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Unread 2016-11-14, 11:40 PM   #1
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Default The Jaguar I-Pace Concept Is The Sexiest Electric SUV Anyone's Made Yet



The all-electric Jaguar I-Pace is aimed right at the Model X

An estimated 220 miles of range, coming in 2018

This is the Jaguar I-Pace concept car. It’s a close-to-final electric SUV and Jaguar says the production version will hit dealer showrooms by the second half of 2018. The concept looks terrific, and it will likely be the first real competition for Tesla’s Model X SUV.
Jaguar says the I-Pace, with a 90 kWh battery and slippery 0.29 drag coefficient, will tally more than 220 miles of EPA-estimated range when it goes on sale. At a press preview earlier today, Jaguar executives emphasized the car’s cab-forward design, made possible because of the lack of an engine up front. Instead, the car uses a pair of electric motors to deliver a total of 394 horsepower and 516 foot-pounds of torque via the all-wheel drive system. Jaguar claims the car will go from 0-60mph in around four seconds.
394 horsepower and 0-60mph in four secondsBut the electric motors are only half the story. Thanks to the space recovered from where the traditional drivetrain would be, Jaguar says the I-Pace has more room for passengers and cargo than some larger SUVs. The interior is vaguely Tesla-ish, with wide open floors and plenty of room. A 12-inch touchscreen dominates the center stack, with a 5.5-inch secondary touchscreen flanked by two aluminum rotary dials sitting below. Infotainment and climate can be controlled on the lower screen, while navigation info can remain in full-view above. The assembled press wasn’t allowed to actually play with the new nav system (it’s unclear if it was functional or not), but it all looks great.
The instrument cluster consists of another 12-inch display and a full-color heads up display, controlled by capacitive touch switches on the steering wheel. Copying the iPhone 7’s home button, the buttons vibrate with haptic feedback when pressed.
The I-Pace uses the same suspension system as Jaguar’s new F-Pace SUV. That’s good news. I drove that car earlier this month and it’s very much a sporty SUV that let’s drivers feel connected to the road while still delivering a comfortable ride. Unlike that car, however, the I-Pace will not have a throaty exhaust note.



Jaguar says the SUV will include 50kW DC charging capabilities, allowing the liquid-cooled battery pack to be charged from 0 to 80 percent in 90 minutes, and to full in around two hours. Jaguar, which fielded a Formula E team for the first time this year, designed and developed the battery in-house. The company says it will learn a lot about cooling and charging batteries from its Formula E efforts, and it will put that knowledge into the I-Pace.
Though it’s just a concept, Jaguar says this I-Pace a good representation of what customers will be able to buy when it goes on sale in the second half of 2018. If it hits that timetable, it could be one of the first non-Tesla all-electric luxury SUVs on the market.


The company gave no estimate on pricing.
Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar Jaguar
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Unread 2017-03-02, 06:49 PM   #2
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Jaguar to display Photon Red I-PACE Concept at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show















Jaguar revealed that it will be showing off its new I-PACE Concept during the 2017 Geneva Motor Show on March 7 and it will come in the Photon Red color. This sports crossover is the first electric model to come from the brand and is expected to go head-to-head with the Model X from Tesla.

According to Jaguar, powering the I-PACE are two electric motors which have been placed on each of its axles. Combined output is estimated at 400 hp with peak torque of 516 lb.-ft. (700 Nm). Acceleration from 0 to 60 mph (0 to 96 km/h) is possible in 4 seconds. Meanwhile, the maximum driving range is around 310 miles (500 km).
In a statement, Design Director Ian Callum revealed that this concept car is different from the typical electric vehicles already available. He described its design as being clearly ahead of its time as it not only shows emotions but brings with it an attitude that is ready for the future. It is the result of using the genuine design language of the brand and then complementing it with British craftsmanship and adding in the use of premium details, he continued. Callum said further that this is not simply a concept car anymore as it is also serves as a look into the five-seat production car that Jaguar expects to put on sale by 2018. Given that this is the first EV to come from the brand, he said, it also marks the beginning of a new page in Jaguar’s history.
It was during the 2016 Los Angeles Auto Show that Jaguar first gave a preview of the I-Pace Concept. It became clear that the brand wanted to make it similar to a SUV. In addition, this concept car made full use of the fact that it had a cab forward design and because of this superior packaging, it was able to place the batteries beneath its floor.
While the brand is claiming that it is indeed a SUV, many are saying that it is similar to the Mercedes-Benz GLA and the Infiniti QX30, though both in fact look closer to a hatchback. Still, the combination of a broad deck and sloped glass in rear does give it a shape similar to a sedan, especially when viewed at certain angles. The original design did show that while already an attractive car, it can continue to have that quality even if the production version would tone down the appearance.
As if to challenge Tesla even more, Jaguar said that it will be accepting reservations for the I-Pace through their Jaguar.com website. The brand guaranteed then that with the production version’s release anticipated to be around two years away, it will not be accepting any deposits, much less one priced at $1,000. This will also mark the first time that Jaguar uses its online presence to push sales.
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Unread 2017-05-22, 08:40 AM   #3
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Production Jaguar I-Pace spotted in Monaco




The I-Pace hasn't changed much in its transition from a concept to a production model.
Footage taken on the streets of Monaco gives us a good look at the upcoming Jaguar I-Pace. The British company couldn't have picked a worse time to take the camouflage off of its first electric car. Monaco is preparing to host its annual Grand Prix, meaning thousands of media members and smartphone-wielding fans are descending upon the tiny, coastal state.
Taken by French website l'Agenda Automobile, the video confirms the I-Pace hasn't changed much in its transition from a concept car to a production model. The unusual quasi-sedan, quasi-crossover silhouette remains virtually unchanged, and designers haven't added traditional door handles.
We expect the specifications sheet will stay roughly the same, too. That means the production I-Pace will arrive with a 90-kWh battery pack linked to twin 200-horsepower electric motors (one over each axle). All told, the drivetrain pumps out 400 horsepower and over 500 pound-feet of torque.
The I-Pace will boast about 300 miles of range, and it will hit 60 mph from a stop in four seconds flat, according to Auto Express. Jaguar boldly claims it's developing a sports car, not an electric crossover.
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Unread 2017-05-22, 10:41 AM   #4
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Unread 2017-10-30, 09:58 AM   #5
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Jaguar’s first upcoming all-electric car spotted testing with new sensors

Fred Lambert

- Oct. 30th 2017 7:56 am ET
@FredericLambert











Jaguar recently made a serious commitment to electric propulsion and its first effort in the space, the Jaguar I-Pace, is set to launch next year.

The British automaker is currently testing the vehicle ahead of the launch and it was recently spotted with a new set of sensors.














Earlier this year, the Jaguar I-Pace was spied speeding around a track in Monaco and running some tests on the streets of London.
Now a test vehicle was spotted in Budapest, Hungary’s capital, last week.
It might seem strange to see a Jaguar test vehicle so far from the UK, but it might have to do with Jaguar having a new factory in neighboring Slovakia.
Though that’s not even where the I-Pace is expected to be built. Jaguar said that they plan to manufacture their first EV at the Magna facility in Graz, Austria, which is also just a few hours from Budapest.
Therefore, Jaguar clearly has a lot of interest in the region.
The vehicle was spotted by local publication HVG:








Sensors previously unseen on the I-Pace were spotted on the vehicle. HVG speculates that it could be self-driving sensors, like radar, lidar, and cameras, but it’s hard to say from this angle.
Let us know what you think in the comment section below.
Jaguar hasn’t announced any specific autonomous driving or driver assist capacity for the vehicle, but it would make sense for them to be working on it if it aims to compete with the Tesla Model X, which is equipped with such features.
As we previously reported, the I-PACE is a sport SUV equipped with a 90 kWh battery pack with a range of “over 500 km” NEDC-rated. Interestingly, the automaker has now confirmed “a targeted range of approximately 220 miles on EPA test cycles”.
They also announced a few other specs like 700 Nm of torque, 0 to 60 mph acceleration in “about 4 seconds”, and a drag coefficient of 0.29.
The automaker appears quite serious about the vehicle, which is expected to launch during the second half of 2018. They are even launching a new all-electric race series using the I-Pace in partnership with the Formula E.
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Unread 2017-12-07, 01:36 PM   #6
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Stylishly-Camouflaged Jaguar I-Pace Completes Late-Stage Testing in Los Angeles

This electrified beauty isn't anything like your mother's drab SUV.





Despite the global reveal of Jaguar's luxury all-electric SUV coming in 2018, the manufacturer sent the Jag out for a spin around the City of Angels during the Los Angeles Auto Show. The goal was for the production-prototype I-Pace to perform some tests regarding its range and overall durability, plus to look damn good while doing it.
This SUV is rather important to Jaguar—it's not only the automaker's first electric SUV, but it's also the first all-electric production car that JLR has ever made. It cares so much about the defining moment of the I-Pace's release that it had developed more than 200 prototypes and passed through the hands of more than 500 engineers before becoming the latest production prototype seen before you.
This hasn't been the first time the I-Pace has been out and about. Though Jaguar's official video only shows a short 200-mile trot from Sunset Boulevard to Morro Bay, Jaguar noted that it has put the SUV through about 1.5 million test miles around the globe to ensure its prototype could live up to its own internal hype. The I-Pace was able to deliver the 200-mile charge with room to spare, as predicted, and will continue to do so well into its battery lifespan of at least 10 years.


Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XB9Y_3tLKLg

In case you were wondering what the I-Pace looks like under its fancy camo, don't fret. Our sources tell us that Jaguar's actual production model will look eerily similar to the concept displayed at the 2016 Los Angeles Auto Show. It's also said to charge quite quickly, likely making use of existing Level 3 charging infrastructure supplied by automakers and charging partners around the world.
"Jaguar's first battery electric vehicle will also be fast to charge," said Jaguar's Vehicle Line Director, Ian Joban. "Our target is a zero to 80 percent charge being achievable in a short break."
For now, the manufacturer is keeping all of the juicy official details under wraps. Performance, battery details, and pricing will be announced closer to March 2018 when Jaguar plans on beginning to take orders on its I-Pace. Judging by the previous information supplied, we expect around 300 miles of range from a battery with similar capacity to the Tesla Model X 100D. Jaguar had previously claimed that the SUV will sprint to 60 miles per hour in just four seconds, and deliver up to 516 pound-feet of instant-access torque to all four wheels.
The attractive styling of the I-Pace makes it a modern-yet-familiar offering that's sure to stand out from the bland SUVs used to commute back and forth from soccer practice. If the British automaker can wrap all of this up into a single offering without any hiccups, it may certainly give the Tesla Model X a run for its money.
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Unread 2017-12-21, 04:19 PM   #7
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Jaguar's All-Electric I-Pace Could Start At $76,000


Ahead of Jaguar Land Rover’s launch of its first all-electric vehicle, the I-Pace, there’s now reports of the car’s price-point for. when it goes into production. If reports from early reservation pan out, the crossover could come close to the base price of a Tesla Model X.






Early reservation holders in the Netherlands reportedly received pricing and options from Jaguar Land Rover, according to a report from Autoblog.nl, which said the base price will start at 82,000 euros. The $76,000 figure is being circulated by way of Electrek, which picked up the story and cited some back-of-the-envelope math from a user on Reddit. Taking into consideration the Value Added Tax, the Redditor concluded:
Back out the 21% VAT and convert to dollars, it looks like:
  • I-PACE S: $76,400 - 18" wheels, LED headlights, Meridian audio system
  • I-PACE SE: $83,864 - 20" wheels, adaptive cruise control, leather, power tailgate
  • I-PACE HSE: $90,387 - 18 way power adjustable seats, surround audio, other stuff
  • I-PACE First Edition: $98,773 - adds heads up display, air suspension, and sunroof
When reached, a spokesperson for Jaguar Land Rover declined to comment on the leaked prices. Jaguar has said it’d come in about 10-15 percent higher than an F-PACE, which suggests it’d be in the ballpark of $60,000-70,000, so this isn’t too far off.








“We have said it will be priced in line with other luxury BEV competitors, above F-PACE,” the spokesperson, Stuart Schorr, told Jalopnik. “Market details will be released in the spring when the production car debuts.”

For now, take it with a grain of salt—but it does offer some insight. To be honest, if this is accurate, the base pricing’s a tad higher than expected. I think the general consensus when Jaguar released this concept was that it’d start much lower. (At least that was the talk around the office this morning.)
At best, it seems like this is just ... an electric Jaguar. That’s fine! But stacked up against the Model X, the I-Pace appears like it’s going to have a lot to prove. Jaguar doesn’t have the charging infrastructure like Tesla; the automaker says the I-Pace could fully recharge in two hours using a 50 KW DC charging network, but that’s for about 220-250 miles of range with the car’s 90 kWh battery pack. Tesla Supercharges can tackle that amount in about half the time.

The adaptive cruise control gives it some of the driver aid features of a Model X, but Tesla’s Autopilot suite is still more advanced on that front. Still, the I-Pace can hang on the road; if it sticks to the concept released last year, Jaguar says it’ll pack 400 horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque and could swing up to 60 mph in about four seconds.
To its benefit, the I-Pace looks sharp. The appearance alone could give it an edge Jaguar needs among prospective buyers. Sales are expected to begin mid-2018.
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Unread 2018-02-01, 01:30 PM   #8
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Jaguar I-Pace EV will finally be revealed, available to order March 1

Crossover will also have really fast charging




It sure feels like the Jaguar I-Pace electric car concept was revealed longer ago than November 2016. That might be because in addition to running barely camouflaged production models around for months, the company has even announced a one-make race series with the car before we've seen the revealed production model. But the wait is almost over. The company finally announced a reveal date of March 1. This comes just before the Geneva Motor Show, and the debut will be shown on a livestream. Not only that, but Jaguar will be taking orders for the EV the same day.

Reveal and order dates weren't the only things Jaguar announced regarding the I-Pace. The company also said the I-Pace will be able to get an 80 percent charge from a DC fast charger in just 45 minutes. This charge time necessitates a 100-kW fast charger, though, so that time may vary in real life based on what chargers are available. This is also greater charging capability than Jaguar claimed when the concept was revealed, which promised an 80 percent charge in two hours on a 50-kW fast charger.

Jaguar hasn't revealed many other details about the production car yet. When the concept was shown, Jaguar claimed it made 400 horsepower and had a range of 220 miles. The prototypes we've seen on the road also look extremely similar to the concept, so there shouldn't be much, if any, disappointment in the styling department when it's revealed.
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Unread 2018-03-01, 03:06 PM   #9
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Jaguar I-Pace EV specs and pictures revealed

It'll go 240 miles on a charge and from 0-60 mph in 4.5 seconds




It's been a long time coming, but the day has finally arrived. The production all-electric Jaguar I-Pace crossover has officially been revealed. If it looks familiar, that's because since we first saw the concept car back in 2016, we've seen the car testing, barely camouflaged, at the Nürburgring and elsewhere. We've also seen a hotter version called the I-Pace eTrophy, intended as a support racer for the Formula E electric championship series. Today, Jaguar has unveiled the final consumer I-Pace ahead of the Geneva Motor Show, and we're not surprised to see that it remains true to the original concept.

As we learned in the livestream of the I-Pace reveal, this electric Jaguar offers 394 horsepower and 512 pound-feet of torque. It'll do 0-60 mph in a brisk 4.5 seconds. With high and low regenerative braking settings, the driver can choose a more traditional driving feel, or opt for mostly one-pedal driving. Its 90-kWh battery pack offers up to 240 miles of driving range between charges. Jaguar says it can recharge to 80 percent in just 40 minutes on a 100-kW DC fast charger.

With two electric motors, one at the front and one at the rear, the I-Pace is all-wheel-drive, adjusting torque from front to rear as necessary. The vehicle boasts a low center of gravity, as well as a 50:50 weight distribution. Its standard air suspension with available Adaptive Dynamics improves ride and handling. It can also lower the I-Pace for better aerodynamics.

The I-Pace features the Touch Pro Duo infotainment interface shared with the Range Rover Velar. It will also feature an Amazon Alexa Skill to interact with the car, and over-the-air updates to keep the software current.

In addition to the unveiling, Jaguar is also opening up orders for the I-Pace today. Deliveries are expected in the second half of the year. United States pricing will be announced in Geneva.

The I-Pace is a harbinger of things to come. Last fall, the British automaker announced it would electrify all new models — and possibly even some old ones — beginning in 2020. In addition to pure EVs, this electrification strategy will include hybrids and plug-in hybrids.
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Unread 2018-03-08, 01:29 PM   #10
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Jaguar I-Pace vs. Tesla Model X and Model S: How they compare on paper

Jaguar takes on the EV establishment


When Jaguar released its first specifications on the 2019 I-Pace, we decided to see how it stacks up with a number of other EVs including the Tesla Model 3, Chevy Bolt EV, and Hyundai Kona EV. The reason being that they all deliver between 200 and 300 miles of range, and they were all quite close in size. But it wasn't a perfectly accurate comparison, because the Jaguar occupies an odd space in the electric market. While it offers similar range and size to those more entry-level EVs, it packs substantially more power, more brand cachet, and, once the official pricing was released, a much higher price tag. As such, we wanted to also compare it with the cars synonymous with luxury electric motoring (literally), the Tesla Model X and Model S. We're only comparing it with the base-level 75D models of each Tesla, since they are the closest in price and performance to the Jaguar. You can see the raw stats below, and can find more analysis and highlights farther down. If you'd like to compare these cars with others, be sure to try out our comparison tools. Performance

All three of these electric cars use a similar powertrain consisting of two electric motors, one up front and one in the rear to power all four wheels. The Jaguar I-Pace's 394 horsepower and 512 pound-feet of torque is a fair bit more than the 328 horsepower and 387 pound-feet combined power from the Teslas, according to Motor Trend. But in the sprint to 60 mph, the Jaguar doesn't really gain an advantage. It's 0.4 seconds quicker than the Model X, but 0.3 sec. behind the Model S. This is despite the Jaguar weighing about the same as the Model S, and a few hundred pounds lighter than the Model X.




At 90 kWh, the Jaguar also has a larger battery capacity than the Tesla 75D models, but range is again mid-pack between Musk's cars. At 240 miles, it's just 3 miles ahead of the Model X, and 19 miles behind the Model S. The I-Pace and Model X also are about as hungry for electricity as each other, both with an energy consumption estimate of about 36 kWh/100 miles, while the Model S is the most frugal at 33. All three vehicles have the ability to use DC fast chargers, with Jaguar claiming an 80-percent charge in 40 minutes at a 100-kW charger. But only the Teslas have access to the Supercharger network, and they come with credits for free charging up to 400 kWh at those stations. Exterior and Interior Dimensions

In every measurable way, the Jaguar is smaller than the two Teslas. It's about 14 inches shorter than the longest of the trio, the Model X, and still about 12 inches shorter than the Model S. It's also a few inches narrower than both, and it's shorter in height than the Model X. The Model S is shorter than either, but it's a more traditional car than the Jaguar and Tesla crossovers. The available air suspension on the Teslas also allows both to have greater ground clearance when needed than the Jag.


As a result of the Jaguar's smaller size, it's smaller inside than both cars in most ways. Legroom and shoulder room is tighter than the Teslas, and the Jaguar only barely squeaks out an advantage in headroom over the Model S. The Jaguar has a maximum occupancy of 5 people, but the Teslas have options for more. The Model X comes standard with seating for 5, but can be had with a third row and either captain's or bench seating in the second row, bringing the total to 6 or 7. The Model S can seat 5 in reasonable comfort, but there is a pair of jump seats in the cargo area, though they're really only suitable for extremely short trips or kids.

Unsurprisingly, the Model X has the most cargo capacity, which is listed in a strange way because of the wide array of seating available. What's interesting though is that, although the Jaguar is smaller than the Model S, its rear cargo space is still somewhat close the Tesla's.



Pricing

Jaguar's ace advantage is price. It's about $9,000 cheaper than the base Model X, and it's about $4,000 cheaper than the Model S. That's before incentives, though the difference should still be about the same. At least they'll be about the same for now. The federal tax credit of $7,500 for EVs is only available until an automaker sells 200,000 electric cars. Once it reaches that point, the tax credit will drop in half with it later disappearing altogether, and Tesla could hit the mark this year. Once that happens, the I-Pace will have a bigger price advantage.
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Unread 2018-03-14, 11:41 AM   #11
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Jaguar's all-new I-Pace looks to challenge the eggs from Silicon Valley with British style
At the 2018 Geneva Auto Show, Jaguar finally let the cat out of the bag with the all-new 2019 Jaguar I-Pace, the brand's first-ever electric vehicle as it sets its on some Silicon Valley prey. Built from the ground up to be an EV, the I-Pace makes the best of its packaging while continuing the brand's effort to shed its staid image as being the official car of British dentists. Not only will the addition to Jaguar's ever-growing range of SUVs be a performer on the road, the I-Pace is going to let loose on race tracks, too, as a single-make support series for Formula E.


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As Jaguar's first EV, the I-Pace has a burden to bear. For starters, Jaguar is one of the first luxury brands to bring a full-electric model to market. It's also the moonshot Jaguar hopes will carry it through to electrifying every vehicle it sells by 2020, just a mere two years away. At its core, the Jaguar I-Pace relies on a 90kWh Nickel Manganese Cobalt (NMC) lithium-ion battery pack, which Jaguar estimates will provide the EV with up to 240 miles of range. (EPA estimates have not yet been published.) Within that pack live 432 pouch cells, considered to be the most space efficient of all battery cell types, that can grab an 80-percent charge in 40 minutes if connected to a 100kW DC fast charging station, Jaguar claims.



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That charging time is much longer at home, taking over 10 hours to reach 80 percent when connected to a 230V AC power source. A full charge will take nearly 13 hours. For those who have a short commute, the long at-home charging times likely won't be a concern as the I-Pace probably won't ever be drained flat before its eventual return to the garage. A Mode 2 universal cable will ship with the I-Pace as standard kit. With all that electric power comes much responsibility as the large battery pack sends electrons to two concentric motors, one at each axle, to lay down 394 horsepower and 512 lb-ft of torque. Zero to 60? 4.5 seconds. Top speed? Wrong car. (Okay, it's 124 mph, but who cares?)


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For those of you counting, the I-Pace's performance figures put it at near level-pegging with the Tesla Model X 75D, which manages a Tesla-claimed sprint to 60 mph in 4.9 seconds. However, Silicon Valley's wunderkind ekes out a higher top speed of 130 mph—not that it matters. The Jaguar's exterior isn't simply a surface for the British luxury marque to spread its new design ethos. Much of what makes the I-Pace look the way it does is functional. For instance, while electric vehicles don't need to cool a traditional combustion engine, they do need to keep their batteries at an optimal operating temperature, so the Jaguar scoops up atmosphere through its grille and active vanes for that purpose.


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Elsewhere, the I-Pace's shape is sculpted to make it aero-slippery and to channel air where the EV needs it most. Larger elements, like its low-slung hood, coupe-like tapered greenhouse, and adjustable air suspension that hunkers down the SUV above 65 mph combine to produce a drag coefficient of 0.29Cd. And like Tesla's vehicles, the Jaguar has flush door handles that pop out when touched or activated by a button on the key fob. But the Jaguar won't win any awards for aerodynamic trickery, as its Cd puts it on par with the BMW i3, but well behind the 0.25Cd Toyota Prius, 0.24Cd Tesla Model X, and the 0.22Cd Mercedes-Benz CLA. Jaguar will likely make aero refinements in the future.


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Aside from its sheet metal's functional properties, the I-Pace is a stellar example of how an automaker can blend evoquative, electric-vehicle design language with a brand's already established visual theme. The I-Pace looks like a Jaguar, but it doesn't all the same. If you're into cars, one look at the I-Pace's front fascia—especially its headlights and signature grille—are enough to peg it as a Jaguar. Yet if you were to compare it side-by-side with the F-Pace, the differences are stark. You need to give Ian Callum and the design team at Jaguar some credit for pulling off such a task as it's no small feat. Well done, 'A' surface team. Your work should be commended.


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The I-Pace's sculpture is wrapped around a body style atypical of Jaguar's heritage: a high-riding hatchback. Still, its wheelbase and exterior lengths are decidedly SUV-esque. The distance between the I-Pace's axles is just a tad bit farther than that of the F-Pace, but the I-Pace's body is just a smidge shorter. If you do the math, that means Jaguar's new EV wears its wheels closer to the corners, which is great for handling and interior space all the same. And yes, that extra bit of wheelbase length when combined with the structural flexibility of an electric drivetrain (in a platform meant from day one to house it) does pay off inside the I-Pace. Jaguar claims it has more space inside than the F-Pace. How much? Jag wouldn't specify exactly.


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However, Jaguar did give some other figures: 25.3 cu. ft. of trunk space (slightly more than F-Pace), 51.0 cu. ft. of cargo space with the rear seats folded flat (dwarfed by the 88 cu. ft. offered in the Model X), 40.9 inches of front legroom, 35.0 inches of rear legroom, and more than 38 inches of headroom in both rows. The I-Pace isn't huge, but it's more than ample for its footprint. Jaguar isn't just about giving you more space. The new I-Pace is filled with technology, starting with a brand-new InControl Touch Pro Duo infotainment system. It features 10-inch upper and 5.5-inch lower touchscreens to best separate information pages and control pages.


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As for how the Jaguar I-Pace drives, we can only speculate at this point, but the brand's willingness to setup a single-make series for the EV should be a good indicator of how much confidence it has in its new chassis. Similar to the BMW i3, the Jaguar can be driven with one foot thanks to regenerative braking. As you back off the accelerator, there's a certain point where the I-Pace will transition from coasting to engaging regen. The more you back out of the throttle, the more aggressive the regenerative braking gets. For those of you who've yet to drive the BMW i3, regenerative braking is all you need to bring it to a complete stop at a light.



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This obviously has the benefit of recharging the battery as the I-Pace slows down, further extending its range. It also alleviates brake wear, so you shouldn't have to replace consumable brake components nearly as often as with a conventionally powered vehicle that must rely on brake friction alone. Keeping the I-Pace's unsprung mass stuck to the tarmac are double wishbone front and integral link rear suspensions working together with Jaguar's air suspension system and Adaptive Dynamics continuously variable shock absorbers. In concert, these solutions give the I-Pace self-leveling abilities for when you're hauling heavy cargo.


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There's much more to the I-Pace's story to tell in the future, but the salient points should be a solid prescription for success against Tesla. (Jaguar also has the upper hand as it makes a profit on all the other cars it builds, unlike the Silicon Valley automaker.) The 2019 Jaguar I-Pace will head to dealers during the second half of 2018 in S, SE, and HSE trims. First Edition models will only be available during the 2019 model year. The I-Pace S has a starting price of $69,500 before any applicable federal and state incentives, taxes, fees, and Jaguar's $995 destination charge. Preorders are open now on jaguarusa.com.


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Unread 2018-03-27, 09:58 AM   #12
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Waymo and Jaguar will test self-driving I-Pace SUVs later this year

The luxury EVs will be part of Waymo's driverless ride-hailing fleet.



Waymo is adding a luxury vehicle to its fleet of self-driving test vehicles, the upcoming I-Pace EV. At an event ahead of the New York Auto Show, the two companies announced that testing of the I-Pace outfitted with Waymo's autonomous technology will be on public roads later this year in Phoenix, Arizona.
The two companies expect the electric SUV to be part of the full Waymo fleet in 2020. In the first two years of production, up to 20,000 I-Pace vehicles will join the Alphabet Inc company's driverless service which is expected to launch later this year and will give the public the opportunity to book rides in the driverless cars.
The I-Pace will be the sixth vehicle in the Waymo fleet joining the Chrysler Pacifica, a semi truck, the cute little test car and others. Jaguar and Land Rover already have their own self-driving technology which includes off-road capabilities.
This news comes at a precarious time in the self-driving world. After a self-driving Uber test vehicle was involved in a fatal accident, companies and regulators are re-evaluating autonomous vehicles.
On Saturday, Waymo CEO John Krafcik said, "at Waymo, we have a lot of confidence that our technology would be able to handle a situation like that."

At the event, Krafick noted that Waymo has over five million real-world on the road tests and five billion miles. He noted that the company is confident about the technology it's putting on the road. "Our role in the world is to build the world's most experienced driver."
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Unread 2018-03-28, 10:10 PM   #13
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Here's Why The Electric Jaguar I-Pace Still Has A Functional Front Grille





Many people have challenged the design team at Jaguar for slapping the corporate face on the innovative new Jaguar I-Pace, claiming it doesn’t need a grille if it’s electric. Jaguar wanted to set the record straight at the New York Auto Show, and it turns out the grille actually serves two vital functions.


The new all-electric 2019 Jaguar I-Pace, not to be confused with the new internal-combustion E-Pace …
Read more

It’s easy to look at cars like the Tesla Model 3 and Nissan Leaf and assume that electric vehicles do not need an air intake like traditional internal combustion vehicles, but that’s not necessarily true. Cars like the Model 3 pill in air through holes in the bottom of the car for stuff like battery cooling.

But the Jaguar I-Pace clearly does something different. The first purpose of the functional grille at the front of the I-Pace is to, you guessed it, provide airflow to aide cooling the big 90 kWh battery. But it serves a second, even cooler purpose.



Jaguar designer Ian Callum cited the stillborn Jaguar C-X75 supercar concept in the design and functionality of the I-Pace. Not only are both vehicles loosely similar in their cab-forward layout, where the cabin in pushed farther towards the front axle, but the I-Pace also borrowed some aerodynamics.

The intake grille is actually segmented in half behind the cat badge and mesh, with the lower half directing air to cool the batteries, and the top half directing air through the front of the car, up and over the windscreen and down the back through a hole in the hood.



Jag even claims the directed airflow is powerful enough over the top of the car and down the rear window that there’s no need at all for a rear wiper blade. Evidently, water will just get blown away thanks to the directed airflow.

So there you have it, haters. The I-Pace’s grille isn’t just a lazy copy-paste design, nor a lie straight from the heart of Ian Callum. It’s fully functional, and vital to the aerodynamic profile of the car. Plus, it looks good!

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Unread 2018-03-30, 09:33 AM   #14
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Jaguar interested in building I-Pace SVR




The future may hold another performance-oriented Jaguar SVR model, but rather than one based on a raucous supercharged internal-combustion engine, the brand is reportedly considering an I-Pace SVR, based on its first purely electric SUV.
At the 2018 New York auto show, Hanno Kirner, Jaguar Land Rover’s executive director and head of Special Vehicle Operations, said SVO is looking at what an electric SVR model could be—and how the badge would adapt to an electric propulsion, Autocar reported on Wednesday. His comments come hot on the heels of the Jaguar F-Pace SVR debut at the New York show the same day.

2019 Jaguar F-Pace SVR, 2018 New York auto show


Kirner didn't rule out any future I-Pace performance versions, but he also said the company hasn't committed to an SVR model yet. He also suggested a more luxurious I-Pace and even an off-road-oriented model as possibilities.
His comments follow a similar sentiment from John Edwards, head of Jaguar Land Rover's personalization and performance arm. In an interview earlier this month, Edwards said SVO will eventually develop a range of performance-oriented electric cars, and hinted the I-Pace would likely be the starting point. Jaguar will also take the I-Pace racing in its own one-make series held before Formula E open-wheel electric-car races.

Edwards believes the rules for electric performance cars remain unwritten—precisely why SVO would embark on a new and electrified range for Jaguar.
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Unread 2018-04-03, 01:02 PM   #15
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2019 Jaguar I-Pace electric crossover (brief) first drive review: 4:34 to the future


In the four minutes and 34 seconds that I get behind the wheel of the 2019 Jaguar I-Pace, I could listen to “Moby Dick” (Zeppelin, not Melville), make a bag of popcorn, or charge the electric Jag for about 20 miles.
Ideally, I’d like to do all three. But I get four minutes and 34 seconds to run my hands across its steering wheel and spaghetti around a parking lot in an improvised autocross course.
It’s long enough to marvel at Jaguar’s luxury electric crossover, but not long enough to forget the classic E-Types sitting 100 yards away in the automaker’s U.S. headquarters in Mahwah, New Jersey.
It’s also not long enough to draw any meaningful conclusions about the I-Pace, which goes on sale later this year.
But it’s long enough to know that things will change.

2019 Jaguar I-Pace first drive


Back to the future
The 2019 Jaguar I-Pace carefully skips thoughtless trendiness in its looks, inside and out.
Jaguar Designer Wayne Burgess notes that the I-Pace still has to safely carry humans—who sit on their bottoms and mostly have protruding appendages—and cargo. It’s a modern interior, but there’s no vodka-bar chic décor or holograms on the dash; the I-Pace is clearly meant for Jag clientele first.
That means a usable back seat, a quiet interior, and leather everywhere. The I-Pace sports a cribbed version of Land Rover’s Touch Pro Duo setup—a 10-inch touchscreen on top and a smaller touchscreen on the bottom for climate controls and vehicle functions. I flick quickly through the menus, but that’s the sheet music, I’m here for the piano.

This Jag will live a clean life, free from gasoline and with straight enough sheet metal to be accepted as a freshman at Brigham Young University. The body was sculpted without Malcolm Sayer’s Coke-bottle shape; its sides are straight to keep air close to the body and wick it away for efficiency.

Jaguar has big ideas for the way the I-Pace drives and cuts a hole through the wind, but employs an anti-Whopper approach for how it’ll take on that task. Namely, very few substitutions are available in the drive menu.

Would you like idle creep? Would you like aggressive regen (up to 0.4 G)? That’s it. No “Sport” or “Ludicrous” settings. Nothing to adjust for the all-wheel-drive system—just let it work.
In that vein, the “shifter” is really just the four standard P, N, D, R buttons. Hardly techno.
I tap “D” because I have four minutes and 34 seconds to find out what that means to the I-Pace.

Mass appeal

Before I set out, a friendly I-Pace minder reminds me to toe in to the gray New Jersey parking lot in the office park sea. The Jag builds its speed quickly and convincingly, although the steering stays unobtrusive and light.

The twin 147-kilowatt (197-horsepower) motors on the front and rear axles work in matrimony to deliver 394 hp together, although it’s the 512 pound-feet of torque that’s holy to me. Like other electric cars, the twist is immediate and immense.
As I build speed through the coned course, the I-Pace confidently maneuvers its compact body through the tight esses.
The I-Pace predictably uses MacPherson struts up front with a multi-link rear suspension, but it’s the standard air suspension that balances the prodigious load around corners. There’s no mistaking the I-Pace’s 4,800-pound unladen mass, but hard work and a 50/50-weight distribution have paid off in competent handling.
As I snake through the cones, the I-Pace prefers understeer, like nearly everything else on the road. The all-wheel-drive system neatly spins up the outside rear wheel to pivot the car around and it’s possible to mash out some oversteer in the wagon, although it’s quickly corrected by the stability control.

Gate to gate, I point the I-Pace around and take more aggressive lines with harder throttle to see how quickly the all-wheel-drive system reacts. Sense memory and residence in a mountain state tell me that the I-Pace doesn’t work in the same way that Jag’s Magna-sourced all-wheel-drive system does—the electric car is quicker to find ideal traction.

Dynamically, the I-Pace should be every bit as fun to drive as Jaguar’s portfolio. In reality—for my short jaunt—it couldn’t be further from the rest of them.

There’s no shouting exhaust or thrum from an idling engine. The I-Pace is missing the carefree blat of a V-8 and a long nose. The ride is serene and calm—all four minutes and 34 seconds of it.
It's immediately apparent that the electric Jaguar is heavier, literally and figuratively; the I-Pace has the weight of a halo car to carry.








First, for now

I couldn’t care less about how quickly I lapped the improvised course, but somehow I topped the leaderboard after my drive.

Although my overall time was leisurely, my route and distance were highly efficient—a testament not to my driving skills but to the I-Pace’s ability to carve increasingly tighter lines over four minutes and 34 seconds.

As the first luxury electric vehicle from a mainstream brand, the Jag won’t be alone for long. Others such as Porsche, Audi, and Mercedes-Benz are building electric cars to compete head-to-head with Jaguar, Tesla, and everyone else. Soon.

Jaguar provided travel and lodging to Internet Brands Automotive to bring you this firsthand report.

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Unread 2018-04-03, 03:04 PM   #16
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The Electric 2019 Jaguar I-Pace Can Wade Through 19 Inches Of Water, Which Is A Lot




The 2019 Jaguar I-Pace is a fairly practical hatchback disguised as an electric crossover, but it has one surprising feature that might be unexpected for a low vehicle powered purely by batteries—it can wade through 19 inches of water. Almost 20, in fact.

As I sat there shifting on my feet at the launch presentation for the production I-Pace at Jaguar’s brand new headquarters (which was clearly not designed for presentations, considering we had to do it in the building’s cafeteria and didn’t have any seats) last week, I perked up a bit when Wolfgang Ziebart, Technical Design Director for Jaguar, amusedly announced the I-Pace has a wade depth of 500 millimeters, or 19.68 inches.

In a later interview from the show floor of the New York Auto Show, I asked Dr. Ziebart about it. He told me it was never a specific engineering objective, but since Jaguar and Land Rover share the same engineering team, it just sort of happened.

To put those 19 inches into context, the Subaru Outback has a maximum wade depth of 18 inches, the Jeep Cherokee is 19 inches, the Jaguar F-Pace is 20.7 inches, the Land Rover Discovery Sport is 23.6 inches, and the Jeep Wrangler is 30 inches.

Considering the I-Pace rides much lower than the Cherokee and has the same wade depth, it would probably be pretty shocking to see one of these things pushing through over a foot-and-a-half of water.

So not only is the I-Pace a practical EV for those concerned with cutting off emissions, but it’s also preparing for climate change by being surprisingly capable for when the ocean levels drastically rise. I like engineering that’s looking ahead.
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Unread 2018-05-29, 01:11 PM   #17
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Jaguar I-Pace SVR would prioritise handling, not 0-60mph time



Jaguar product planning boss Hanno Kirner says the I-Pace's 50/50 weight distribution would be key in a hotter version





I-Pace SVR, imagined here by Autocar, would not just be about straight-line pace
A high-performance Jaguar I-Pace SVR – and any other performance electric cars – would not be engineered for their 0-60mph performance alone, according to high-ranking JaguarLand Rover officials.
With rumours of an I-Pace SVR – and even a special limited-edition ‘Project’ car – gathering momentum, product planning boss Hanno Kirner conceded that teams within the firm had already worked through potential credentials for such cars.
“We have asked ourselves how you would ‘SVR’ an electric car,” said Kirner. “Yes, we can make it do 0-60mph in 1.8sec. It’s a good headline, but once you’ve done it once or twice, and lost your eyes in the back of their sockets, you might not want to do it again.”

Kirner highlighted the I-Pace’s 50/50 weight distribution and dynamic set-up in standard form as indications of what could be possible with the car. He also suggested that technical enhancements from current SVR vehicles could be applied in the same way to the I-Pace but also cautioned that an electric powertrain would need to be treated with respect.

“You also have to make sure you can’t go too fast,” he said. “I do worry that the instant torque and performance might be too much for untrained drivers. It may be that we have to impose some kind of restriction, so that the performance is limited until they have gone on a driving course or something.”
Kirner stopped short of confirming a high-performance I-Pace, stressing instead that the car had the capability to be developed as an SVR (performance), SVX (off-road) or SVA (luxury) vehicle if the company chose to do so. “There is probably more than one route we could take,”he said. “But there is definitely space for a performance electric car or cars.”
An SVR version of the I-Pace is thought to be most likely initially as it ties in with the one-make I-Pace eTrophy racing series that will launch later this year. An SVA version is set to follow once thereborn Jaguar XJ is established as the manufacturer’s halo model.
Jaguar also faces a fight to maintain its electric SUV leadership among established car makers, having beaten Audi (and its E-tron), BMW and Mercedes to market with the I-Pace.
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Unread 2018-06-05, 01:38 PM   #18
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Jaguar Details 2019 I-Pace EV


The battery-electric 2019 Jaguar I-Pace is a landmark moment for the British car maker, with some even saying that it’s as important as the iconic E-Type.

Almost every established automaker is developing their own electric proposals but Jaguar is among the first to offer a long-range premium crossover with an electric powertrain with the I-Pace.
Power comes from a duo of electric motors, each mounted on the front and rear axles, for a combined output of 395hp (400PS) and 513lb-ft (696Nm) of torque. That’s plenty of poke, with Jaguar claiming a 0-60mph in 4.5 seconds (0-100km/h in 4. and a top speed of 124mph (200km/h), but the most important figure for an EV is that of the driving range.
In the US market EPA estimates that the Jaguar I-Pace is capable of covering 240 miles on a full charge while in Europe that goes up to 298 miles/475km on the latest WLTP cycle. Use a home charger and the I-Pace will take 10 hours to charge up to 80 percent while a 100kW fast charger will replenish the 90kWh battery pack to the same percentage in 40 minutes.

These figures are more than reassuring – if you have easy access to a charging network during your daily commute. It’s true that the Jaguar I-Pace will not fit in everyone’s lives as some might find more difficulties in running an electric vehicle than others.
Those who can live with a Jaguar I-Pace however will find that the British car maker’s first series-production EV offers a dynamic drive that matches its attractive styling. They will also find a spacious interior with plenty of head- and leg-room, despite the low roofline and thanks to Jaguar’s clever packaging. Boot volume is rated at 656lt at the back and 27lt at the front.

In addition, the 2019 I-Pace is the first Jaguar that comes with over-the-air updates for the infotainment, telematics and battery energy control software, just like that other electric car company.
The new Jaguar I-Pace is priced from $70,495 before any federal and local government incentives in the US and from £63,495 in the UK, excluding government incentives
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Unread 2018-06-05, 01:40 PM   #19
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Unread 2018-06-05, 01:41 PM   #20
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Unread 2018-06-13, 11:57 AM   #21
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2019 Jaguar I-Pace First Drive Review | The future is now

Jaguar beats the Germans in bringing a Tesla-fighter to market



Jaguar's new all-electric I-Pace may be one of the brand's most significant breakthroughs. This is not just because the handsomely muscular all-wheel-drive crossover can travel 240 miles on a single charge to its 90 kWh battery. Or because it will cost a competitive $69,500 before federal and state incentives. Or that it can accelerate from 0-60 in 4.5 seconds — about as quickly as Jaguar's V8 F-Type sports car. It is not even because it may be the first vehicle to feature a small "froot" — "front boot" — which is a hideous British English term for the area known by the equally unappealing American neologism "frunk."

The I-Pace ranks high in the Jag insurrective pantheon because it is the first truly competitive all-electric vehicle from a major luxury manufacturer to hit the entirety of the American market since Tesla jump-started (ugh!) the contemporary, fancy, battery-powered vehicle campaign back in 2008. Sure, Mercedes, Porsche, Audi, BMW, and others have promised these vehicles, but as far as we know, they don't exist, and we haven't driven them.

The best news about the Big Electric Cat is that it's actually enjoyable on the road. Some of this is because of its intrinsic design benefits. The heavy battery pack, housed in the floor, contributes to a low center of gravity as well as ideal 50/50 front/rear mass balance. Both of these aid not only in the vehicle's road-holding capabilities, but in its style of holding the road.



Jaguar has always been adept at splitting the suspension difference between German plank and American couch, and the I-Pace follows this general trend, providing a ride that is connected without feeling overly harsh, even on the optional 22-inch wheels and Pirelli P-Zero tires. (Note to self: Reserve the Instagram handle Donk-E.) But the I-Pace does something interesting. Due to its high seating position, and the low placement of its drivetrain components, it provides the sensation that the mechanical action of forward momentum is within the driver's direct and immediate control, but taking place elsewhere. There is no delay, or vagueness — the inputs are precise and it goes where you want and expect. But it induces the odd feeling that you are riding atop a maglev hovercraft. It's futuristic, uncanny, and fun.

This slightly eldritch quality is enhanced by the vehicle's Active Sound Design, an ersatz soundtrack resembling the vague and distant thrum of an entire summer camp playing with Hot Wheels cars, that emanates from the I-Pace's stereo. It's not exactly present under ordinary circumstances, though it's not exactly not present. But it truly kicks in under hard acceleration, and continues its portamento for as long as you keep the throttle nailed, which can be a long time in a car with only one gear. (You can turn it off, but it takes about a dozen actions on the upper touchscreen of the I-Pace's dual-LCD "flight deck.") This is intriguingly disconcerting on the track ­— yes we drove the I-Pace on the track — though this may not be the most unnerving thing about hustling a very quick, 5,000-pound SUV around a technically sophisticated European race circuit. Imagine a full-grown rhinoceros that had been trained, since birth, to wakeboard. It defies logic, and it does not seem to display joy in its circumstance, but it performs admirably for its category.



This raises the question of what category the I-Pace fits into. Because of its short front and rear overhangs, a design advantage born of the lack of engine and transmission, it hosts a large cabin on compact dimensions. It can climb very steep hills, and ford very shallow streams (again, yes, we did that) so it's surprisingly — don't say "shockingly" — capable, not normal for most crossovers. And it can be set to creep off the line when you release the brake pedal, like in a normal petroleum-powered car, so that's also weird. This last system is known by the moniker "Creep Mode," though this term more aptly applies to the trucklet's integration with Amazon's omniscient Alexa. As an engineer giddily told us, Alexa can "learn" your behavior, and remind you to do things it detects you doing habitually, like stopping for an unhealthy snack or calling your side piece on your way home from work. This meddling interference in our personal life would detract from our time in the I-Pace's cabin, but, again, it can be turned off.

With its stitched leather seats and dashboard, flat and knurled aluminum accents, wood trim, and full glass roof and lengthy (if narrow) greenhouse, the I-Pace interior feels at once premium and accessible. It doesn't reach Mercedes or even Porsche levels of detail and quality, but it also doesn't attempt to suggest that the cost-cutting parsimoniousness of cheap materials is a virtue, like Tesla. And there are surprising little storage bins throughout that offer delight, and storage, including one under the center console. What would you put under there? Whatever it is, don't tell Alexa, that blabbermouth.



Most of all, the I-Pace proves, by being an existing vehicle from a major manufacturer, that our fancy electric future has actually arrived. Obviously, adoption will not occur instantaneously. When the elevator was invented, people gasped in horror until personal audience or experience demonstrated that riding in the levitating capsule did not require signing a blood oath to Satan. Disruption is difficult. But, for a change, Jaguar is leading our voyage. And if that requires vroomy ersatz sound effects, we're willing to accept the bargain.




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Unread 2018-06-14, 09:53 AM   #22
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The Fake Sounds Produced By The Jaguar I-Pace Make Me Weep For The Future





Photo: Jaguar
There’s nothing worse than discovering that your car pumps in fake or weirdly amplified noise. Sure, I know isolation from other road sounds is a luxury, but it just sounds completely fake. Unfortunately, many electric cars have picked up this baton of sadness and ran with it, as Jaguar’s new I-Pace makes some of the worst fake car sounds I’ve ever heard—and it won’t be the last one to lie to you like this.











Electric cars don’t produce a lot of noise, so Jaguar made their in-car “exhaust note” sound like Dumb and Dumber’s most annoying sound in the world as heard through a toilet. Above is a clip of the sound the I-Pace makes inside when you give it the beans, as taken by Roadshow’s Tim Stevens. Jaguar calls it “Dynamic Audio,” which really just means that the pitch and volume of the droning changes with throttle position.

Honestly, it sounds like Jaguar wanted to license The Jetsons’ flying car noises, but couldn’t, so they put Jim Carrey through a sound board instead. Hear the resemblance? It’s bad, and not to mention a new level in fakery.

At least BMW’s dirty cheatin’ speakers sound like the car should have if BMW hadn’t muffled the engine with turbos, excessive sound deadening and a wanton disregard for aural pleasure. Their “enhanced” audio is still a slimy act of deception, but the I-Pace is a new low. That I-Pace noise is just fantasy. Irritating, droning fantasy.

Worst of all, Jaguar won’t be the only offender. Porsche has already committed to making their new Taycan electric sedan (formerly the Mission E) artificially amplify the car’s lower frequency sounds on the inside. Car & Driver explains:
[Porsche head of electric vehicle development Stefan] Weckbach, who earlier this decade prepared the 718 Boxster and Cayman to transition to turbocharged four-cylinder engines, explained that Porsche will tune that sound in the production car by filtering out some of the high frequencies—the whine—through the strategic use of shielding. At the same time, engineers will make it more robust by aiming to let the lower-frequency and mid-frequency sound through.
In the Cross Turismo concept, the net effect is that you hear more of the low whir and howl of the motors than you would since electric-vehicle motors went brushless. If you close your eyes, it’s not far from the sound of cooling fans in old Porsche flat-sixes.
You can make it sound like an old flat-six cooling fan all you want to—it still isn’t one. That’s a dirty, rotten lie.

Look, cars. All I ask is that you be honest with me. Making noise on the outside to warn pedestrians that there’s a car seems like a noble pursuit. Pumping fake, tweaked or otherwise “enhanced” sounds into the cockpit is just a dirty, rotten trick and I won’t stand for it.

These new fast luxury electrics are exciting cars! They don’t need weird fake sounds inside to convince me of their worth.


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Unread 2018-06-15, 11:56 AM   #23
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2019 Jaguar I-Pace First Drive: Spark Of Genius













It’s not an electric Jaguar; it’s a Jaguar that happens to be electric.

Tesla has dominated the chatter around electric vehicles. The upstart brand and its founder, Elon Musk, helped turn the EV from something admired by the granola-munching, tree-hugging crowd to a must-have fashion accessory, a screaming performance vehicle, and a technological hotbed that's forced slow-to-adapt legacy automakers to move

And now we're seeing the unintentional fruits of Musk's efforts. Major global automakers are diving into electrification, and if the all-electric Jaguar I-Pace is any indication, Tesla should worry about the sleeping giant it’s awoken.



Despite the technology involved, the I-Pace's layout is rather simple. Two electric motors – one on the front axle and one on the rear – provide 394 horsepower and 512 pound-feet of torque split evenly between all four wheels. Effectively all-wheel drive, there's a single-speed transmission to put the power down, while the floor-mounted, 90-kilowatt-hour battery pack gives the I-Pace a manufacturer-estimated 240 miles of range. Disregard saving electricity, and this sleek four-door crossover-coupe can get to 60 miles per hour in just 4.5 seconds.

Those numbers are no match for the straight-line speed of a Tesla Model X P100D, but the I-Pace is two-tenths of a second quicker than the more common 100D. And importantly, the Jag outperforms two of its gas-powered rivals, the BMW X4 M40i (4.6 seconds) and Porsche Macan GTS (5.0 seconds).
The I-Pace is two-tenths of a second quicker to 60 than the Tesla Model X 100D.

The I-Pace is effortlessly quick at low, around-town speeds thanks to its zero-rpm peak torque. Even at half-throttle, this is a point-and-shoot car that can easily expose gaps in traffic and snake through with aplomb. The power doesn't relent at higher speeds either, meaning the I-Pace feels nearly as spirited accelerating from 70 miles per hour as it does from rest.

Like so many other Jaguar products, there are three primary driving modes – Eco, Comfort, and Dynamic – but the difference in throttle response between all three isn't especially severe. Eco is obviously the most relaxed, retarding the gas pedal without making the I-Pace feel sluggish. Dig in and full performance is still available in this mode. Comfort and Dynamic are even closer in behavior, with the latter making it clear that Jaguar isn't messing about with the I-Pace's sporting credentials.



To prove it, we ran a handful of laps at the stunning Autódromo Internacional do Algarve, in the hills outside Lagos, Portugal. Even your ham-fisted author managed to crest 120 miles per hour – very near the I-Pace's 124-mph top speed – on the front straight at the twisting track, while the zero-rpm electric torque catapulted the I-Pace from corner to corner.

Both the track and the tight two-lane public roads around it featured plenty of elevation change, sharp corners, and in the case of the latter, extremely narrow lanes to manage.
Normal roads are the I-Pace's happy place. Lower speeds and tighter bends showed off the natural-feeling steering and controlled turn in. The I-Pace isn't a pointy car, but it changes direction quickly and predictably for its size, with its steering wheel taking just 2.5 turns from lock to lock.

The weighting of the electric rack is very natural and positive, with a pleasant on-center response building to an appropriate level for a 4,784-pound vehicle.







The I-Pace is less suited to Algarve – because, obviously – but it did manage the race track’s tight corners, elevation, and braking zones better than any SUV not wearing a Porsche badge. Roll is more pronounced than on the road, owing to the speed, but the sheer level of grip from the massive wheels and tires – we split our time between 20- and 22-inch options, while 18s are standard – kept us feeling confident. It takes either a lot of pushing or a particularly dimwitted entry speed (or both) to get the I-Pace to understeer – in most other cases, the Jag felt pleasantly neutral, owing to its near perfect weight distribution.

This handling prowess is thanks in part to smart design and parts sharing. The I-Pace mounts its batteries low in the floor, but it's also not particularly tall for a crossover, at just 5.1 feet. The center of gravity is impressively low (thanks, batteries!), contributing to the flat handling, while the suspension itself comes from the entertaining F-Pace. That means double wishbones in front and an integral link in back as standard, and an air suspension as an option.

Normal roads are the I-Pace's happy place.

The I-Pace is most at home on the motorways, where drivers can revel in its accessible quickness and relax in its pleasant cabin. Unlike the F-Pace, which can occasionally feel cheap, the material quality in the I-Pace is impressive throughout. Where there's plastic, it feels robust and premium, with excellent fit and finish on such an early run vehicle. Tesla could learn a thing or six here.

The seats themselves are quite good, with standard heating and ventilation, and ample support for carving corners. In back, there are technically three seats, although we wouldn't ask an adult to sit in the middle. Used as a two-plus-two, the I-Pace is perfectly suitable for four adults. Your six-foot, two-inch author has plenty of head and leg space in back and wouldn't hesitate to spend a few hours riding back there. Cargo space is also useful, too, with 25.3 cubic feet available.






Ride comfort is quite good, although the I-Pace did feel underdamped on undulating sections of road. It should be noted, though, that we only drove cars with the optional air suspension, so the damping issues may not be present on the standard car. And while this is an electric vehicle with no engine noise to cover it up, we found road noise disruptive on some of Portugal's rougher sections of pavement, with impact noise and the effects of the road surface entering the cabin clearly. Wind noise is less of an issue.

Like the Range Rover Velar, the I-Pace's cabin is a touchscreen-intensive environment. Called TouchPro Duo, the center stack features a 10-inch screen up top, a 5.5-inch screen below, and even a pair of displays inside the twin climate control dials. Dual-screen setups are normally visually taxing, but Jaguar's implementation here is aesthetically beautiful thanks in large part to the floating bridge design for the lower screen. Unfortunately, the entire affair is functionally disappointing.





The screens simply aren't responsive enough. Inputs take a moment to register and the touchpoints themselves require too much precision (although the smaller 5.5-inch screen is better in this regard). Forget about taking in-depth action on anything but a pristine piece of road, because you'll miss your target.
'
The learning curve for the system is steep, too. The menus are byzantine in their complexity, and there's a tremendous amount of redundancy. Want communications info? You can have it in the main display, the secondary display, and the 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster. At the same time.

Same with entertainment and navigation. It's needlessly difficult to manage.



And speaking of the instrument cluster, just because it has analog controls doesn't mean there aren't similar digital problems. Inputs on the steering wheel controls are slightly faster than the touchscreens, but only just. There's too much depth to the menus here, too, and unless you know about this verticality, you'll grow frustrated (like we did) about why the steering wheel buttons aren’t doing what you want them to.

This needless complexity is particularly troubling because it impacts how the I-Pace drives. For example, there are two separate modes for the regenerative brakes – high regen allows for one-footed driving, even in a dynamic setting, while low regen behaves more like a conventional vehicle’s brakes. We, along with our equally tech-fluent co-driver, had to pull over because we wanted to switch from the high setting to the low. We couldn't find the menu and had to have a Jaguar rep walk us through it. We were told later in the evening that JLR's software team is aware of the issue and is fixing it in customer cars – expect regular updates, too, since like the Model X, the I-Pace can handle over-the-air software updates.






There is some technology on offer that works well, though. For example, those regenerative brakes are among the best we've sampled in an electrified vehicle. Pedal feel both on public roads and in the more demanding environment at Algarve is excellent, with progressive, predictable behavior, but only in low regen mode. We say that because in high regen mode, the normal brakes are mostly superfluous. It's exactly as aggressive as we'd want in street driving.

The charging system sounds good too. A 220-volt charger can get the I-Pace from zero to 80 percent charge in just 10 hours, while a 100-kilowatt DC fast charger can do the job in a mere 40 minutes, and the less-powerful 50-kW DC systems take 85 minutes.

What makes the I-Pace most impressive is just how normal it all felt.

But what makes the I-Pace most impressive is just how normal it all felt. Electric cars, especially Teslas, capitalize on being standouts and statement makers. The I-Pace does make a statement, but it does so in the same way that most of the brand's products do. This isn't an electric Jaguar, it's simply a Jaguar that happens to be electric. Whether you're tired of Elon's bombast and the culty attitude of Tesla owners or you simply want a stylish all-electric luxury crossover that isn't defined by its powertrain, the Jaguar I-Pace will give you what you're looking for.

Prices for the I-Pace start at $69,500 with US sales starting this summer.
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Unread 2018-08-07, 12:15 PM   #24
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Here’s How Far The Jaguar I-Pace Can Go On Single Charge


The real driving range is somewhat beyond the stated factory numbers

Even as the EV adoption rates are climbing and numerous legacy car makers either pushing to production or planning fully electric models, the range anxiety still seems to be the biggest deciding factor for new adopters. The upcoming Jaguar I-Pace is one of the most interesting EV models to hit the road this year. It features a rather impeccable exterior design, lavish interior, and impressive performance. But, how does it stake up with the range requirements? The crew at Top Gear Magazine decided to answer that question.





The test drive at hand is performed by Paul Horrell. This long-time automotive journalist has been at the helm of some of the world’s most interesting cars throughout the years. Let’s just say that putting new cars through their paces is what Paul is good at. Hence, when he was tasked with the range part of the I-Pace test drive, he had something interesting in mind. London to Land’s End on a charge – putting the I-Pace’s figures within the WLTP (Worldwide harmonized Light-vehicle Test Procedure) to the test.

The Jaguar I-Pace has an official WLTP range of 298 miles. The trip Top Gear was about to take is 291 miles. It features city driving, some back roads, motorways and a few stops necessitated by a real-world need for the driver to take a break. The trip is finished with some precarious accelerator pedal usage, braking as the last resort, slow in and slow out of every possible road scenario. The I-Pace manages to reach the southern tip of the British Isles with a single charge. However, there are some caveats to the whole situation.
The Jaguar I-Pace had to be charged once to ensure the vehicle wouldn’t be left stranded on the road. They’ve popped by a charger to add 10% to the battery, but the vehicle actually reached the finish line with 11% of its battery power remaining. That means 99 percent actually used. The crew attained the rated WLTP range. But only crawling along, denied heating, A/C, stereo, HUD, lane-assist, wipers, headlights. The actual driving range for any sane person not dwelling about the aforementioned driving modes will certainly be less.
Not bad for a large, chunky vehicle who’s range calculating software is still in beta. The new driving range test is more realistic than the old and we reckon it’s gonna raise a lot of dust in the EV industry in the forthcoming months. Largely because it still seems less accurate than EPA figures.
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