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Disclaimer: Use this ONLY as a guide. I have done hours upon hours of research on all these aspects because I want to succeed and figured that since I have all of these notes, I will share with you guys. Again, these are just NOTES, not fool-proof ways to land jobs. If you have anything to contribute in any of these areas that has helped you get the job, feel free to add on and I will edit as needed. Also, keep in mind that these tips can work for some jobs and totally fail with others so pick and choose as needed. Good luck with the job hunt!

(P.S. I have used these tips and successfully landed a job without any €œinside€ help.)

(P.P.S. I have been accepted to graduate school to pursue a Masters in I/O Psychology, which in turn will be used in HR so I hope to help those who need some advice in the near future)

(P.P.P.S. It's been a while since I've created this guide. I still stand firm behind the information in this. I have grown to become a successful HR and Employee Development professional, and many of the tips in this article has helped me throughout my career growth. Good luck!)


Contents

I. The Resume
II. The Cover Letter
III. Salary History/Requirements
IV. The Interview
V. Thank You Letters
VI. Following Up
VII. Job Offers
VIII. Organization
IX. Places to Search
X. Letters of Resignation
XI. Further articles
XII. Sites to Check Out
XIII. Informational Interviewing


Part I: The Resume
I feel this is the hardest to compile when looking for jobs. It takes time and lots of effort.... and there are so many ways to make up. The main thing you are focusing on is selling yourself. They don't know you so you have to make yourself shine! Start out with your name on the top, large, bold, whatever. Just make it stand out. Following your name is your contact information, including address, phone, email, fax, etc.

Your Objective.
Next is your objective. Most often the objective statement includes 1-3 line of text, summarizing the position(s) you are applying for and/or your main qualifications. To improve your chances for success, it''s always a good idea to tailor your objective statement to particular organizations and/or positions. Avoid making objective statements that are too general or vague. (For example: An internship allowing me to utilize my knowledge and expertise in different areas.)

Questions to Ask Yourself
It is often difficult to write an objective so use the following questions as guide to help you.
About you: What are your main qualifications (strengths, skills, areas of expertise)? What positions (or range of positions) do you seek? What are your professional goals? What type of organization or work setting are you interested in?
About the Company/Organization: Which of your qualifications are most desired by your resume's readers? What position titles (or range or positions) are available? What are some goals of the organizations that interest you? What types of organizations or work settings are now hiring?
Common Approaches
- If you know or want to emphasize a specific position (or two) and your main relevant qualifications, you might experiment with one or more of these formats: A position as a [name or type of position] allowing me to use my [qualifications], To utilize my [qualifications] as a [position title]
- If you know or want to emphasize the field or type of organization you want to work in and your professional goal or your main qualifications, you might experiment with one or more of these formats: An opportunity to [professional goal] in a[type of organization, work environment, or field], To enter [type of organization, work environment, or field] allowing me to use my [qualifications]
- If you know or want to emphasize your professional or career goal or an organizational goal, you might experiment with one or more of these formats: To [professional goal], An opportunity to [professional goal]
- If you know or want to emphasize a specific position desired, you may want to experiment with this format: [position name]

Word Replacement
Substituting for €œuse€ words like €œdevelop,€ €œapply,€ or €œemploy,€ etc.
Replacing €œallowing me€ with €œrequiring€ or €œgiving me the opportunity,€ etc.
Changing €œenter€ to €œjoin,€ €œpursue,€ €œobtain,€ €œbecome a member,€ €œcontribute,€ etc.

Skills.
You often want to list your skills when you're a recently graduated student. Often times you would not have the work experience the employer may be looking for so it is critical that you make them stand out at the beginning. Again, depending on what work area you are going into is where you will tailor it. Administrative related things often want to see how fast you can type, what programs you know, etc. Make sure it is tailored to your specific field.

The rest.
€The rest€ includes things such as your education, your work experience, volunteer experience, research experience, certificates, and language. Again, ALL IS TAILORED TO YOUR SPECIFIC JOB. There is no specific order the rest can be in so arrange it as you see fit.
Education
- You want to add where you received your degree and in what area (Example: Bachelors of Arts, Psychology). If you are recent graduate, you may want to spruce up your resume by adding your GPA.
- If you are still in college and know when you will be receiving your degree, make sure to add €œExpected [Month] [Year]€
- If you attended any technical schools, you want to include that. You may also want to include what program you went through and the skills and certifications you received.

Work Experience.
- Do not go past 10 years of experience
- Start out with your current employer and work your way down, in descending chronological order.
- A common format would be: [Employer Name], [City, State] [Years of Employment]. Underneath that, you want to include your position/title.
- After that set up, you want to include your accomplishments for that employer. Did you receive employee of the month/year for doing something? Did you implement new strategies? Help train? Etc. You want to make your resume show WHY you''re better than the rest, now what you did at the job. If you only remember the most recent 1 or 2 employers and your accomplishments, just list those and leave the rest with just the name of the company, location, years of employment, and your title.
- You want to also include any internships you received in this area.

Research Experience.
- Format it similar to the work experience, including where you did the research at, who was your supervisor, what years, etc. Then, you want to include what sort of work you encountered. Did you gather data? Analyze? Recruit? etc.

Etc.
- If you know another language fluently (often, spoken, not necessarily written), you want to include that.
- Volunteer experience is always a plus, especially for recent graduates. Shows that you can balance your time.
- Memberships to any honors societies?
- Do you have some additional certifications?

I often conclude my resume with €œReferences upon request.€ This way, there isn't an additional page for the hiring managers to sort through.

Tips.
- Remember to keep it to one page.
- Personalize and customize your resume depending on the specific job
- Keep it one font
- Don''t get fancy with it

Actions verbs to incorporate into your statements:
Accelerate
advise
analyze
approve
arrange
assemble
assist
build
collect
complete
conceive
conduct
control
coordinate
create
delegate
detect
develop
direct
discover
distribute
edit
deliver
demonstrate
design
eliminate
establish
evaluate
examine
expand
expedite
formulate
generate
implement
improve
increase
influence
install
instruct
lead
maintain
manage
motivate
obtain
operate
order
organize
originate
oversee
participate
perform
pinpoint
plan
prepare
present
process
produce
program
promote
propose
protest
prove
provide
purchase
receive
recommend
record
reduce
reinforce
reorganize
represent
research
revamp
review
revise
schedule
select
sell
setup
solve
streamline
structure
study
supervise
support
teach
test
train
write

Having a hard time making your resume work for the job you want?

Check out: http://online.onetcenter.org/

It's a great site that give you an overview of any particular occupation you are aiming for and what the typical company looks for (and many companies use that site for job descriptions!). If you have any of those qualifications, it would be beneficial for you to incorporate them into your resume/cover letter.

Part II: The Cover Letter
This can often times be the hardest thing to do because just like your resume, you really have to sit down and think about things. Effective cover letters explain the reasons for your interest in the specific organization and identify your most relevant skills or experiences. They should express a high level of interest and knowledge about the position.

Tips.
- The first rule of cover letter etiquette is to send a cover letter -- always. It doesn't matter if the hiring manager didn't ask for it or you're too busy to write one.
- Get to the point as expeditiously as possible, and break any paragraphs seven lines or longer into short, easily digestible ones.
- If/when emailing your cover letter, avoid statements such as: €œPlease see attached resume, and thank you for your time and consideration.€ You should still be able to formulate a few paragraphs.
- Cover letters give you a chance to reveal your personality. Appropriate use of humor, combined with a friendly and professional tone, can help endear you to the hiring manager.
- Whenever possible, address your letter to a specific person. If a job posting doesn't include a person's name, do some research to find out who the correct person is. Try calling the employer (but do respect ads that state €œno phone calls€), and ask a receptionist for the hiring manager's name. Keep the salutation professional by using €œDear Mr. Jones,€ not €œDear Jim.€
- Research the employer and find out what types of problems managers there are facing, qualities they look for in employees and their future goals. Then use your letter to prove that you are the answer to their problems.
- Your cover letter will stand out if you employ some creativity. For example, you could include a brief summary of your toughest sale or most challenging project.
- PROOFREAD, PROOFREAD, PROOFREAD! Cover letters should be free of errors
- Confirm that your materials were received and that your application is complete.

Format.
First Paragraph - Why you are writing
You may have been referred to a potential employer by a friend or acquaintance. Be sure to mention this mutual contact, by name, up front since it is likely to encourage your reader to keep reading.
Response to a job posting: indicate where you learned of the position and the title of the position. More importantly, express your enthusiasm and the likely match between your credentials and the position's qualifications
A prospecting letter (a letter in which you inquire about possible job openings): state your specific job objective. Since this type of letter is unsolicited, it is even more important to capture the reader€™s attention.
A networking letter: to approach an individual for information, make your request clear
Second Paragraph - What you have to offer
Refer specifically to the qualifications listed and illustrate how your particular abilities and experiences relate to the position for which you are applying. In a prospecting letter express your potential to fulfill the employer's needs rather than focus on what the employer can offer you. You can do this by giving evidence that you have researched the organization thoroughly and that you possess skills used within that organization.
Third Paragraph - How you will follow up
Close by reiterating your interest in the job and letting the employer know how they can reach you and include your phone number and/or email address. Or bid directly for the job interview or informational interview and indicate that you will follow-up with a telephone call to set up an appointment at a mutually convenient time. Be sure to make the call within the time frame indicated. Emphasize your achievements and problem-solving skills. Show how your education and work skills are transferable, and thus relevant, to the position for which you are applying.
In conclusion, you may indicate that your references are available on request.

More Tips
- Add a skill statement. Start with a list of technical skills (ones that are visually measured), like filing, typing, computer skills, welding, etc. Just make sure if it tailored to the job you are applying. Next, add soft skills, such as teamwork, persistence, detail orientated, etc.
- DO NOT add jokes, use puns, or put in your personal hobbies (unless it pertains to the job) or any personal information. Add your soft skills, like team player, takes direction well, but can lead when needed, detail oriented, etc.

10 Common cover letter mistakes
1. Failing to personalize. Avoid saying, €œDear Sir or Madam€ and take the initiative to find out the appropriate contact name. Often a quick phone call to the company can help you fill in the blank. You'll show that you're resourceful and truly interested in the job.
2. Starting off weak. Your opening paragraph should capture the reader's attention. So, rather than simply saying, €œI am applying for the copywriter position posted on AnytownPaper.com,€ follow up with, €œYour need for an experienced professional is a good match for my five years of experience in advertising and extensive copywriting background. €œIf you've been referred to the hiring manager, be sure to point out the mutual contact in your lead. This may encourage the person to read further.
3. Making it too short/long. E-mailed cover letters should be included within the body of the e-mail and be limited to two paragraphs, while those faxed or mailed should be three to five paragraphs.
4. Being generic. Don't send the same cover letter to all companies. Take the time to do some basic research of prospective employers so you can customize them. In a survey by Robert Half, only 44 percent of executives polled said it's common for applicants to use their cover letters to show they've learned more about the job; so if you make the effort, you'll already be ahead of half your competition.
5. Rehashing the resume. Instead, focus on aspects of your background that relate directly to the job opportunity and note any relevant accomplishments, training, classes or certifications. The cover letter also allows you to explain anything that might be unclear or questionable on your resume, such as a gap in employment or change in career paths.
6. Underselling your talents. Give hiring managers a compelling reason to call you in for an interview. Instead of saying you have strong communication skills, provide examples: €œI recently led a training session in the sales department on a new database application and received significant praise for my ability to relay complex information to a non-tech-oriented audience.€
7. Trying to be witty or humorous. This can backfire, so it's best to stick with a business letter format, even with e-mailed cover letters. A professional yet conversational tone and salutations such as €œMr.€ and €œMs.€ will help you be taken seriously.
8. Focusing too much on yourself. While you want to sell your qualifications, don't forget to explain how you would add value to the company. If your cover letter is dominated with €œI,€ chances are you need to focus more of your content on the prospective employer.
9. Omitting contact information. It's easy for cover letters and resumes to become separated, so make sure hiring managers can reach you should they only have your cover letter. Close your letter by mentioning that you'll call the individual soon to follow up and include a current phone number and e-mail address where you can be reached should the person want to contact you first.
10. Failing to proofread. As qualified as you may be for the opening, you're likely to fall out of contention if your cover letter is full of typos, misspellings and grammatical errors. Ask friends and family to review your document to make sure there are no mistakes. The following examples from real cover letters prove just how important this can be: €œI'm attacking my resume for you to review.€ €œI prefer a fast-paste environment.€ €œI never take anything for granite.€

Part III: Salary Requirements
Sometimes when applying for jobs, an employer may request a salary history or salary requirements. If they do so, the most common way of including your salary requirement is in your cover letter. You may state it in terms such as: €œMy salary requirement is negotiable based upon the job responsibilities and the total compensation package,€ or €œMy salary requirement is in the $25,000 - $35,000+ range.€
__________________

"Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want"
"If you feel you need to tell lies to get ahead, perhaps you need to evaluate why you're behind in the first place."

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Part IV: The Interview
So after countless hours of researching and sending out your resume to prospective employers, you've finally landed the interview. What should you expect? What should you bring with you to the interview? Multiple questions are probably running through your mind. The most important thing you should do prior to an interview is research the company. Understand who you will be working for. However, there's more than that so let's begin.[

b]Prepare for the Interview[/b]
1) Dress Appropriately: If you’re interviewing for a corporate-style position, you would want to wear a suit or jacket and appropriate bottoms. If you don’t have that, wear what you would on a daily basis to the job. If you’re interviewing for a construction position, you would wear your safety boots, clean and neat jeans or work pants, and an appropriate work shirt.
2) Come prepared: Bring extra copies of your resume and cover letter. You may also want to consider business cards to help the interviewers remember you. BE SURE to research the company and understand the company’s mission statement or basic workings of the company. You may also want to create and use a summary skill sheet that only you use only. You will want to use it to remind yourself of important points you want to include in the interview.
3) Be sure to be in the right mind set: Use calming techniques like deep breaths and visualization before the interview to keep your mind and body in tune. Put a smile on you face and in your voice. Your attitude will go a long way in getting you the job. And remember: you DID get the interview so you DO have the right qualifications!

Your objectives are:
1. Make a good impression
2. Determine if you were interested in pursuing the position further
3. Receive an invitation for a second interview (maybe)

The interviewer's objectives will be:
1. Obtain information to determine whether you have the skills and qualifications to do the job
2. Determine who to invite back for a second interview

Getting to the Interview
- Be sure you are EARLY to the interview. This will give you opportunities to get a feel of the company and also make a good impression that you are eager to get the job.
KsuMax: Don't be more than 15 minutes early.
- Know who you will be interviewing with. Again, this will show that you have researched and are one step ahead of them.

Possible Questions You May Encounter
You shouldn't come to an interview completely cold turkey so I've taken the liberty to research possible questions that you may be asked. Take the time to read through them and prepare possible answers to them.
- What's your biggest accomplishment so far? (Be ready with a specific example for this interview question.)
- Why should I hire you? (Good question. Tip - it's a great opportunity for you.)
- How do you handle a job that's very stressful?
- Why do you think you will fit in with the company culture? (Research the company, the position you're applying for, etc before the interviews.)
- How do you define success? Are you now successful?
- Why do you want a job here instead of with our competitor, XYZ Inc?
- Do you work better on your own or as part of a team?
- How do you handle it if your boss criticizes you about your work?
- Have you ever lost your job? Why?
- What will you do if you have a serious difference of opinion with your immediate superior?
- What have you accomplished in the last five years?
- Describe what you think this type of job entails and what you might like and dislike about the work.
- Describe a conflict you've had with other staff members and how you resolved it.
- Tell me about a time when you saw room for improvement in some area of your work environment or a process that could be more efficient. What did you do to change the status quo?”
- Describe an occasion when you had two bosses ask you to do conflicting tasks. How did you handle this dilemma?
- Describe a time when your supervisor or a co-worker asked you to help out and doing so required extra work outside your established responsibilities or staying later than you anticipated. What did you do, and how did you feel?
- Tell me about a time when your job required you to perform a task that you didn't know how to do. How did you respond?
- While at work, a co-worker complains to you about the office manager and some of the office policies and procedures, concluding with ''Don't you think so too?'' How would you respond?

100 possible interview questions (some may be repeats from above)
1. Tell me about yourself.
2. What are your strengths?
3. What are your weaknesses?
4. Who was your favorite manager and why?
5. What kind of personality do you work best with and why?
6. Why do you want this job?
7. Where would you like to be in your career five years from now?
8. Tell me about your proudest achievement.
9. If you were at a business lunch and you ordered a rare steak and they brought it to you well done, what would you do?
10. If I were to give you this salary you requested but let you write your job description for the next year, what would it say?
11. Why is there fuzz on a tennis ball?
12. How would you go about establishing your credibility quickly with the team?
13. There's no right or wrong answer, but if you could be anywhere in the world right now, where would you be?
14. How would you feel about working for someone who knows less than you?
15. Was there a person in your career who really made a difference?
16. What's your ideal company?
17. What attracted you to this company?
18. What are you most proud of?
19. What are you looking for in terms of career development?
20. What do you look for in terms of culture -- structured or entrepreneurial?
21. What do you like to do?
22. Give examples of ideas you've had or implemented.
23. What are your lifelong dreams?
24. What do you ultimately want to become?
25. How would you describe your work style?
26. What kind of car do you drive?
27. Tell me about a time where you had to deal with conflict on the job.
28. What's the last book you read?
29. What magazines do you subscribe to?
30. What would be your ideal working situation?
31. Why should we hire you?
32. What did you like least about your last job?
33. What do you think of your previous boss?
34. How do you think I rate as an interviewer?
35. Do you have any questions for me?
36. When were you most satisfied in your job?
37. What can you do for us that other candidates can't?
38. What are three positive things your last boss would say about you?
39. What negative thing would your last boss say about you?
40. If you were an animal, which one would you want to be?
41. What salary are you seeking?
42. What's your salary history?
43. Do you have plans to have children in the near future?
44. What were the responsibilities of your last position?
45. What do you know about this industry?
46. What do you know about our company?
47. How long will it take for you to make a significant contribution?
48. Are you willing to relocate?
49. What was the last project you headed up, and what was its outcome?
50. What kind of goals would you have in mind if you got this job?
51. Give me an example of a time that you felt you went above and beyond the call of duty at work.
52. What would you do if you won the lottery?
53. Can you describe a time when your work was criticized?
54. Have you ever been on a team where someone was not pulling their own weight? How did you handle it?
55. What is your personal mission statement?
56. Tell me about a time when you had to give someone difficult feedback. How did you handle it?
57. What is your greatest failure, and what did you learn from it?
58. What irritates you about other people, and how do you deal with it?
59. What is your greatest fear?
60. Who has impacted you most in your career, and how?
61. What do you see yourself doing within the first 30 days of this job?
62. What's the most important thing you've learned in school?
63. What three character traits would your friends use to describe you?
64. What will you miss about your present/last job?
65. If you were interviewing someone for this position, what traits would you look for?
66. List five words that describe your character.
67. What is your greatest achievement outside of work?
68. Sell me this pencil.
69. If I were your supervisor and asked you to do something that you disagreed with, what would you do?
70. Do you think a leader should be feared or liked?
71. What's the most difficult decision you've made in the last two years?
72. What do you like to do for fun?
73. Why are you leaving your present job?
74. What do you do in your spare time?
75. How do you feel about taking no for an answer?
76. What was the most difficult period in your life, and how did you deal with it?
77. What is your favorite memory from childhood?
78. Give me an example of a time you did something wrong. How did you handle it?
79. Tell me one thing about yourself you wouldn't want me to know.
80. Tell me the difference between good and exceptional.
81. Why did your choose your major?
82. What are the qualities of a good leader? A bad leader?
83. What is your biggest regret, and why?
84. What are three positive character traits you don't have?
85. What irritates you about other people, and how do you deal with it?
86. If you found out your company was doing something against the law, like fraud, what would you do?
87. How many times do a clock's hands overlap in a day?
88. How would you weigh a plane without scales?
89. What assignment was too difficult for you, and how did you resolve the issue?
90. If I were to ask your last supervisor to provide you additional training or exposure, what would she suggest?
91. If you could choose one superhero power, what would it be and why?
92. What's the best movie you've seen in the last year?
93. Describe how you would handle a situation if you were required to finish multiple tasks by the end of the day, and there was no conceivable way that you could finish them.
94. What techniques and tools do you use to keep yourself organized?
95. If you could get rid of any one of the US states, which one would you get rid of, and why?
96. With your eyes closed, tell me step-by-step how to tie my shoes.
97. If you had to choose one, would you consider yourself a big-picture person or a detail-oriented person?
98. If selected for this position, can you describe your strategy for the first 90 days?
99. Who are your heroes?
100. Tell me 10 ways to use a pencil other than writing.

Ways to Answer Some Interview Questions
Tell Me About Yourself
The interviewer is often trying to find out how you organize, your thinking, what you focus on, and how well you articulate your thoughts when you answer. Be sure to keep your answers concise and do not go off on tangents. Talk about more professional accomplishments and avoid personal topics.Example: “Well, first of all, I''m pleased to be here meeting you because I''ve long been an admirer of your company and of the work you personally have done. I believe I have what you''re looking for. I''m currently working with ABC Corporation where I head the accounts team. I have 8 years experience in accounts and internal audit with two Fortune 500 companies. In my performance appraisals, my bosses have remarked that I''m an effective manager and a good problem solver and that I have an excellent ability to create and implement office procedures and systems. I''d be happy to elaborate on any of these, if you''d like me to.”
What Are Your Weaknesses?
Do not try to mention a strength and present is as a weakness! Trying to say that you''re a workaholic or that you''re a stickler for detail and using those as a weakness will make it seem that you are attempting to doge the question or over-glorify yourself. Talk about your weakness in content knowledge rather than a basic personal quality or skill because lack of content knowledge is much easier to fix than a personality trait. For example, saying that you are unfamiliar with a computer software rather than saying you have difficulty managing people. You should also mention what you are doing to remedy the weakness.
How Do You Prioritize Work?
This is often a difficult questions to answer (at least for me) because you are not physically working for the company. These are a few ways people have chosen to answer:
- Prioritize based on most important and not by who has seniority or who asked you first. For example: If you had a huge document to photocopy and collate for a meeting that was taking place in an hour and an urgent email to staff that needed to be sent right away and your boss wanted you to contact the travel agency and fix his tickets for this afternoon's flights. Which one would you do first and why?
- Review the length each assignment would take. For example, you have 3 projects and you know that 2 would take the least amount of time so you would knock those out first and then work on the 3rd project.
- If there are unequal factors, rank assignments by deadlines, time for each project, and seniority of person who requested the project.
Explaining Terminations
This is often a very uneasy topic to discuss, but the best thing you can do is be 100% honest about the situation and explain how you have fixed such behaviors (if it was your fault for being fired).
- Tardiness (a common one): Where you tardy due to transportation? Explain to the interviewer that your transportation situation has been taken care of because you now realize, too late but better than never, that promptness is as important for attendance as actually being at your desk for the day of work. Where you tardy because you needed before school child care? Explain to the interviewer that you do have appropriate child care for before school and that you do realize it should have been taken care of sooner. Where you tardy because you just couldn''t get your butt out of bed? Explain to the interviewer that you didn''t feel challenged any longer and, in your quest for locating another position, you left your house later than you should have in order to arrive to work on time. Go on to state that you are excited about this opportunity as it will offer you the challenges that you have wanted.

Questions to Ask the Interviewer.
It is always important to ask questions at the interview (often times at the end). You want to ask questions and find out their exact roles at the company, any significant achievements they have to their credit at the organization, samples of their work, etc. You can also ask names of future colleagues and supervisors.
The following is a brief list I have compiled. Again, pick and choose as needed.
- What are the day-to-day responsibilities of this job?- What challenges might I encounter if I were to take this position?
- What are the first projects to be addressed? / What are the priorities you’d like addressed in the first six months to a year?
- What major issue(s) is the functional group facing right now?
- Are there any gaps or improvement opportunities in particular you are looking to address?
- What do you consider the five most important day-to-day responsibilities of this job? Why?
- What personality traits do you consider critical to success in this job?
- How is performance measured? Based on the individual or a team measurement?
- What might be a logical or natural career path/progression for someone in this role?
- Assuming I excelled in the position, what opportunities for growth and development might I expect?
- Do you have any concerns with my ability to do the job and fit in?
- How do my skills compare to those of other candidates you’re considering?
- What is the timetable for filling the position?
- What are the next steps in the interview process?
- Will you be contacting all candidates regardless of the outcome?
- What key results do you expect out of someone in this position?
- What are the main challenges this job entails?
- Why is this position open at this point in time?
- What results do you like someone in this position to achieve in six months?
- How many people have held this position over the past three years?
- How much independence would I have in making decisions?
- What options do I have for advancement?
- What key factors contribute to success in this job?
- Are there any major changes due to take place at the company in the near future?
- How would you like the new person to do things differently from the person who had this position earlier?
- What factors have been responsible for the company's success in the past?

Wrapping Up.
Before getting up and shaking their hand, you want to talk about some of the things you have learned about the company and the work you may be doing and then mention how much you look forward to working with them. Also, be sure to ask for a business card if they hadn''t already given you one.

Mistakes to Avoid.
1. Do not go in with a job-hunter's mentality. Often times you have to ask yourself what the company is interviewing you for and then decide what sort of person would fit that description. Is it someone how is out “hunting for a job” or someone who sees themselves as part of the effort, a team player, who wants to make a difference? If you are the job hunter, it will show because you will often come across as self-centered and often use phrases such as “I want...” and “I''m looking for,” etc. To avoid that, think from the viewpoint of the company and find out what they need and try to convey how you can fill that need.
2. Behaving in an overly careful manner. Interviewers commonly come across candidates like this. They sit erect in their chair, dutifully respond to the interviewer's questions and in general, try to get everything just right. By being stiff and overly formal, you reduce your chances of interview success. You won't connect with the interviewer, nor will you be able to exercise any control over the interview
3. Not doing any background research on the company. You cannot position yourself as a problem-solver if you don't know what the employer wants. And that takes some fact-finding.
4. Not listening. When the interviewer is speaking, do make an effort to understand what she's really saying. Listening is not just waiting for your turn to speak. Also, if you answer questions in a clinical, detached manner, you'll turn employers off.
5. Not paying attention to non-verbal language. Understand the interviewer's body language and personality style. That alone will take you a long way towards a job offer
6. Lying. This should be obvious, but many candidates lose sight of the fact that interviewers can cross-check on what you mention at the interview
7. Not following up after the interview. This is more than just sending thank you notes after the job interview. You need to keep in touch with the employer without becoming pushy

2nd Interview (or 3rd, or 4th)
Your objectives are to:
1. Obtain more information about the company and position to determine if you are interested in pursuing the job further
2. Impress the interviewer(s) and receive a job offer (not that you will necessarily accept it!)

The interviewer''s objectives are to:
1. Introduce you to other people to see if there is a “fit” between you and the company
2. Probe further into any areas where they want more information (NOTE: You may actually go through 3, 4 or more rounds of interviews prior to receiving any job offer)

When you are asked back for a second interview it means that you are considered a viable candidate for the position and you are qualified to do the job. Second interviews vary with each company. Since you are going to meet with different people, you can expect to be asked some of the same questions, beginning with Tell me about yourself,” or “Walk me through your resume.”
They know you have the skills by now, and will be looking to see personality and cultural fit. You will be measured against other candidates who have applied for the same position. It is important that you leave the interviewer with something to make you remembered. Think of five strengths you have and pick the one that you feel differentiates you from the pack. An example would be a technical person who has great customer service skills.
Questions for the 2nd interview can also center around the particular challenges of the company(and, of course, you can talk about how you would proceed to assist in meeting their goals-be of benefit to them!)The questions you ask will be determined by what was covered in the first interview. Information that you need to know, so that if you are offered the position, you can make a good choice for you, is:- Exact specifications of the job -- what will you be doing? (Then ask yourself “IS that what I want to do?”)
- The expectations the company has for the person they hire. (Then ask “Are they realistic?” and “Do I think I can (or want to) meet those expectations?”)
You'll want to know more specifics about your supervisors, how your past experience fits in with the work position and opportunities for growth. Who will you be working with and how closely, what territories does the company cover, and does the company have plans for expansion are also things you will want to know about, in addition to whether you will be responsible for doing any of the development. What strategies have they used in the past, what worked and did not and any analysis about why would be especially useful now.
Other subjects may come up in this interview such as salary requirements and benefits. Prepare by doing some research on salary and some thinking about your benefits requirements. You cannot negotiate a salary until you have an offer, but you can prepare by knowing the “going rate” for your position -- salary.com. You should also do a budget sheet of your expenses and figure out what it costs you to live each month - your salary needs. You should know your “walk away” number, when you cannot afford to take the job.

Possible Questions to Ask
1. “Can you please tell me how your career has developed at Happy Corp. and would someone entering the company today have similar opportunities?”
2. “I read the career section and your recruiting literature, so I have some familiarity with career paths at Happy Corp. Based on the history of people you hired five years ago, if I work hard and prove my value to the firm, where might I be in five years?”
3. “I read in your literature that your training program is comprised of three (3) six month rotations. Does the employee have any input into where s/he will go at the end of each rotation? How do you evaluate the employee's performance during the training period?”
4. “I read in Business Week that a major competitor, Eager Corp., is increasing its market share in your main market. What plans does your firm have to regain its lost market share?”
5. “Can you describe for me what a work week is really like as a salesperson for Tasty Pops? For example, about how many sales calls do you make in a week, about how much time do you spend on paper work, and how far in advance do you set up your calendar?”

Tips
- The skills that helped you through the first interview (e.g. communication, confidence, and enthusiasm) will be looked for in the second interview.
- The interviewers will also look for increased interest on your part in the company and the position.
- You could be interviewed by many people on-site. Feel free to ask what the agenda will be before your second interview. Remember, the people you will interview with haven't met you yet so you need to impress them with your “Story.”
- You may be asked similar questions to the first interview. Don't worry about repeating your answers. The second interviewer is hearing your answers for the first time.
- Your interviewers may be peers, supervisors or executives - each of whom has the task of determining your “fit” with the company.
- Make sure you get a card from each person you interview with for writing thank you letters.







- If you interviewed with Human Resources on-campus, be prepared to interview with hiring managers and people who work in the area you are interviewing for. The questions these people ask may be more technical.
- The interviews may be very similar or different and the styles may also differ. Be prepared for anything!
- You may be asked to take a test some kind (i.e. personality, drug, honesty, IQ, numerical, verbal reasoning, aptitude, physical). Some companies also conduct background checks.
- ASK FOR THE JOB!!! People do not get jobs unless they ask for them. Don't assume the interviewer knows that you want the job. Let him/her know that you want it.
- After the interview, determine whether this position is a “fit” for you. For example, ask yourself whether the people you met with represent the kinds of people you would like to work with. Does the organization seem dynamic and energized or do the employees seem lethargic? Has the organization met its obligations in terms of agreements and promises made during the interviewing process?

Interviewers’ Pet Peeves
1) Do NOT overdue the perfume/cologne!!
2) Don’t say too little!
3) Don’t ramble on!
4) Tie it all together: relating questions back to another one or asking clarifying or follow up questions
5) No eye contact. If you are too shy to look into their eyes, look at their third eye, which is above and between the person’s two eyes.
6) Slang or street speak.
7) Deception. Just don’t lie!

How to dress for interviews
***DO NOT DRESS CASUAL FOR ANY INTERVIEW***
- Rumpled and wrinkled clothing is not appropriate
- Shoes should be polished, well-heeled, not scuffed, and coordinated with your outfit
- Fly-away or bizarre haircuts are out. If hair is colored, it should be a natural shade
- Avoid wearing too much cologne or perfume
- Earrings: Women - limit to one per ear; Men - remove before the interview
- Do not wear jewelry that dangles, clangs, or is distracting
- Hands and nails should be clean and trimmed. Women - conservative polish.
- After securing the job, you may be able to dress less conservative.
- If you have doubts, don't wear it.
- Dress not for where you are, but where you want to be.

How to end the interview
1. Leave your interviewer with the right picture of you. Think of at least five skills or traits you want remembered after the interview.
2. Ask if there is anything else you can provide, such as references, background information or work samples.
3. State your interest in the position. Don't be overly anxious, but act interested. Remember to mention the added value you can bring to the job.
4. Ask about the next step in the process. It's important for you to know the next step so you can follow up. Ask for the decision date.
5. Find out how to contact them. If you don't hear back, you will need to know who to contact and whether they will accept calls to check the status.
Closing the sale is important, but your closing should be tailored to the position, your personality and interviewing style and the interviewer.

Signs you may not want to work for this boss...
Quote:
Originally Posted by speedysweetie
  • * There is no clear job description or expectations
    * The interviewer is abrupt or rude
    * NO eye contact or their eyes are focused on a specific body part
    * The interviewer is bored, with little to no interaction
    * They don't bother to read your resume or refuse a copy when offered
    * You are interrupted repeatedly
    * Your resume/education/experience is roughly questioned without relevance
    * The interviewer or recruiter has no regard for appropriate notice to your former employer
    * They want an answer now or offer you the job after a few minutes of one sided conversation
    * Illegal or irrelevant questions abound
    * They talk down to you.
    * No one can answer simple job or company related questions
    * The recruiter calls or emails you more than twice to see how you felt about the interviewers. Not the friendly call after a great interview, this one is more of a flag raised on rookie interviewers running off qualified applicants.
    * Hostility vibe
    * The job description is beginning to sound like "Looking for a scapegoat..."
    * The interviewer confides in you or provides TMI about either the staff or boss.
    * Unrealistic expectations. Expecting miracles without acknowledging core problems.
    * Be observant! Use the time waiting to interview to observe other employees and their conversations
    * Belittling or immature conduct
    * How does the boss interact with the guard, receptionist or employee?
    * You are confused by evasive answers. If you ask a question and the answer seems too complex to the point of unintelligible, you are being railroaded.
    * You find you are not yourself during the interview. You may be having a personality conflict with your potential boss.
    * Your gut starts screaming. If your brain can't come up with a logical reason why your gut is telling you "that person isn't trustworthy," stop trying to figure it out and go with your gut.
    * If you are a witness to racism or prejudice, OF ANY KIND, towards another job applicant.
    * When the company gives you a timed-related knowledge test, as part of the interview, and you are told to stop BEFORE your time is up.
    * Refuse to show you your future department and/or workspace, because they are worried that the looks of surprise on your possible future co-workers faces may shock or stun the applicant (as in: 'Someone actually applied for the job?')
    * If they give you a vague or implausible response as to why the person in the position prior to you left the company
    * They can offer you full time job only after a probation period with low pay, and are very evasive when you ask questions what would follow after
    * You get an offer while not being told anything about your responsibilities
    * People seem to be controlling and arrogant, they criticize your opinion and argue with you
    * If you're a female interviewed by a male (or visa versa), you get compared with their nasty ex
Quote:
http://career-advice.monster.com/int...w-_2/Home.aspx
Ten Tips to Boost Your Interview IQ
by Carole Martin
Monster Contributing Writer

Even the smartest and most qualified job seekers need to prepare for job interviews. Why, you ask? Interviewing is a learned skill, and there are no second chances to make a great first impression. So study these 10 strategies to enhance your interview IQ.

Practice Good Nonverbal Communication
It's about demonstrating confidence: standing straight, making eye contact and connecting with a good, firm handshake. That first impression can be a great beginning -- or quick ending -- to your interview.

Dress for the Job or Company
Today's casual dress codes do not give you permission to dress as "they" do when you interview. It is important to look professional and well-groomed. Whether you wear a suit or something less formal depends on the company culture and the position you are seeking. If possible, call to find out about the company dress code before the interview.

Listen
From the very beginning of the interview, your interviewer is giving you information, either directly or indirectly. If you are not hearing it, you are missing a major opportunity. Good communication skills include listening and letting the person know you heard what was said. Observe your interviewer, and match that style and pace.

Don't Talk Too Much
Telling the interviewer more than he needs to know could be a fatal mistake. When you have not prepared ahead of time, you may tend to ramble, sometimes talking yourself right out of the job. Prepare for the interview by reading through the job posting, matching your skills with the position's requirements and relating only that information.

Don't Be Too Familiar
The interview is a professional meeting to talk business. This is not about making a new friend. Your level of familiarity should mimic the interviewer's demeanor. It is important to bring energy and enthusiasm to the interview and to ask questions, but do not overstep your place as a candidate looking for a job.

Use Appropriate Language
It's a given that you should use professional language during the interview. Be aware of any inappropriate slang words or references to age, race, religion, politics or sexual orientation -- these topics could send you out the door very quickly.

Don't Be Cocky
Attitude plays a key role in your interview success. There is a fine balance between confidence, professionalism and modesty. Even if you're putting on a performance to demonstrate your ability, overconfidence is as bad, if not worse, as being too reserved.

Take Care to Answer the Questions
When an interviewer asks for an example of a time when you did something, he is seeking a sample of your past behavior. If you fail to relate a specific example, you not only don't answer the question, but you also miss an opportunity to prove your ability and talk about your skills.

Ask Questions
When asked if they have any questions, most candidates answer, "No." Wrong answer. It is extremely important to ask questions to demonstrate an interest in what goes on in the company. Asking questions also gives you the opportunity to find out if this is the right place for you. The best questions come from listening to what is asked during the interview and asking for additional information.

Don't Appear Desperate
When you interview with the "please, please hire me" approach, you appear desperate and less confident. Maintain the three C's during the interview: cool, calm and confident. You know you can do the job; make sure the interviewer believes you can, too.
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Part V: Thank You Letters
This is a very important aspect after your interview. This can sometimes make you stand out from all the other interviewee's. You want to send out a thank you letter as soon as you get back from the interview that day or no later than the following day. Now, after doing some research and asking on KCSR, it is acceptable to send an emailed thank you letter. However, you may want to consider a simple, hand-written, snail mail thank you note/card (something cheap from a drug store works fine).Think of a thank you letter being more than just a thank you. It is your opportunity to reiterate your interest, sills, and what you can bring to the company.

Formatting a Thank You Letter.
Start out by formatting it like any other letter.
Date
<space>
Name of interviewer
Title
Organization
Address
City, State Zip
<space>
Dear Mr./Ms. last name
<space>
Use the first paragraph to thank the interviewer for taking the time to meet with you. Mention your interest in the job and how enthusiastic you are about it.
<space>
The second paragraph of your thank you letter should include the reasons why you are an excellent candidate for the job. List specific skills that relate to the job you interviewed for. The more detailed you are, the more the interviewer will know about your qualifications.
<space>
The third paragraph (optional) can be used to mention anything that you didn't bring up at the interview that you'd like the employer to know.
<space>
In your closing paragraph, reiterate your appreciation for being considered for the job and let the interviewer know you are looking forward to hearing from him or her soon. You also may want to mention that if they need any additional information, you'll make it available. Conclude by saying you look forward to hearing from them soon.
<space>
Sincerely,
<4 spaces> (within these spaces, you will add your signed named)
Your name.

Formatting a Thank You Note.
This should be something simple and hand written. You want to thank them for their time and consideration and how much you like the company and you continue to be interested in the job following your meeting. Also, if the interview was pretty relaxed and the interviewer referred to themselves by first name, don't hesitate to start the note with: Dear [First Name]. Remember, you want this to be hand written and separate from the official letter you send out.

Part VI: Following Up
Aside from your thank you letter, you essentially want to get a hold of the employer to see the “status” of the decision process. Usually, it is about 7-10 days after your interview. There are multiple ways you can go about this, too. Balance the aggressiveness of your follow-up with the field you are in; the more aggressive the job is, the more aggressive you should be in following up (Example: If you're in sales, you probably should be following up every 2-3 days, unless otherwise stated). One fact to consider -- many companies don’t tell you their hiring decision (unless you’re the one they’re hiring), rude though that practice may be. They hope you will just give up and go away after three weeks. If no one returns your e-mails or voice mails after several weeks, let it go and presume that there will be no offer.

Email.
Email can be a great tool for following up, but don't forget the phone call either!
You want to use email when...
- You're over age 40 to underscore a contemporary image.
- You hope to start or continue a dialogue with an interviewer. E-mail is more conversational and easier for a quick reply (but, on the other hand, it's also easier to say no in an e-mail message than on the telephone).
- Quick action matters. The job could be filled while you're waiting for postal mail to be delivered.
- That was the way you sent your resume and especially if the employer requested electronic communication in a job ad.
- You are dealing with a high-tech firm; the firm's hiring authority probably doesn't remember what paper is and may think voicemail is a bother
Keep your e-mail follow-up short and send it in plain text, not as an attachment. Limit the message's width to three quarters of the screen. Use appropriate business language and don''t forget your contact information, even though the interviewer can push the reply button and get back to you with ease. Remember to complete your subject line with sales pizzazz (Example: “Thank you for reviewing my qualifications: Sales, 6 yrs, autos.”)
Example email:
Good Afternoon, Dave,

That interview with you was great! Thanks again. Just wanted you to know that I am very interested in this opportunity with [name of company]. Please call or e-mail me with an update at your earliest convenience.

Sincerely,

Bob Smith

Phone Calls.
If you call interviewers too often now, you waste their prime work hours, annoy them, and probably jeopardize your opportunity for the job. Space your follow-up calls --- once a month is probably plenty. Fill in the slack with e-mail or letters. Avoid calling during prime working hours so aim for early morning or at the end of the workday. You want to avoid leaving messages if possible, but if you tried several times, that may be your best bet. However, give them a 30 second clip of something interesting. For example: “This is (name). I'm calling about the (job title or department) opening. After reflecting on some of the issues you mentioned during our meeting, I thought of a facet of one problem you might like to know (create intrigue). My number is _____.”
Example: “Hi, this is [your name]. How are you doing, mr./ms. [interviewer]? I interviewed with you on [week day]. Since I am very interested in this opportunity, I thought I should follow-up with you. You thought you might have an answer on [day]. How is your decision process going?”
Opening the Conversation
- Is this a good time to talk?
- I think you'll be interested to know _____.
- I understand you're still reviewing many applications.
- I forgot to go into the key details of (something mentioned during the interview) that might be important to you.
- While listening to you, I neglected to mention my experience in (function). It was too important for me to leave out, since the position calls for substantial background in that area.
- I was impressed with your _____.
- I appreciate your emphasis on _____.
Keeping the conversation going
- Remind the interviewer why you're so special, what makes you unique (exceptional work in a specific situation, innovating): “Let me review what I'm offering you that's special.”
- Establish a common denominator --- a work or business philosophy: “It seems like we both approach work in the (name of) industry from the same angle.”
- Note a shared interest that benefits the employer: “I found a new Web site that may interest you --- it's XYZ. It reports on the news items we discussed . . . Would you like the URL?”
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Part VII: Job Offers
Declining a Job Offer
- Make a formal call first, and then follow up with a formal letter.
- DO NOT say anything negative about the employer, regardless of your experience
- It is ok to state that another offer was a better fit for you, without giving details as to why. Better fit could’ve been better for your career goals, your degree application, your abilities and skills, etc.
- It is not necessary to state whose offer you took, but you may do so if you wish
- Be polite, brief, and to the point.
- Include: a thanks and appreciation for the offer, followed by a written rejection of the job offer.
- Format: address letter to the person who offered it to you and include your contact info.

Negotiating Salary
- Discover what you're worth by researching salary surveys for your occupation, experience and location. Use sites like salary.com, cbsalary.com, and bls.gov. Be sure you are researching salary in your area and occupation because it will vary depending on your location!!
- Research the company to see if they're booming or hurting financially. If booming, go for top salary, benefits and perks. If not, get what you can comfortably live on, but think twice about working there.
- Also research yourself so you can sell your skills, talents, accomplishments, work ethics and experience for top pay.
- Politely sidestep salary (say it's negotiable, open or competitive) until you're confident they want to hire you. Then you have leverage.
- When asked point-blank about salary, counter by asking what the range is, so you know the boundaries.
- If the employer does ask your salary requirement, say you’d expect a salary that’s competitive with the market or, if you know the market value, give him a bracketed range.
- Command rather than demand, while working toward a win-win situation.
- Be eager and enthusiastic, but willing to walk away if you've reached an unsatisfactory negotiating ceiling. Don't burn your bridges, but rather politely decline the offer.
- When everything is done, be sure to get it in writing, but don't sign just yet. Even if you get what you want, wait to accept for a day or two to think it over, time permitting.

Tips:
1. Never lie about past salary. Reference checks might expose you.
2. Consider the value of benefits and perks too, such as stock options, bonuses, telecommuting options, and promotion potential.
3. Ask about extra benefits and perks, so it appears that you are compromising if you don't get them, or attempt to trade them for a higher salary.

What about raises?
- Know your company’s compensation policies. You can’t play the game unless you know the rules. How is job performance evaluated? What’s the maximum raise given? (So you don’t look like a fool and ask for too much.) When are raises given? If your company conducts annual performance reviews, schedule an informal meeting with your supervisor a few weeks prior to yours to discuss your achievements in the past year.
- Know the worth of your job. This was mentioned in the previous section, but it’s just as important here. Reread your job description and see if you’ve picked up some extra duties along the way. If so, those tasks may mean bigger bucks.
- Keep detailed records. It may seem strange, but keeping a journal of your progress and accomplishments is physical proof of a job well done. It may help your manager understand how you add value to the company financially. This documentation is also handy if your supervisor needs to argue your case to the higher-ups.
- As with salaries, practice your negotiating skills. Tailor your presentation to fit with your supervisor’s managerial style, like chatty or to-the-point. If you’re nervous about the meeting, practice the speech in front of a mirror or into a tape recorder. When the time comes, don’t say you need a raise. Explain why you deserve one.
- Don’t settle for no. This doesn’t mean you should quit your job or scream until you get your way. If your manager says there’s no money in the budget for a raise, try working in a bonus. If that doesn’t work, ask her what you can do to better ensure a raise in the future. If it involves additional training, see if the company will pay for classes. But above all, leave your manager’s office on a positive note. Smile, shake hands and thank her for her time.

Don’t know whether to accept or decline an offer
- “This is great news. I really appreciate the offer. However, this position would mean great changes for me. Is it alright if I get back to you tomorrow/[day of week]?” Be sure to give them a date of when you’ll get back to them (usually 2-4 days after the initial phone call). You will also have to give them a reason for the delay and some factors you will be considering making your decision on. You may also want to plan out what you will say before they even offer the position.
- If salary/benefits where not what you hoped for: Figure out what is more important to you, then see if you and your potential employer can agree on terms you both can live with.
- If you’re hoping another job offer would come through: Call the other interview, let them know that you have been offered a position, but wanted to check in before you accepted the other job. Sometimes this will be enough to move the wheels of bureaucracy… or sometimes they other organization will let you know that you are not in the running. If neither is the case, you must make the call yourself.
- If you are not sure about the job/organization: tactfully bring up any concerns, if you can.
- If after everything, you’re still not sure, write a list of pro’s & con’s and then sleep on it.
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Part VIII: Organization
There are so many ways you can organize your search, but remember that it is to benefit you and is not necessary, but will definitely help. This is what I made up and I will be more than happy to email you a copy. Just PM me.



Part IX: Places to Search
- http://www.careerbuilder.com
- http://www.monster.com
- http://kansascity.craigslist.org
- http://hotjobs.yahoo.com
- http://www.indeed.com
- http://www.jobcircle.com
- http://www.jobs.com
- http://www.dice.com -- Good for IT related jobs
Myspace has a jobs section.Facebook
has a jobs section.
Linkedin is a good place to start networking. It also has a job section.
Check the star and your local paper.
Community colleges have job listings.
Any major company you'd like to work out? Go to their site and they have a career section.

Part X: Letter of Resignation
- Keep it as simple, brief, and focused as possible
- DO NOT criticize your employer or your job
- Be sure to include the date that you are planning on leaving (ie. when resignation is effective)
- You can also include your appreciation for working with the company
- Make sure it's professional and polite. This letter will go into your employer folder and can possibly be shared with future employers.

Sample letters:
http://jobsearch.about.com/od/resign...gnationlet.htm

Part XI: Further articles
http://www.careerowlresources.ca/art...es11-22-02.htm
http://www.jobdig.com/articles/368/P...questions.html
http://humanresources.about.com/od/w...a/quit_job.htm
http://jobsearch.about.com/od/unemployment/a/layoff.htm

Part XII: Sites to check out
www.careerexec.com
www.kcphilnet.org
www.kchasjobs.com
www.kcchamber.com
www.collegegrad.com
www.hotjobs.com
www.careers.org/reg/crusa-mo.html
www.jobweb.com
www.indeed.com
www.greathires.org
www.job-hunt.com
www.kansasjoblink.com
www.salaryexpert.com
www.wetfree.com/research/companies.asp
www.careerbuilder.com
www.jobvent.com
http://www.lifeclever.com/give-your-resume-a-face-lift/
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Unread 2008-11-09, 03:56 PM   #6
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Part XIII: Informational Interviewing
1 out of every 200 resumes result in a job offer!

However, 1 out of 12 informational interviews result in a job offer.

What does that mean for you?

Start networking, especially if you are still in school.

Go on a few informational interviews. These will help you get a feel of the field or industry you plan on going into. So while most people screen jobs and companies after they’ve already taken a job, informational interviewing gives you the opportunity to conduct the screening process before accepting a position... and also establishing a network for yourself.

Informational interviewing can also benefit those who are looking for a career change.

The Benefits:

* Information about the career field you are interested in and the skills needed to do your job effectively.
* Opportunity to make personal contacts among management-level personnel.
* Gain insight into the hidden job market
* Learn what happens on the job beyond the understanding provided through your course work or other outside research
* Due to the lower stress level of an informational interview, you gain confidence in talking with people while learning what you need to know.
* Because you are only asking for information, you are in control of the interview.
* This opportunity will expose you to a variety of jobs and personalities of companies making the search for your "niche" that much easier.
* It is an opportunity to learn where you might fit into a particular organization.
http://www.quintcareers.com/information_results.html

Steps for an informational interview:
1. Identify the occupation(s) you are interested in and make a list of all possible questions you have about it.
2. Identify people in the field: start with your immediate network (friends, family, coworkers, etc) and branch out to alumni of your college. Be sure to research the organization, person you'll be speaking with, product produced by the organization, etc.
3. Never ask for a job!!

How to schedule the interview:
1. Letter: think of it like a cover letter, minus the pitch about yourself.
Include:
* A brief introduction about yourself;
* Why you are writing to this individual;
* A brief statement of your interests or experiences in the person's field, organization or location;
* Why you would like to converse. Be straightforward; tell him/her you are asking for information and advice.
* The last paragraph of the letter should always include a sentence about how and when you will contact this person again.
Remember to proofread before sending and of course... FOLLOW UP!
(Sample letter: http://www.quintcareers.com/informat...le_letter.html)
2. By phone: Remember, they are volunteering their time to speak with you so be respectful and flexible. If they sound too busy on the phone initially, ask if you can call back at a better time.
* "Hello, my name is ________________________. I’m conducting career research in your field. I would like to meet and talk with you for about 30 minutes so that I can find out more about your field of expertise."
* "Hi, my name is ______________________ and I’m a student at _______ University. I got your name from ________________. You’re in a line of work that I’m interested in, and I was hoping that you could help me gain insights into the profession. I’m sure that my questions could be answered in a 20-30-minute informational interview."
* If you prefer to arrange an appointment in person and cannot get past the front desk, treat receptionists as resources. They hold the key to getting inside the unit or section ofthat organization if you do not already have an inside contact or referral. Ask them some of your questions. You will usually get good information. Receptionists and other support staff know much more about their company than we often realize. They know how it works, the names of key people, job requirements, etc. It is important that they understand what you want. If you ask them something that they feel could be more fully answered by someone else, they will usually give you a referral.
* You can use your own creativity, but the most important thing is to emphasize that you are simply trying to get first-hand information, and whatever they share with you will be appreciated.
* You may want to schedule some of your interviews with managers and supervisors who have the authority to hire. Identify yourself and explain that you are researching careers in the contact’s field, and that you obtained the person’s name from ____________________(if you were referred).

Prior to the interview
1. Do your homework: Company Website, Annual Reports, Other Company Literature, Library Reference Material, University Career Service Office
2. Call to confirm your interview and arrive early. Have all of your questions on hand, bring a notebook and pen to jot down notes, dress appropriately, and just in case, bring your resume.

Questions to ask
* What is your job like?
- A typical day?
- What do you do? What are the duties/functions/responsibilities of your job?
- What kinds of problems do you deal with?
- What kinds of decisions do you make?
- What percentage of your time is spent doing what?
- How does the time use vary? Are there busy and slow times or is the work activity fairly constant?
* How did this type of work interest you and how did you get started?
* How did you get your job? What jobs and experiences have led you to your present position?
* Can you suggest some ways a student could obtain this necessary experience?
* What are the most important personal satisfactions and dissatisfactions connected with your occupation? What part of this job do you personally find most satisfying? Most challenging? What do you like and not like about working in this industry?
* What things did you do before you entered this occupation?
- Which have been most helpful?
- What other jobs can you get with the same background?
* What are the various jobs in this field or organization?
* Why did you decide to work for this company?
* What do you like most about this company?
* Do you find your job exciting or boring? Why?
* How does your company differ from its competitors?
* Why do customers choose this company?
* Are you optimistic about the company’s future and your future with the company?
* What does the company do to contribute to its employees’ professional development?
* How does the company make use of technology for internal communication and outside marketing? (Use of e-mail,Internet, intranets, World Wide Web page, video conferencing, etc.)
* What sorts of changes are occurring in your occupation?
* How does a person progress in your field? What is a typical career path in this field or organization?
- What is the best way to enter this occupation?
- What are the advancement opportunities?
- What are the major qualifications for success in this occupation?
* What were the keys to your career advancement? How did you get where you are and what are your long-range goals?
* What are the skills that are most important for a position in this field?
* What particular skills or talents are most essential to be effective in your job? How did you learn these skills? Did you enter this position through a formal training program? How can I evaluate whether or not I have the necessary skills for a position such as yours?
* How would you describe the working atmosphere and the people with whom you work?
* Is there a basic philosophy of the company or organization and, if so, what is it? (Is it a people, service or product oriented business?)
* What can you tell me about the corporate culture?
* What is the average length of time for an employee to stay in the job you hold? Are there incentives or disincentives for staying in the same job?
* Is there flexibility related to dress, work hours, vacation schedule, place of residence, etc.?
* What work-related values are strongest in this type of work (security, high income, variety, independence)?
* If your job progresses as you like, what would be the next step in your career?
* If your work were suddenly eliminated, what kinds of work do you feel prepared to do?
* With the information you have about my education, skills, and experience, what other fields or jobs would you suggest I research further before I make a final decision?
* How is the economy affecting this industry?
* What can you tell me about the employment outlook in your occupational field? How much demand is there for people in this occupation? How rapidly is the field growing? Can you estimate future job openings?
* What obligations does your employer place have on you outside of the ordinary work week? What social obligations go along with a job in your occupation?
- Are there organizations you are expected to join?
- Are there other things you are expected to do outside work hours?
* How has your job affected your lifestyle?
* What are the salary ranges for various levels in this field? Is there a salary ceiling?
* What are the major rewards aside from extrinsic rewards such as money, fringe benefits, travel, etc.?
* From your perspective, what are the problems you see working in this field?
* What are the major frustrations of this job?
* What interests you least about the job or creates the most stress?
* If you could do things all over again, would you choose the same path for yourself? Why? What would you change?
* What are the educational, requirements for this job? What other types of credentials or licenses are required? What types of training do companies offer persons entering this field? Is graduate school recommended? An MBA? Does the company encourage and pay for employees to pursue graduate degrees?
* Does your work relate to any experiences or studies you had in college?
* How well did your college experience prepare you for this job?
* What courses have proved to be the most valuable to you in your work? What would you recommend for me?
* How important are grades/GPA for obtaining a job in this field?
* How do you think my university’s reputation is viewed when it comes to hiring?
* How do you think graduation from a private (or public) university is viewed when it comes to hiring?
* How did you prepare for this work? If you were entering this career today, would you change your preparation in any way to facilitate entry?
* What abilities or personal qualities do you believe contribute most to success in this field/job?
* What are the typical entry-level job titles and functions? What entry level jobs are best for learning as much as possible?
* Who is the department head or supervisor for this job? Where do you and your supervisor fit into the organizational structure?
* Who else do you know who is doing similar kinds of work or uses similar skills? What other kinds of organizations hire people to perform the functions you do here? Do you know of other people whom I might talk to who have similar jobs?
* Do you have any advice for someone interested in this field/job? Are there any written materials you suggest I read? Which professional journals and organizations would help me learn more about this field?
* What kinds of experience, paid or unpaid, would you encourage for anybody pursuing a career in this field?
* What special advice do you have for a student seeking to qualify for this position?
* Do you have any special world of warning or encouragement as a result of your experience?
* These are my strongest assets (skills, areas of knowledge, personality traits and values):___________________________________. Where would they fit in this field? Where would they be helpful in this organization? Where might they fit in other fields? Where might they be helpful in other organizations?
* How would you assess the experience I’ve had so far in terms of entering this field?
* [If you feel comfortable and it seems appropriate:] Would you mind taking a look at my resume?

Remember to share something about yourself (your enthusiasm in the career field, etc), but DO NOT DOMINATE IT.

Remember to keep in contact with this person. They have invested time talking to you so it is only appropriate that you keep them updated with your progress and research. You never know, they may not have a job for you, but they may know others who do.

Before leaving, ask your contact to suggest names of others who might be helpful to you and ask permission to use your contact’s name when contacting these new contacts.

ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS send a thank you note within 1-3 days of the interview. Think of it as the thank you note for job interviews, but tweaks. Just be sure to include:
1. A quote of something that the resource person said back to them, word for word.
2. Ask the person to keep you in mind if they come across any other information that may be helpful to you in your career research.
3. Include your address and phone number under your signature.

Organize everything!
1. Keep a folder or notebook dedicated to your informational interviews. This will help you keep everything straight and a good place for you to refer to later on.
2. Evaluate your interview. Think about asking the following questions:
* What did I learn from this interview (both positive and negative impressions)?
* How does what I learned fit with my own interests, abilities, goals, values, etc.?
* What do I still need to know?
* What plan of action can I make?

Final thoughts

* If you ask for 20-30 minutes of a person’s time, stick to the limit.
* Take all information given with a grain of salt and don't settle for 1 or 2 interviews about a given area of work
* Avoid impressions about an area of work based solely on whether the person interviewed was likeable or the surroundings attractive.
* When in an interview, ask what you want to know but really let the person talk because you might discover and acquire information about unanticipated areas of employment. You don't have to stick strictly to your question outline... this is also good networking practice. Listen to cues and ask questions as you see fit.
* Note your reactions on an objective level, but don’t ignore personal feelings.
* Find out if the interviewee has any insight on the qualifications necessary for a position such as the one you are discussing.
* Talking with people doesn’t have to be a formal process or one you practice only when job hunting. Chat with people casually -- on a plane or bus, while waiting in lines, at social gatherings, etc. Since most people enjoy talking about their work, curiosity can open many doors.
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"If you feel you need to tell lies to get ahead, perhaps you need to evaluate why you're behind in the first place."
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Unread 2008-11-09, 04:01 PM   #7
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Revamped.
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Unread 2008-11-09, 04:02 PM   #8
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wow
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Unread 2008-11-09, 04:03 PM   #9
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wow


A few of those sections need to be updated, but I'll have to get to it when i can.
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Unread 2008-11-09, 04:25 PM   #10
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for the regular joe its perfect
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Unread 2008-12-24, 11:16 AM   #11
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Added info about how to close an interview.
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Unread 2009-05-19, 01:36 PM   #12
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This is the best thread on KCSR.
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Unread 2009-05-27, 04:34 PM   #13
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This is the best thread on KCSR.
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Unread 2009-10-19, 02:59 AM   #14
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http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/career-arti...to_recover-967

10 Ways to Make a Bad First Impression -- and How to Recover

Quote:
In the book "You Are the Message," media executive Roger Ailes wrote that it takes only seven seconds to make a first impression. With a job on the line, the pressure to immediately impress is even more intense. No wonder we get flustered.
The good news is that no matter what goes wrong -- your fly is down, you spill your water, you mispronounce the company name -- it's all about how well you recover. "I had one candidate who sat on a chair, it flipped out from under her, and she landed on her back," says Ellen Reeves, author of "Can I Wear My Nose Ring to the Interview?" "But, she picked herself up, picked up the chair, and made a joke. She knew how to recover -- and she got the job."

Below are 10 ways to potentially botch your interview, and the steps to take to right your sinking ship.

1. You're Sick the Day of the Interview
Don't try to be a martyr. Even if you just have a cold, you should call and reschedule. "I once interviewed someone who told me she threw up on her way over," says Reeves. "I was just thinking, 'Why didn't you cancel?'" You may be trying to prove your dedication, but employers would rather interview you when there isn't a risk you'll give them the flu.

2. You Have a Black Eye
If you're hurt in some way -- whether you have a black eye, broken leg, or visible stitches -- first assess whether you can give the interview the same effort as if you were well. You may want to call and explain your condition, especially if it's severe or requires handicap access. If you decide not to call, be prepared with an explanation. A general rule of thumb: sporting accidents are more acceptable than bar fights.

3. You Have a Nose Ring
Facial piercings and visible tattoos are tricky. The best bet is to cover them until you feel out the culture. If you're concerned your personal decor won't be tolerated, make an anonymous call and ask the receptionist if it's the correct environment for your nose ring. If the answer is no, remove/hide your piercing/tattoo. If you're unwilling, be prepared to get rejected for not fitting into the company culture.

4. You're Sweating
You're human. You perspire. But don't let interviewers see it. If you arrive at an interview spouting like a sprinkler, excuse yourself to the restroom to compose yourself -- and towel down. Sweaty palms don't make for a pleasant handshake. Run your hands under cold water to cool them off, then dry thoroughly.

5. You're Underdressed
Dressing to impress should be a no-brainer, but many people still struggle with what to wear. "Do your homework," says image consultant Lauren Solomon. "Be able to walk in and look like part of the team -- but one step above." Solomon suggests looking at peoples' clothes on the company website, asking the secretary, or posing the question on Twitter. If all those fail, wearing a suit is always a safe bet.

6. You're Late
There really is no excuse for being late to an interview. Scope out the route beforehand, and give yourself plenty of transit time. If you have to be late -- your car stalled, your train is running late, or there was a UFO landing outside the office -- call the interviewer, explain the situation, and ask if he still has time for you or would like to reschedule. Be respectful of recruiters' time and they'll remember it.

7. You're Early
While you should give yourself plenty of time to get to the interview, hanging out in the lobby for 30 minutes before the interview makes you look desperate. If you arrive early, sit and wait in a coffee shop, or just sit in your car. Don't go into the office until 10 minutes before the scheduled time.

8. You Misuse Your Lobby Time
Count your 10 minutes in the lobby as part of the interview. "The security guard, doorman, and receptionist will all be judging you," says Reeves. "If you're rude or dismissive, they will tattle, and there's a good chance you won't get the job." Talking on your cell about last night's exploits or reading a book are also bad ideas. Spend your time gathering information -- read available literature or look at company bulletin boards.

9. Your Handshake Is Lacking
A University of Iowa study found a solid handshake is more important than physical appearance when establishing an impression in an interview. Your grip should fall between the dead fish and the bone-crunching clasp. It sounds silly, but practicing with a friend is the best way to perfect your handshake. Also make sure to look your interviewer in the eye and say his name.

10. You're Bad at Small Talk
Think of some questions to ask your interviewer as you walk through the hall. If you notice something like a company picnic flyer, inquiring about that can be a great way to learn about company culture. Another safe topic is how the interviewer learned about the company. By showing interest in your interviewer's background, you'll put her at ease and establish a connection.
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Unread 2012-08-11, 07:45 PM   #15
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I didn't see it in the resume section but when printing your resume would I use Ivory paper or just white? I'm getting mixed reviews.
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I guess people are doing anything for a quick buck these days. If I wanna vacuum my house butt naked while listening to Darude - Sandstorm with the blinds open, I should be able to without people OUTSIDE giving a fuck.
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Unread 2012-09-07, 02:01 PM   #16
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I didn't see it in the resume section but when printing your resume would I use Ivory paper or just white? I'm getting mixed reviews.
Honestly, doesn't matter. Most things are done electronically now-a-days.

(Sorry for the delayed response. Just noticed that someone responded...)
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Unread 2012-09-07, 04:21 PM   #17
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Honestly, doesn't matter. Most things are done electronically now-a-days.

(Sorry for the delayed response. Just noticed that someone responded...)
That's fine, I figured it didn't matter. It's just I have a business career fair coming up at my school so I wanted to make sure I was doing everything right.

I also read that black suits are not a good idea for interviews? Thoughts?
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Unread 2012-09-07, 04:23 PM   #18
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I always put my resume on card stock paper, its just a hint nicer and thicker. Even if they have my resume electronically its nice to have an extra to hand them.
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BTW, shorten your SIG.
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Unread 2012-09-08, 06:53 PM   #19
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That's fine, I figured it didn't matter. It's just I have a business career fair coming up at my school so I wanted to make sure I was doing everything right.

I also read that black suits are not a good idea for interviews? Thoughts?
That's the most bogus thing I have ever heard!!!

Black suits, navy suits, grey suits... whatever. Just make sure you keep it classy. No crazy, off the wall colors. Make sure your suit is tailored to you (seriously, spend the extra $10-20) and is nicely pressed. Nice tie & a neutral colored button up. That's it.
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Unread 2012-09-08, 06:58 PM   #20
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I always put my resume on card stock paper, its just a hint nicer and thicker. Even if they have my resume electronically its nice to have an extra to hand them.
Yeah, that is nice. But, I wouldn't recommend buying car stock paper. Honestly, even just plain paper that is heavier than regular printing paper is fine. A (good) recruiter can look at your resume and know within 20-30 seconds if you are worth a second glance.

Here's how I used to do career fairs (an inside look):
- Person presented themselves to me. Were they interested in the position or just trying to get a job? Did they ask follow up questions? Did they have a degree that can be carrier over/used in this position?
- I'd make note if the person was well dressed (not everyone had suits, but presentable, ya know?).
- I took everyone's resume that gave them to me, but I had 2 piles: Yes, follow up. Or No, toss.
- After the person left, I would flip their resume over and jot down any thoughts about that person. Enthusiasm for the position. Dress. Follow up questions. Passion for the career field. Etc.
- Then, I can take 20 seconds to scan the resume & know right off the bat if they fit the position description & if they would be a good fit for the company.

Honestly, be prepared for the fairs. Dress well. Review the companies that will be there and mark the ones you want to visit with. Check up on the company online and make yourself familiar with it.
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Unread 2012-09-08, 07:42 PM   #21
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What is your stance on facial hair? I have no problem getting rid of it, but I look like a kid when I do.
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I guess people are doing anything for a quick buck these days. If I wanna vacuum my house butt naked while listening to Darude - Sandstorm with the blinds open, I should be able to without people OUTSIDE giving a fuck.
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Unread 2012-09-09, 11:59 AM   #22
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What is your stance on facial hair? I have no problem getting rid of it, but I look like a kid when I do.
If it's part of who you are, make sure it's clean & maintained. No crazy axe man beards.
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Unread 2012-09-09, 02:37 PM   #23
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If it's part of who you are, make sure it's clean & maintained. No crazy axe man beards.
I was thinking a conservative goatee like this.

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Unread 2012-09-10, 10:56 AM   #24
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I was thinking a conservative goatee like this.

that works.
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Unread 2013-09-19, 12:21 PM   #25
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Let me ask you a question geared specifically towards the Human Resources field.

I am working towards my bachelors in Human Resources, graduating in May 2014. I am having a terrible time finding anybody that will consider me for a position in HR, even if it doesn't prefer a degree. Everybody seems to want 3-5 years of experience. Tried internships but am only looking at paid ones, as I have kids and a family to support. I have no issues getting opportunities with other fields but not HR. My resume is top notch as are my interviewing skills imo ( i facilitate resume and interview skills workshops) and have had co-workers review it as well. I am not asking for unreasonable salary requirements and have done my research via many different sites : onetonline.com, salary.com, glassdoor.com , klic.dol.ks.gov etc .

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