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Unread 2017-02-23, 10:36 AM   #126
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2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia QV review



Alfa’s performance flagship finally makes landfall here in Australia. We've been impressed by it on track, but how does the most eagerly anticipated sports sedan of 2017 shape up on our roads?
WHAT IS IT?
Think of the Alfa Romeo Giulia QV as a Latin BMW M3 or Mercedes-AMG C63 S and you're not in completely the wrong post code. Thing is, Alfa Romeo has a stack of catching up to do in a sector where the Germans have been polishing their wares to a finely burnished sheen in recent years. Even with the best power-to-weight ratio in the division, the chances of the Alfa putting manners on the class benchmarks would appear a very long bet.
WHY WE'RE TESTING IT
The Giulia is the first beneficiary of a $50bn investment in the new ‘Giorgio’ platform that will eventually spin off eight separate Alfa models, so if it’s not up to scratch, Alfa Romeo's future looks bleak. The QV has been developed by a stellar cast of Ferrari's best and brightest, so it should be dynamically on point, but can it bring a broader array of qualities to bear in a market sector where the bar's set in the stratosphere?
MAIN RIVALS
BMW M3, Mercedes-AMG C63 S, Lexus RC F
THE WHEELS VERDICT
It lacks the showroom polish of its German rivals, but in terms of its ability to plaster a massive grin across your face, the Alfa Romeo Giulia QV has ’em aced. The most surprising thing about the QV? It articulates the requirements of a modern performance sedan far more eloquently than we could have ever hoped. It won't be for everyone, but even its harshest critic will find it difficult to deny that this is a serious return to form for Alfa Romeo.
PLUS: Searing pace, supple ride, smart drive modes, great driving position, long-distance legs
MINUS: Engine not the most musical, some scratchy interior plastics, we don't get manuals or AWDs
THE WHEELS REVIEW
THIS shouldn't happen. Mash the throttle at the apex of a third-gear corner in a sports sedan with 375kW going to the back wheels and you normally need faster hands than Steve Smith in the slips cordon at the WACA. Yet the Giulia QV digs in, finds grip where none should theoretically exist and catapults away in a melee of bangs and barks. It's but one of the many perplexing qualities of this car; characteristics that time and again leave you shaking your head and wondering how they did it.
Of course, we used to wonder why Alfa had done things. Why their performance flagship was front-wheel drive. Why you'd developed lumbago just leafing through the brochure. Why their dynamics ethos championed an underdamped, out of phase, understeering catastrophe. After so many false dawns we'd all mentally written the Giulia off ahead of time. Safer that way.
You probably know the headline figures already. The 2.9-litre twin-turbo V6 is good for 375kW, sending just 1585kg down the highway. 0-100km/h appears in 3.9 seconds and if you have an autobahn at your disposal, 307km/h is apparently on the cards. There's a carbonfibre roof, bonnet, spoiler, skirts and even prop-shaft. Active aero, a whip-smart ZF eight-speed auto and a fiendishly effective electronic rear diff. A design and engineering team who have the Ferrari LaFerrari, 488GTB and F12 on their resumes have equipped the Giulia QV with a formidable arsenal of hardware.
And yet the most impressive thing is the subtlety with which this barrage of new tech is integrated. Rather than dialling everything to 11 and hoping for the best, Alfa's chassis engineers have instead delivered a car that just plain works on Australian roads. There's a refreshing suppleness to the adaptive suspension, and even when it's switched to maximum attack and punted along a heavily cambered and scabrous high-country B-road, it never gets crashy or brittle. The deployment of torque to the rear wheels ramps up as you ascend the gears, Ferrari-style, and there’s Maranello's imprimatur in the steering, which is livewire but never neurotic. A little more heft in Dynamic or Race modes wouldn't have gone amiss; a certain level of trust is required for the work of the front contact patches.
The engine isn't inherently operatic. Some have described it as sounding akin to a pair of BMW i8s at flat chat and there's something in that. The torque band is so broad that meaningful go is rarely hard to find, but it does enjoy being pegged into the upper registers. Knock the lever across into manual and you can ping the limiter without the box changing up for you. The beautiful aluminium paddles are (correctly) column rather than wheel-mounted and in Race mode will crack through upshifts with a real shunt. It's like Lambo Corsa-lite. The QV, like all its turbocharged rivals, injects a bit of street theatre with the fusillade of overrun crackles, but this isn't an engine which will have you searching out tunnels at 3am.
The DNA rotary dial on the centre console switches through four demonstrably different drive modes and you can also select suspension stiffness independently. The steel brakes are more than up to the task, the optional carbon ceramic discs being a little grabby in the first few millimetres of pedal travel. If you're planning on a fair amount of track work, you may consider the 3kg per corner weight saving and $18k pricing to be a reasonable ask. I'd rather direct funds at the manually adjustable Sparco carbon-shelled bucket seats which are 8kg lighter but sit you down noticeably lower in the car than the electrically adjustable standard chairs. Alfa claims that the driver's hip point is 13mm lower. It feels more.
The result then, is you asked and Alfa Romeo has clearly listened. The Giulia QV is an astonishing effort, but clearly also a work in progress. And sometimes even astonishing doesn't cut it. We're already shaping to put it up against the heaviest hitters in its class, and that should be one hell of a showdown. One thing we do know, though is that in isolation, the QV is a triumph.
SPECS
Model: Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio
Engine: 2891cc V6 (90), dohc, 24v, twin-turbo
Max power: 375kW @ 6500rpm
Max torque: 600Nm @ 2500-5500rpm
Transmission: 8-speed automatic
Weight: 1585kg
0-100km/h: 3.9sec (claimed)
Economy: 8.2L/100km
Price: $143,900
On sale: Now
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Unread 2017-02-23, 10:38 AM   #127
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Unread 2017-02-23, 11:48 AM   #128
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Pogea Racing Tunes The 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio To 612 PS And 750 Nm




With the advent of the Giulia Quadrifoglio, Alfa Romeo intends to show the BMW M3 that it can play ball as good as the best in the segment. In the real world, meanwhile, some people expect more grunt from the Italian sedan with a Ferrari-derived heart.

The Giulia Quadrifoglio is, without a single shadow of a doubt, an exciting machine. On the track and off it, Alfa’s starlet is worth every single penny. But then again, too much is not quite enough according to the tuning scene.

Pogea Racing is one of those outfits that makes ends meet by squeezing more ponies out of a given engine, and this leads us to the pictured Giulia Quadrifoglio. A “project car” according to its maker, the four-door sedan now produces 612 PS and 750 Nm (604 horsepower and 553 pound-feet).

For reference, the 2018 Mercedes-AMG E63 S 4Matic+ churns out the same amount of harrumph as the Pogea Racing Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio. In regard to torque, this red-painted project car has the ability to make the Porsche 911 Turbo S blush thanks to what it packs under its sleek hood.

But Pogea Racing won’t be stopping at that. The tell-tale sign the German tuner is gunning for more is a hashtag: #700psssoon, translating into 700 PS or 690 hp. That’s an insane undertaking from a 2.9L twin-turbo V6 propelling a road-legal vehicle, but then again, “reason” is a loosely-defined term.

It should be noted that the 612 PS and upcoming 700 PS tuning jobs are not listed in the product catalog of Pogea Racing, at least not for the time being. Giulia Q owners that really feel the need for speed can opt for a “Stage 1” package, which ramps things up to 577 PS (569 hp) and 705 Nm (520 lb-ft) of torque. Pricing for this tune-up is an “on demand” affair, though the fine print reads €149 for TUV certification and €305 for an extended warranty plan.

Expect the same go-faster goodies to be offered by Pogea Racing GmbH, in the near future, for the 2017 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio as well.
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Unread 2017-03-02, 11:05 AM   #129
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Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio: Best-In-Class Performance, 2.9-liter Twin-turbo V-6 engine With 505 Horsepower


Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio is more than a showcase for the best power-to-weight ratio in its class. It is a study in how to use that power.


(Photo : Top Gear/Youtube)

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio comes with a design that provokes your senses. The use of ultralight, high-strength materials, class-exclusive technologies and supercar power and handling convert it into priceless driving dynamics.




Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio is equipped with a 2.9-liter twin-turbo V-6 engine with 505 horsepower and an 8-speed automatic transmission. The car has a max torque of 443 lb-ft. The front mounted engine and the all-aluminum suspension create a near perfect 50/50 weight distribution with optimal balance. The car has four selectable drive modes that adjust suspension damping and throttle response. These stats make Giulia Quadrifoglio the fastest four-door production vehicle. It had a lap time of 7:30 on the demanding Nurburgring track.

According to The Drive, the Youtube user Auto Avanti has posted a video that shows the 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio being tested on a dynamometer. Even though the Italian automaker claims that Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio has 505 horsepower, the dynamometer test resulted says otherwise. According to the power reading, it has 392 horsepower. That is 113 horsepower lower from what Alfa rates the 2.9-liter engine. However, there is always drivetrain loss.
The amount is dictated by the type of dynamometer being used, and the number of driving wheels on the car being tested. A normal drivetrain loss on a two-wheel drive car is around 20% of the reported factory power output. In this example, 20% of 505 horsepower is 101 horsepower. That is well within the range of normal drivetrain loss.

Jalopnik also reported that dynamometers are known for giving conservative ratings. It is safe to assume that there may be a little more power available than what was shown on the video. For comparison, Matt Farah tested his pre-tuned Focus RS on a similar Mustang dynamometer. The results showed an eight percent difference in horsepower, and no difference in torque from Ford’s claimed specs.
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Unread 2017-03-02, 12:08 PM   #130
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Unread 2017-03-02, 12:58 PM   #131
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Looks like Aristocrat is going to start carrying the Alfa brand.

I'm curious if they'll offer a CPO program..

Even in base trim, the car looks spectacular.

https://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/d...5703/overview/
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Unread 2017-03-02, 05:09 PM   #132
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Saw one at the dealership near my house. If I wasn't trying to get to the train station to pick the wife up, I would have stopped to check it out. Not sure which version it was though.
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Unread 2017-03-02, 06:07 PM   #133
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$143k?
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Unread 2017-03-02, 06:16 PM   #134
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Originally Posted by mild83 View Post
$143k?

where did you get that number ?
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Unread 2017-03-02, 06:42 PM   #135
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDLM View Post
2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia QV review


SPECS
Model: Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio
Engine: 2891cc V6 (90), dohc, 24v, twin-turbo
Max power: 375kW @ 6500rpm
Max torque: 600Nm @ 2500-5500rpm
Transmission: 8-speed automatic
Weight: 1585kg
0-100km/h: 3.9sec (claimed)
Economy: 8.2L/100km
Price: $143,900
On sale: Now
.


-fixed due to lack of knowing how to edit

Last edited by JDLM; 2017-03-02 at 06:46 PM..
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Unread 2017-03-02, 06:44 PM   #136
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and notice what country that article is from...come on now

hint it's not a US based review
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Unread 2017-03-02, 09:23 PM   #137
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They start around 40k.

Looks like their Super Bowl ads paid off...

http://www.roadandtrack.com/new-cars...n-all-of-2016/
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Unread 2017-03-03, 10:39 AM   #138
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2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia (Quadrifoglio) First Test: Two outta three?

Checking items off this Giulia’s must-do list



View all 43 Photos


Few new vehicles have entered the market with greater expectations than this Alfa sedan. Alfa Romeo departed our market with its proverbial tail between its legs in 1995 after its products proved uncompetitive and unreliable—though undeniably exciting to drive and listen to. Nine years ago, Alfa teased us with a handful of hand-me-down Maseratis (the 8C Competizione coupe). Then the delightfully light and impractical 4C came along in 2014. Cars like those don’t sustain a starving dealer network peddling Fiat 500s as hard as it can. Nor, frankly, do 505-hp boutique fire-breathers such as the Giulia Quadrifoglio. No, the future success of Alfa Romeo in the U.S. market rests for now on the shoulders of this 2.0-liter Giulia. To be successful, it must do three things: 1) be the best-driving, best-handling, most exciting entrant in a crowding 3 Series/C-Class/A4 field, 2) offer competitive space, comfort, and ergonomics with no crazy Italian quirkiness, and 3) approach Acura/Lexus levels of quality and reliability.
Our first drive experience indicated strong evidence of success on item one, and now that we’ve gotten a Giulia out of captivity and strapped our gear onto it, we have verified Alfa’s promise of a 0–60 time of 5.1 seconds. It managed this en route to a quarter-mile time of 13.6 seconds at 103.7 mph, which has the base Giulia running at the head of a crowded pack of 2.0-liter turbo sport sedans. (The Audi A4 Quattro nips most closely at its heels running 13.7 seconds at 100.4 mph). The Giulia’s engine delivers a stirring wail on its way to each redline shift, which the ZF eight-speed automatic executes smartly whether under orders from a computer that’s uncommonly savvy at selecting the optimal gear or when directed by the Ferrari-esque column-mounted aluminum elephant-ear shift paddles. Downshifts even provoke throttle blips. (It should be noted that this paddle arrangement sometimes puts the desired paddle out of reach when turning the wheel, and it relocates the turn signal to a farther reach than normal, all of which prompted some grumbling among the staff.)

View all 43 Photos
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Head out on a twisty road, and dial up Dynamic mode from the DNA selector, and from the first twirl of the smaller-than-usual steering wheel, you’ll enjoy the quick turn-in and feedback through the steering wheel rim. This reinforces the impression made by the eager engine’s snarl and the Ferrari lookalike steering wheel–mounted start button that this is a car that encourages aggressive driving. After admonishing our readers to be sure to select the $1,250 Sport package, our base rear-drive tester arrived so equipped with 8-inch-by-18-inch sport wheels wrapped in 225/45R18 Pirelli Cinturato P7 rubber. Those all-season tires scream in the corners. Along with a stability control system that can’t be completely switched off, the tires hobbled the Giulia’s handling numbers.
Testing director Kim Reynolds reported that it was difficult to enter or leave the curves on the figure eight without inciting either lift-throttle or throttle-on oversteer, both of which prompted aggressive, lap-time-killing stability-control intervention. The resulting 26.8-second lap at 0.67 average g ranks below all the obvious competitors, as does the max lateral grip of 0.84 g. And none of those stats jibe with what you’ll experience at the wheel. Plying real-world roads with all systems engaged, few drivers reported any stability meddling, and nearly everyone who thrashed the Giulia agreed that its neutral balance and poise make it the best-driving sedan in the class. Several also praised its ride quality as approaching that of class leaders such as the Mercedes-Benz C-Class. Let’s check off item one as done.









As for the second item on the Giulia’s must-do list, many of us who’ve struggled to master Ferrari and Maserati user interfaces were delighted by how normally Alfa’s twist-and-push knob with finger-writing interpretation on its top surface worked despite lacking the menu-button shortcuts that perfected iDrive. Interior styling meets Italian expectations and complements the gorgeous exterior, but some knocked the red leather for seeming a bit too pleathery. Others criticized the graining and gloss of some plastic bits. The trunk opening is smaller than most, and the volume inside is just barely class competitive, but as Italian sedans go—well, let’s just say no old-timers from the Alfa 164 team appear to have helped with the packaging and ergonomics of this one. So if not a slam dunk on space, comfort, and ergo-quirkiness, at least it’s darned competitive.

View all 43 Photos
It’s that third item that nobody can assess yet. This car behaved perfectly for two weeks but for an errant car alarm incident. Alfa Romeo as a company ranked near the bottom of J.D. Power’s 2016 Dependability Study for the U.K., reporting 235 problems per car—just behind BMW (196), Jag (173), and Audi (169). But this is an all-new car. A fresh start? Nobody knows. Watch this space in a year or so, when we hope to have some long-term results to share. In the meantime, hurry out and lease a Giulia now before your left brain gets any ammunition that might help it talk you out of it.
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Unread 2017-03-08, 11:44 AM   #139
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UPATED: How much power does the Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio get to its wheels?

Put it on a dyno and find out







The freshly minted Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio is on sale now for $73,595, and for that, you get a twin-turbocharged 2.9-liter V6 making 505 hp and 443 lb-ft of torque, all sent through the rear wheels. We got our hands on the latest Italian immigrant late last year at Sonoma Raceway in California and found it as glorious to drive as it is gorgeous to look at, if you're into that sort of thing. AutoAvanti got their hands on one, too, and they've been updating periodically on their YouTube channel.
Part 5 (check out the rest here) involves taking that Quadrifoglio to a shop to get it dyno tested, to see how many of those 505 ponies make it to the wheels. You might be surprised to find out that 113 horses escape during the transmission of power, leaving 392 rwhp (rear-wheel horsepower). However, that is within the average drivetrain loss accepted under normal circumstances, albeit on the high side of the average. The Mustang Dynamometer used in the video might have played a role -- they can reportedly give more conservative results than other chassis dynos. Some in the comments section don't believe it, but we do. The commenters also ask about using an all-wheel-drive dyno to test the Giulia, which is also addressed. AutoAvanti says that when run on a two-wheel dyno, the Alfa goes into limp mode, so the four-roller version was the only one that would work.
Check out the video, and click over to AutoAvanti's page to read the rest of the updates.




UPDATE: FCA shot us a note to get its side of the story out there, basically saying what we expected, and believe: that the Quadrifoglio was SAE tested for its power and torque, and ran within 1 percent of the company's claims.
"The 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio’s class-leading 505 horsepower and 443 lb.-ft. torque ratings were both verified by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) in 2016. SAE only validates the ratings if the measured output is within 1 percent of the claimed ratings in their independent testing, which the Giulia Quadrifoglio achieved for both its horsepower and torque. The 2017 Giulia Quadrifoglio is the fastest four-door production sedan in the world with a Nürburgring lap time of 7 minutes and 32 seconds, which is faster than the Pagani Zonda F, Porsche 911 GT3 RS and the Audi R8 GT. The Giulia Quadrifoglio is powered by a 2.9-liter twin-turbo V-6 engine that earns the title of the most powerful Alfa Romeo production car engine ever and the quickest with a class-leading 0-60 mph time of 3.8 seconds.” -- Berj Alexanian, product communications, Alfa Romeo North America
The moral of the story? If you don't want to be dissapointed, don't put your car on a dyno.



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Unread 2017-03-08, 11:52 AM   #140
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I am not 100% sure how dynos operate but I would imagine running a RWD car on 4 rollers would rob some power. Is there not a dyno mode for these?
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Unread 2017-03-08, 01:57 PM   #141
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$75k ain't bad for that package, imo.
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Unread 2017-03-08, 02:34 PM   #142
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393whp on a Mustang dyno isn't bad. That's probably closer to 420whp on a typical Dynojet. I'd like to see the plot and torque figures. Power under the curve rules all.
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Unread 2017-03-08, 02:48 PM   #143
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDLM View Post



UPATED: How much power does the Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio get to its wheels?

"The moral of the story? If you don't want to be dissapointed, don't put your car on a dyno."



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Unread 2017-03-10, 01:41 PM   #144
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Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XT8LrA21vuo
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Unread 2017-03-10, 06:29 PM   #145
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Alfa Romeo's Giulia Quadrifoglio is a wolf in sheep's clothing






Fiat Chrysler's Alfa Romeo Giulia is wickedly fast and quite luxurious — an unusual car combination that costs a lot more than the average Fiat or Chrysler.











Has the world been waiting for a relatively affordable four-door track car with luxury-level comfort?
Well, it’s here. It’s the Alfa Romeo Giulia.




The latest assault on the American market by a company that hasn’t had much success getting our collective attention, it’s a bit of a wolf in sheep’s clothing.
The outside presents an anodyne sedan that — minus the company’s traditional triangular front grille piece or the four-leaf-clover badging that marks the Quadrifoglio version — could easily be mistaken for something from BMW, Audi, Mazda or Mitsubishi.



It has clean lines, four full-size doors, plenty of glass and limited chrome adornments.
But the inside presents a very different picture. Built largely from carbon fiber, and outfitted with standard racing seats, the Giulia is a limber, lightweight rocket ship.
Under the hood is a 2.9-liter turbocharged V-6 engine that makes 505 horsepower and 443 pound feet of torque, through a very tight eight-speed transmission.
Said to be based on a Ferrari engine, this V-6 will push the Giulia Quadrifoglio from zero to 60 in 3.8 seconds and up to 191 mph, Alfa boasts.
It’s pushing a machine that weighs 3,800 pounds — a bit burly for a two-door sports car, but not for a four-door sedan.
That’s partly because of all the carbon fiber, the lightweight material from which Alfa has crafted the Giulia’s roof, hood, rear spoiler and other key parts. Even the drive shaft is made of carbon fiber.
It’s a great combination. The acceleration is aggressive. The eight-speed transmission is snappy. The suspension is tight. The rear-wheel drive configuration feels a little old fashioned and a little scary — like this is a Corvette’s crazy Italian cousin, come to visit and freak everyone out.
Surrounded by black and red leather, while wrapping the Giulia around a tight corner, I felt like I was piloting a very fast, very plush bordello.
As befits a car with a base price of $73,595, the Giulia comes standard with heated front seats, heated steering wheel, aluminum pedals, leather dash and doors, keyless entry and start, and eight-way adjustable seats.
The Giulia comes factory-equipped with Pirelli tires and Brembo brakes. The model I drove had a carbon ceramic Brembo upgrade and carbon fiber race seats.
Very little about the interior says race car. The ride is quiet, even when the engine is working hard. Road noise is kept to a minimum by the combination of leather upholstery and a high-end Harmon Kardon sound system.
The back seats offer fair head and leg room, and are very comfortable. The trunk is spacious, partly because it doesn’t include a spare tire. You could stow your golf clubs or enough luggage for a week away back there.
Device plug-ins are hidden in the center console which, as a nod to the car’s racy personality, does not have proper cup holders. This is for serious driving.
Drive modes are normal, eco (but they call it Advanced Efficiency), dymanic and race. I found dynamic very dynamic, especially when I put the steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters to use.
Alfa says it’s the only sedan in the world fitted with an “active aero front splitter.” Built into the front fascia, this device activates at high speeds and applies extra downforce. I’m not sure I drove the Giulia fast enough to engage them, but the car didn’t feel to me as if it was struggling to maintain traction, no matter what I did with it.
Alfa representatives say potential buyers of the base model Giulia, which is powered by a smaller 2.0-liter engine and starts around $48,000, are cross-shopping the Audi A4, BMW M3, Cadillac ATS and Mercedes-Benz C-Class sedans.
For the racier, more expensive Quadrifoglio, they’re likelier to be considering the performance versions of those vehicles — the Cadillac ATS-V, say, or the Mercedes C63S.
It’s too soon to know how many of them are going Italian. The Quadrifoglio became available in the U.S. in December, and the regular Giulia a month later.
2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio
Times’ take: A luxurious four-door race car
Highs: Fast on its feet, plush in its feel
Lows: Does this car have a customer?
Vehicle type: Four-door, five-passenger sedan
Base price: $73,595
Price as tested: $85,445
Powertrain: 2.9-liter, V-6, twin-turbocharged gasoline engine
Transmission: Eight-speed automatic
Horsepower: 505
Torque: 443 pound-feet
EPA fuel economy rating: 17 mpg city / 24 mpg highway / 20 mpg combined
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Unread 2017-03-13, 09:37 AM   #146
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6 Reasons Alfa Romeo's New Super Sports Sedan Isn't As Mind-Blowing As We Hoped




Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

The 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quattrofoglio is the smokin' hottest four-door sport sedan on the road today. Hands-down. The voluptuous bodywork, the stunning Rosso Competizione three-layer paint, and the delicate-looking five-hole Alfa heritage wheels contribute to jaw-dropping looks more typical of sport coupes than sedans.





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It has the performance to back up the suggestive looks. The Quattrofoglio (Alfa racer Ugo Sivocci's four-leaf good luck symbol) has a 505-horsepower twin-turbo 2.9-liter V6 that blasts to 60 mph in just 3.8 seconds. The car crushed the Nurburgring lap record for four-door sedans with a time of 7:32. Top speed is 191 mph.
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The accolades have rolled in. The experts at Hagerty classic car insurance have already named the Giulia Quattrofoglio to their hot list of future classics. The Car Connection named it "Best New Luxury Car." It was named "Star of the Show" at the Miami International Auto Show.
But we disagree. Everybody else is wrong about the sex-on-wheels Giulia Quattrofolglio. You'll pursue the fantasy of Lara Croft and end up divorcing Angelina Jolie. The problem is that the car is tuned for blitzing the track and raiding tombs and not for the daily life of domestic bliss. Here's why.
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1. It won't go. The Giulia Quattrofoglio's lurching 8-speed automatic transmission makes smooth takeoffs and simple tasks like creeping into a parking space a white-knuckle challenge that threatens to crumple sheetmetal.
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2. It won't stop. The massive Brembo brakes are superlative at speed. But like the transmission, they are appalling in regular driving because they are so grabby that they take every opportunity to jerk the Quattrofoglio to an unintentionally abrupt stop that makes every driver look like a learners-permit student pilot. Great cars flatter their driver. Overrated cars embarrass them in public.
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3. It won't sit still. The Giulia Quattrofoglio is saddled with the hands-down worst execution of a fuel-saving engine stop-start system. In the very best examples, like the current Acura NSX hybrid, a massive electric motor spins the combustion engine up to speed so instantaneously that it seems like it was running unnoticed all along. The Alfa's feels like Danny Trejo kick-starting a vintage Harley chopper. The shut-off is no better.
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4. It won't drive the places you go. OK, it will actually go anywhere. It will just scrape on the ground and threaten to damage its pricy carbon fiber aerodynamic splitter beneath the front bumper going into your driveway. And over speed bumps. And entering parking lots. Or crossing intersections on crowned roads. We tolerate (with an eye roll) this sort of high-maintenance behavior from mistresses like the Lamborghini Aventador. It is harder to live with in a four-door wife of a car.
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5. It will punish you. There is only one way to achieve a race track lap time like that of a race car, and that is to build a race car. The Quattrofoglio's suspension is utterly unforgivingly stiff; the zero-travel suspension you've seen watching late-night German Touring Car races is what you get here. Which is great for breaking track records. It is also pretty good at breaking drivers' backs.
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6. It doesn't even sound good. OK, it does sound good when it wants to. At redline, at wide-open throttle. But Italian performance cars are supposed to seduce us with irresistible sounds that build with speed, forcing us to keep the throttle down into extra-legal speeds because we can't break the trance of the engine's song.
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The Quattrofoglio sounds like a stationary generator until the throttle is wide open and the needle is swinging toward the redline. It is the audible equivalent of having minivan sheetmetal until you put the hammer down. We should be able to enjoy a performance engine's sound all the time, to different degrees.
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The good news is that all of the troublesome hardware is optional. Rather than paying $79,195 for our Quattrofoglio, you just get the much more reasonable $39,995 Guilia Ti for a 280-horsepower turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder. With that one, you can live happily ever after.
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Unread 2017-03-16, 10:36 AM   #147
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Alfa Romeo Giulia QV: One tail flick — and all is love

Is the new Alfa Romeo Giulia QV really as good as some say it is? Mark Smyth finds out


In QV guise, the Giulia looks like it means business. Picture: FIAT CHRYSLER SA



Alfa Romeos. Chat to anyone who has owned one and they will regale you with stories of how their beloved Alfa broke down on the side of the road, how it leaked oil or how bits fell off for no reason.
Strangely, though, you will be hard-pressed to find an owner who condemns the car for these flaws. It’s as though Alfa performs Jedi mind tricks on them the minute they sign the ownership papers.
We had a long-term 159 in our fleet, possibly one of the most beautiful modern sedans of the past couple of decades. Bits fell off. We didn’t care and we didn’t know why.
In recent years Alfa has made some good, not brilliant, cars, but they convey all the passion of the Alfisti. That passion is, of course, steeped in history. It was an Alfa that won the first Formula One race. Alfas have dominated the notorious Mille Miglia event and today there are thousands of historic examples taking to tracks around the world every weekend.




Lower Giulia models offer character and individuality but will struggle against German rivals. Picture: FIAT CHRYSLER SA



I discovered quite a few of them when I arrived at Johann Rupert’s Franschhoek Motor Museum on his L’Ormarins estate. Everything was there, from the iconic Alfa Spider to the quirky SZ (Sprint Zagato).
To top it all, I was driven to the museum by a member of the Alfa Romeo owners club in an original Giulia. It was a pleasant drive, more pleasant perhaps than it was for a couple of fellow journos who travelled in a model whose brakes caught fire.
It was appropriate that I travelled in a Giulia because I was at the estate to drive the latest member of the Alfa family, the new Giulia.




The QV makes no attempt at subtlety in its looks or performance. Picture: FIAT CHRYSLER SA



The car has stirred up huge debate, not least of all because some people have said they would buy it over a BMW M3. Really? You would buy an Alfa over a German-engineered performance icon?
First, they are talking about the Quadrifoglio Verde, or QV version, not the basic Giulia. The range starts at R555,000 for the base model which, along with the Super and Stilo models, features a 2.0l turbo motor generating 147kW and 330Nm, mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission.




The interior is simple, well-equipped, comfortable and driver-very much focusedon the driver. Picture: FIAT CHRYSLER SA



At this point, I will be honest with you. There is nothing like getting up at 3.30am to catch a flight to make you feel very tired by mid-afternoon. This was the point at which I was to drive the regular Giulia. I tried, but in the interests of safety, I handed control over to a fellow scribe.
From the passenger seat, things seemed rather nice, but the Giulia is not about the base models that will appeal to true Alfa fans but struggle against those Germans.
Fortunately I was more awake earlier in the day when I found myself at Rupert’s private racetrack on the estate with a full 375kW and 600Nm emanating from the 2.9l bi-turbo V6 of the QV version.
The power and torque figures are impressive, but what if I tell you we are talking about a 0-100km/h time of 3.9 seconds and a top speed of 307km/h? Sod those gentlemen’s agreements to limit cars to 250km/h — Alfa is all about performance.
Emotion
It is no surprise that the company is using a tagline of "the mechanics of emotion" — the QV is all about emotion. Put it in race mode and the exhaust burbles in a way that is not overwhelming and the traction control loosens almost all of its grip.
As you would expect of an Alfa, the driving position is excellent, as is the design of the paddles. Pulling out onto the track in first gear, the rear flicks as that 600Nm is pushed through the carbon-fibre propshaft (all models have this).




Alfa Romeo Giulia QV.



There is a load of clever wizardry in the form of Chassis Domain Control, torque vectoring, an Alfa Link technology suspension, an integrated brake system and the Alfa DNA or DNA Pro drive selector. You can also have optional carbon-fibre brakes, which slow the QV impressively before the tail flicks slightly as you put the power down again.
It is no precision instrument, but the QV is bags of fun. It is flair, emotion and passion … all those Italian traits rolled up into one incredible machine. Those who love the superb engineering of the BMW M3 will hate it. It is far from perfect in so many ways, but yet perfect in the way it makes you feel.
There is one big issue though — the QV will cost you R1.4m. It’s a great machine, but I’m not convinced it is a R300,000 better machine. Having said that, it’s evident that the QV is a "heart" buy and the M3 a "head" buy.
I’ve never owned an Alfa. I have no stories to tell. But no Alfa has made me want one more than the Giulia QV.
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Unread 2017-03-20, 06:02 PM   #148
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2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio: The Jalopnik Review



This isn’t the Alfa Romeo that your dad had in college, the Spider that was great on sunny days but wrecked his bank account over and over again with its repair bills. This isn’t the Alfa Romeo of the 1990s, after it left America and turned out one dismal Fiat-sourced front-wheel drive hatchback after another.

This isn’t even the Alfa Romeo that recently cranked out the 4C, a wonderful, hardcore and at times objectively bad car designed only for crazy people. The 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio is the vanguard of the new Alfa Romeo, the one that’s the recipient of a huge cash dump from parent Fiat Chrysler in hopes that it can take on the German luxury brands.
It does so with a Ferrari-derived turbocharged engine and some of the best driving dynamics you can find in this class. It also does so with a series of letdowns you might expect from Alfa Romeo, but let me tell you this: when this thing is on, it’s on.





What Is It?





The Quadrifoglio is the top-trim level of the new-for-2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia sport sedan, designed to compete with the M3s and C63 AMGs of the world with a 2.9-liter twin-turbo V6 pumping out 503 horsepower—a motor that is essentially the turbo V8 from the Ferrari 488 GTB/GTS and California T with two fewer cylinders.










A base four-cylinder Giulia with 280 HP is also available, and so is all-wheel drive, but only on that base model. There’s a diesel too but America’s not getting it. You know exactly why.
Why Does It Matter?





A base four-cylinder Giulia with 280 HP is also available, and so is all-wheel drive, but only on that base model. There’s a diesel too but America’s not getting it. You know exactly why.

The Giulia and the upcoming Stelvio crossover have to be for more than just crazy people. They’re for normal luxury buyers; they’re made to steal sales away from competitors for Alfa Romeo’s ambitious and costly world takeover plans to become a kind of ultra-profitable and volume-selling luxury titan, like an Italian BMW or Mercedes-Benz.


And despite its surprisingly short development time, it yielded an insane Nürburgring lap time record, if you care about that sort of thing, which you shouldn’t.
Now forget all the business-side bullshit for a second. If you’re a driving enthusiast then all you need to know is that the Giulia QV is a firecracker. It’s a blast to drive in anger and a delight to drive around town. It’s a symphony of speed and violence with four doors and a carbon fiber hood.




It’s proof that cars can still be weird and full of character in 2017. It looks awesome, sounds incredible, is blisteringly quick, has a sketchy interior and will more than likely have disappointing reliability.






In other words, it’s an Alfa Romeo. They fucking nailed it.




Standout Features

The way it looks, for one. I’m not sure you can call the Giulia classically beautiful, but it is handsome and quite distinctive, sleek and aggressive at the same time.
Car people who knew what it was threw a thumbs-up or a wave when they saw it, or stopped to gawk and hear the engine rev. Casual passers-by turned their heads and stared, some of them no doubt perplexed by the unfamiliar snake and cross badge on the grille.



Next, and the thing you’re really paying for here, is that engine. In a world where turbocharging, once the domain of expensive suicide machines, has been normalized into just another appliance to boost efficiency, this Ferrari-derived V6 truly feels like it has exotic roots.





Do what we did: pop the hood and rev the shit out of it. Listen to it scream at high-RPMs, because that’s where the black magic and the God-noises happen. Watch the motor rumble and shake in its engine bay. Let it howl, unfiltered and unrestrained.


The Alfa “DNA” driving modes—more on those in a bit—are probably the other big highlight. On most new cars, modes like “Sport Mode” and “Eco Mode” don’t mean shit, or do little more than make the steering and throttle feel more aggressive at the expense of balance while creating an illusion of actual performance gains.


Not so, here. These modes dramatically change the ride quality, behavior and sound of the car, making it switch between a comfortable and livable but quick BMW 340i to a vicious and track-ready M3 at the switch of a button, all in the same vehicle. This versatility, this wide range of character and what it can do, is perhaps what impressed me the most.




Disappointments

“I owned an Alfa Romeo,” people my parents’ age would tell me when I drove that 4C a while back, and they’d usually finish that sentence with “and it was a piece of shit.”
Even now, this is the reputation that Alfa and the Italians have in America—a reputation for soul and passion and flare, but of shoddy quality and craftsmanship that falls way short of the meticulous Germans or Japanese.





This feels readily apparent when you step inside. Boy, does it want to be a BMW 3 Series in there. The gear selector, the dashboard, the center console, the shape of the arm rest, the shape and location of the infotainment system’s control knob—all of it feels like it was traced over from the Bavarians, but badly.

The inside is rife with rough and cheap-feeling plastic, not to mention a persistent rattle from the dash plagued us on our weeklong test.



See these carbon fiber-backed “racing seats?” They’re a $2,750 option made by Sparco, and while they do a great job of bolstering the driver and front passenger and offering comfort at the same time, they feel cut-rate and have a bizarre wiggle every time someone sits on them. It’s not the most reassuring thing in the world. They also do not heat and are only partially power-operated. You can pass on that option.


Then there’s that infotainment system itself. Inexplicably, this is not the Fiat Chrysler UConnect touch system we are used to, which is generally excellent. It is an iDrive-like non-touch system operated by a knob (which you can trace letters on like a BMW, something that didn’t work as well here) which proved to be consistently frustrating and difficult to use. I ended up relegating all navigation duties to my iPhone instead.
Early reviewers had trouble with this system and so did I; at one point the audio from the stereo and nav directions stopped working entirely until I restarted at a traffic light. My week with the Giulia QV did little to assuage those quality concerns.
Casual Driving





At first I did not like driving this Alfa Romeo Giulia. That was in large part because I started my drive in Manhattan rush hour traffic, which is seldom pleasant. It was too harsh-riding, too loud, too jerky between gear changes, with brakes that were too grabby and a throttle that was too sensitive.

“A hyper-aggressive mess!” I declared. “I’ll-suited for anything but a day at the track!”



But then I realized the car’s Drive Mode was set to D, which stands for Dynamic; the other modes are Natural and Advanced Efficiency. (A bit forced, but whatever.)
Moving it into N for Natural made all the difference. The car immediately became smoother, a little softer, more laid back and capable of everyday city driving. The firmness of the car’s active suspension is dialed down in this setting and the difference in ride quality is obvious.



But it’s still quick, absolutely. Though the car’s been dyno’d at something like 392 HP, that is still nothing to sneeze at. Around town it has more than enough sauce for on-ramp blasts, quick merges or the kind of assholery necessary for driving the Big Apple’s crowded streets and highways. As I mentioned earlier, in Natural mode it feels like, say, a 340i—powerful and athletic, but easily livable and daily-drivable. Most of the time I preferred this setting.


The car’s sole gearbox option in the U.S. is a ZF-sourced eight-speed paddle shift automatic. I was quite surprised to learn this; in many ways it behaves more like a dual-clutch, especially in its hesitancy to roll from a stop without a bit of throttle. I’ve heaped praise on this ‘box before and it’s deserved. It’s smooth and shifts are lightning quick. I must say this, however: good as the ZF8 is, and is good, I wish a manual was at least an option on this car. Given that its best competitors have that, it should too.
Rear seat room seemed pretty adequate, never cramped like cars in this segment often are—looking at you, Cadillac ATS. Trunk space is decent too. It may not be as big as some sedans, and it’s no wagon, but it’s a perfectly practical everyday car.
Aggressive Driving



But find the right road and Dynamic Mode makes a ton of sense. It firms up the dampers, cranks up the noise and gives you the throttle response you want. If you want to go fast, this is the setting you desire.

Zero to 60 mph is said to come at 3.8 seconds or so and I have nothing to dispute this. Turbo lag is a bit evident at lower RPMs, but in the midrange and upper part of the powerband the QV really comes alive. These Ferrari motors may have turbos these days, but they kept a lot of their revvy character.
I have to salute car’s electric steering; it’s among the best I’ve encountered, superior to that of the M3 and even the ATS-V, offering tremendous feel and on-road control. It’s tuned perfectly for backroad storming or just driving around town—not too loose, not too tight, lots of feel.




But here’s what you need to do if you find yourself in a Giulia QV. Take that DNA knob, switch it to D, and then crank it clockwise one further to go into Race Mode. That is what shit gets extremely real. Stability control comes off and so does forward collision detection. The car’s full power and wildness and, yes, its incredible noise—the noise you expect from an Italian car with this kind of heritage—is available on tap.


That sound in the video up above? Race Mode. Here is when the car goes from 340i competitor to killer of M3s, from comfortable sport sedan to track day demon, in an authentic way its competitors can only seek to replicate. The aggressiveness of Race Mode, the power and thundering sound of it all, transforms the Giulia into a true exotic sports car—one that just happens to have four doors. Also, stopping power on the $5,500 optional carbon ceramic Brembo brakes was tremendous, albeit an unnecessary splurge for all but the most extreme of track rats.
Above everything else, this ability to switch between normal sport sedan and screaming devil car at the switch of a button is what impressed me the most.
Who’s It For?





Ferrari owners who need a sedan for practical reasons. People who take their car-buying advice exclusively from Chris Harris the way ordinary people get it from Consumer Reports. Sport sedan buyers who want extreme performance but want something different and are maybe bored with the current crop of offerings from the Germans and Lexus and Cadillac. People who aren’t put off by the relative lack of brand cachet Alfa Romeo has here. Americans who can correctly pronounce both “Giulia” and “Quadrifoglio,” though I look forward to hearing both get mangled horribly.
Value

All that noise and Italian passion and sporty dynamism don’t come cheap. While a base four-cylinder Giulia starts at a reasonable $37,995, the top shelf Giulia QV starts at nearly twice as much at $72,000. And optioned as you see here, it comes in at an eye-popping $87,445.





That is a spicy meat-a-ball, paisanos! And it’s quite a bit more expensive than your average M3 or C63 or ATS-V, even with more power. It’s especially eye-raising with the lackluster infotainment system and disappointing interior quality we encountered during testing. Certainly on the inside it never feels that expensive.


That’s one way to think of it; the other is with the performance and duality this car offers, how it’s basically a comfortable sedan and a hard-edged exotic in one, perhaps its value is justified.
The Verdict





Yes, the price tag is a bit outrageous. Yes, the interior isn’t up to par, and the fit and finish lived up to brand’s reputation in a not-great way. I didn’t care. The drive was too good.


I really grew to love the Giulia QV, as did my staff over the week we played with it. The style, the noise, the power, the duality, the fact that as Americans we could stare at the steering wheel and realize we’re driving a new Alfa Romeo—all of that won us over.






In spite of its flaws, I’m prepared to declare that it’s probably my favorite car in this very challenging segment, and easily the most fun one I’ve driven. It has a wild, lively, organic quality to it, a playfulness that its synthesized German cyborg car competitors do not have.

It’s true Alfa has a long way to go to make American buyers even aware of what it is, and to get past the bad taste its lack of reliability left in our collective mouths more than 20 years ago. I don’t care. I am willing to do what the Alfisti have done for decades and chalk up most of its flaws to that thing that is so elusive in modern cars: character.


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Unread 2017-03-20, 08:44 PM   #149
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So apparently consumer reports bought one.

And they've had a ton of issues with it already.
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Unread 2017-03-20, 09:23 PM   #150
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haven't seen anything ...just that it hasn't been fully tested...plus I don't really follow them so I haven't seen
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