the middle of nowhere in Nevada, three donkeys decided to wander out and cross the street that I was driving on; due to having Glass on, I captured a memorable 10 second video of the weirdness. It’s the little things, you know?
  • Notifications. When it’s synced up properly, hearing a gentle “ding” to signify an incoming notification is quite useful. You can choose to look up at it immediately, or just wait. We need more notification customization options, but the crux of it is ace.
  • Being a Bluetooth headset. I’ll never wear a conventional Bluetooth headset, but I loved having phone conversations on Glass. The only downside here is that it doesn’t get loud enough — in airports in on noisy roads, you’ll struggle to hear the person on the other end.
  • Being comfortable. Amazingly, Glass is super light, and you barely notice them on your cranium. Every person who tried my set on commented on how much more comfortable they were than they had anticipated.

What Google Glass is not awesome at:

  • Organization. There’s no (current) way to dismiss notification cards permanently. There’s no way for users to customize the order of their cards. You can’t change the “home screen.” There is essentially no flexibility whatsoever in the user interface, which at least means that Google has a huge opportunity for improvement.
  • Being used while playing sport. Try running with Glass and taking a photo mid-stride. You can’t. Google is aware of the issue, however, and will hopefully remedy this in a future software update.
  • Lasting longer than four hours. Seriously, the battery life on Glass is abysmal. It gives me all sorts of anxiety to use Glass for more than two hours without being near a charger.
  • Capturing great images. The camera sensor in the Glass headset is fairly poor. It’s at least three or four generations behind whatever is in the top-end iPhone, which — like it or not — is going to remain the benchmark that Google will absolutely need to match.
  • Collapsing. Astonisinghly, you can’t fold Glass’ side bars in as you can with bona fide glasses, so they take up a comical amount of space in one’s backpack.
  • Being useful in sunlight. Shocker — projector-based displays are awful outside — but you really need something of a solid backdrop, and to be indoors, to really see what’s going on on Glass’ module.
  • Being comfortable long-term. I have the same issue with watches, but most “normal” humans won’t have an issue wearing a watch for their waking hours. Wearing something on your face for 12+ hours is going to take some getting used to. (Yes, those who’ve worn glasses for years won’t have much issue adjusting.)
  • Maintaining a connection. Not a day went by where Glass didn’t disconnect from my iPhone’s Bluetooth signal at least once. You’ll need Bluetooth for using Glass as a headset, but you’ll also tether Glass to receive data — it often requires a full power down + power on to reconnect fully, which is annoying (and unacceptable for mainstream users).
  • Transcribing the human voice. So, so much of Glass’ utility revolves around the headset’s ability to ingest and transcribe the spoken word. Quick email replies, Twitter messages, etc. The harsh reality is that it’s simply poor. It frequently gets words wrong, even if I make myself look like an idiot in public by speaking slowly and deliberately to a glass cube above my eye. When swipes and vocal cords are the only input choices, they have to be flawless. The latter is still heavily flawed. Nothing will make you swear off wearables faster than this. If Glass borks up even a couple of spoken emails, I’ll bet you that the majority of mainstream consumers will say: “You know what, typing on my phone is more private, less embarrassing, and more accurate. Screw Glass.”

What I hope Google Glass gains before it’s widely available to consumers:

  • True phone connectivity. I need to be able to capture a photo with Glass and instantly import than into Snapseed (a Google product, no less) on my phone for further editing and sharing. Period.
  • Easier settings. It’s stupidly difficult to connect Glass to a Wi-Fi network. Seriously, it’s a 3-4 minute process, and it usually involves the scanning of a QR code. Just… no.
  • A better display. The resolution is too low, viewing angles are poor, and it barely works in sunlight. That’s a recipe for mass rejection if it’s not resolved.
  • A relocated micro-USB port. The charging port is directly beneath the power button, which caused me to inadvertently turn Glass off while trying to shove a power cable in.
  • Collapsible arms. Really, that’s all that needs to be said.
  • Some amount of ruggedness. Glass is ideal for adventuring, hiking, etc. It needs to be able to resist a bit of water and take small beatings.
  • Support for all apps. The ecosystem has to grow tremendously, or — like Pebble — it should simply tap into a phone’s existing notification system. Being able to receive Gmail notifications, but not Mail notifications, is frustrating.
  • A better battery. This needs to be an all-day device, at least.
  • Speed. The menu transitions are too slow, and in general, the user interface needs to be snappier. Sorry, but if your product isn’t as snappy as the latest iPad or iPhone, people aren’t going to use it. The bar has been set, and continues to be reset on a yearly basis.
  • Functionality. The list of things that Glass can do is painfully short, and nearly every trick it can play can also be played on a smartwatch. Google has to take better advantage of the form factor here.

Funnily enough, I never had any strange stares while wearing Glass in airports, in Las Vegas, in ghost towns in California, and at a resort in Mexico. I think Glass has been on CNN enough at this point that most humans understand what’s going on. I firmly believe that society is well on their way to accepting face worn wearables — that’s not going to be Google’s primary challenge. The challenge is going to be price and functionality. As we saw with 3D HDTVs, you have to have a killer — killer — pitch to convince a customer to strap something onto their face. And, it’ll need to be priced like a smartwatch. If an eventual iWatch hits at $349, Glass will need to be immediately, obviously, and unarguably superior in the functionality department to stand a chance.
Google’s biggest issue with Glass today is that I have no good answer to why anyone should buy one. I prefer a watch for raw notifications and I prefer my phone for input. I also prefer traveling with as few things as possible, so the company still has some persuading as to why Glass should make the carry-on cut. The upside, however, is that the potential for Glass far exceeds its present state. Much like the original iOS — the one that shipped without an App Store — Glass could be morphed into a game-changing device for the masses. I’m also completely in love with Google’s investment on the Glass Guide side of things; there’s an entire stable of Glass professionals who are scouring message boards for complaints and suggestions, which gives me hope that they’re working tirelessly to make sure that the consumer edition of Glass is impossible to resist.
For the sake of a wilder, crazier future, join me in hoping so.
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Unread 2014-01-28, 09:36 AM   #135
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Nation's biggest vision care insurer plans to cover Google Glass


















John Minchillo/AP
The new Google Glass "Bold" prescription frames in shale color are modeled at the Google Glass Basecamp space at Chelsea Market in New York.





The New York Times
Published: 28 January 2014 07:36 AM
Updated: 28 January 2014 07:36 AM




Google and VSP, the nation’s biggest optical health insurance provider, have struck a deal to offer subsidized frames and prescription lenses for Google Glass, the Internet-connected eyewear.
The announcement could take wearable devices, which tech analysts say are the next wave of computing, out of the realm of science fiction and into the mainstream by making them more affordable and giving them a medical stamp of approval. And it opens the door to a new level of cooperation between the health care and consumer electronics industries, which could lead to a world in which people wear or even ingest computers.
“The key business model of the year for wearables is becoming embedded into the health care system,” said J.P. Gownder, an analyst studying wearable devices at Forrester, which predicts that computers that people can ingest, tattoo on their skin or embed in a tooth are three to five years from being a medical reality.
“Selling wearable consumer electronics one-on-one to individual consumers is kind of a tough business,” Gownder said. “By embedding them into the health care system, you can reach a mass market.”
The agreement with VSP, which insures one-fifth of Americans, is also a coup for Google, which plans to begin selling Glass to the public this year.
Resistance to Glass has grown from privacy fears that the devices could be used to secretly record conversations or take photos. Some establishments have banned Glass wearers, and just this month, a man in Ohio was removed from a movie theater and interrogated after wearing Glass to a movie.
With traditional-style frames and prescription lenses, which Glass did not have before, the computer and screen for the device are less evident and the device looks more typical - and is available even to people who wear glasses.
Some early Glass owners hacked Glass to add prescription lenses, sunglasses and other accessories.
“What I’ve noticed in public is I get less interaction with people” when wearing Glass with frames, said Steve Lee, product management director for Google Glass. “It’s something society’s more accustomed to.”
Wearable devices have posed a challenge to technology companies because they involve understanding fashion and health, not just software and screens. That is why Fitbit partnered with Tory Burch and Intel partnered with Opening Ceremony to make smart bracelets, and one reason Apple hired Angela Ahrendts, former chief executive of Burberry, to oversee retail.
Some health insurers and big companies have offered wearable devices like the Fitbit or Jawbone UP as part of corporate wellness programs, and discounts to employees who improved their health with the gadgets.
But Susan Pisano, a spokeswoman for America’s Health Insurance Plans, an industry trade group, said she was not aware of other insurance companies offering coverage for wearable devices.
“We know our 64 million members are seeing and hearing about Google Glass and how it will affect their lives and vision, so we are really focusing on the eye health management perspective,” said Jim McGrann, president of VSP Vision Care, VSP’s insurance division.
“We see this whole concept of smart eyewear continuing to evolve as an opportunity to provide instant information,” he added.
The hurdle to persuade people to wear a computer on their bodies is lower if the computer is attached to something they are already accustomed to wearing, like glasses or a watch.
Google’s design team, led by Isabelle Olsson, designed frames for Glass in four styles, made of lightweight titanium, partly because Glass’ processor and battery add weight. Google also plans to offer two new styles of clip-on sunglasses for $150 each (Glass is sold with another style of clip-on shade). The color, frame and shade choices will offer 40 style variations for Glass, Lee said.
The Glass computing device, which costs $1,500 for people invited to buy the current version, will retail for several hundred dollars less than that later this year when Google introduces the consumer version. The titanium frames are $225.
VSP will reimburse members based on their prescription plan, with an average reimbursement of $120, plus the cost of buying prescription lenses.
VSP and Google created a training program for optometrists to learn how to mount the Glass device on frames and fit Glass on people’s faces. It is important that the nose pads are adjusted so the screen is not in people’s direct field of vision, said Dr. Matthew Alpert, an optometrist in Los Angeles who is on the board of VSP Global, the insurer’s parent company. A VSP lab in Sacramento will cut the lenses for Glass frames.
Nathan O’Kane, a traffic engineer in Salem, Va., did not wait for Google to introduce new styles. He bought an old pair of sunglasses on eBay and used a saw, a sander and a drill to attach them to his Glass.
“I definitely think that the sunglasses make Glass look less obvious or more discreet,” he said. “You definitely see people whispering and pointing, but I let the really skeptical people try it on, and after they use it for two or three minutes, they think it’s really cool and useful.”
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Unread 2014-01-28, 01:10 PM   #136
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Google Glass Titanium Collection prices and color options for shades and frames go live







Google said we’d know more about how Glass Explorers can get their hands on Titanium Collection frames and shades later this afternoon, and the first bit of information is already up. For starters, we have our first bit of information (that is perhaps more important than anything else): price.

It looks like Google will be charging about $225 for each pair of frames, all of which are available in five different color options:
  • Black
  • Gray
  • Red
  • Silver
  • Blue
As for the sporty clip-on attachment shades, you’ll be able to scoop those up for $150 a piece. Interestingly enough, all of the shades currently show as out-of-stock on Google’s Glass Explorers website, though we can’t be too sure if that’s due to Google readying the rest of the site for public consumption. In either case, we’ll be keeping a close eye on all of it in the moments to come.
In case you’re wondering about getting these outfitted with appropriate lenses, here’s a quick blurb from Google’s FAQ:
If an Explorer has an eyeglass lens prescription issued in the last 12 months, they can take their new Glass frames, Glass itself, and their lens prescription to one of our preferred ECPs to have the frame outfitted with prescription lenses. Your Glass unit does not need to be left with the ECP, while the frame does. The ECP then contacts the Explorer when the new frames are ready and the Explorer returns to the ECP for a final fitting. The Explorer needs to bring along the Glass device as the frames cannot be fitted without it.

We’re still thumbing our way through the new drags added to the Glass Explorers site, so stay tuned for any more information we might be able to come across (such as information about finding lens providers for your new frames). We’ll be updating this post with all the latest.
Continue reading on the Google Glass forums, see the specs, or find news and reviews.
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Unread 2014-02-05, 01:18 PM   #137
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Creepy new Google Glass app can identify whoever you’re looking at






We’ve seen our fair share of creepy apps, but this one probably takes the cake. It’s called NameTag, and in Robocop-like fashion, the app can scan a person’s face and compare it to a records database consisting of millions of people.
If NameTag successfully finds that person, it spits back tons of information about them, including their full name, their relationship status, what school they went to, their current occupation, their interests, and more. It’ll even tell you if that person has a criminal record.

It does all of this by searching various online social networking profiles for that person and pulling details from the profiles they may have filled out. It also pulls information from public records database, such as online court records in your city and state.
Upon gathering these details, they upload them to FacialNetwork.com‘s database without your permission. Don’t want your information made available? NameTag gives you the ability to opt-out, though we’d contend that something like this should be strictly opt-in.
Legal and moral issues aside, NameTag says that their goal isn’t to invade user privacy:
It’s about connecting people that want to be connected. We will even allow users to have one profile that is seen during business hours and another that is seen in social situations. NameTag can make the big, anonymous world we live in as friendly as a small town.
Except it should be up to that person whether or not they want to make their details known to strangers who happen to be wearing Google Glass and using this app. I know I’m not necessarily interested in talking to and meeting every single person I come across while I’m out and about. If they need to know more about me for whatever reason, they can come up to me, introduce themselves, and ask like normal human beings are supposed to.
NameTag’s angle is to enhance people’s social lives, but one might think up a few other cases where it might be useful. Perhaps you want to know if someone is registered as a sex offender before engaging them or allowing your children to be near them. That would be a noble use-case scenario, though some would contend that people should have a reasonable level of privacy no matter what they may have done in their life.
To be fair to NameTag, using public records and social networking profiles to craft reports about an individual are nothing new. Spokeo allows you to do this with as little as a name or email address, and gives you even more intimate information than NameTag claims to. That said, it’s not often that these types of services maintain their own database and use images to initiate a search for someone instead of their name or other details you might have access to.
We’re excited for the future of Google Glass, but apps like these will continue to come around and make us take a step back every now and then as we ponder how far is too far. Sure, our phones have cameras and would be capable of doing this with the right app (in fact, NameTag is planning on making iOS and Android apps of their own).
Still, it’s a lot more obvious when it’s being done with a smartphone, and there’s something about a camera that sits on your face that may or may not be taking your photo at any given time that makes something like NameTag a bit more uneasy to swallow. How do you feel?
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Unread 2014-03-03, 11:00 AM   #138
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Google Glass updates slow down ahead of KitKat upgrade

The electronic eyewear will be "smoother" and "better" after moving to the latest Android operating system version, Google says.
(Credit: Google)
Google took a break from its monthly update cycle for the Google Glass Explorer Edition, saying it's working on a bigger change to the 4.4 KitKat version of Android.
Google's Teresa Zazenski announced the change on the private forum for owners of the electronic eyewear, according to Glass Almanac. Google didn't want to publish an update that "isn't ready for prime time," she said Friday, but what's coming next will make Glass smoother and give it a better foundation for other changes:
The pace isn't changing and we're still committed to regular updates for Glass -- even if they're not monthly anymore, because bigger updates just take more time. In fact, we're working to move Glass from Ice Cream Sandwich to Kit Kat to make the Glass experience smoother and just plain better. This change will make it easier for us to bring you more useful updates and it's something we're really excited about. Developers, we know you're gonna be excited, too. But it's also something that we don't want to send to you all until it's just right.
Google introduced KitKat with its Nexus 5 in 2013. Many of its features are specific to mobile phones and tablets, but underneath, the operating system update also brings under-the-covers improvements to multitasking and user-interface responsiveness.
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Unread 2014-03-21, 01:19 PM   #139
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Google addresses Glass “myths” in post






Google Glass has seen hard times lately. Between various talking heads positing the end of days for the wearable and more establishments banning it, Glass is gaining quite the reputation. In an attempt to quell fears and misunderstandings, the Glass team created a rather lengthy Google+ post about Glass.

In the post, Google goes over the top ten “myths” about Glass, ranging from facial recognition to always-on recording. They even went so far as to remind us that Glass is still a beta program, and not ready for the big leagues of retail. They also suggest Glass isn’t distracting, and caution establishments against banning it. As many “myths” as the post addresses, it asks as many questions in return.

At least in a roundabout sort of way, five of the ten “myths” regard the camera on Glass. Google suggests the same privacy fears brought up with Glass have been posed when both regular cameras and cell phone cameras were introduced in their day. What they don’t address is that it’s pretty easy to tell when someone is pointing a device they're holding up at you; it’s much harder to tell when you’re being video taped while someone looks in your general direction. In a more intimate setting — say a bar — it’s pretty clear when someone is taping you. In an open space? Not so much.
Google also makes an argument against Glass being for “technology-worshipping geeks”. They take the stance that people from all walks of life are using Glass, and finding it efficient and useful. That’s true, but there are also an incresing number of folks dropping Glass for their own reasons — and not just the noisy ones. It’s also a bit dismissive to think that a zookeeper or doctor can’t be a tech-obsessed nerd.
Bottom line: Google is unnerved. The fervent anti-Glass chatter is obviously bothering them. Between potential driving bans and ‘Glassholes’ getting much more attention than the respectful ones, Google has their hands full. We’re not sure posting something to the tech-centric Google+ crowd is really fixing the issues, though.
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Unread 2014-03-24, 06:03 PM   #140
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Ray-Ban and Oakley are working with Google Glass



Google only recently announced versions of its Glass headset attached to conventional specs and sunglasses, but a new partnership with Luxottica -- the company behind brands including Oakley and Ray-Ban -- will give it a significant boost. Described as a strategic partnership to "design, develop and distribute" Glass eyewear, the promise headsets that "that straddle the line between high-fashion, lifestyle and innovative technology." Oakley has shown off its own heads-up display equipped goggles already, and one wonders if the two projects will merge or continue separate development. Andrea Guerra, CEO of Luxottica Group, says his company is proud to "set the pace in the eyewear industry once again," but offers few details on how or when that will happen, with more info to be released later.
The Google Glass G+ post is a bit more revealing, highlighting Luxottica's more than 5,000 retail locations and distribution channels that will come in handy later.
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Unread 2014-04-04, 10:45 AM   #141
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Google Is Struggling to Trademark the Word ‘Glass’

It won't surprise you to hear that Google is desperately trying to trademark the world Glass—but it may raise a wry smile on your face when you find out that the U.S. government is taking exception to the idea.
The Wall Street Journal reports that the US Patent and Trademark Office has objected to granting Google a trademark for Glass. There are two grounds for its refusal. First, it claims that trademarking the term will cause confusion between Google's product and others that use glass in the name—like Microsoft's SmartGlass. Second, it deems the word "glass" to be "merely descriptive." It's usually very difficult to trademark generic terms, and Google is finding that out now. Clearly, with simple and clear naming comes some administrative headaches.
In response to the trademark office's objections, Google's lawyers sent a 1,928-page letter—imagine that!—largely filled with with articles discussing Glass, to try and show that the name has already cemented itself in popular culture. It also tries to argue that "glass" isn't a merely descriptive term, noting that "the frame and display components of the Glass device do not consist of glass at all." Err, right. The patent office is yet to reach a final decision.
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Unread 2014-04-08, 03:40 PM   #142
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Google Glass Gets Down To Business

Google's new Glass At Work program aims to capitalize on the enterprise's interest in Google Glass, even if consumers are still skeptical.



After months of promoting Glass as a fashion accessory and pushing back against misperceptions, without an evident shift in public perception, Google has extended its Explorer Program to businesses in an effort to win acceptance for its computerized eyewear in the workplace.
Glass at Work, announced Monday, formalizes a pathway toward enterprise use of Glass that many developers had already explored on their own. Google says that it has noticed how some of its Glass Explorers have used Glass to advance business goals, and that several companies already have begun working with enterprise software developers to create Glassware relevant to their business processes and customers. It has asked developers working on enterprise-oriented Glassware to get in touch.
Two organizations that have embraced Glass are the oilfield services company Schlumberger and the Washington Capitals hockey team. Schlumberger partnered with Wearable Intelligence, a startup focused on wearable technology, to use Glass to enhance the safety and efficiency of workers in the field. The Washington Capitals have been working with APX Labs, another wearable technology firm, to deliver real-time statistics, instant replays, and alternate camera angles to fans wearing Glass.


"We are at the beginning of a dramatic shift in how enterprise workers will be empowered by technology," Wearable Intelligence said in a blog post over the weekend. "To-date, technology has predominantly touched the lives of knowledge workers: those of us sitting behind computers at desks. Most people don’t work this way."
The implication is that Glass and similar technology can assist people who work with their hands or on their feet -- modes of work that limit interaction with desktop or mobile devices.


Such scenarios already have been realized. For example, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center recently began testing a version of Glass that has been modified to meet healthcare privacy regulations so emergency room doctors can use the device to view patient data while keeping their hands free.
Glass at Work has an upside for Google: The perception of Glass as a $1,500 indulgence for the 1% doesn't matter much in enterprise settings, where the distance of shareholders anesthetizes organizations from vendor price gouging. This is doubly true in the healthcare industry, where the price of acetaminophen might be marked up as much as 10,000%. A healthcare-compliant version of Glass could probably go for five figures without anyone batting an eye.
But Google's interest in enterprise use of Glass might be more realpolitik than actual enthusiasm. Until consumer demand for wearables has been figured out and exploited, Glass will not provide the scale or data that Google needs to matter to its hugely profitable advertising business. Enterprise users are not inconsequential, but they require hand holding, salespeople, and industry-specific accommodations, such as privacy requirements that might preclude use of Gmail or the like. They require a level of service that imposes extra costs.
Google's enterprise business has flourished largely thanks to Google Apps channel partners and integrators. While Google continues its consumer-focused campaign to make being a cyborg socially acceptable, companies such as APX Labs and Wearable Intelligence will find ways to make Glass fit comfortably in the workplace.
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Unread 2014-04-09, 02:34 PM   #143
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Google Glass field trial aims to help those with Parkinson’s





Newcastle University has recently begun a field trial to see whether Google Glass will be able to assist people with Parkinson's. In this case Newcastle University was gifted five pairs of Glass which researchers are using to see whether they can be used to help with independence.

The research teams are working with volunteers with Parkinson's ranging in age from 46-70. The initial work was being done to determine the acceptability of Glass. And at this point the teams have moved onto the next stage of the project, which is putting Glass to use to offer "discreet prompts linked to key behaviours typical of Parkinson’s."
Some of these include reminders to speak up, or to swallow to prevent drooling. Along with reminders specific to Parkinson’s, the team also has Glass being used for more personal items such as when to take medication and for any upcoming appointments. There was also mention of using the motion sensors in Glass to support people with "freezing." It was said freezing is a "behaviour caused by motor blocking," which is another common symptom with Parkinson’s.
Anyway, for now the study is still said to be in the "very early days." But despite that, it appears there is some hope moving forward.
“What was really encouraging from this early study was how well our volunteers took to the wearable technology and the fact that they could see the potential in it.”
Some of the future work involved with this trial will include development on new apps. The team appears hopeful on that front as well, noting how they "are designing the apps and systems for Glass in collaboration with the users so the resulting applications should exactly meet their needs."


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Unread 2014-04-09, 02:41 PM   #144
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Google Glass testing begins with the US Air Force







Google Glass is currently in a test phase with the US Air Force. Details coming by way of Venture Beat mention the tests are being handled by the "BATMAN" research team at Wright Patterson Air Force Base which is located in Ohio. The BATMAN team is part of the 711th Human Performance Wing and made up of both military and civilian behavioral and technology scientists.

Perhaps key here, the team is performing testing to see how well Glass could perform in battle situations. Some possible use scenarios could include forward air controllers working on the ground, search and rescue missions and combat controllers communicating with aircraft and ground troops. There was also mention of using Glass to help assist in supply operations.
According to the team, one of the highlights for Glass includes being able to "access information very quickly." The team also highlighted the "low footprint" of Glass noting how it "sits totally above the eyes, and doesn't block images of hinder vision." The US Air Force is also said to be testing "proprietary software to enhance the Android OS platform that powers the technology."
There hasn't been any indication as to how long the testing period is expected to last, however there was talk of how wearables may be more beneficial as compared to laptops and smartphones as they are easier to carry wear and use. And lastly, the BATMAN team has two pairs of Google Glass, both of which were picked up through the regular Explorer Program.
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Unread 2014-04-14, 07:46 PM   #145
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Google Glass update to bring along Android 4.4 and more






It's a bit later than the promised February timeline, but Glass Explorers will definitely be getting a big treat really soon. Google has just teased an upcoming update to the Google Glass firmware that, among other things, adds Android 4.4 KitKat, photo bundles, voice command sorting, and a whole lot more.

The biggest change is also the most subtle, according to Google. For end users in the Glass crowd, they might not even notice the difference. But with the next update, Glassware developers will be able to make use of the latest Android API along with the Glass-specific GDK. That's right, Android 4.4 has finally arrived on Google Glass, making sure that the smart spectacle is running Android's latest and greatest.
The update, however, wouldn't be that much if that was the only change. Google is throwing in a mishmash of new features in this round. The new photo bundles feature collates photos, videos, and other similar media into a neat bundle whenever users scroll through their timelines. Related to photos, users will now also be able to reply to Hangouts using a photo, whether taken right then and there or snapped up before. The list of voice commands is growing rapidly and is expected to grow even more as Glass firmly takes root. In order not to overwhelm users with choices every time they utter the magical "OK, Google" phrase, voice commands are now sorted based on how often or how recently you've used them, ensuring that your favorite ones are right at the top of the list.


Unfortunately, Google giveth and Google taketh away. Video calls will be going away in the next update, but only temporarily. This was due to user feedback pointing out how poor the quality of the service was. Fortunately, Google plans to put it back when they are able to give it more polish, though they don't have any timeline for that yet. This is definitely one of Glass' biggest updates yet, so Explorers should look to later this week when the update finally starts rolling out.
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Unread 2014-04-29, 07:51 AM   #146
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Dual-wielding Google Glass patent shows a version of Glass covering each eye


It seems this was the only likely progression of Google Glass. As a unique wearable that (almost) covers one eye to super impose information onto the real world, the only way to 1-up the current version of Glass is to introduce 2 screens covering each eye. Proof that Google is at least toying around with the idea of a fully immersive Google Glass future, is a patent discovered by our friends at GGlassDay.
What they uncovered was a newly granted USTPO patent filed back in September of 2011 and listing off Google Glass lead Max Braun as one of its inventors. The patent filing describes HUD and/or augmented reality Glasses similar to the version of Glass we see today. Only in this patent, there’s 2Xs more Glass, because more Glass means more fun, right?

With 2 screens being displayed on each eye, Glass could effectively offer a 3D experience. This would add a entirely new level of immersion to the wearable, and is something we’ve seen other OEMs target (the Epson Moverio, for instance). It’s tough to tell from the supplied schematics, but it appears as if this version might cover the user’s direct line of site, unlike the current version of Glass which actually sits above the eye, requiring the user to look up to see what’s displayed.

This dual-wielding version of Glass also mentions how the display will change according to the image in the background (real-world), adjusting the virtual image’s saturation, hue, contrast, etc., to offer a more unobstructed view of the world through Glass. Pretty advanced stuff. Of course, some will liken this to the “Terminator” HUD view made popular in the Arnold Schwarzenegger movies, only we’re sure these will serve less dubious purposes.
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Unread 2014-04-30, 07:02 PM   #147
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Google Glass Parts May Only Cost $80, Google Calls Report “Absolutely Wrong”






Google Glass is incredibly expensive. At $1,500, the Explorer Edition is a product aimed at at a select group of developers and tech enthusiasts who want to be a part of one of Google’s visions for the future. In other words, it’s not meant for the regular Joe, unless the regular Joe has a ton of cash to blow. The odd thing is, that most of the parts that make up Glass are pretty old at this point and probably not worth their $1,500 price tag.
According to a teardown of the wearable by Teardown.com, the sum of the parts may only add up to around $80. Let me say that again – $80.
If you consider the ancient TI OMAP 4430 processor (similar to the one found in the 2011 Galaxy Nexus), small battery, WiFi and Bluetooth modules, and low-end camera, the part list certainly doesn’t add up to much. From the outside looking in, only the prism used as the overhead display on Glass seems like the expensive component.
Google has already denied this dollar value, stating that the figure is “absolutely wrong.” So there’s that.
The number does seem quite low, especially when you factor in manufacturing costs and the level of engineers who have worked on the product. I’m not saying that $1,500 is justified, but $80 in parts doesn’t quite seem right. Teardown.com also noted that this figure was a “rough estimate” and that it may change after they finish a thorough breakdown.
If you bought Google Glass, I hope you didn’t just read this.
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Unread 2014-05-06, 03:56 PM   #148
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When are Google Glass going on sale worldwide?
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Unread 2014-05-06, 03:59 PM   #149
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiritinthesky View Post
When are Google Glass going on sale worldwide?

They have had 1 day deals here and there nothing announced for a mass release.

Are you not in the US?
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Unread 2014-05-06, 04:03 PM   #150
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I finally saw someone wearing these for the first time yesterday. Not sure i would enjoy them.
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