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Unread 2017-07-12, 01:15 PM   #1
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Default The Irishman

Joe Pesci, Harvey Keitel, Bobby Cannavale Join Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’


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The Irishman will mark the first time that Pacino and Scorsese will have worked together and the first time all the Italian greats are on the big screen together. The film starts shooting next month in and around New York and will continue through December.
Pesci’s involvement comes after the actor said no multiple times (some say about 50); a deal was just sealed this week. He will portray Russell Bufalino, a Mafia boss out of PA and has been long suspected of having a hand in the disappearance of Hoffa. Pesci and Scorsese have done five films together.







Producers of The Irishman are De Niro, Fabrica’s Gaston Pavlovich, Jane Rosenthal, Scorcese, Randall Emmett and Emma Tillinger Koskoff. The casting director Scorsese’s longtime collaborators Ellen Lewis with Thelma Schoonmaker serving as editor. The film is expected to get a small theatrical release to qualify for Oscar.
This project has been embroiled in controversy when the author of the book I Heard You Paint Houses (which is slang for a hit ala “painting” the walls with blood) Charles Brandt penned it based on the deathbed confession of Frank ‘The Irishman’ Sheeran. The hitman claimed to tell the real story of the disappearance of union former boss Jimmy Hoffa. However, the account that Sheeran told to Brandt has been disputed as well. Still, the FBI actually thought enough of Sheeran’s confession to pull up several floor board planks from a house where he said he shot and killed Hoffa to look for DNA (blood) evidence. Latter the bureau said that the DNA samples weren’t from the former Teamsters boss.
It’s one of the coldest cases in history, but there is no statute on murder so it is not closed.
Over the years, many stories about what happened to Hoffa has sprung forth, all to be debunked one by one by one. There are a couple of men still alive today whose knowledge of the event would still carry any weight with the FBI and who the bureau considers really do know what happened on July 30 after Hoffa got into Chuckie O’Brien’s car outside the Machus Red Fox restaurant and then disappeared, but these guys (now in their 90s) still aren’t talking.
The Hoffa kids, one still in the union politics in Detroit and the other a former judge in St. Louis, are still waiting for resolution to bring their father’s remains back to bury next to their mother. They nor anyone else will likely know the full story behind his disappearance, but it is very possible that they will find out where their father’s remains are in their lifetimes.

Pesci is represented by longtime manager Melissa Prophet and Jai Stefan, his longtime producing partner. Keitel is repped by ICMPartners and lawyer Todd Rubenstein while Cannavale is repped by WME and Framework management.
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Unread 2019-02-14, 11:49 PM   #2
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Half of Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’ Will Feature De-Aged Actors, May Arrive in October



It seems like every few months we learn a little more about Martin Scorsese‘s ambitious inter-generational gangster movie, The Irishman, and a little less about when this film will finally come out. Since rumblings about the film first started happening in 2010, Scorsese fans have waited with bated breath for The Irishman release date to be announced.

When Netflix picked up the drama, the end appeared to be in sight. Then 2017 passed us by. Then 2018. And not a word about this film has been spoken since the new year started — but now actors and crew have started to drum up anticipation for the Robert De Niro, Al Pacino gangster movie with new details about the film’s de-aging technology and (finally) a possible release date.

How Much of The Irishman Will Have De-Aged Robert De Niro and Al Pacino?

The Irishman‘s costly budget has been a great source of headlines in the past few years, with Scorsese’s use of complicated CGI to de-age several of the actors for certain scenes reportedly pushing the budget to over $140 million. But just how much of this movie, which is set to take place over multiple decades with De Niro and Pacino playing both the younger and older versions of themselves, will feature the de-aged actors?

Editor and longtime Scorsese collaborator Thelma Schoonmaker revealed to Yahoo that about half of The Irishman will feature De Niro and Pacino as their de-aged selves:
“We’re youthifying the actors in the first half of the movie. And then the second half of the movie they play their own age. So that’s a big risk. We’re having that done by Industrial Light and Magic, ILM. That’s a big risk.”
ILM is the visual effects company founded by George Lucas responsible for the effects behind the Star Wars franchise, as well as the de-aging effects in Marvel films like Ant-Man and the Wasp, Captain America: Civil War, and Captain Marvel — through which the technology has had the most mainstream exposure. The tech was used extensively in Ant-Man and the Wasp in particular, but never has it been the focal point for half of an entire film. Schoonmaker admitted that because The Irishman is such “an expensive project, [Netflix are] taking a risk there,” and thus the success of the film heavily rides on how convincing that de-aging technology is. But, in a vote of confidence for this film, she said that when she watched that first cut with Scorsese, and the lights came on in the room, they both looked at each other and said “wow.”

“We’re seeing some of it, but I haven’t gotten a whole scene where they’re young, and what I’m going to have to see, and what Marty’s going to have to see is, ‘How is it affecting the rest of the movie when you see them young?'” she added.
When Will This Movie Come Out?

The Irishman was rumored for a long time to be hitting Netflix (and possibly theaters) in 2019, but as the second month of the new year rolls by and we hear no news of the Scorsese film, that release date is becoming less certain. However, actor Sebastian Maniscalco, who plays legendary crime boss “Crazy” Joe Gallo in The Irishman, told the Joe Rogan Experience podcast to expect a October 2019 premiere on Netflix:
“It’s coming out in October…I didn’t sleep for the first week leading up to the [first] scene, because I knew it would be with De Niro and Pesci. When I went in there, I told myself that I’m not speaking to nobody. I’m gonna speak when I’m spoken to. There was a part when they were lighting De Niro and I, we’re standing face to face, and I’m looking straight at him.”
There’s no official confirmation from the streaming giant yet, but this could mean that Netflix is eyeing a big Cannes premiere for the Scorsese movie with a possible Oscars 2020 push akin to last year’s campaign for Roma — if they can dissolve their Cannes feud. But this is a huge star-studded film, with Scorsese’s past collaborators De Niro and Pesci reuniting for the film, as well as Pacino marking his first time working with the legendary director. Harvey Keitel also stars, along with Anna Paquin, Bobby Cannavale, Ray Romano, Stephen Graham and Jesse Plemons. The film is based on Charles Brandt’s I Heard You Paint Houses about Frank Sheeran, a union official with mob connections who claimed to be involved with the murder of Teamster boss Jimmy Hoffa (played by Pacino).
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Unread 2019-02-27, 06:59 PM   #3
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Netflix Already Positioning ‘The Irishman’ as a Serious Oscar Contender By Planning Wide Theatrical Release






We’re all excited for The Irishman, but no one is more excited than the folks at Netflix. Because in the eyes of the streaming giant, Martin Scorsese‘s new gangster epic is a one-way ticket to winning a Best Picture Oscar next year. Having not scored the top award at the recent Academy Awards with Roma, a new report reveals Netflix is going all-in on positioning The Irishman as a serious Oscar contender. In fact, they might even do something they’ve never done with one of their movies before: give it a wide theatrical release.

Netflix didn’t go home empty-handed at last weekend’s Oscar ceremony. Their acclaimed film Roma scooped up Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film, Best Cinematography and Best Director. But Netflix wanted more. They wanted the coveted Best Picture prize. Several Academy voters anonymously admitted that they flat-out refused to vote for Roma for Best Picture because they thought of it as a “Netflix movie.” People in the industry don’t care for Netflix’s release model – in their minds, movies only really count as movies when they’re released in theaters. And while Netflix gave Roma a theatrical release, it was very limited.
According to THR, Netflix is determined to make sure the same issue isn’t repeated with Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman. Per THR, Scorsese wants a wide theatrical release for the film, and Netflix is working to make it happen. To pull this off, “Netflix will have to expand the three-week art house theatrical window it pioneered amid controversy this awards season and will have to allow theater owners to report box office numbers, which the streamer did not do for Roma.”
Netflix recently joined the MPAA, which is just one more step towards following traditional norms. Releasing box office numbers would be another big step. And giving Scorsese’s The Irishman a longer wide release certainly makes sense, since Scorsese is the biggest director the streaming service has worked with so far. And while The Irishman is getting the most focus, Netflix is also considering wider theatrical releases for Steven Soderbergh’s The Laundromat, David Michôd’s The King, Dee Rees’ The Last Thing He Wanted, Fernando Meirelles’ The Pope and Noah Baumbach’s currently untitled film starring Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver.
Even though the most recent Oscar ceremony was only three days ago, Netflix has already begun ramping up plans for next year. ABC required $2 million to $3 million for 30-second spots to air during the Oscars on Sunday, and Netflix plunked down double that to air a 60-second teaser for The Irishman that had no actual footage.
The Academy currently does not require an exclusive theatrical window on films to earn nominations, but some Academy members are becoming increasingly nervous about that. “People are feeling very strongly that if this loophole continues, it could destroy the whole concept of cinema,” an Academy member told THR. On top of all that, several members of the Academy are pushing for a “rule change at the organization that would require a movie to have an exclusive theatrical window of at least four weeks to be eligible for major Oscars.” In short, the Academy is trying to do everything in their power to disqualify the current Netflix model, and Netflix has decided to roll over in order to take home more Oscar gold.
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Unread 2019-06-25, 03:10 PM   #4
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Rumors of an Official ‘The Irishman’ Release Date Are Inaccurate [Updated]






Update: Representatives from The Irishman have reached out and let us know that the reports of the film opening this November are inaccurate. While it’s entirely possible for the film to open during that window, nothing has been set in stone and we will let you know when and if we hear more. Our original article follows below.
The Irishman is a movie long in the making. After months of hearing not a peep from distributor Netflix — apart from one cryptic teaser — the highly anticipated Martin Scorsese crime epic finally has a release date window, and it’s something to be truly thankful for.

Producer Irwin Winkler confirmed that The Irishman release date has been set for Thanksgiving of this year. In an interview with Gilbert Gottfried’s Amazing Colossal podcast, Winkler revealed the release date window of Thanksgiving 2019, though he did not supply the specific release date or whether the film will get an initial theatrical debut before heading to Netflix in the following weeks, like last year’s Oscar contender Roma. But this November release date tracks with Netflix’s serious Oscar campaign for The Irishman, as well as Scorsese’s insistence on perfecting the film’s substantial visual effects.
Netflix is reportedly planning to ramp up its Oscar campaign for The Irishman, which the streaming giant is positioning as its best chance to win the coveted Best Picture award. As opposed to last year’s Roma, which broke Netflix day-and-date tradition and received a limited release before it rolled onto the streaming service, Netflix plans to give The Irishman a wide theatrical release to better appeal to wary Academy voters.
If any month is the time to debut a Scorsese gangster flick, it’s November, one of the busiest box office months outside of the summer. But with that month, which is packed with awards contenders and blockbusters alike, comes heavy competition. Films like Terminator: Dark Fate, Charlie’s Angels, and Disney’s surefire box office giant Frozen 2 are all set for November, with more sure to be announced. But the combination of Scorsese with his longtime collaborators Robert DeNiro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci could be the formidable force needed to oppose the big blockbuster remakes and sequels.
Watch this space as we await the official The Irishman release date from Netflix.
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Unread 2019-07-29, 03:18 PM   #5
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Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’ Will Premiere at the New York Film Festival; See First Look Images




Martin Scorsese‘s highly anticipated The Irishman will have its world premiere at this year’s New York Film Festival. There was some question about whether or not Scorsese’s crime epic would be a part of festival season, as the filmmaker was still putting the finishing touch on extensive VFX work for the movie. Now it looks like Scorsese is confident enough to unleash the pic to a crowd, as it becomes the Opening Night film of the 57th New York Film Festival. See the first images of the film below.

With The Irishman, Martin Scorsese reunites with Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci for a new crime epic – one that will also mark his first collaboration with Al Pacino. In short, it’s a big deal, and cinephiles have been aching to lay eyes on this thing. Netflix will be releasing The Irishman later this fall, but first, audiences will have a chance to catch it as the Opening Night film of this year’s New York Film Festival.
This news comes with the first two official images of the film, as well as a synopsis.
The Irishman is a richly textured epic of American crime, a dense, complex story told with astonishing fluidity. Based on Charles Brandt’s nonfiction book I Heard You Paint Houses, it is a film about friendship and loyalty between men who commit unspeakable acts and turn on a dime against each other, and the possibility of redemption in a world where it seems as distant as the moon. The roster of talent behind and in front of the camera is astonishing, and at the core of The Irishman are four great artists collectively hitting a new peak: Joe Pesci as Pennsylvania mob boss Russell Bufalino, Al Pacino as Teamsters president Jimmy Hoffa, and Robert De Niro as their right-hand man, Frank Sheeran, each working in the closest harmony imaginable with the film’s incomparable creator, Martin Scorsese.


“It’s an incredible honor that The Irishman has been selected as the Opening Night of the New York Film Festival. I greatly admire the bold and visionary selections that the festival presents to audiences year after year,” said Martin Scorsese. “The festival is critical to bringing awareness to cinema from around the world. I am grateful to have the opportunity to premiere my new picture in New York alongside my wonderful cast and crew.”
New York Film Festival Director and Selection Committee Chair Kent Jones added:
The Irishman is so many things: rich, funny, troubling, entertaining and, like all great movies, absolutely singular. It’s the work of masters, made with a command of the art of cinema that I’ve seen very rarely in my lifetime, and it plays out at a level of subtlety and human intimacy that truly stunned me. All I can say is that the minute it was over my immediate reaction was that I wanted to watch it all over again.”
The Irishman is based on the True Crime book I Heard You Paint Houses, in which Frank Sheeran claimed he was the man who killed Teamsters leader Jimmy Hoffa. Crime flicks are nothing new for Scorsese, but the approach the filmmaker is taking here is a bit different. Since The Irishman spans several decades, Scorsese has opted to use VFX technology to de-age his actors to show them as younger men – similar to the work Marvel did this year with Samuel L. Jackson in Captain Marvel. It’s a risky move, and it could backfire if it doesn’t look right. But it sounds like things are finally in place.
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Unread 2019-07-31, 05:19 PM   #6
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Netflix Releases Martin Scorsese's The Irishman Trailer

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Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Expe7hf6MU


Martin Scorsese's new film will bring a star-studded cast to Netflix, and now we have our first official trailer for the project. The film is titled The Irishman and will introduce viewers to Frank Sheeran, a hitman who ends up involved in some of the most infamous events in American history. As you can see in the trailer, that includes the disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa, the death of John F. Kennedy, and more, and you can check out the full trailer for the project in the video above.
The mystery of what happened to Jimmy Hoffa is one of the most debated pieces of American history, and we're interested to see AlPacino bring the character to life as well as Scorsese's take on what ultimately happened to him. The Kennedy assassination will also play into this film in a big way, and it seems Sheeran had something to do with that as well.
There's still plenty of mystery regarding the film, but at least now we know what to look forward to, and Fall can't get here soon enough.
The Irishman stars Robert De Nira (Frank Sheeran), Anna Paquin (Peggy Sheeran), Al Pacino (Jimmy Hoffa), Joe Pesci (Russell Bufalino), Harvey Keitel (Angelo Bruno), Jesse Plemons (Chuckie O'Brien), Stephen Graham (Anthony Provenzano), Bobby Cannavale (Felix 'Skinny Razor' DiTullio), and Aleksa Palladino (Mary Sheeran), and you can check out the official description below.

"Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci star in Martin Scorsese’s THE IRISHMAN, an epic saga of organized crime in post-war America told through the eyes of World War II veteran Frank Sheeran, a hustler and hitman who worked alongside some of the most notorious figures of the 20th Century. Spanning decades, the film chronicles one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in American history, the disappearance of legendary union boss Jimmy Hoffa, and offers a monumental journey through the hidden corridors of organized crime: its inner workings, rivalries and connections to mainstream politics."
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Unread 2019-07-31, 08:10 PM   #7
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Who Is The Irishman? Robert De Niro’s Title Character Explained



Robert De Niro will play the title character in Martin Scorsese's new Netflix movie, but who exactly is The Irishman? De Niro has reunited with Scorsese for their first feature together since 1995's Casino, with Al Pacino and Joe Pesci also onboard for what's shaping up to be a true-crime epic, with the Raging Bull and Goodfellas star leading The Irishman as Frank Sheeran.
Based on the book I Heard You Paint Houses by Charles Brandt, The Irishman will chronicle the majority of Sheeran's life through flashbacks, with digital de-aging techniques allowing De Niro to play the character as young as 30 in the film. The recently revealed trailer for The Irishman promises a sprawling mob movie, and that fits with what's known about Sheeran's life.


Sheeran, born in New Jersey and raised in Pennsylvania, came from a strict Irish Catholic background, hence him later earning the nickname 'The Irishman'. When he was just 20-years-old he enlisted in the U.S. Army where he served for four years, although it was a decision that would ultimately shape his entire life. After the attack on Pearl Harbor he was sent overseas to fight in World War 2, completing a campaign in Italy before moving across to be part of the landings in Southern France, the Battle of the Bulge, and the invasion of Germany.




As per Sheeran himself, it was during World World 2 that he first developed his remorselessness when killing people, admitting to the execution and massacre of several German prisoners-of-war. After being discharged from the army in 1945 he became a truck driver, but it's also here when he started working in organized crime, which including serving as a hitman. Sheeran built a particularly close relationship with Mafia boss Russell Bufalino, who'll be portrayed by Pesci in The Irishman.
It was through his connection with Bufalino that Sheeran started working for labor union The International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), where he became close friends with Jimmy Hoffa (Pacino's character in The Irishman). Sheeran would carry out hits for Hoffa, which included murdering rival union members, as organized crime increasingly took hold of IBT. The title of Brandt's book comes from the first words Hoffa said to Sheeran, which were supposedly "I heard you paint houses", meaning carry out hits, to which Sheeran is said to have replied, "I do my own carpentry too", implying that he would get rid of the bodies himself.
The key event in the lives of Sheeran and Hoffa, and one The Irishman will focus heavily on, is the disappearance of the former in 1975. Hoffa's last known whereabouts were in a suburb of Detroit, where he was supposedly going to meet with two Mafia bosses, at least one of whom had been threatening him. Hoffa's car was found in the car park of a local restaurant, but no trace of Hoffa himself has ever been found. In his book, Brandt claims that Sheeran confessed to murdering Hoffa, however, Sheeran's role has been disputed, since blood found at the house where he alleged the murder took place didn't match up with Hoffa's DNA.


Sheeran died from cancer at the age of 83 on December 14, 2003. The Irishman will feature an old Sheeran looking back upon his entire life, meaning we're likely to see many of these events play out on-screen, especially his apparent role in the disappearance of Hoffa. Given the uncertainty around that incident, it'll be fascinating to see just how Scorsese and screenwriter Steven Zaillian handle it. The Irishman promises to be a towering portrayal of organized crime, and Sheeran sounds like the sort of figure to get another great performance out of De Niro.
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Unread 2019-08-08, 08:27 PM   #8
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5 Reasons We're Excited About The Irishman (& 5 Things We're Worried About)





Martin Scorsese's last drama was Silence, released in 2016. Since then, fans have been patiently awaiting The Irishman, a crime drama starring Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, and Al Pacino. As if this team-up wasn't exciting enough, the film will also feature extensive use of de-aging technology.

A trailer dropped just a couple of weeks ago, piquing interest and heightening the already high anticipation for the project. No movie is a sure thing until it is out, however, and uncertainty still floats in the air around this project. Furthering the conversation, here are five reasons to be excited about The Irishman, and five reasons to worry.

10 Worried: Uncanny Valley



De-aging technology has been in vogue for almost a decade. Tron: Legacy used it for its antagonist who resembled a young Jeff Bridges, and the MCU has used it for Robert Downey Jr., Samuel L. Jackson, and Clark Gregg.
The Irishman will do the same for Robert De Niro since the story will take place in several time periods. It's a novel idea, but unless it looks perfect, it will prove a huge distraction for the audience. When the effect is even the slightest bit off, it stops looking like a normal person's face.
9 Excited: Scorsese & De Niro Together Again



Martin Scorsese is undeniably one of the most talented filmmakers to ever grace this green and blue planet. The same rings true for Robert De Niro's acting. When the two come together, the result is always a masterwork.
Listing all the films they did together would be too many words for this entry, but ones that immediately come to mind are Goodfellas, Taxi Driver, The King of Comedy, and Raging Bull. A collaboration between the two has yet to fail, and there is no reason to think they'll flop with The Irishman.
8 Worried: Underwhelming Trailer



People have been waiting a long time for footage from the upcoming film. The recently released teaser finally showed how young Robert De Niro looks like, along with a few other tidbits. The film looks promising, but as a trailer, it could have been better.
Of course, these advertisements aren't always representative of the final product, but they are still integral in generating hype. If the legendary names weren't attached to this project, the teaser would not do much to raise awareness or excitement.
7 Excited: Ambition



No one likes it when people play it too safe. While Scorsese is no stranger to historical gangster films, this one is trying something new and bold with its extensive use of de-aging. If it works, people will sing the praises of the film all the way to the academy awards.
On the other hand, failure will leave a bad mark on a nearly flawless filmography from the famed director. Regardless of how it turns out, one cannot disrespect the film's lofty goal to attempt what was once thought impossible. Unless it is something completely unethical and morally corrupt, no one should ever criticize ambition.
6 Worried: Another Gangster Film



Martin Scorsese has a varied array of films under his belt. Throughout his career, however, he always comes back to crime films centering around gangsters. His most famous works often involve the mafia, the police, or some mixture of the two.

He has done phenomenal work outside of these, too. After Hours, The Last Temptation of Christ, and The Aviator are all memorable works not involving gangs. While the Irishman will surely be a hit, one can't help but desire for the talented filmmaker to go into a direction he's never gone before.
5 Excited: Steve Zaillian



The book on which the movie is based, I Heard You Paint Houses, was adapted for the screen by Steve Zaillian. It wouldn't be the first time Scorsese directed a screenplay which Zaillian wrote, as Gangs of New York was also penned by the screenwriter.
In addition to the Scorsese film, he also wrote the screenplay for Schindler's List, Mission: Impossible, and American Gangster. With such works already under his belt, one can rest assured that if The Irishman turns out poorly, it won't be because of a weak screenplay.
4 Worried: Al Pacino



Al Pacino has indeed played some of the most memorable characters of all time. However, for every Godfather and Scarface, there exists a Jack and Jill and 88 Minutes. Few actors have churned out gold with every performance, but Al has been in some stunningly terrible movies.
It is always hard to tell if the veteran actor will hit a home run or strikeout. Fans are praying for the former, but a bad performance in this movie can break the whole thing, even if everything else works.
3 Excited: Joe Pesci



Joe Pesci has been taking it easy in recent years. Of the three films he's participated in since the turn of the century, one of them was a cameo and the other was a voice-over role. In the upcoming film, he's expected to play a major part in the plot.
Like De Niro, all of his parts under Scorsese's direction have been stellar. For him to come out of retirement for a film must mean the part is really something special, and not just a paycheck.
2 Worried: Feeling Like Goodfellas



Goodfellas is another film that follows the life of a gangster. While the events will undoubtedly play out differently, one cannot help but compare the new film to the 1990 classic.
It doesn't help matters anymore when Goodfellas is often seen as one of the greatest films of all time. The movie will probably be a solid hit at worst, but it already has a shadow hanging over it from the director's previous classic gangster film.
1 Excited: Theatrical Release

Netflix has a weird relationship with the film industry. Many veteran filmmakers get up in arms when movies produced by the streaming giant become eligible for academy awards. There is certainly a case to be made for immediate home video availability destroying the sanctity of the theater, but it should have no effect on the people making the product and their artistry.
Regardless of one's thought about it, everyone can rejoice in knowing The Irishman will make its way to theaters, if only for a limited time. Hopefully, it will show in enough theaters to give everyone who wants to see it a chance to do so.
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Unread 2019-08-27, 09:25 PM   #9
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‘The Irishman’ Will Be 3.5 Hours Long Because Martin Scorsese Can Do No Wrong

Are you sitting down, folks? The New York Film Festival has revealed that Martin Scorsese‘s The Irishman will boast a running time of… wait for it… 210 minutes. That is exactly 3-and-one-half-hours. You could literally watch Crank and Crank: High Voltage in that time frame, and still have roughly 10 minutes to spare.
Now, I know what you’re thinking. 3.5 hours? That’s a lot of movie. Why are movies so freakin’ long these days? Well, normally I would agree, but when it’s Scorsese teaming up with Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci again, and they’re bringing Al Pacino along for the ride, well, I’d welcome the chance to sit in that theater until my eyeballs fell out of my head. I’d watch a 10-hour cut of The Irishman, so long as there was a well-timed intermission and my parking was validated.
Image via Amazon

Per NYFF, whose programmers have obviously seen the film, The Irishman “is a richly textured epic of American crime, a dense, complex story told with astonishing fluidity. Based on Charles Brandt’s nonfiction book I Heard You Paint Houses, it is a film about friendship and loyalty between men who commit unspeakable acts and turn on a dime against each other, and the possibility of redemption in a world where it seems as distant as the moon. The roster of talent behind and in front of the camera is astonishing, and at the core of The Irishman are four great artists collectively hitting a new peak: Joe Pesci as Pennsylvania mob boss Russell Bufalino, Al Pacino as Teamsters president Jimmy Hoffa, and Robert De Niro as their right-hand man, Frank Sheeran, each working in the closest harmony imaginable with the film’s incomparable creator, Martin Scorsese.
Of course, in a classic line of ‘Cover Your Ass’ fine print, the NYFF website makes sure to note that the “runtime is subject to change.” That said, it sounds right on the money to me, as not only would this story require more than three hours to tell, and not only would Scorsese have the clout to command such an extravagant running time, but Kris Tapley, who has been writing for Netflix’s new Queue magazine and has seen many of the streamer’s films, tweeted on Tuesday, “Some sagas WARRANT 3 1/2 hours” — a sentiment to which I’m inclined to agree. Bring it on, baby!
The Irishman will make its debut at the festival on Sept. 27 before hitting select theaters on Nov. 1, and, eventually, Netflix on Nov. 27 — the day before Thanksgiving, so you can watch it with your entire family from the comfort of your own living room, where you’ll be able to pause the film for bathroom breaks.
Some of us questioned whether The Irishman would ever get made, but Netflix has actually gone and done it, and we’ll know soon if this year’s awards race is going to be another Marty Party, or whether Scorsese’s latest will be greeted with respectful silence by Oscar voters.
Image via Netflix
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Unread 2019-09-26, 02:11 PM   #10
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‘The Irishman’ Trailer: A Lot Can Happen in a Lifetime, Especially in a Martin Scorsese Movie




Martin Scorsese returns to organized crime in a big way with his first Netflix movie, the three and a half hour drama The Irishman. The film is playing at the New York Film Festival this week, so a new trailer has arrived to showcase the movie starring Robert De Niro. And in case you somehow didn’t know, this isn’t just an old De Niro, but also a much younger De Niro brought back to the big screen thanks to digital de-aging technology. Watch the latest The Irishman trailer below.

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Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjrzu37-ljI

There aren’t any reactions to The Irishman yet, with the exception of Jimmy Fallon, who debuted the trailer:

Fallon isn’t exactly a trusted critic, and he’s not going to offer any helpful criticism when De Niro was his guest on The Tonight Show and they’re premiering a new trailer on NBC. So we’ll have to wait for the first critical reactions to get a better idea of what people think of the movie.
But based on this trailer, this looks exactly like the kind of movie you’d want from Scorsese without feeling like he’s treading the familiar territory of GoodFellas, Casino, or The Departed. Has any filmmaker covered the mob so extensively without losing any steam or appeal? That’s how you know Scorsese is truly a master at work.


Having said that, I think the biggest concern with this movie is how well the de-aging technology works on De Niro and his co-stars Al Pacino and Joe Pesci. Some stills have looked a little too touched up, resembling video game cinematic characters instead of actors manipulated by convincing visual effects. Maybe it’ll look better in the final cut of the movie, though. All I know is this has to be extremely convincing since this is not a blockbuster with a lot of razzle dazzle to surround it, but a drama that really asks the audience focus in on the actors.


Here’s the official synopsis for Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman:
The Irishman is an epic saga of organized crime in post-war America told through the eyes of World War II veteran Frank Sheeran, a hustler and hitman who worked alongside some of the most notorious figures of the 20th century. Spanning decades, the film chronicles one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in American history, the disappearance of legendary union boss Jimmy Hoffa, and offers a monumental journey through the hidden corridors of organized crime: its inner workings, rivalries and connections to mainstream politics.
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Unread 2019-09-27, 02:26 PM   #11
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‘The Irishman’ Early Buzz: Martin Scorsese Has Made Another Masterpiece




Who bets against a legend like Martin Scorsese? To be fair, The Irishman seemed like the master filmmaker behind Goodfellas, Casino and Taxi Drive may have been biting off more than he could chew. A 209-minute, Netflix funded crime epic that features extensive visual effects to transform the core cast into younger versions of themselves spanning 50 years? That’s…a lot.


But now, The Irishman has had its world premiere and the first reactions are rolling in…and they’re almost all thrilled with the film. It seems that Scorsese’s biggest risk in years may be another masterwork.



/Film’s own Chris Evangelista, a noted Martin Scorsese fanatic, was over-the-moon with The Irishman, calling it an instant classic:


Quote:
Chris Evangelista @cevangelista413



THE IRISHMAN is a masterwork. Funny, epic, and most of all, melancholy. It’s Scorsese confronting aging, legacies, and mortality. I may or may not have teared up at the end...

1,009

11:26 AM - Sep 27, 2019

Quote:
Hoai-Tran Bui @htranbui

· 2h


THE IRISHMAN made me hungry



Hoai-Tran Bui @htranbui


Martin Scorsese's bid to make his CITIZEN KANE is pretty close to a masterpiece. De Niro, Pacino, Pesci are all firing on all cylinders, and the 3+ hour runtime rarely drags. The de-aging effects are rough but I couldn't imagine this sprawling saga without De Niro the entire time

20

12:15 PM - Sep 27, 2019

Chris will have a review ready to run on the site when the embargo is up, but he certainly was not alone in praising the film:


Quote:
Jason Gorber @ #NYFF @filmfest_ca



THE IRISHMAN - Audacious, epic, a film that feels like it spans lifetimes yet whisks by. Technically bold, performances raw and darkly humourous, it is the culmination of Scorsese's genre fascinations, and a late career triumph. Truly cinematic, demanding to be seen big #nyff57

334

11:27 AM - Sep 27, 2019

https://www.slashfilm.com/the-irishman-early-buzz/
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Unread 2019-09-30, 06:12 PM   #12
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The De-Aging in ‘The Irishman’ Isn’t Perfect, But It is Essential




Digital de-aging is either the scourge of cinema or an exciting new tool for filmmakers, depending on whom you ask. But the effects in Martin Scorsese‘s new gangster epic The Irishman lie somewhere in between. This conversation comes on the heels of the technology’s busiest year yet, with studios smoothing out the faces of their stars in Captain Marvel, It Chapter 2, and Ang Lee’s upcoming Gemini Man. In each of the aforementioned films apart from Captain Marvel (thanks to Marvel Studios having almost perfected the tech), the de-aging has been roundly criticized, though perhaps not nearly as much as the effects in The Irishman.
When the first trailers for The Irishman were released by Netflix, the grumblings over Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci‘s silky-smooth skin and uncanny valley faces began, and were amplified when the streaming giant released stills of De Niro looking like a PS2-era video game character. But rest assured, the de-aging effects in The Irishman (mostly) work. At the very least, there is no other way that Scorsese could have made his latest masterwork.

The Irishman takes place over the course of 60 years, opening with its aged protagonist, hitman Frank Sheeran (De Niro), sitting in a retirement home sometime around the turn of the 21st century. As he reminisces about his life as a hitman for the mob, the film takes us back to the 1940s, with De Niro, Pesci, and Pacino playing characters 30, 40 years younger than their current ages. The movie skips around time, with each decade adding a few more grays and wrinkles to its main characters, and allowing us to spend the full three-and-a-half hours getting to know — and even care about — these morally bankrupt men.
At a press Q&A with Scorsese, De Niro, Pesci, Pacino, and producer Jane Rosenthal, Scorsese stated that the long road to making this film, which had been in development since roughly 2007, was a result of them waiting for the technology to catch up to their ambitions. That de-aging technology was provided by Industrial Light & Magic (ILM), Lucasfilm’s VFX and animation studio, and continued to evolve even through the 108-day production.
“It was slow in moving but not in a negative way,” Scorsese said. Producer Jane Rosenthal agreed, adding, “The technology did not slow us down. The technology kept evolving and kept changing and kept making things simpler.”
But the technology was only a prop for the work of De Niro, Pesci, and Pacino, whose outsized performances are essential to the magic of this film. But it takes a good hour into the film before you get used to those skin-smoothing, wrinkle-abolishing effects, particularly in the case of De Niro’s Frank Sheeran. It’s in part due to De Niro’s internal, reactive performance — Scorsese’s camera lingers on the actor’s face, which can only bring attention to the de-aging technology, especially in the harsh light of day. It’s only in wide shots and darkly lit scenes that you can truly become immersed in the film. With Pesci, who gives a similarly understated performance but goes through less noticeable de-aging, and Pacino, who gives such a showy, larger-than-life performance that you can barely register the digital effects, it isn’t as much of an issue. But Scorsese explained that he and his stars didn’t rely completely on the “lenses and computer imagery” to give the illusion of youth.
“It’s about posture, it’s about movement, it’s about clarity of the eyes, everything.” Scorsese recalled a day on set when Pacino, in the heat of the moment, hops out of his chair in the middle of a rant. After a few takes, stuntman Gary Tacon whispered to Scorsese that Pacino was “supposed to be 49.” A few more takes got them down to “62.” Scorsese said, “No, no, no. We gotta get it down to 49.”
But the main problem with The Irishman is that we remember what a 30-year-old De Niro performances was like — all electric energy and raw physicality. He seesaws between moody and menacing in Taxi Driver, he’s precise and powerful in Goodfellas, and his just shy of manic in The King of Comedy. In The Irishman, De Niro is a 76-year-old acting as a 30-something, and inevitably, brings with him the weight of his age. Still sporting his old-man scowl even in his memories of his 30s, the de-aging effects can smooth out his skin and turn his eyes a distractingly bright blue (to mimic the eye color of the reel Sheeran), but it can’t change the way that the 76-year-old actor carries himself. But, whether that is Scorsese’s intention or not, it adds another artistic layer to the film.
The Irishman is framed through the memories of an old man looking back on his life, alone and mostly immobile in a wheelchair. His memories of his younger self are distorted — he is remembering himself not as he was back then, but as a younger version of how he is now. The “young” Sheeran is a play on how memories become not an accurate reflection of how we were then, but a shadow of what we are now.
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Unread 2019-10-29, 06:30 PM   #13
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‘The Irishman’ Clip: Never Keep Al Pacino Waiting




No one in their right mind would keep Al Pacino waiting, but that’s what Stephen Graham‘s Anthony Provenzano does in a recently released clip from Martin Scorsese‘s mob epic, The Irishman. And understandably, he gets chewed out by Pacino’s powerful Teamsters leader Jimmy Hoffa in a monologue that speaks profoundly to the soul of every punctual person. Watch The Irishman clip below.


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Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ntpwLPAnRJQ


Punctual people are getting a comeback in pop culture lately. First there was Anna Torv’s Wendy Carr on Mindhunter, who delivered a sharp rant about the importance of being on time to movies. And now there’s Al Pacino’s Jimmy Hoffa, the only man who can lambast a mob boss for being more than 10 minutes late to a meeting. It’s a profoundly satisfying scene that will touch the heart of every punctual person (not that I would know, and now I feel bad, I’m sorry Al Pacino). The new The Irishman clip is a quiet little comedic scene in Scorsese’s crime drama, but the rapid-fire dialogue and the satisfying way that Pacino dresses down Graham’s Anthony Provenzano elevates this little moment to comedy gold.
It’s just one of many disarming funny moments peppered throughout Scorsese’s latest mob masterwork, which stars Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci in a decades-spanning saga that transcends time and technology. The Irishman received a rapturous reception upon its world premiere at the New York Film Festival, where I and /Film’s Chris Evangelista were blessed with the chance to see it. Chris writes in his review, “This is Scorsese at his most reflective, crafting a masterwork that finds the filmmaker reflecting on everything he’s done, and what it’s all amounted to,” and I wholeheartedly agree.
The Irishman will open in limited release on November 1, 2019 before it premieres on Netflix on November 27, 2019.
In the 1950s, truck driver Frank Sheeran gets involved with Russell Bufalino and his Pennsylvania crime family. As Sheeran climbs the ranks to become a top hit man, he also goes to work for Jimmy Hoffa — a powerful Teamster tied to organized crime.
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