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Unread 2018-05-02, 11:43 AM   #726
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Originally Posted by jwdb1fish View Post
You people keep sinking to new lows every day.

Stop trying to discredit Trump and his accomplishments. It's not a good look....
Being crazier than the other crazy guy and making threats and pushing the envelope towards possible world war is neither diplomacy or Nobel Peace Prize type material. South Korea is largely is the entity largely responsible for bringing possible peace between SK and NK. Both nations realized that Trump was a grave danger.
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Unread 2018-05-02, 12:01 PM   #727
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Being crazier than the other crazy guy and making threats and pushing the envelope towards possible world war is neither diplomacy or Nobel Peace Prize type material. South Korea is largely is the entity largely responsible for bringing possible peace between SK and NK. Both nations realized that Trump was a grave danger.
Anyone but Trump.

Trump could bring about world peace and not get credit.
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Unread 2018-05-02, 12:19 PM   #728
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Being crazier than the other crazy guy and making threats and pushing the envelope towards possible world war is neither diplomacy or Nobel Peace Prize type material. South Korea is largely is the entity largely responsible for bringing possible peace between SK and NK. Both nations realized that Trump was a grave danger.

Results matter, Dave.
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Unread 2018-05-02, 01:11 PM   #729
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Results matter, Dave.
Not diplomacy or Nobel PEACE Prize material. Period. Consider the other possible outcomes if NK would have been crazier than Trump, perhaps started a war with SK? That would mean China, Russia, US, and NATO involved as well thus a world war. Thank God that level heads are prevailing. Also, I trust NK to follow through with this about as much as I trust the Russians not to meddle in Western politics. You cannot trust either of these countries. I guess we'll see how it goes. Sound familiar? LOL
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Unread 2018-05-05, 01:10 AM   #730
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Trump: NK summit plans set; US troop drawdown not on table


© Evan Vucci/AP Photo President Donald Trump speaks during a "National Day of Prayer" event in the Rose Garden of the White House, Thursday, May 3, 2018, in Washington. WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump offered his latest teaser Friday for a historic U.S. summit with North Korea: The time and place have been set but he's not saying when and where.
The White House did, however, announce the details of a separate meeting later this month between Trump and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, as the U.S. administration pushed back on a report that Trump is considering the withdrawal of U.S. forces from the allied nation.
Trump and Moon would meet at the White House on May 22 to "continue their close coordination on developments regarding the Korean Peninsula" following last Friday's meeting between Moon and Kim Jong Un. They will also discuss the U.S. president's own upcoming summit with the North Korean leader, a statement said.
Earlier this week, Trump expressed a preference for holding the "big event" with Kim in the demilitarized zone or DMZ between the two Koreas, where Moon and Kim met. He also said Singapore was in contention to host what will be the first summit of between a U.S. and a North Korean leader.
"We now have a date and we have a location. We'll be announcing it soon," Trump told reporters Friday from the White House South Lawn before departing for Dallas. He's previously said the summit was planned for May or early June.
A meeting with Kim seemed an outlandish possibility just a few months ago when the two leaders were trading threats and insults over North Korea's development of nuclear weapons. But momentum for diplomacy has built this year as the rival Koreas have patched up ties. In March, Trump unexpectedly accepted an offer of talks from Kim after the North Korean dictator agreed to suspend nuclear and ballistic missile tests and discuss "denuclearization."
According to South Korea, Kim has said he'd be willing to give up his nukes if the United States commits to a formal end to the Korean War and pledges not to attack the North. But his exact demands for relinquishing weapons that his nation spent decades building remains unclear.
Trump said that withdrawing U.S. forces from South Korea is "not on the table." Some 28,500 U.S. forces are based in the allied nation, a military presence that has been preserved to deter North Korea since the war ended in 1953 without a peace treaty.
"Now I have to tell you, at some point into the future, I would like to save the money," Trump said later as he prepared to board Air Force One. "You know we have 32,000 troops there but I think a lot of great things will happen but troops are not on the table. Absolutely."
The New York Times reported that Trump has asked the Pentagon to prepare options plans for drawing down American troops. It cited unnamed officials as saying that wasn't intended to be a bargaining chip with Kim, but did reflect that a prospective peace treaty between the Koreas could diminish the need for U.S. forces in South Korea.
At the inter-Korean summit last Friday, held on the southern side of the DMZ, Moon and Kim pledged to rid the peninsula of nuclear weapons and seek a formal end this year to the Korean conflict where the opposing sides remain technically at war more than six decades after fighting halted with an armistice.
But for Trump to contemplate withdrawing troops now would be a quixotic move as he enters into negotiations with Kim whose demands and intentions are uncertain. Two weeks ago, shortly before the inter-Korean summit, Moon said that Kim actually wasn't insisting on a longstanding demand for the withdrawal of U.S. troops as a precondition for abandoning his nukes.
National security adviser John Bolton, who was due to meet his South Korean counterpart Chung Eui-yong in Washington on Friday, called the Times report "utter nonsense."
During his presidential campaign, Trump complained that South Korea does not do enough to financially support the American military commitment. In March, Washington and Seoul began negotiations on how much South Korea should offset the costs of the deployment in the coming years. Under the current agreement that expires at the end of 2018, the South provides about $830 million per year.
Before Trump meets Kim, Washington is looking for North Korea to address another persistent source of tension between the adversaries: the detention of three Korean-Americans accused of anti-state of activities in the North.
Trump hinted that the release of Kim Dong Chul, Kim Hak Song and Tony Kim was in the offing, but again was sparing on the details.
"We're having very substantive talks with North Korea and a lot of things have already happened with respect to the hostages, and I think you're going to see very good things. As I said yesterday, stay tuned," Trump said, referring to an earlier tweet on the issue.
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Unread 2018-05-05, 09:39 AM   #731
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South Korea faces dilemma over anti-North leaflets as ties thaw


SEOUL/PAJU, South Korea (Reuters) - Days after a historic inter-Korean summit Lee Min-bok, a defector who has been flying anti-Pyongyang leaflets into the North for 15 years, received a call from an official at Seoul’s Unification Ministry urging him to halt his balloon campaign.

It was a plea by South Korea not to jeopardize the recent thaw, engineered by the leaders of the two Koreas who agreed during last week’s summit to cease all hostile acts along the border - including the distribution of leaflets - from May 1.

On Saturday, police prevented a planned release of balloons by a defector group after a confrontation with anti-leaflet protesters.

For Lee, the campaign is personal. He says reading such leaflets as a young man in the North brought an “awakening moment” in 1990 that helped him realize how oppressive and destitute his homeland was at a time when the South was emerging as an economic powerhouse. In 1995, he escaped to South Korea.

“I really believed that Kim Il Sung was the center of the world and he was making everything right and great for us,” Lee said, referring to North Korea’s founding father, the grandfather of current leader Kim Jong Un.

“Realizing what I had learned, heard and read were all lies, I decided to defect to the South to live with the truth.”

Lee, who launched his first batch of balloons in 2003 and has since dispatched more than 300 million, runs one of several defector-led civic groups that regularly send leaflets across the border carrying messages critical of Kim and human rights abuses in North Korea.

Their campaign now poses a thorny dilemma for Seoul, which is striving to keep up the momentum for inter-Korean reconciliation after a decade of confrontation amid the North’s growing nuclear weapons and missile programs.

Pyongyang has in the past blamed Seoul for failing to stop previous leaflet launches, calling them “an act of war”. The two Koreas even traded fire in 2014 after the North’s military shot machine guns at balloons launched by defector activists.

LAUNCH BLOCKED
In the call from the Unification Ministry, the official repeatedly pleaded for an end to balloon launches, promising support if his group switched to other activities aimed at improving human rights in North Korea, according to Lee.

The ministry was not available for comment on the call, but on Friday it issued a statement urging civic groups to halt leaflet launches, which it said would violate the spirit of the agreement made at the summit and heighten military tensions and safety concerns.

Some South Koreans also think the balloon campaign should end.

“Customers stopped visiting our town after North Korea threatened to shoot the balloons,” said Kim Hyung-do, who runs a chicken soup restaurant in the border city of Paju.

“The mood between the two Koreas has a big impact on our lives. I hope they won’t send flyers and throw cold water on this good mood after the summit.”

Despite the pleas, a group of North Korean defectors flocked to Paju on Saturday to fly balloons into the North.

The group prepared 150,000 leaflets, 1,000 $1 bills and 500 booklets authored by another defector on South Korea’s dramatic rise from the ashes of the 1950-53 Korean War, said its leader Park Sang-haak.

“We are carried away by Kim Jong Un’s sudden deceitful peace offensive, but just a while ago he blackmailed us and the whole world with nuclear and missile provocations, while killing his own family members and executives,” Park said.

About 150 residents of Paju and members of a small, progressive party staged a protest against the leaflet launch, and one protester ran into Park as he gave a speech, prompting police to intervene.

“I risked my life to cross the border. You can’t stop me,” a colleague of Park furiously shouted at the man, drawing applause from other defectors.

The launch was eventually called off as police blocked the truck carrying the balloons from entering the site. Local police were not immediately available for comment.

LEAFLET WAR
The two Koreas have waged rival leaflet campaigns for decades.

The South’s military used to launch anti-North flyers across the demilitarized zone, but the program ended in 2010, a defense ministry official said.

Defector groups continued the campaign, sending, along with the flyers, $1 bills, mini radios, instant food such ramen noodles and USB sticks containing South Korean dramas and news.

Pyongyang has also used balloons to send its own propaganda leaflets, which typically feature military threats and satirical images of South Korean and U.S. leaders.

“I remember picking up fliers praising Kim Il Sung from the playground and mountain near my home when I was in elementary school, and we were told to drop them at a police box and get pencils as a reward,” said Kim Chang-hwan, a 35-year-old book editor in Seoul.

“It was sort of scary as we were taught that those things were very bad, but when I saw them again during my military service, I would just laugh it off.”

Defector and human rights campaigners say the South Korean government cannot obstruct civilian activities that they say are subject to freedom of speech guaranteed by the constitution.

In 2015, a local court dismissed a lawsuit filed by a group of residents to prevent Park’s leaflet campaign, citing freedom of expression.

But in a separate 2016 case, the Supreme Court ruled the government could limit the civic group’s activities due to residents’ safety concerns.

President Moon Jae-in, a former human rights lawyer, took office last May, pledging to re-engage the North. As an opposition lawmaker, Moon co-sponsored a resolution calling for a halt to leaflet launches in 2014.

“The agreement from the summit doesn’t have binding authority over what the people do or don’t do,” said Kim Tae-hoon, a member of Hanbyun, an association of lawyers for human rights and unification. “And it can’t undercut the universal value of human rights.”
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Unread 2018-05-06, 09:58 AM   #732
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North Korea calls U.S. claims about upcoming summit "misleading"


PYONGYANG, North Korea -- North Korea on Sunday criticized what it called "misleading" claims that President Trump's policy of maximum political pressure and sanctions are what drove Pyongyang to the negotiating table. The new comments come with just weeks to go before Mr. Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are expected to hold their first-ever summit.
The North's official news agency quoted a Foreign Ministry spokesman warning the claims are a "dangerous attempt" to ruin a budding detente on the Korean Peninsula after Kim's summit late last month with South Korean President Moon Jae-in.
At the summit, Kim agreed to a number of measures aimed at improving North-South ties and indicated he is willing to discuss the denuclearization of the peninsula, though exactly what that would entail and what conditions the North might require have not yet been explained.
Mr. Trump and senior U.S. officials have suggested repeatedly that Washington's tough policy toward North Korea, along with pressure on its main trading partner China, have played a decisive role in turning around what had been an extremely tense situation.
Just last year, as Kim was launching long-range missiles at a record pace and trading vulgar insults with Mr. Trump, it would have seemed unthinkable for the topic of denuclearization to be on the table.
But the North's statement on Sunday seemed to be aimed at strengthening Kim's position going into his meeting with Mr. Trump. Pyongyang claims Kim himself is the driver of the current situation.
"The U.S. is deliberately provoking the DPRK at the time when the situation on the Korean Peninsula is moving toward peace and reconciliation," the spokesman was quoted as saying. DPRK is short for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the North's formal name.

Kim and Mr. Trump are expected to meet later this month or in early June.
Mr. Trump has indicated the date and place have been chosen and said he believes the Demilitarized Zone that divides the Koreas might be a good venue.
"Numerous countries are being considered for the MEETING, but would Peace House/Freedom House, on the Border of North & South Korea, be a more Representative, Important and Lasting site than a third party country? Just asking!" Mr. Trump said on Twitter late last month.
Numerous countries are being considered for the MEETING, but would Peace House/Freedom House, on the Border of North & South Korea, be a more Representative, Important and Lasting site than a third party country? Just asking!
— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 30, 2018
Singapore was also believed to be a potential site.
Experts are split over whether Kim's statement made with Moon at the DMZ marks a unique opening for progress or a rehash of Pyongyang's longstanding demand for security guarantees.
Sunday's comments were among the very few the North has made since Mr. Trump agreed in March to the meeting.


The spokesman warned the U.S. not to interpret Pyongyang's willingness to talk as a sign of weakness. He also criticized Washington for its ongoing "pressure and military threats" and its position that such pressure won't be eased until North Korea gives up its nuclear weapons completely.

Before Mr. Trump meets Kim, Washington is hoping to gain the release of three Korean-Americans accused of anti-state activities. Mr. Trump hinted the release of Kim Dong Chul, Kim Hak Song and Tony Kim was in the offing.

There was no sign of an imminent release on Sunday, though the men had reportedly been moved to the capital.
The White House, meanwhile, has announced a separate meeting between Mr. Trump and Moon at the White House on May 22 to "continue their close coordination on developments regarding the Korean Peninsula."
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Unread 2018-05-06, 10:29 AM   #733
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North Korea says denuclearization pledge not result of U.S.-led sanctions


SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea said on Sunday its intention to denuclearize, unveiled at a historic inter-Korean summit, was not the result of U.S.-led sanctions and pressure, warning the United States not to mislead public opinion.

Impoverished North Korea has been hit by a series of U.N. and U.S. sanctions in recent years in a bid to rein in its nuclear and missile programs.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in vowed “complete denuclearization” of the Korean peninsula in the first inter-Korean summit in more than a decade on April 27, but the declaration did not include concrete steps to reach that goal.

The North’s official KCNA news agency said Washington was “misleading public opinion” by claiming the denuclearization pledge was the result of sanctions and other pressure.

The United States should not “deliberately provoke” the North by moving to deploy strategic assets in South Korea and raising human rights issues, KCNA said, citing a foreign ministry spokesman.

“This act cannot be construed otherwise than a dangerous attempt to ruin the hardly-won atmosphere of dialogue and bring the situation back to square one,” the spokesman was quoted as saying.

It would not be conducive to resolving the issue of denuclearization if Washington miscalculated North Korea’s “peace-loving intention” as a sign of weakness and continued to pursue its pressure and military threats, KCNA said.

U.S. President Donald Trump, who plans to meet Kim over the next few weeks, has said he will maintain sanctions and pressure on the North and “not repeat the mistakes of past administrations” and has said his tough stance had led to the breakthrough.

Trump told the National Rifle Association’s annual convention in Dallas on Friday that he had toned down his rhetoric in anticipation of the talks after labeling Kim “Little Rocket Man” last year and threatening him with “fire and fury”.

Moon said Trump deserved a Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to end the standoff with the North.

The White House said that Trump’s national security adviser, John Bolton, met his South Korean counterpart, Chung Eui-yong, on Friday and both said there were no plans to change the U.S.–South Korea bilateral defense posture.

North and South Korea are technically still at war because their 1950-53 conflict ended in a truce, not a peace treaty. South Korea said U.S. troops need to stay in the area even after a peace treaty is concluded to replace the armistice.

The United States stations 28,500 troops in South Korea, a legacy of the war.
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Unread 2018-05-06, 07:09 PM   #734
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And here we go...

North Korea has set this whole thing up for Trump to fail once the talks happen. They used his arrogance against him and all of these "efforts" N Korea have made "prove" their willingness to make a peace deal. Trump will come to the table talking tough because he's arrogantly spoken about his "victory" before it's even happened. Kim will be unreasonable and cause the talks to break down. He will pull out or Trump will out of frustration. Both will accuse the other of killing the deal and the world will blame Trump because of all the evidence of Kim's willingness to make peace and all the evidence of Trump's aggressive and bullying ways. Who the fuck knows what happens from there.

Why didn't they say all of this before the meeting was set? They only say it after it has been agreed upon, or at least Trump says it's been agreed upon. Which is another thing they used to their advantage. Trump doesn't want to look like a fool. He promises things ahead of time and then that puts pressure on people behind the scenes to make those things happen. He played himself this time.
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Unread 2018-05-11, 04:12 AM   #735
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June 12th

Trump/Kim Jung Un in Singapore
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Unread 2018-05-11, 07:37 AM   #736
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Results matter, Dave.
That's hilarious
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Unread 2018-05-11, 12:02 PM   #737
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That's hilarious
Again, just because you don't like him, does t mean he's not keeping his campaign promises.
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Unread 2018-05-14, 10:50 AM   #738
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Mark Mobius says combination of South and North Korea would be 'beautiful' for investors

"The South has technology, it has the know-how, it has the manufacturing ability and the North has resources," emerging markets investor Mark Mobius said of the "reunification play."

Prominent emerging markets investor Mark Mobius said he would "definitely" be interested in putting money into North Korea if he could.

South and North Korea is a "beautiful combination," he told CNBC's "Street Signs" on Monday.

"The South has technology, it has the know-how, it has the manufacturing ability and the North has resources," he said of the "reunification play."

Even though any reunification between South and North Korea will come at a huge cost, it will be "very, very beneficial from a longer point of view," said Mobius, founding partner at Mobius Capital Partners.

"People who go in at the beginning in North Korea, given this combination of North and South, should do very well," he added.

Mobius' comments come ahead of a meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore on June 12.

Relations between the two countries had been tumultuous in the last year amid heated insults, against the backdrop of Pyongyang's frequent missile launches.

However, recent developments on the Korean peninsula have ignited hopes of peace — and new investment opportunities — in the region.

Kim in late April became the first North Korean leader to cross the border into South Korean territory since 1953, as he met with President Moon Jae-in. The two pledged to work together to achieve denuclearization.

On Saturday, Pyongyang said it will dismantle its nuclear test site on May 23-25.Other markets to watch
Mobius said recent developments in Malaysia and South Korea boded well for corporate governance in these countries.

Following Malaysia's shock election result, if its new prime minister Mahathir Mohamad is able to impose the rule of law as he said he would, it would be "incredible."

"Because it means that companies now have to comply with rules and regulations, and there's potential for improvement of governance," he said.

In South Korea, the public is now demanding for more accountability amid recent scandals involving large companies.
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Unread 2018-05-14, 11:39 AM   #739
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Denuclearization Means Different Things to Kim and Trump, North Korean Defector Says

Pyongyang is unlikely to agree to Washington’s demand of ‘complete, verifiable, irreversible denuclearization’

SEOUL—North Korea’s highest-profile defector in two decades said that Kim Jong Un doesn’t share the same concept of denuclearization as the U.S., issuing a warning ahead of a planned summit meeting between President Donald Trump and the North Korean leader.

Thae Yong Ho, Pyongyang’s deputy ambassador in London before his defection to South Korea two years ago, told reporters in Seoul on Monday that North Korea is unlikely to agree to Washington’s demand of “complete, verifiable, irreversible denuclearization,” or CVID, because it would challenge the fundamental structure of North Korea’s political system.

CVID “will strike at the core of North Korea’s power structure. North Korea will not accept CVID that does not ensure the security of the regime,” Mr. Thae said.

Instead, Mr. Thae said that North Korea is likely to push for a watered-down version of denuclearization that will ensure the long-term stability of the regime.

Disagreements over how to verify North Korea’s denuclearization and the meaning of complete denuclearization have emerged as stumbling blocks in the U.S.-North Korea talks.

Mr. Thae emphasized Mr. Kim’s insistence on a security guarantee as a precondition for committing to denuclearization.

“What Kim Jong Un means by a security guarantee is a promise to keep his hereditary political system intact, and his absolute authority intact,” Mr. Thae said, adding that he didn’t believe Pyongyang would pursue economic reforms in the same way as China and Vietnam, both communist nations.

Since his defection, Mr. Thae has spoken out against the regime he once served. Last year, he told reporters in Seoul that Mr. Kim’s “days are numbered” and vowed to help bring him down.

His remarks come at a delicate time. Mr. Kim met with South Korean President Moon Jae-in last month at the inter-Korean demilitarized zone and is set to meet with Mr. Trump in Singapore on June 12.

Mr. Trump said last week that he believed Mr. Kim wanted to strike a big deal to give up his nuclear program in exchange for economic inducements.

“I really think he wants to do something and bring that country into the real world. I really believe that,” he said.

Mr. Thae, speaking to reporters at the release of a 542-page memoir, said North Korea had described its nuclear program as its “spear and shield” just a week before last month’s inter-Korean summit—language that underscored Mr. Kim’s commitment to holding on to such a strategic asset.

Instead, Mr. Thae said, the North Korean leader is more likely to seek increased South Korean investment in his country by initially reopening it to South Korean tourists. He reasoned that Mr. Kim’s youth in Switzerland had made him open to the idea of earning cash through tourism, unlike his father, Kim Jong Il.

The former Pyongyang diplomat further asserted tourism would be a way to earn trust with South Korean investors, who remain wary of spending cash in North Korea due to the political risk stemming from the regime’s nuclear-weapons program.

Mr. Kim is likely to pursue tourism ventures for two to three years in coastal areas, before seeking to widen South Korean investment to joint industrial parks similar to one at Kaesong that was built with South Korean cash and employed cheap North Korean labor. That park was closed in 2016 after North Korea’s fourth nuclear test.
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Unread 2018-05-14, 02:08 PM   #740
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Could North Korea's nuclear weapon arsenal end up in Tennessee?



WASHINGTON – A top Trump administration says North Korea’s nuclear weapons should be shipped to East Tennessee if that rogue regime makes good on its promise to dismantle its nuclear-testing program.

In a television interview Sunday, National Security Adviser John Bolton said North Korea’s nuclear weapons should be totally dismantled and sent to Oak Ridge, where the U.S. Department of Energy operates a national research laboratory and a nuclear weapons complex.

Denuclearization of North Korea “means getting rid of all the nuclear weapons, dismantling them, taking them to Oak Ridge,” Bolton said on ABC’s This Week. “It means getting rid of the uranium enrichment and plutonium processing capabilities. It means addressing the ballistic missile issue. A lot of things like that.”

Bolton did not say whether the weapons should be stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or the nearby Y-12 National Security Complex, whose primary mission is nuclear weapons production.

But the Y-12 facility is where equipment and documents from Libya’s nuclear and ballistic program were shipped and stored after Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi agreed to dismantle his weapons of mass destruction in 2003.


Officials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Y-12 complex did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

More: North Korean summit: Mike Pompeo says U.S. aware of risks, but hopes for success

White House officials are ratcheting up pressure on North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in advance of a summit between him and President Donald Trump in Singapore on June 12, where the two leaders are expected to discuss denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. Both sides say they hope for a breakthrough.

But some experts have expressed deep skepticism about Kim's intentions, noting that he is a master at propaganda and may renege on his promises.

North Korea declared in April that it would suspend nuclear and missile testing, and North Korean leaders announced over the weekend they would take the first steps in less than two weeks to dismantle the country’s nuclear test site.

American officialssay the U.S. objective is the complete dismantling of North Korea’s nuclear program and the elimination of its weapons stockpile. It is not clear what, if anything, North Korea will agree to at the summit or what Kim means by denuclearization.

Even if Kim agrees to get rid of his weapons, the denuclearization process could be costly and take years. Bolton has said previously that the dismantling of Libya’s nuclear program could serve as a model. But while Libya had a nuclear weapons program, it had not yet developed a nuclear bomb when it agreed end its program.

A lot of issues would have to be resolved before any decision is made about where to ship North Korea’s nuclear weapons, said Daryl Kimball, executive director of the Arms Control Association, a nonpartisan group in Washington that promotes public understanding of arms-control policies.

“One of the key issues that has to be sorted out between the United States and North Korea is what are the steps toward denuclearization North Korea will take and in exchange for what,” Kimball said. “So we are still quite a long way from talking about moving North Korean nuclear devices to any site for dismantlement.”

More: Analysis: What does Trump's Iran move mean for a potential agreement with North Korea?

From a technical standpoint, denuclearization involves a range of steps.

“It requires a halt to the production of highly enriched uranium and plutonium for weapons,” Kimball said. “It involves getting an accurate declaration from North Korea of their existing holdings and fissile material and of nuclear weapons. Then that declaration needs to be verified as being accurate.”

Then comes the question of what to do with the nuclear material that North Koreahas in its possession and might agree to give up.

Kimball said North Korea is probably not the best place to actually dismantle any such weapons.

"It would make sense to physically remove from North Korea dissembled devices and take them somewhere that has the technical capability to dissemble a nuclear weapon,” he said.

Oak Ridge has some capacity to do that because it's relatively secure and already works on U.S. nuclear warhead life extension, Kimball said.

But Oak Ridge is better known for storage of uranium than warhead assembly and disassembly, so it’s a little surprising that one of the facilities there would be considered a storage area for nuclear warheads, Kimball said.

“If we’re talking about excess uranium, it makes more sense,” he said.
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Unread 2018-05-15, 09:40 AM   #741
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A step-by-step plan for denuclearizing North Korea


Editor's Note: The Trump-Kim Jong-un summit could still wind up being a bad idea, but on balance, there is a real potential for success, writes Michael O'Hanlon. That is especially true if the United States goes into the summit with its eyes wide open. He proposes that denuclearization can be largely reduced to four main steps. This piece originally appeared on The National Interest.

The recent news about the upcoming summit between President Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un on June 12 in Singapore is exciting and encouraging. It would not have seemed remotely possible a year ago—or even six months ago. Back then, war seemed much more likely. It is impossible to know whether the decision to hold a summit is primarily due to Kim’s newfound confidence in his missile and nuclear capabilities, or his fear of Trump’s military threats, or a result of the pain his country has endured from U.N.-imposed economic sanctions, which have cut North Korea’s external trade in half. Perhaps the charm offensives that Kim, Trump, President Moon, and Secretary Pompeo have been showering on one another led to the summit. In truth, it is probably some combination of most of those factors.


The summit could still wind up being a bad idea if it fails miserably, or if President Trump somehow accepts a poor deal. But on balance, there is a real potential for success. That is especially true if the United States goes into the summit with its eyes wide open. Aiming for near-term complete denuclearization of North Korea is fine. But the odds of achieving such a goal anytime soon are probably in the single digit percentages. North Koreans view the program as a key legacy of Kim’s father and grandfather, and thus a national crown jewel. Kim sees his arsenal as an essential insurance policy against suffering the fate of Saddam Hussein, Moammar Gadhafi, and the Taliban leadership in Afghanistan in 2001. None of these bad actors had a nuclear bomb, and none of them survived war with America. To change this position, Kim will need a lot of convincing and a wide array of incentives and reassurances that will likely take some time to implement. By contrast, the odds of a step-by-step process that would cap North Korean capabilities and perhaps eventually lead to nuclear disarmament seem much better—though here the risk is that the United States will wind up with deals that North Korea soon violates or exploits, as in 1994 and 2007. Thus, outside analysts and government experts should focus much of their time between now and June 12 on what kinds of reciprocal steps the various parties could take that would lead to a successful negotiation and meaningful, even if only gradual, denuclearization.

I would propose that denuclearization can be largely reduced to four main steps. Ideally similar steps would be applied to longer-range missile and chemical weapons stocks as well, though they are a somewhat lower priority.

1 Freeze testing. A freeze on the testing and production of nuclear weapons, and of longer-range missiles as well, as Pyongyang has already done this year.

2 Cap arsenals. Verifiable termination of production of highly enriched uranium and plutonium (I would term this the “cap” phase to distinguish from the existing freeze on testing, since this caps the size of the arsenal).

3 Dismantle infrastructure. Verifiable dismantlement of the infrastructure used to produce enriched uranium and plutonium (centrifuges, nuclear reactors, reprocessing facilities) and of longer-range missiles (rocket and fuel factories).

4 Disarm. Actual extrication of existing fissile materials and nuclear warheads out of the country—the true denuclearization phase.

Thus, the U.S. goal of permanent, verifiable, irreversible disarmament, or “PVID,” can be achieved all in one fell swoop—if the United States is very lucky. Or it can happen through the “FCDD” process of freeze, cap, dismantle, and disarm. The first step has already been temporarily achieved by unilateral North Korean declaration, perhaps partly because the country’s existing nuclear test site was badly damaged by North Korea’s large test last fall. We need to codify that decision and follow it up with more. President Trump is right to hope for the whole enchilada through a single deal. But he would have made a major contribution to world peace if he can achieve even the first three steps listed above—FCD—while leaving the ultimate elimination of North Korea’s existing warhead arsenal until later. And even if Trump can somehow negotiate complete disarmament, it will likely play out in something like the four stages noted above.

That leads to a very important question: To make the process work, what kinds of inducements should the United State offer North Korea at each stage of a disarmament process? Believing that North Korea will wait until the process is complete for any reward whatsoever is unrealistic and will almost surely condemn the negotiations to failure. But giving up too much too soon could incentive Kim to agree to a deal that he has no intention of fully carrying out—pocketing whatever concessions he can get early and then ignoring the accord later.

I would propose the following framework for each stage of the process:

Freeze. This is the stage we are now in, of course, so no radical steps are needed to achieve it in the short term, but the positive atmospherics around the summit are smart and should continue. Some have criticized President Trump for being too complimentary about Kim. This is a valid point, given Kim’s human rights record, and given the importance of not encouraging other countries to ease up on sanctions enforcement. But Trump is right that it is still better to err on the side of staying positive at this stage.

Cap. A verifiable cessation to the production of fissile material needed in a nuclear bomb would be a huge step. To achieve it, North Korea would have to shut down existing nuclear activities, provide a database of existing production sites to international inspectors, and allow those inspectors to visit the sites as well as “suspect sites” in other parts of the country. It could shroud and shield areas of each major military facility so that inspectors would not be able to find actual warhead stocks, but otherwise it would be giving up information on the regime’s most prized possessions to the international community. At the same time, however, it would not be permanently disabling or dismantling these sites, so the incentives offered to it should be temporarily and reversible as well—the suspension of certain sanctions rather than their elimination, and the provision of just humanitarian aid rather than wide-ranging economic aid.



Dismantle. At this stage, while North Korea would be keeping its warheads (presumably), it would be giving up huge investments worth many hundreds of millions of dollars that would take years to rebuild. As such, more significant quid pro quos would be appropriate.

Ryan Hass and I recently outlined some basic principles that could be useful in such an effort. We argued for making a clear distinction between U.N. sanctions, most imposed in recent years, and U.S. sanctions, many of them resulting from the early decades after the Korean War of 1950–53 before North Korea even had the bomb. The majority of U.S. sanctions should stay in place until nuclear disarmament really begins to happen—until the final phase of the process, discussed below.

However, U.N. sanctions are a different matter. Starting with Resolution 1718 of 2006 and continuing through Resolution 2371 of August 2017, as well as the Resolution 2397 of December 2017, they have gradually turned up the pressure on North Korea. Some focused on trade in technologies relevant to weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missiles (e.g., U.N. Security Council Resolution 2087 of January 2013); they were subsequently broadened to encompass weaponry in general (such as UNSCR 2270 of March 2016). More recently, they have begun to target commercial sources of revenue for the North Korean regime as well as the assets of individuals and companies from North Korea or those doing business with North Korea (2270 plus 2371 and 2397). These sanctions hurt the regime most because they have affected economic engagement with the key countries—China, Russia, South Korea, Vietnam, others—on which North Korea currently depends. Suspending some and then lifting most as dismantlement is completed makes sense.

Disarm. At this stage, U.S. sanctions could be lifted as warheads were shipped out of North Korea. These U.S. sanctions are codified in agreements and laws such as the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, the Trade Act of 1974, the Arms Export Control Act of 1976, the Export Administration Act of 1979, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, and the Iran, North Korea, and Syria Nonproliferation Act of 2000, so the laws would have to be changed. Of course, there is virtually no trade between the United States and North Korea today. But such lifting of sanctions would still be important because it would make possible major loans and grants from the World Bank and the U.S. Agency for International Development, among other bodies. The spigot for such aid should not be fully opened all at once, even after nuclear disarmament. North Korea should be expected to make economic reforms, reduction in its enormous conventional military capabilities, and elimination of other weapons of mass destruction to qualify for the international community’s full largesse. A human rights dialogue should also be initiated by this stage. But significant aid would begin once the warheads and any additional stocks of highly enriched uranium or plutonium were turned over to international control.


Then there is the matter of a possible peace treaty, the restoration of diplomatic relations, and the possible deployment of a multilateral peacekeeping force between the two Koreas. I would unlink these from one another. A peace treaty, if viewed simply as ending the 1950–53 war formally, would be welcome anytime. I do not believe the United States should refuse this if Pyongyang is prepared to sign it with Washington, the United Nations, and ideally Seoul and Beijing too. An international monitoring force deployed roughly along the existing Demilitarized Zone might be useful to confirm the deal was being respected, and to make it harder for either side to attack the other. By contrast, full-fledged U.S. diplomatic relations with North Korea should await, at a minimum, the end of the dismantlement phase noted above, and perhaps the disarming phase too.

My taxonomy of stages and steps may require refinement; certainly, more detail of specific measures within each step will be necessary. That is what follow-on negotiations after the Trump-Kim summit would have to develop. But my main point is this: Since an immediate and complete North Korean nuclear disarmament is extremely unlikely to result from the Singapore summit, U.S. leaders will need a conceptual framework like the above to guide them. Trump should be armed with a framework before he gets on his plane to meet Kim next month.
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Unread 2018-05-15, 01:27 PM   #742
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Satellite Photos Show North Korea Razing Nuclear Test Site, Analysts Say











A satellite image released and notated by Airbus Defense & Space and 38 North on March 30 shows the Punggye-ri nuclear test site in North Korea.


Airbus Defense and Space/38 North via AP


New commercial satellite imagery shows that North Korea has begun dismantling its underground nuclear test site ahead of schedule – an apparent goodwill gesture offered by Pyongyang in advance of a summit next month between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.
North Korea over the weekend pledged to begin destroying the Punggye-ri site in the country's northeast in a ceremony open to foreign journalists between May 23 and May 25. Punggye-ri has been the site of all six North Korean nuclear tests, including its most powerful, in September, which Pyongyang said was its first fusion device, or H-bomb.
North Korea said it would allow journalists from the U.S., South Korea, China, Russia and Britain "on-the-spot coverage" of the ceremony.
In a tweet on Saturday, President Trump called North Korea's decision to raze the site "a very smart and gracious gesture!"
The move comes amid a major thaw in relations between Pyongyang, Seoul and Washington that witnessed a summit last month between Kim and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, where the two agreed in principle to the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. Trump and Kim are expected to meet for a historic summit in Singapore on June 12.
However, analysts writing for the North Korea monitoring blog 38 Northreport that moves to tear down the site are already underway.

"Several key operational support buildings, located just outside the North, West and South Portals, have been razed" since April 24, write Frank V. Pabian, Joseph S. Bermudez Jr. and Jack Liu.
"Some of the rails for the mining carts, which had led from the tunnels to their respective spoil piles, have apparently been removed. Additionally, some carts seem to have been tipped over and/or disassembled, and several small sheds/outbuildings around the site had been removed," the authors of the post say.
Earlier, the official Korean Central News Agency had said that tunnels would be collapsed, entrances blocked and research buildings, observation and security posts would be removed as part of the decommissioning process.
It was not immediately clear why the North Koreans would move to dismantle the site earlier than expected.
The decision to dismantle the test facility now may be politically expedient for Kim, but having perfected a crude nuclear deterrent and ballistic missiles thought capable of delivering it as far as the continental United States, the North Korean leader may no longer need the underground test facility.
In one of the first signs that Kim was willing to concede Punggye-ri, he announced last month that the site had "done its job."
In fact, several reports have emerged in recent months that September's massive underground test, the last conducted there, caused portions of the underground facility to collapse, rendering them unusable.
The same three authors who looked at the most recent satellite imagery for 38 Northwrote after last year's test that imagery taken then appeared "to show numerous landslides throughout the Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Site and beyond."
Last month, two separate groups of Chinese scientists also concluded that the Punggye-ri site might be untenable.
"One group of researchers found that the most recent blast tore open a hole in the mountain, which then collapsed upon itself. A second group concluded that the breakdown created a "chimney" that could allow radioactive fallout from the blast zone below to rise into the air," according to The South China Morning Post.
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Unread 2018-05-15, 02:16 PM   #743
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North Korea suspends high level talks with South Korea over military drills with US

US President Donald Trump is scheduled to meet North Korea's Kim Jong-un on 12 June

Korea Summit Press Pool/Getty Images North Korea has announced it is suspending scheduled talks with South Korea due to US-South Korean military drills, which it called a "provocation".
North Korea's state-run Central News Agency (KCNA) said that the so-called 'Max Thunder' drills between the South Korean and US Air Force are simply a "rehearsal for [an] invasion of the North and a provocation amid warming inter-Korean ties," Yonhap News Agency reported.
The talks, scheduled for 16 May, were meant as a follow-up to the historic and opulent ceremony during which North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in signed the Panmunjom Declaration for Peace, Prosperity, and Unification of the Korean Peninsula during the Inter-Korean Summit on 27 April. The signing took place in the in the neutral territory between the two Koreas, the Demilitarised Zone (DMZ), and officially ended the war that began when the north and south split in a battle over communism and democracy that began on 25 June 1950.
Pictures of Mr Kim and Mr Moon holding hands and smiling made headlines as there appeared to be home for the South Korean's campaign promise of a "sunshine policy," or improved economic relations with the north.
The suspension comes just one month before the first scheduled meeting between Mr Kim and US President Donald Trump on 12 June in Singapore.


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Unread 2018-05-16, 05:26 AM   #744
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https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/15/nort...n-reuters.html

Quote:
North Korea says it may blow off Trump meeting, and 'sinister' US won't make it give up nukes
  • North Korea said it will reconsider a June 12 meeting with President Donald Trump if Washington insists on Pyongyang relinquishing nuclear weapons.
  • Earlier, the isolated state abruptly canceled talks with South Korea in protest over Washington and Seoul's joint military drills.


North Korea on Wednesday injected further uncertainty into plans for a highly anticipated summit between leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump.

In a statement carried by state news agency KCNA, North Korea's First Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Kim Kye Gwan said his country will reconsider the historic June 12 meeting if the U.S. insists on Pyongyang relinquishing its nuclear weapons.

The development is the latest sign of possible backtracking by Kim following the ruler's months-long international charm offensive that was widely hoped to clear tensions on the Korean Peninsula. Earlier, the rogue state canceled talks with South Korea and threatened to ditch the June 12 summit in protest over Washington and Seoul's joint military drills.

Wednesday's news "is classic North Korean playbook," said Sean King, senior vice president at consulting firm Park Strategies.

Ongoing peace efforts, which include Kim's summit with South Korean leader Moon Jae-In last month, may "be moving faster than North Korea ever expected and this is sort of their passive-aggressive excuse to get out of it," he continued.


No Libya-style denuclearization

Recent "unbridled remarks" from Washington prior to the June 12 meeting constituted signs of "unjust" behavior, Kim Kye Gwan stated.

Specifically naming National Security Advisor John Bolton, the North Korean minister said U.S. officials are "letting loose the assertions of so-called Libya mode of nuclear abandonment" and discussing a formula of "abandoning nuclear weapons first [and] compensating afterwards."

That amounts to "awfully sinister" moves to impose on North Korea "the destiny of Libya or Iraq, which had been collapsed due to yielding the whole of their countries to big powers," the minister said, stressing that Pyongyang rejects Libya-style denuclearization.

Libya voluntarily gave up its nuclear ambitions in 2003 in order to get out from under economic sanctions. The country's dictator Moammar Gadhafi was eventually overthrown in a Western-supported coup and killed in 2011.


North Korea considers nuclear weapons equally important as economic growth so "without the nukes as cover, should it ever want to coerce or invade the South again, it really has nothing to bail themselves out," according to King.


Different definitions of the term denuclearization is seen as a major obstacle to negotiations.

For the U.S., the concept entails North Korea giving up its entire nuclear arsenal— but Pyongyang may agree to that only if certain conditions are fulfilled, experts warn. Those prerequisites include terminating America's military presence in South Korea as well as ending the U.S. regional nuclear umbrella.

If Kim does withdraw from the June 12 meeting, it wouldn't be the first instance of Pyongyang reversing on its commitments. The isolated state has duped multiple U.S. presidential administrations, each of which has passed the North Korea problem onto the next.

Under a 1994 deal with President Bill Clinton's administration, Pyongyang committed to freezing its illicit plutonium weapons program but in 2002, the North once again began operating nuclear facilities.

North Korea will never agree to economic trade with the U.S. in exchange for abandoning nuclear weapons, according to Kim Kye Gwan, who warned that Trump "will be recorded as more tragic and unsuccessful president than his predecessors" if he follows in the steps of previous U.S. leaders.
How's that Nobel Peace Prize looking? That last line about Trump being "recorded as more tragic and unsuccessful president than his predecessors"... That's a direct attack on his ego which is meant to manipulate him and they know it. This man's narcissistic vulnerabilities are so glaringly obvious, our enemies are using them against him. Who's next? China? Iran? God help us all.
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Doomed are the poor
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Unread 2018-05-16, 07:53 AM   #745
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Glad to see the North Korean propaganda machine never stops
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Unread 2018-05-16, 10:50 AM   #746
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDLM View Post
Glad to see the North Korean propaganda machine never stops
Looks like it's working on the right people. This is meant to rattle Trump. Throw him off his game a bit. They'll still meet with him.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qt0zJNBSA-E

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/news...002700315.html
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Doomed are the poor
Doomed are the peaceful
Doomed are the meek
Doomed are the merciful
For the word is now death
And the word is now without light
The new beatitude:
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Unread 2018-05-17, 08:47 AM   #747
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With comments like this article is the SAME song and dance that North Korea has always done, if you know about the way that politics works for them (or not work in this case) Kim Jung Il was the exact same way.

I was in S. Korea for 14 months, I have had A LOT of insight into how the "regime" works and saw it 1st hand day to day, one of their end goals is for the US to leave the peninsula and this is one of the ideas that I myself look at all the time and think about WHY we are even really still there.

North Korea says it won't hold talks with the 'incompetent' South unless differences are settled

  • North Korea's chief negotiator called the South Korean government "ignorant and incompetent."
  • Ri Son Gwon, chairman of the Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of the country, denounced U.S.-South Korean air combat drills.
  • He threatened to halt all talks with the South unless its demands are met.



KCNA | Reuters
North Korea's Kim Jong Un

North Korea's chief negotiator called the South Korean government "ignorant and incompetent" on Thursday, denounced U.S.-South Korean air combat drills and threatened to halt all talks with the South unless its demands are met.
The comments by Ri Son Gwon, chairman of North Korea's Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of the country, were the latest in a string of inflammatory statements marking a drastic change in tone after months of easing tension with plans for denuclearization and a summit scheduled with the United States.
Ri criticized the South for participating in the drills, as well as for allowing "human scum" to speak at its National Assembly, the North's KCNA news agency said in a statement.

"Unless the serious situation which led to the suspension of the north-south high-level talks is settled, it will never be easy to sit face to face again with the present regime of south Korea," the statement said.
It did not elaborate.
KCNA, in its English-language service, deliberately uses lower-case "north" and "south" to show that it only recognizes one undivided Korea.
North Korea on Wednesday said it might not attend the June 12 summit between leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump in Singapore if the United States continued to demand it unilaterally abandon its nuclear arsenal, which it has developed in defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions to counter perceived U.S. hostility.
A South Korean presidential Blue House official said the South intends to more actively perform "the role of a mediator" between the United States and North Korea, but that goal has been cast into doubt by Ri's comments.
"On this opportunity, the present south Korean authorities have been clearly proven to be an ignorant and incompetent group devoid of the elementary sense of the present situation," Ri's statement said.
The statement did not identify the "human scum" by name, but Thae Yong Ho, a former North Korean diplomat to Britain who defected to the South in 2016, held a press conference on Monday at the South Korean National Assembly for his publication of his memoir.
In his memoir, "Password from the Third Floor," Thae describes North Korean leader Kim as "impatient, impulsive, and violent."


Summit in doubt


South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha told parliament that North Korea and the United States had differences of views over how to achieve denuclearisation. Trump acknowledged on Wednesday it was unclear if the summit would go ahead.
"It is true that there are differences of opinion between the North and the United States on methods to accomplish denuclearisation," Kang told lawmakers, according to Yonhap News Agency.
Trump will host South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the White House on May 22.
The Blue House intends to "sufficiently convey (to the United States) what we've discerned about North Korea's position and attitude... and sufficiently convey the United States' position to North Korea," thereby helping to bridge the gap, the official said.
Asked if she trusted Kim Jong Un, South Korean Foreign Minister Kang said: "Yes."
Japan's Asahi newspaper reported that the United States had demanded North Korea ship some nuclear warheads, an intercontinental ballistic missile and other nuclear material overseas within six months.
The newspaper, citing several sources familiar with North Korea, said U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo appeared to have told the North Korean leader when they met this month that Pyongyang might be removed from a list of state sponsors of terrorism if it complied.
The Asahi also reported that if North Korea agreed to complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearisation at the Singapore summit, Washington was considering giving guarantees for Kim's regime.
China's top diplomat, Wang Yi, said the measures North Korea has taken to ease tension should be acknowledged, and all other parties, especially the United States, should cherish the opportunity for peace.
Cancellation of the summit, the first between U.S. and North Korean leaders, would deal a major blow to what could be the biggest diplomatic achievement of Trump's presidency.
This comes at a time his withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal has drawn criticism internationally and moving the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem has fuelled deadly violence on the Israel-Gaza border.
North Korea defends its nuclear and missile programmes as a deterrent against perceived aggression by the United States, which keeps 28,500 troops in South Korea, a legacy of the 1950-53 Korean War, which ended in a truce, not a peace treaty.
The North has long said it is open to eventually giving up its nuclear arsenal if the United States withdraws its troops from South Korea and ends its nuclear umbrella alliance with Seoul.
North Korea said it was pulling out of the talks with South Korea after denouncing U.S.-South Korean "Max Thunder" air combat drills, which it said involved U.S. stealth fighters, B-52 bombers and "nuclear assets."
Speaking to reporters in Brussels on Wednesday, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said: I hope that, in the end, common sense will prevail, and the summit will take place and it will be successful.

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Unread 2018-05-17, 03:41 PM   #748
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North Korea summit: Trump says no 'Libya model'

US President Donald Trump says the so-called "Libya model" for denuclearisation is not being pursued with North Korea.
In 2003, Libya's leader Muammar Gaddafi agreed to give up his nuclear programme but was killed by western-backed rebels years later.
The suggestion, put forward by his national security adviser John Bolton, prompted alarm in North Korea.
Mr Trump said he still thought a summit with the North would happen.
North Korea warned on Wednesday that it might not attend the talks, due to take place in Singapore on 12 June.


What did President Trump say?

As Mr Bolton looked on, the US president said: "The Libyan model isn't a model that we have at all when we're thinking of North Korea.
The deal Mr Trump was considering with Kim Jong-un would be "something where he'd be there, he'd be in his country, he'd be running his country, his country would be very rich.
"If you look at South Korea, this would be really a South Korean model in terms of their industry… they're hard-working, incredible people."
On the planned summit, Mr Trump said: "Nothing has changed on North Korea that we know of. We have not been told anything.
"And if it does that's fine and if it doesn't I think we'll probably have a very successful meeting."
How does North Korea see it?

Also on Thursday, North Korea said it would not resume talks with the South until issues between the two are resolved.
Pyongyang has been angered by continuing US-South Korea joint military exercises which it sees as a rehearsal for invasion. It cancelled planned high-level talks with South Korea earlier this week.
In a statement, chief negotiator Ri Son-gwon reverted to the angry language the North has used before, describing South Korean authorities as incompetent and senseless in comments reported by state news agency KCNA.



He also criticised the South Korea for allowing "human scum" (a reference to a North Korean defector) to speak at the Seoul National Assembly.
Thursday's criticism of South Korea marks yet another shift in tone from Pyongyang just weeks before the planned US summit, the BBC's Laura Bicker in Seoul says.
Pyongyang appears to be putting pressure on both the US and South Korea and refusing to talk until some concessions are made, she adds.
What has Libya got to do with this?

North Korea's suggestion that it might pull out of the US summit pointed the finger squarely at US National Security Adviser John Bolton.
"We do not hide our feeling of repugnance towards him," said Wednesday's statement, which was written by Vice-Foreign Minister Kim Kye-gwan.

North Korea was apparently referencing an interview Mr Bolton gave comparing it to "the Libya model" of denuclearisation.
In 2003, Libya's Colonel Muammar Gaddafi agreed to give up his country's programmes of weapons of mass destruction in an announcement that surprised the world.
Most US sanctions on Libya were lifted within a few months and diplomatic ties between the countries restored. The North African country came in from the cold.
But in 2011 the authoritarian leader was toppled by rebels and militiamen backed by Nato. He was later captured and killed by rebel forces.

What does this mean for the nuclear issue?

At the summit between the leaders of North and South Korea on 27 April both sides agreed to work to rid the Korean peninsula of nuclear weapons.
But Pyongyang's professed commitment to "denuclearisation" is likely to differ from Washington's demand for "comprehensive, verifiable and irreversible" nuclear disarmament.
South Korea's Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha told MPs on Thursday there was a gap between North Korea and the US on "how to pull off denuclearisation",according to South Korea's Yonhap news agency.
North Korea said last week it would begin dismantling its nuclear test site at Punggye-ri between 23-25 May, but there was no mention of allowing foreign experts access to the site.
On a recent visit to North Korea, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo stressed that any claim of denuclearisation by the North would require a "robust verification" programme by the US and other nations.
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Unread 2018-05-17, 03:45 PM   #749
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US offers to help rebuild N Korea economy if it denuclearizes


America will help rebuild North Korea's economy if it agrees to give up its nuclear weapons, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said.

The US would be "prepared to work with North Korea to achieve prosperity on the par with our South Korean friends", he told reporters on Friday.

Mr Pompeo, who has just returned from Pyongyang, said he had "good" talks with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.
Mr Kim and President Donald Trump will meet in Singapore on 12 June.

The two leaders, who had previously exchanged insults and threats, made the announcement after landmark talks between North and South Korea in April.

What did Mr Pompeo say?

"If chairman Kim chooses the right path, there is a future brimming with peace and prosperity for the North Korean people," he said after Friday's talks in Washington with South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha.


Mr Pompeo urged Pyongyang to take "bold action to quickly denuclearise".

But he stressed that this would require a "robust verification" programme by the US and other nations.
During his surprise visit to North Korea this week, Pyongyang released three US detainees.
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Unread 2018-05-18, 11:06 AM   #750
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U.S. AGREES TO SCRAP PART OF MILITARY EXERCISE THAT INFURIATED NORTH KOREA: REPORT

The U.S. has agreed to scrap a training exercise involving B-52 bombers as part joint of military drills with South Korea which provoked Pyongyang's ire, The Wall Street Journal reported on Friday citing American officials.
The request reportedly came from the South Korean government, who cautioned against generating tensions with North Korea ahead of a planned meeting with President Donald Trump in Singapore on June 12. The drills began on Wednesday in South Korea.
North Korea reacted with fury on Tuesday at the news of the drills, codenamed Max Thunder. The country cancelled talks with South Korean officials planned for this week and threatened to axe the Kim Jong Un-Trump summit.
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