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Unread 2011-03-24, 06:11 PM   #151
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Originally Posted by TWEETY View Post
Yes, I can say I am not the absolute be all/end all for computers. I did, however, fix my issue.
All by myself even.
I guess my fingers didnt translate my point as well as my brain was thinking it. I DO have T-Mobile, so this will affect me too. I believe its quite premature to bail at this point just because AT&T sucks. From this point in time, we all probably have about 1 yr before big changes would likely occur. And already, some of ya are really moaning and groaning about it as though the end of the world is at hand. Relax a bit, jeez.
Reasonable?
Just had to poke a little fun your way. :P Although I'm glad I stuck with Sprint instead of going to T Mobile a year and a half ago. Still pay $58 with insurance on my unlimited data plan and getting some of the best Android phones on the market soon (as well as a damn nice tablet). I hope this doesn't go through though, I like where T Mobile sits with it's phones and such, AT&T would just ruin any sense of uniqueness T Mobile brings to the table.
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Unread 2011-03-24, 07:35 PM   #152
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AT&T's Pitch for Free Mobile


By MARTIN PEERS And LIAM DENNING

Deflation has truly arrived: Big, profitable companies are going for free.
That is, at least, what AT&T is claiming in relation to its T-Mobile USA acquisition from Deutsche Telekom. AT&T says the $39 billion cost of the deal is more than offset by the present-day value of synergies.
What are those synergies? AT&T has estimated an annual improvement in earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization of $3 billion, starting in the third year after the deal is completed. That comes from cost savings in areas like the companies' retail stores, advertising budgets, staffing and other administrative expenses.
It also includes hoped-for improvements in average revenue per user: T-Mobile contract users now generate $52 a month, well below AT&T's level of $62.57. AT&T also sees prospects for reducing T-Mobile's churn—the level of customers who switch out every year.
No one would dispute cost-cutting opportunities will be great. But there have to be questions about revenue synergies. Many people are on T-Mobile because it offers lower prices—its price for an unlimited voice family package with two phones is $99.99 a month, compared with AT&T's $119.99.

AT&T says its synergies are achievable. It is offering to grandfather in T-Mobile customers' existing contracts, it will try to persuade them to upgrade to pricier plans by offering them better phones. For some, that might be attractive. But there is likely to be a good chunk of T-Mobile's 26.3 million customers on contract who defect, either before the deal closes or in the year or two afterward, to other cheap providers. Others might refuse to pay more. That would make it hard for AT&T to lift revenue per user as much as it wants to.
Even if AT&T hits targets, the net present value of $3 billion in annual synergies, after deducting $7 billion of up-front integration costs and using an 8% discount rate, is only $16.3 billion. AT&T, in its $39 billion-plus synergy calculation, is including capital expenditures that won't have to be made as a result of the integration of the two companies' cell networks. In addition, it is counting wireless spectrum that won't have to be acquired by either company.
Unquestionably, the value of the deal is T-Mobile's spectrum, which will be particularly useful for AT&T as it rolls out the next generation of wireless technology, called LTE. So the deal has brought forward spending that would be necessary in the future.
But whether AT&T really gets T-Mobile's existing cash flows for "free" is debatable. It depends on getting the deal through regulators without crippling concessions. And on holding on to T-Mobile's cost-conscious customers, while persuading some to pay more.
—Martin Peers
and Liam Denning
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Unread 2011-03-24, 07:41 PM   #153
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I'm guessing since the tmobile 3g phones won't work on ATT while true they supposedly will replace the phone, I assume it's going to be at the cost of starting a new 2 year contract and having to then get an ATT plan at their higher price
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Unread 2011-03-24, 09:18 PM   #154
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I'm guessing since the tmobile 3g phones won't work on ATT while true they supposedly will replace the phone, I assume it's going to be at the cost of starting a new 2 year contract and having to then get an ATT plan at their higher price
THEY

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Unread 2011-03-24, 09:31 PM   #155
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THEY

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WORK
right but no data?
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Unread 2011-03-24, 09:57 PM   #156
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right but no data?
i thought they will work just no 3g or 4g only edge
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Unread 2011-03-25, 08:46 AM   #157
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...
This wouldn’t be the first time the FCC has approved a deal such as this, may point to the out the example of Sirius and XM radio combining into a single entity.
I see that being different. those were two failing companies that were/are struggling to stay alive.

AT&T is not hurting for business at all
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Unread 2011-04-03, 12:36 PM   #158
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***Q&A Answering time ***

Ok I have had a lot of people asking me if I know what is going to happen to them once AT&T buys T-Mobile, being that they are T-Mobile customers.


Nobody will know for sure, but here are my predictions.

AT&T Will treat it like they did when they purchased Cellular One.

You as a T-Mobile customer will be automatically converted to an AT&T customer. Your cheaper rate plan will be grandfathered in, until you want to get an upgrade.

When you want to upgrade, you will be forced to change your plan to an AT&T plan. If its anything like they did with Cellular One they will not be able to sell you a new phone without a new SIM card as well. (By getting a new SIM card you will also be forced to change your plan)


***READ***

Like I said, these are just predictions. Nothing is set in stone. I am simply comparing this experience to that of those who were with Cellular One.



By the way, I have already had a handful of customers switch from T-Mobile to Verizon
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Unread 2011-04-03, 12:38 PM   #159
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I think they should just give me a new sim and call it even my phone works on both tmo and at&t
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Unread 2011-04-03, 01:25 PM   #160
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By the way, I have already had a handful of customers switch from T-Mobile to Verizon

they are idiots, but i wont ever fault a salesman for a making a sale.
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Unread 2011-04-03, 01:29 PM   #161
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I think they should just give me a new sim and call it even my phone works on both tmo and at&t
this.


we put our tmobile account on hold. they offered to do this instead of us canceling the account completely with my orders. it puts the account into a frozen state, $0 bill and our numbers are held for 2 years.

when we get back to the states i will have whatever current phone from over here with me and will expect to start that plan back up and just get a new sim card.

our plan is too good and we will have way better phones than the states will have for me to even think about getting suckered into a ridiculously over priced plan....

..oh and my plan has true unlimited internet.
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Unread 2011-04-08, 04:42 PM   #162
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AT&T/T-Mobile Merger Proposal to Undergo Competition Hearing, Nothing to See Here [The Legal Process]

by Quentyn Kennemer on April 8th, 2011 at 10:14 am

Things are just about set to get underway with this T-Mobile and AT&T merger. The United States Senate has informed everyone that the Senate Judiciary antitrust subcommittee will be holding hearings about the proposed acquisition starting May 11 to determine whether or not consumer competition will be heavily impacted by the move. I say nothing to see here because this is normal with any high-profile acquisition. Many more hearings and trials and those such things are to come so sit back and enjoy the ride because it’s going to be a long one.
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Unread 2011-05-26, 11:24 PM   #163
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AT&T Explains T-Mobile Transition




Although the deal has yet to be approved, AT&T has provided a bit of insight as to how they plan on transitioning the existing T-Mobile customers to their network.
According to senior AT&T executive, John Stankley, the initial focus will be combining the existing 2G networks of both companies, with the intentions of getting as many customers as possible off the 2G networks over time. The use of T-Mobile’s 1700Mhz spectrum was already mentioned as the means for the planned LTE roll out and remains so with plans to move T-Mobile customers over to AT&T’s 1900MHz spectrum for 3G service. The transition is expected to take anywhere from a year to two depending on the amount of 1900MHz spectrum available.
As mentioned earlier AT&T plans on rolling out LTE service by this Summer in 5 cities and expanding to more by the end of the year with a goal of nationwide coverage by 2013.
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Unread 2011-05-27, 09:11 AM   #164
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I was in the middle of a debate about this. Because in contracts it couldn't possibly include merging to another carrier.

I'd be happy to switch anyone over to Verizon.

Ill be strongly considering this!
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Unread 2011-05-27, 09:33 AM   #165
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As long as I can just get new sim cards, I'll be happy as I have unlocked iPhones and they are running on edge network. I will just factory default them and put in the at&t sim and run like normal but with 3G! Hopefully they will let tmobile users go that route who have any unlocked phone. My plan is already alot. I hate seeing my cell phone bill every month.
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Unread 2011-05-27, 09:38 AM   #166
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As long as I can just get new sim cards, I'll be happy as I have unlocked iPhones and they are running on edge network. I will just factory default them and put in the at&t sim and run like normal but with 3G! Hopefully they will let tmobile users go that route who have any unlocked phone. My plan is already alot. I hate seeing my cell phone bill every month.
This was my thinking but w/o the crappy edge network
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Unread 2011-05-31, 07:30 PM   #167
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Sprint Makes Their AT&T-Mo Merger Opposition Official With Appeal to the FCC




Sprint’s been joining committees and speaking their mind on a merger that is sure to shake up the United States wireless industry, but they’d never officially appealed to the FCC. Until today, that is. They’ve requested that the merger be blocked under the usual grounds of stifled competition, innovation and protection of consumerism. Here is the appeal in bulletpoint form:
  • The proposed T-Mobile takeover would harm the broadband economy, competition and consumers. It would reverse two decades of successful U.S. government wireless competition policy and result in higher prices for consumers in the absence of marketplace choices.
  • The proposed T-Mobile takeover would harm innovation and investment. Approval of this transaction would uniquely position the Twin Bell duopolists of AT&T and Verizon as the gatekeepers of the digital ecosystem, stifling innovation and choice in new devices and applications, and the capital markets that fund them.
  • The proposed T-Mobile takeover has no public interest benefit. The transaction would do nothing to relieve AT&T’s purported spectrum congestion. AT&T is already the largest holder of licensed spectrum and unused spectrum and has simply failed to upgrade or invest sufficiently in its network. Moreover, AT&T does not need T-Mobile to expand its LTE network to reach 97 percent of all Americans, because its current spectrum holdings and network already reach approximately 97 percent of the population.
There’s not much more to be said, really. And Sprint does make very valid points that I’m sure a vast majority of consumers and other carriers agree with. Will it be enough to persuade the FCC to block the acquisition from going through? AT&T and Deutsche Telekom have already faced stiff resistance from several governing bodies of our nations, but such is always the case in mergers. (And some pretty big ones have gone off without a hitch in the past, even when a majority of folks wanted otherwise.) [Sprint]
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Unread 2011-05-31, 08:45 PM   #168
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soooooooooo are they for sure going to take t moblie? i thought the idea died out when i quit hearing about.
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Unread 2011-05-31, 08:47 PM   #169
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soooooooooo are they for sure going to take t moblie? i thought the idea died out when i quit hearing about.
Paperwork w/ the FCC is filed that is all thus far
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Unread 2011-05-31, 09:44 PM   #170
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oooh ok
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Unread 2011-05-31, 09:55 PM   #171
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soooooooooo are they for sure going to take t moblie? i thought the idea died out when i quit hearing about.
AT&T bet a billion dollars on them being able to buy T-Mobile. They are certain that the 15.3 million bucks spent lobbying the govt (last year alone) has put them in a position to close this deal.

I'd say they are pretty positive this will be approved and pushed through.
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Unread 2011-06-10, 05:00 PM   #172
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AT&T Posts Statement Regarding T-Mobile Buyout






Today’s AT&T/T-Mobile merger news comes via AT&T herself with a post on their Public Policy Blog titled “It is Much Easier to be Critical than to be Correct.” The blog post starts right off with a one two punch from AT&T promising this deal is necessary in order to give AT&T the necessary network capacity to work within the “broadband revolution.” AT&T of course claims that the capacity of the combined company will exceed that of the two companies working separately. AT&T promises that the winners will be the American consumer with extra capacity allowing for faster data speeds and fewer blocked/dropped calls.
AT&T continues to emphasize their efforts to let everyone know this deal will allow them to bring their LTE network to 97% of Americans. That’s over 55 million more people than they would be able to do on their own. AT&T continues to push the rural coverage message which remains a big part of their lobbying effort to gain government approval.
As we move further into AT&T’s lengthy blog post they work in some digs at Sprint all but calling their claims ridiculous. AT&T believes that while Sprint claims their opposition is due to a concern over a cut in output, raising prices and stopping innovation it’s actually for much different reasons. AT&T believes Sprint’s real motive in opposing the merger is to continue to compete against a “capacity-strained AT&T and a standalone T-Mobile USA that lacks financial backing from its parent and has no clear path to LTE.”
Furthermore AT&T plans to lay out in a Joint Opposition filing with the FCC tomorrow the details of each major complaint lobbied against them:
1) Network Capacity Crunch — AT&T says that contrary to the idea that their capacity issues can be solved without this transaction, they claim that they couldn’t make any kind of moves that would give them the same kind of capacity additions without this deal.
2) Duopoly Myth — It is here that AT&T continues to claim the “duopoly” myth is exaggerated with at least 3/4 of Americans living in an area with a choice of at least 5 wireless providers.
3) Contriving Conditions and Concessions — AT&T says that the proposals for possible concessions AT&T has to make in order to achieve regulatory approval such as concessions related to pricing, 700MHz handset interoperability, bill shock and early termination fees should not just be addressed in relation to their merger approval but as an industry.
The entire post is an interesting read and a good look at the continued arguments AT&T will continue to provide while lobbying for government approval.
AT&T
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Unread 2011-06-10, 05:00 PM   #173
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Full Blog Post:
There is one overarching imperative that drives this merger: giving AT&T and T-Mobile USA customers the network capacity they need to enjoy the full promise of the mobile broadband revolution. The combination of these two companies, and their uniquely complementary networks and spectrum holdings, will create new capacity – the functional equivalent of new spectrum – to handle rapidly escalating mobile data traffic. Indeed, the capacity of the combined company will exceed that of AT&T and T-Mobile operating separately.
The winners will be America’s consumers because the extra capacity will enable us to offer them better service — faster data speeds and fewer dropped and blocked calls.
And with the scale, spectrum, and other resources generated by this transaction, the combined company will be able to offer Long Term Evolution, or LTE — the premier next-generation wireless broadband technology — to an extra 55 million people and more than 97 percent of the U.S. population, all without reliance on government funds. And that is a big win for rural America because it gives those communities the same high quality broadband service that consumers in urban areas will receive. It also means more jobs and more investment.
That investment will also be a win for the innovators in the high-tech industry, who need the bulked up infrastructure to support their next generation of bandwidth intensive applications and other innovative products and services.
For these reasons, the transaction has drawn tremendous support from across the political and industrial landscape. Among the many supporters are labor unions, including the CWA, the AFL-CIO, the Teamsters and others representing nearly 17 million workers. No transaction before the FCC in recent memory has ever garnered such broad support from organized labor.
This transaction has also received tremendous support from a broad cross-section of the high-tech community. These are the innovators whose very businesses depend on the availability of robust wireless platforms – and their support is a direct repudiation of claims that the transaction will harm competition, innovation and consumers. Indeed, the members of the high tech community are among the most sophisticated and informed users of wireless platforms; and they have a unique ability to speak to the merits of this transaction. They are the ones in the trenches every day investing, inventing and innovating. That so many of them voiced such strong support is compelling evidence of the transaction’s enormous economic and consumer benefits.
Opposing this transaction are Sprint and a few other wireless competitors, along with the same inside-the-beltway special interest groups that reflexively oppose all mergers. They tried gamely last Tuesday to spin the transaction’s enormous benefits as anti-consumer, anti-innovation and anti-competition. But the fallacy of their opposition is easily unmasked. Why do Sprint and other wireless competitors oppose this transaction? Because they are worried, as they claim, that the combined company will cut output, raise prices and stop innovating? I don’t think so. Those consequences could only benefit these carriers as well as their shareholders.
The reason they oppose the merger is because they would prefer to compete against a capacity-constrained AT&T and a standalone T-Mobile USA that lacks financial backing from its parent and has no clear path to LTE.
But it’s not just that their arguments are transparently inconsistent with their motives. Motives aside, their arguments don’t stand up to scrutiny. In the Joint Opposition we will file tomorrow at the FCC, we dissect in detail each of the straw men they advanced.
1) Network Capacity Crunch – Contrary to claims that our network capacity issues can be solved without this transaction, we detail the engineering principles that make the extraordinary capacity gains that the combination will yield possible – and nothing close to those gains would be possible without this transaction. In fact, AT&T is not only already doing the very things they claim we should be doing, but we are the industry leader in them. We have more Wi-Fi hotspots, for example, than any other carrier. And we are the only carrier that has created Wi-Fi hot zones in heavy use urban areas, like Times Square, to off-load traffic from our network. And when merger opponents say in one breath that we are not migrating our customers fast enough to LTE and in the next that we should repurpose the spectrum we are using for LTE to relieve congestion on our legacy networks, they lose all credibility.
The bottom line is that the combined company will be able to offer more output and higher quality service – and that’s a good thing for consumers even if our competitors don’t like it. We also demonstrate that, by relieving AT&T and T-Mobile from capacity constraints, the merger will expand output, which economists recognize means lower, not higher, prices.
2) The Duopoly Myth – From the beginning, merger opponents have ramped up the rhetoric, claiming, for example, that if this merger is approved, the wireless market will become a “duopoly.” The truth is that a “duopoly” signifies a market with only two sellers, and that is a flatly inapt description of the post-transaction U.S. wireless marketplace. Commission data shows that today ¾ of Americans have a choice of five or more wireless providers, so, at worst, after this merger they will have a choice of four. That is not a duopoly. And it is particularly ironic that Sprint is the leading proponent of the duopoly theory given that Sprint is boasting to Wall Street of its marketplace resurgence, including its recent largest number of net ads (over 1 million) in five years.
The duopoly myth can be exploded with a single fact: MetroPCS and Leap together added a remarkable 1.057 million net retail subscribers in the first quarter of 2011 for cell phones, smartphones, laptop USB adaptors, and other personal computing devices. That figure is greater than the combined net retail additions (postpaid and prepaid) by both AT&T and Verizon for these same types of subscribers (1.026 million) – all in the same quarter that Verizon debuted its version of the iPhone.
3) Contriving Conditions and Concessions – Of course there is the expected wish-list of non-merger-related “conditions” designed to extract regulatory concessions that the opponents have not been able to otherwise achieve. These include proposals to condition merger approval on concessions relating to pricing, mandatory resale, 700 MHz handset interoperability, special access, privacy, receipt of universal service funding, early termination fees, bill shock, and other broad policy issues. As the Commission has consistently found, such issues should be addressed, if at all, in industry-wide proceedings – not a company-specific merger proceeding.
In the end, opponents’ submissions are long on rhetoric and short on substance. As Benjamin Disraeli wisely said, “It is much easier to be critical than to be correct.” After a close review of the facts and evidence presented in this proceeding, we are confident that the Commission will agree that this merger will generate enormous benefits for consumers, workers and the economy, with no significant harm to competition.
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Unread 2011-06-10, 05:15 PM   #174
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AT&T is so full of shit.
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Unread 2011-06-21, 04:58 PM   #175
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T-Mobile: There is a Spectrum Crisis and This Deal Absolutely Needs to Go Through




Just got this formal statement in the inbox, folks. T-Mobile have responded to the opposition who do not want to see the transaction go through, stating they have “failed to offer any credible arguments to support their view that the [FCC] should deny the transaction.” Furthermore, they believe it is inaccurate to say that there is no spectrum crisis when the FCC has made moves to free more of it up. And they say T-Mobile’s spectrum will certainly add enhanced innovation and improved service for their customers. They’re likely referring to the switch to 4G LTE that AT&T’s looking to start sometime this summer. There it is, folks. Another day, another statement. It’s up to the FCC to decide whether or not AT&T and T-Mobile truly need each other.
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