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Unread 2019-08-29, 08:26 AM   #126
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Unread 2019-08-29, 12:07 PM   #127
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Joker Movie Trailer Has Eerie Connection to Batman v Superman

The new Joker trailer has DC fans even more excited for Todd Phillips' Joker origin story, which is anchored by a captivating performance from Joaquin Phoenix. Fans have been perusing the Joker trailer footage for clues and Easter egg references, and they may have spotted one image that connects Joker to Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice!


As you can see below, Joker makes the same cinematic reference that Batman v Superman in its major Batman origin scene, leading DC fans to believe that the connection could be indicative of one of the more pivotal moments in Joker's story:


That's right, the same movie (1981's Excalibur) that was playing at the theater where Martha and Thomas Wayne were gunned down in Batman v Superman can be seen playing at the theater where Gotham's citizens are erupting in clown-faced riot in Joker. In fact, if you look even closer at the scene (see image below), there's a family coming out of the theater in the midst of this riot - a well-dressed man and woman with their young son. The scene is purposefully clipped to be a blink-and-you-miss-it moment, but the family coming out of the theater looks like they could potentially be actors Brett Cullen and Dante Pereira-Olson, who are playing Thomas Wayne and young Bruce Wayne (respectively). No casting news has been shared about Martha Wayne yet, so we cant confirm if the actress seen leaving the theater is playing that character.




The first Joker teaser sprinkled breadcrumb hints of Phoenix's Arthur Fleck / Joker interacting with both Thomas and Bruce Wayne at various points in the film. Those teases fueled fan speculation that Joker would contain a backdoor Batman origin story alongside the Joker's, in testament to how the two future nemeses fuel each other. It would be a fitting ode to past movie versions of The Joker, as Jack Nicholson's version of the villain in Tim Burton's Batman (1989) was infamously retconned into being the thug (Jack Napier) who gunned down the Waynes. Joker looks like it could spin that plotline into a story about how Arthur Fleck stokes the madness bubbling under Gotham's surface to come erupting out: and how that eruption of anarchy, crime, and violence resulted in the Wayne Murders that would in turn create Gotham's symbol of order, justice, and punishment, The Batman.
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Unread 2019-08-31, 03:13 PM   #128
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JOKER Hailed As A "Darkly Funny Masterpiece" With An Oscar-Worthy Performance From Joaquin Phoenix

Joker had its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival this morning, and while full reviews are

embargoed until tonight, the first social media reactions are now online. Find out more after the jump...






The first social media reactions for Warner Bros.' Joker movie are now online following its world premiere at the Venice International Film Festival this morning, and it sounds like the majority of critics (out of the ones that decided to share their thoughts, anyway) were very impressed by Todd Philips' unique origin story for DC's Clown Prince of Crime.

The movie reportedly received a thunderous standing ovation, and is being hailed as a "darkly funny", "thrilling", "tragic" "masterpiece" anchored by a "powerful, Oscar worthy performance" from star Joaquin Phoenix.



Strong praise indeed for a film that was expected to be highly controversial and divisive, but we'll see what the general consensus is when those reviews hit!

In the meantime, hit the "View List" button down below to check out the Twitter reactions.



Quote:
James Jones @jamesjonesfilm



Replying to @jamesjonesfilm
I can’t quite believe how good Joker is. It’s a masterpiece. Funny, dark, beautiful, full of rage, and really fucking cool. Joaquin Phoenix is masterful and every shot is sublime. #Venezia76

453

3:47 AM - Aug 31, 2019

Quote:
Alex Billington @ Venice @firstshowing



There will be before Joker. And there will be after Joker. I don't know if the world is ready for this movie. Or maybe it is? It is GNARLY. It is crazy. It is audacious. It doesn't hold back. Wow. I can't believe it exists. But it does. And it's coming.

3,370

3:51 AM - Aug 31, 2019

Quote:
Jak-Luke Sharp @ Venice Film Festival @JakLukeSharp



Replying to @JakLukeSharp
#Joker Pheonix is phenomenal. Dark, gritty & fucking crazy. More on the lines of Mean Streets than Taxi Driver. It all looks to be serving a masterclass but Phillips stumbles in the last hurdle with the film not knowing if it wants to stand alone or be enticed by lore #Venezia76





101

4:12 AM - Aug 31, 2019

Quote:
Lorenzo Ciorcalo @rotovisor



#Venezia76 The #Joker we fucking deserve. Rings of comedy, rings of fire. It's a circus, it's a carnival, it's a mayhem. Phoenix brings us dancing through this social disease and it's a triumph. #JokerMovie

487

4:11 AM - Aug 31, 2019

https://www.comicbookmovie.com/joker...hoenix-a170331
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Unread 2019-08-31, 03:27 PM   #129
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Joker Rotten Tomatoes Score Is Out

Joker, the new Todd Phillips film that follows the origin story of Batman’s biggest foe, premiered at the Venice Film Festival this week and has been met with mostly positive reactions. The film, which stars Joaquin Phoenix in the titular role, already has a score up on Rotten Tomatoes, and it’s currently living Fresh at 86%.


“#Joker gives its infamous central character a chillingly plausible origin story that serves as a brilliant showcase for Joaquin Phoenix - and a dark evolution for comics-inspired cinema. #JokerMovie is #Fresh at 86% on the #Tomatometer, with 22 reviews,” Rotten Tomatoes tweeted.


Here are some of the positive reviews currently on the website:


“Nobody who sees this new film will ever need any other version,” David Sexton of London Evening Standard wrote.
Joker is a dark, brooding and psychologically plausible origin story, a vision of cartoon sociopathy made flesh,” Justin Chang of the Los Angeles Times praised.


However, a few critics were not on board with the film:
“As social commentary, Joker is pernicious garbage,” Glenn Kenny of RogerEbert.com wrote.


“Phillips may want us to think he's giving us a movie all about the emptiness of our culture, but really, he's just offering a prime example of it,” Stephanie Zacharek of TIME Magazine added.


ComicBook.com’s own Brandon Davis was a fan of the film, calling it an “insane masterpiece.” You can read his review here.


In addition to Phoenix, Joker stars Zazie Beetz (Sophie Dumond), Robert De Niro (Murray Franklin), Brett Cullen (Thomas Wayne), Frances Conroy (Penny Fleck), Marc Maron (Ted Marco), Douglas Hodge (Alfred Pennyworth), Josh Pais (Hoyt Vaughn), Bryan Tyree Henry, Bryan Callen, Shea Whigham, and Glen Fleshler. You can find the official description for the movie below:

"Drama. Joker centers around the iconic arch-nemesis and is an original, standalone story not seen before on the big screen. The exploration of Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix), a man disregarded by society, is not only a gritty character study but also a broader cautionary tale."
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Unread 2019-08-31, 03:28 PM   #130
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Joker Review: An Insane Masterpiece Based on DC Comics Villain

For the first time since launching the "DCEU" (an interconnected series of films linking the DC Comics heroes together in a shared universe on the big screen), Warner Bros. and DC Comics movies and looking to introduce and isolated film which could be the first of many in the form of Joker. While it is unlike other films in the shared big screen universe by existing in its own space, it is also different in every other imaginable way -- from all comic book movies before it. Joker is a thrilling, haunting character study which happens to become a mysterious origin story for the best known villain in comic book history.

Hailing from his best known work with The Hangover movies, director Todd Phillips shows that he isn't checking in for the laughs -- unless they come from the deranged performance by his lead actor Joaquin Phoenix. Phillips focused more on the central character her, an abandoned and mentally ill Arthur Fleck, than on any larger DC Comics connections which fans of comic book movies have been trained to expect. It's not completely free of ties to a larger world but it has no desire to set any stage for future installments, spinoffs, sequels, or expansions -- which is almost a shame given how great of a launch it is for a compelling character.

Joker starts off slowly, meticulously allowing tremendous cinematography and a mesmerizing performance from Phoenix lead the charge. During this slow burn audiences will wonder where the movie could possibly be going but patience will be rewarding. As the movie and its titular character descend into madness simultaneously, the dark, twisted thriller takes off and never looks book. In fact, it's as if Joker takes a look at the darkest paths available and figures out creative ways to incorporate them into the same film. Some of those paths are so dark audiences won't possibly be able to see them coming and will find themselves in an uncomfortable emotional location along the journey.

Once Arthur's tragic story is established, Joker offers up terrifying levels of tension. In fact, it’s scarier than most horror films of the year with its gritty, scary levels of realism. Furthermore, ties to real world epidemics facing the audience observing this work of fiction will act as disturbing reminders as a questionable message (if there is any singular message to be taken) is delivered. This movie is certainly not intended for younger audiences and will leave this a lesser tolerance for tense situations and violence feeling very uneasy. Intimate violence and a terrifying character drive Joker to an intense conclusion which will stick with audiences in the hours and days after watching it.
There has never been a movie like this in the genre. The conversation has long been whether or not a comic book movie can top The Dark Knight as the renowned "best" in genre. Like The Dark Knight, Joker transcends being simply a film based on any super heroes or villains. It becomes a piece of art loaded with raw beats and stirs up internal and external conversations for its audience.
While none of the characters play roles comparable in size to Phoenix's Arthur, familiar faces from around Hollywood pop in including Robert DeNiro, Zazie Beets, Brian Tyree Henry, and Brett Cullen. Some have more screen tine than others but none of the supporting character seem to bear a tremendous burden of individual relevance over the other. Each serve the story in drastically different ways, fueling Arthur's journey, and lending satisfying performances alongside the star.

Joker is loaded with mystery on top of its numerous twists. By the time it ends, viewers will be left with several questions about the experience, some of which might be scarily directed at themselves. Phoenix's Arthur laughs his way through terrible scenarios. For this, the actor demands an Oscar nomination it might not be the only nod this DC Comics movie earns. The cinematography, score, and direction create something unlike anything before it - -and it’s terrifying, thrilling, and moving.

Whether or not Joker is a social commentary on issues such as poverty or mental illness, a new and mysterious take on the best known DC Comics villain, or just another unforgettable piece of cinema which producer Martin Scorsese is attached to, you’ll need to see to believe it and, even then, you still might not believe it.
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Unread 2019-08-31, 03:33 PM   #131
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Joker Movie Drew Inspiration From The Killing Joke and The Man Who Laughs

Inspiration is a significant component of any film. No matter the story, the subject, or the genre, filmmakers and writers use stories and films that came before them to build their own creations. Perhaps it's a lighting choice, an element of the character, something large or something small. For comic book movies that inspiration extends to previous stories including the characters and when it comes to the upcoming Joker, director Todd Phillips had two very specific inspirations -- an iconic Joker story and a classic silent film that originally influenced the creation of the character to begin with.


Speaking at a press conference at the Venice International Film Festival, Phillips explained how he was able to "pick and choose" elements to bring his take on the iconic Batman villain to life.


"What was fun about it was we were able to kind of pick and choose certain elements from the comic book past, the past comic books, and use kind of what we wanted here and we'll use a little bit of that so there's a little bit, I guess, of Killing Joke with the idea of a failed stand-up comedian, but you know another big influence on this movie and the thing that inspired the original creators of Joker was the silent film The Man Who [Laughs] which is really where this started," Phillips said. "It's funny because the co-writer Scott Silver emailed me this morning, our first emails back and forth he was saying congratulations, this is exciting, and he sent me our first emails back and forth and I was reading them, and it was all about The Man who [Laughs]. I almost forgot that in the process that being such a big inspiration for us."


For those who aren't familiar, The Man Who Laughs is a 1928 silent romantic drama, an adaptation of the Victor Hugo novel of the same name. The story (roughly) follows the story of Gwynplaine, a man who was disfigured into having a permanent grin as a child after his father was executed. Gwynplaine's (played by Conrad Veidt) distinctive appearance served as an inspiration for the Joker's appearance. The title of 2005's Batman: The Man Who Laughs by Ed Brubaker and Doug Mahnke is itself an homage to the film and Hugo's novel.


However, even with some very specific inspirations overall, that doesn't mean that star Joaquin Phoenix's performance itself is influenced by any previous portrayals of the character. Phoenix said that he had to approach Joker his own way.


"For me what the attraction to make this film, this character, was that were going to approach it in our own way, so for me, I didn't refer to any past iterations of the character," Phoenix said. "It was just something that felt like it was our creation in some ways, and I think that's what was really important for me and key to it."


Joker stars Phoenix (Arthur Fleck/Joker), Zazie Beetz (Sophie Dumond), Robert De Niro (Murray Franklin), Brett Cullen (Thomas Wayne), Frances Conroy (Penny Fleck), Marc Maron (Ted Marco), Douglas Hodge (Alfred Pennyworth), Josh Pais (Hoyt Vaughn), Bryan Tyree Henry, Bryan Callen, Shea Whigham, and Glen Fleshler. You can find the official description below.

"Drama. Joker centers around the iconic arch-nemesis and is an original, standalone story not seen before on the big screen. The exploration of Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix), a man disregarded by society, is not only a gritty character study but also a broader cautionary tale."
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Unread 2019-08-31, 03:41 PM   #132
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Joaquin Phoenix Didn't Refer To Past Jokers For His Take On The Character

Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXQeJz-8skE


The Joker is one of the most iconic comic book villains ever, and over the years the character's also built quite a legacy in the world of film. Several actors have taken on the part of Batman's greatest nemesis, including Jack Nicholson, Heath Ledger, and Jared Leto. Now Joaquin Phoenix is up to bat as part of Todd Phillips' new standalone Joker film, and from the early praise, it seems to be quite the performance. During a press conference at the Venice International Film Festival, Phoenix was asked if he prepared for the role by watching any other takes on the character, and it seems this version does not find its roots in anything that's come before
"For me what the attraction to make this film, this character, was that we were going to approach it in our own way, so for me, I didn't refer to any past iterations of the character," Phoenix said. "It was just something that felt like it was our creation in some ways and I think that's what was really important for me and key to it."


Early impressions are calling Phoenix's performance as Arthur Fleck truly impressive, with some calling for Academy Award nominations. The film is being described as surprising and brutal in equal measure, and it seems to truly be offering something different than Nicholson's more lighthearted take or Ledger's nuanced and chaotic performance.


As for the most recent Joker, we're not sure if we'll see Jared Leto's take on the Joker grace the screen once more, though he did make quite an impression on fans in Suicide Squad.
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Unread 2019-09-02, 04:27 PM   #133
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JOKER's Rotten Tomatoes Score Revealed; Director Todd Phillips Addresses Leaked Screenplay

With the first wave of reviews for Joker now in, the movie's Rotten Tomatoes score has been revealed! Director Todd Phillips has also addressed the leaked screenplay that has been doing the rounds...




Following its premiere at the 2019 Venice Film Festival on Saturday, the first wave of reviews for Joker have started landing on Rotten Tomatoes and we now have a score for the R-Rated DC Comics adaptation. We know that there's a lot of Oscar buzz surrounding the movie (particularly for star Joaquin Phoenix), but does that all-important percentage match that?

Well, as of right now, 34 reviews have been counted and it sits at 88% with a Critics Consensus that reads, "Joker gives its infamous central character a chillingly plausible origin story that serves as a brilliant showcase for its star -- and a dark evolution for comics-inspired cinema."



So, that's a good start for Joker, and it will be interesting to see how mainstream critics respond.

During an interview with Associated Press, director Todd Phillips was asked about the leaked screenplay which has reportedly spoiled the movie months before it's been released. "They’re in for a big surprise when they see the movie," he explained, making it clear that the version that did find its way online may not reflect the final cut in theaters.
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Unread 2019-09-02, 04:36 PM   #134
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Biggest Difference Between Joaquin Phoenix and Heath Ledger’s Jokers Explained by Todd Phillips

Joker director Todd Phillips explains the biggest separation between failed comedian-turned-symbol Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix) and The Dark Knight’s makeup-wearing agent of chaos (Heath Ledger).
“I don’t think it was this Joker’s goal to watch the world burn. This Joker had an entirely different goal in mind,” Phillips said at a press conference Saturday following Joker’s lauded premiere at the Venice Film Festival. “In the beginning of the movie he’s sitting here doing this [forcing himself to smile and frown] in the very first scene, and it’s a guy searching for identity.”
“I think he becomes, mistakenly, a symbol, and really what he was looking for was adulation. He was never looking for the world to burn, this Joker,” Phillips continued. “As for the past ones, that’s a different thing. But our guy, that wasn’t his goal.”
Though the mentally disturbed Arthur sparks a revolution in the powder keg that is Gotham City, his goal was “to genuinely make people laugh.”
“He thought he was put here on this Earth to make people laugh and bring joy to the world, and he made a few bad decisions along the way, but no, his goal was not that,” Phillips said. “I think he became a mistaken leader, so to speak, or a symbol. Even [Robert] De Niro, [who plays] Murray [Franklin], says it to him. And Arthur says, ‘No, I’m not political.’ He just didn’t get what he was creating.”
Phoenix explained he wanted his spin on the character to be unidentifiable by real-world psychiatrists after noting he didn’t consult past portrayals of the Joker, including Ledger’s Academy Award-winning performance.

“The attraction to make this film and this character was that we were going to approach it in our own way, so, for me, I didn’t refer to any past iterations of the character,” Ledger said. “It was just something that felt like it was our creation in some ways, and I think that’s what was really important for me and key to it.”
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Unread 2019-09-02, 04:38 PM   #135
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Joker Director Not Concerned About Competing with Marvel

Joker director Todd Phillips says his R-rated character study was never meant to compete with Marvel Studios’ blockbuster superhero fare.
“I don’t know about competition with Marvel and that thing, I’ve never been in the comic book world,” Phillips said during a Venice Film Festival conference Saturday when asked if DC’s approach to director-driven cinema could be a “useful tool” in the studio’s competition with Marvel. “When we originally conceived this idea, it was very much about this sort of genre, of taking a different approach with it.”
Phillips wanted to do something “completely different from the comic book movies that have come before” in his first foray into the diverse genre, treating Joker like a ‘70s-era character study inspired by such seminal classics as One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Taxi Driver.
“I don’t know what sort of effect it will have with other filmmakers. I think the comic book movies have been doing really well, and they don’t necessarily need a change,” Phillips said. “We just thought it could be an exciting approach to this genre. I’m not sure what it means for DC, or Marvel, how they’ll change the way they’ll do it.”
Convincing studio Warner Bros. to sign off on its hard R-rating — given for “strong bloody violence, disturbing behavior, language and brief sexual images” — was one of the biggest challenges in bringing the iconic Batman villain to screen with an authentic look at the mentally disturbed Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix).

“I know it was a hard movie for us to get made and to convince DC and the studio at first, but we kind of just kept pushing because we felt like it could be really special,” Phillips said. “And in fairness, the studio really took a bold swing with the movie and let us do exactly what we wanted, so we’re very grateful for that.”
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Unread 2019-09-02, 07:53 PM   #136
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Joker: Jim Lee Reviews Todd Phillips' DC Film



DC Comics Co-Publisher and Chief Creative Officer Jim Lee has shared his thoughts on Todd Phillips' upcoming Joker film.
"Director Todd Phillip's Joker is intense, raw and soulful. He's talked about how his take on the Joker is not beholden to the character's comic book roots. That said, there's absolutely nothing in this film incongruous with our understanding of who the Joker is," Lee wrote in an Instagram post.


"If anything, Joaquin Phoenix's mesmerizing and unsettling turn as the Joker gives us a deep and fully realized look into one of our favorite villains, and I'm sure elements will be embraced going forward in our ongoing, ever evolving mythology," he continued. "That's what powerful, compelling stories do. And without a doubt -- long time DC fans will be spending a lot of time unpacking the many story revelations and questions this harrowing cautionary tale raises."


Lee isn't the only one impressed with Phillips' take on the character. His hard-fought R-Rated vision has been received well on Rotten Tomatoes, with overwhelmingly positive early reviews highlighting Joaquin Phoenix's "astonishing" performance. The film recently received an eight-minute standing ovation after its Venice Film Festival debut.


Directed by Todd Phillips, Joker stars Joaquin Phoenix, Robert De Niro, Zazie Beetz, Bill Camp, Frances Conroy, Brett Cullen, Glenn Fleshler, Douglas Hodge, Marc Maron, Josh Pais and Shea Whigham. The film arrives in theaters Oct. 4.
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Unread 2019-09-02, 07:55 PM   #137
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Joker Director Todd Phillips Explains Whether Movie is Political



Although early reaction to Joker has been quite positive, there's been some concern about the movie's political message in light of a script that leaked earlier this year. Director Todd Phillips has now explained whether the film has any political overtones.


Joker recently premiered at 2019 Venice Film Festival, where the cast and director fielded questions about the upcoming movie. According to Deadline, Phillips was asked about the film's tone. He answered, “I think movies are oftentimes mirrors of society, but never molders. We wrote it in 2017 so inevitably certain themes find their way in. It’s not a political film.” That response elicited laughter from the group.


He added, “For some… I think it depends the lens which you view it through.”


Phillips was also asked about the difference between Joker and The Hangover films. “It’s different tonally than a lot of my work, but ultimately it’s storytelling," he responded. "I was influenced by the movies I grew up on, character studies of the 70s, so I thought why can’t you do genre film like that in the comic book world — a deep dive on a character like Joker. I thought with a great actor we could really do something special.”
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Unread 2019-09-04, 01:56 PM   #138
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Why Joker Is Facing Backlash Despite The Great Reviews



Todd Phillips' Joker movie is receiving great reviews, so why is it also facing a backlash? The DC movie, which stars Joaquin Phoenix as the Clown Prince of Crime, premiered at Venice Film Festival this weekend, and was also screened for critics elsewhere, and the early reviews for Joker have been very positive.


Phoenix stars in Joker as Arthur Fleck, a would-be stand-up comedian in Gotham City who, after a series of failures and setbacks, finds himself turning to a life of crime and becoming more deranged while he's at it, which sets him on the path to becoming the Joker. Directed and co-written by Phillips alongside Scott Silver, Joker has been on many most anticipated lists since its first trailer dropped, showcasing a very different kind of comic book movie.


As per the reviews, that's what Phillips, Phoenix et al have delivered with Joker, which received a standing ovation in Venice, and yet online the discourse about the movie has already started to sour, with multiple backlashes and controversies emerging before the film has even been properly released.
The Joker Movie Backlash Explained



Joker's backlash started before anyone had actually had a chance to see the movie, and instead came when the script leaked online. Despite the fact that this was just a script, and even if real not necessarily the most up-to-date version, it led to some general unhappiness and ill-feeling towards the film online from those who read it, because Joker isn't going to be a typical comic book movie.
Many who read Joker's script weren't happy with the direction it was going in, which represented a shift away from the version(s) seen in the comics and previous DC movies. There was talk that it was going to make the character of Arthur Fleck too sympathetic; that its handling of more topical or political issues was way off; and other controversial elements that we'll not mention outright here for sake of spoilers, but needless to say made some big deviations from what's generally known or accepted about the Joker.


A lot of Joker's script, and the backlash to it, seems to be that it wasn't what people expected or wanted from the film. Of course, the script was an early one, and Phillips has since confirmed Joker's script changed, and it doesn't include the fact that direction, performances, and just about everything else can elevate a weak script into a good movie. What's on the page and what ends up on the screen are often very different things, but that didn't stop people being unhappy with Joker's script.


Some People Are Worried Joker Might Incite Terrorism



Something that was noted by reactions to Joker's leaked script, but has definitely gained more traction now that critics have seen the film, is the idea of Joker being a dangerous movie. Joker is about a man who is rejected and deals with that in a very violent, aggressive way, and it has been suggested by various critics that the film could lead to people taking the wrong message from it: that it actually supports incel culture, and that it could lead to acts of terrorism. That's not to say that Joker openly encourages such acts, but that it could be interpreted that way by the wrong person.


There is some historical precedent for this, in fairness. One of the biggest inspirations for Joker, and a film it's long been compared to, is Taxi Driver. When John Hinckley Jr. attempted to assassinate President Ronald Reagan in 1981, Taxi Driver formed part of his delusional fantasy that triggered the incident. Hinckley Jr stated that his actions were to impress Jodie Foster, whom he was obsessed with, and he had copied the hairstyle of Travis Bickle, while his attorney even played Taxi Driver in court as part of the defense.


In more modern times, and within the DC universe, there was a shooting that took place during a midnight screening of The Dark Knight Rises. At the Century 16 cinema in Aurora, Colorado, a gunman - James Eagen Holmes - opened fire on the theater during the movie, killing 12 people and injuring 58 others. According to initial reports, Holmes identified himself as the Joker at the time of his arrest. That was only seven years ago, and since then the political climate and numbers of mass shootings have only worsened, so it's understandable why there might be some concerns over Joker.
Joker Backlash Is A Bit Out Of Hand



Joker was always going to be a controversial movie in some way. He's too big and popular a character, not to mention too disturbed, for there not to be people unhappy with how things turned out for one reason or another, whether it was Phillips' direction, Phoenix's performance, changes to the character, or something else entirely. DC movies have long been divisive, so it was fair to assume Joker might be too. But it's the reasons for the backlash to Joker that don't seem completely warranted.


Firstly, it's harsh to judge any movie based solely on a draft script. As mentioned earlier, there are so many factors that go into a movie, on top of there being no guarantees it was the version of the script they shot, that it's impossible to say a movie will be bad simply by reading what's on the page. Joker is, according to most reactions, a good-to-great film, and it should be judged by people who have actually seen it; there's little point critiquing a work of art without knowing what it's like.


The second point is a little more delicate. On the one hand, it isn't completely unfair to point out that a movie might have a serious negative impact on a person who is already vulnerable. Joker contains themes and images of violence, revenge, loneliness, anger, masculinity, and much more, all of which could be taken in the wrong way. But is that a reason to criticize, condemn, or "cancel" the movie itself? This risks taking things into murky territory with regards to censorship and who a film is "acceptable" for, calling to mind the BBFC banning The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, which was deemed "all right for you middle-class cineastes...but what would happen if a factory worker in Manchester happened to see it?" It's also similar to the frequent backlashes to violent video games, despite research showing no link between video games and violence or aggression.


In this sense, Joker does feel like Taxi Driver or Fight Club, where yes, there are people who will take the wrong message from it. But is that the fault of the creator? David Fincher made Fight Club as a satire of toxic masculinity that does not paint it in a favorable light, so is it a failing of his as a filmmaker that there are people who hold it up as a celebration of it instead? How much should Joker sacrifice its own story in order to hammer its point home? Going into the movie, the title along should be clear that this is about a character who is a bad guy, since the Joker is one of the most famous villains in pop-culture history, and one there's very little mistaking for a hero, anti-hero, or anything else to be potentially looked up to. It's sadly true that there will be people who'll take the wrong message from it, but then those people would also take the wrong message from reading comics, or some other work of art. Movies are open to different interpretations, and while filmmakers should be responsible with what they're making, that doesn't preclude the fact that there could always be someone who can take it the wrong way. What matters most to the director is making a great movie, and there are far greater issues to address when it comes to acts of terrorism or just the culture of toxic masculinity than Joker.
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Unread 2019-09-04, 08:54 PM   #139
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Joker Director Explains Why It's Not a Typical Origin Movie

DC Comics is presenting some major changes to the classic Batman mythos with their latest movie, which will tell the origin of the Clown Prince of Crime with Joker. And now Warner Bros. Pictures has released new details about the movie and filmmaker Todd Phillips' vision, revealing more about the movie's sadistic plot. And when it comes to Joker, it looks like it will make a lot of changes and instead explore how a person like Joaquin Phoenix's Arthur Fleck could become a violent criminal who takes over the Gotham City criminal underworld.


As part of the production notes for Warner Bros., Phillips explained how Joker is unlike a typical superhero origin story.


“I love the complexity of Joker and felt his origin would be worth exploring on film, since nobody’s done that and even in the canon he has no formalized beginning," explained Phillips. "So, [co-writer] Scott Silver and I wrote a version of a complex and complicated character, and how he might evolve...and then devolve. That is what interested me—not a Joker story, but the story of becoming Joker.”


Much like in The Killing Joke, all it will take is One Bad Day for Arthur to experience the darker side of humanity, which will then push him to explore his own violent tendencies.
“One of the themes we wanted to explore with the movie is empathy and, more importantly, the lack of empathy that is present in so much of Arthur’s world,” Phillips said. “For example, in the movie you see the difference in the way little kids and adults react to Arthur, because kids see the world through no lens; they don’t see rich versus poor or understand a marginalized individual the way adults do. They just see Arthur as a guy who’s trying to make them smile. It’s not inherent, we have to learn how to be unaccepting of others and, unfortunately, we usually do.”
We already know that the movie will make major changes to Joker's origin, as he will not fall into a vat of ACE Chemicals and turn into the pale-skinned clown that haunts the Caped Crusader. Phillips previously told the Associated Press that they're attempting to be as realistic as possible in the movie.

"He doesn’t fall into a vat of acid and come out laughing," Phillips explained. "That’s a comic book thing."
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Unread 2019-09-05, 12:48 PM   #140
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Unread 2019-09-05, 02:48 PM   #141
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Joker Movie is Already Stirring Controversy

DC's Joker movie will chronicle the story of how Batman's greatest villain came to be, and how his malevolent madness stirs chaos in the streets of Gotham City. However, Joker's chaos effect seems to be spreading beyond the film itself, as there's growing controversy over what kind of message the movie is sending.


According to some critics who have seen the movie early, Joker runs the risk of being perceived as glorification of what one angry and disturbed loner is able to accomplish. That kind of message is severely ill-timed, as continued strings of mass shootings and other real-life acts of terrorism have sparked widespread discussion about what kind of violent men there are lurking in the societal underbelly.


Debate over whether Joker turns that kind of archetype into a heroic figure (intentionally or not), is already provoking some impassioned arguments online - a full month before the film even hits theaters. Here's what Variety had to say regarding the quickly-mounting controversy over Joker:


"Joker,” a very R-rated look at the early days of Batman’s main antagonist, was the darling of the Venice Film Festival, capturing rave reviews and an eight-minute (we timed it!) standing ovation. But the film also inspired controversy. Some critics and social media commentators worried that “Joker” sympathizes with a homicidal loner at a time when America and the rest of the world are plagued by gun violence. That all but guarantees that “Joker” will be a topic of fierce debate at Toronto, where it will screen again, as critics and audiences grapple over the questions of whether it’s a brilliant piece of art or a danger to society. If the filmmakers are able to address those fears, “Joker” could be the rare comic-book movie that also becomes a certified Oscar contender..."


It seems that while Warner Bros. overcame the risk of making a Joker origin film, they next have to get over the cultural hurdle of negative PR regarding the film's message. So while Joker is currently projected for a $100 million opening weekend, it remains to be seen if the film's bleak tone and questionable thematic messages chase away a larger mainstream audience. Then again, any film labeled "controversial" - which also has a buzzed-about Joker performance in it - is bound to intrigue just as many mainstream moviegoers as it repels.


As for the discussion surrounding Joker's controversy? Scroll below to see what kind of views and opinions are currently circulating around social media:


https://comicbook.com/dc/2019/09/05/...rsy-reviews/#2
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Unread 2019-09-09, 02:18 PM   #142
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My guess is this is going to be one of those blurred fantasy and reality pieces. You know, like Fight Club or Shutter Island. Most of the story is going to be some fantasy he's living out in his head.
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Unread 2019-09-09, 03:50 PM   #143
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‘Joker’ Gets the Golden Lion Award at the Venice Film Festival, Giving Oscar Chances a Nudge




The world premiere of Joker at the Venice Film Festival has already started a huge swell of buzz for Todd Phillips’ grim take on the origin story of Batman’s most notorious arch nemesis. Now the festival has given Joker another boost by awarding it the Golden Lion, the highest honor that the festival can give.


Todd Phillips accepted the prize in Venice (via The Hollywood Reporter), immediately thanking Warner Bros. Pictures and DC Entertainment for “stepping out of their comfort zone and taking such a bold swing on me and this movie.”


Indeed, studios usually aren’t willing to take risks on comic book movies that are geared towards strictly adult audiences. Some rare exceptions have been 300, Sin City, and Watchmen, as well as Mark Millar’s Kick-Ass and Kingsman franchises. However, Marvel and DC have rarely taken their characters to dark territory. Deadpool, The Punisher and Blade are the only signature comic book characters from Marvel who have been given R-rated movies, and DC Comics never taken one of their popular characters into this arena before.
But Phillips was also quick to thank the man who is really making this movie so compelling: star Joaquin Phoenix. The director praised Phoenix’s performance just as much as critics have been:
“There is no movie without Joaquin Phoenix. Joaquin is the fiercest and brightest and most open-minded lion I know. Thank you for trusting me with your insane talent.”
Earning a prestigious festival award should help the film’s chances of making waves during awards season. In fact, 2017 saw the Golden Lion winner The Shape of Water go all the way to the Oscars, where it took Best Picture. Then, last year saw Roma rake in a ton of nominations, including Best Picture, though it ultimately (wrongfully) lost out to Green Book.


But that’s not necessarily a guarantee that Joker will follow suit. The Golden Lion hasn’t been a good prognosticator of Best Picture contenders. The last time the Golden Lion award went to a movie that was a key player in the Oscars was The Wrestler in 2008. So this doesn’t mean Joker will be able to impress the Academy enough to earn Oscar nominations, but if the buzz is any indicator, it’s probably a safe bet that we’ll at least see Joaquin Phoenix getting a Best Actor nod.
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Unread 2019-09-10, 01:38 PM   #144
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Joaquin Phoenix's JOKER "Definitely" Won't Meet Robert Pattinson's BATMAN, According To Todd Philips

Fans hoping to see Joaquin Phoenix's take on the Clown Prince of Crime cross paths with Robert Pattinson's new Batman might be disappointed, as Joker director Todd Philips says it's not gonna happen...




Although we've always been told that Todd Philips' Joker movie was not going to be a part of Warner Bros.' current DCEU (or whatever you want to call it), many fans still hoped to see Joaquin Phoenix's acclaimed take on the iconic DC villain cross paths with our new Batman, Robert Pattinson.

Unfortunately, it doesn't sound like this is something that's currently on the cards - at least not according to Todd Philips.


The director didn't beat around the bush when Variety asked if these versions of the characters could appear in a future film together, stating "No, definitely not."

“Oddly, in the states, comic books are our Shakespeare it seems, and you can do many many versions of “Hamlet,” Phillips added. “There will be many more jokers, I’m sure, in the future.”

Honestly, after everything we've heard about Joker, a crossover with what is certain to be a more family-friendly incarnation of the Dark Knight was always going to be a long shot. That said, if this standalone origin story is as successful as it's expected to be, Warner Bros. may rethink their current strategy.

Tell us, are you disappointed by this update, or did you figure as much anyway? Drop us a comment down below, and you can also check out some excerpts from the first wave of reviews.



This is a truly nightmarish vision of late-era capitalism – arguably the best social horror film since ‘Get Out’ – and Phoenix is magnetic in it. He runs Heath Ledger cigarette-paper close as the finest screen Joker.

SOURCE:Time Out

Having brazenly plundered the films of Scorsese, Phillips fashions stolen ingredients into something new, so that what began as a gleeful cosplay session turns progressively more dangerous – and somehow more relevant, too. Gotham City is aflame and they’re rioting on the streets. And a rough beast is slouching towards the TV studio to be born.

SOURCE:Guardian

It will be tempting for some to declare this the first art film based on a DC or Marvel property, but while it certainly represents a bit of a departure and something of a risk, “Joker” is ultimately grim-and-gritty comic book nihilism jacked up to the nth degree, wrapped up in a convincing but ultimately hollow simulacra of better, smarter movies.
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Unread 2019-09-10, 02:59 PM   #145
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‘Joker’ Review: Joaquin Phoenix is Phenomenal in This Nihilistic Nightmare [TIFF 2019]




“He’s a lonely forgotten man desperate to prove that he’s alive.” That’s the tagline of Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver, but it might as well serve as a rallying cry for Todd Phillips‘s Joker, a violent, nihilistic horror film masquerading as both a character drama and a comic book movie. Realizing that it’s next to impossible to get a studio-backed character piece greenlit, Phillips has decided to use the Joker as a gateway drug, giving him a chance to more or less remake Taxi Driver for a whole new generation of moviegoers – the ones who’ve grown up on a steady diet of superhero movies. Joaquin Phoenix‘s Arthur Fleck is that lonely forgotten man – a mentally unstable loser just aching for acceptance. He says he wants to be a standup comedian, but what he really wants is attention. And he’s willing to kill to get it.

Joker‘s script, courtesy of Phillips and Scott Silver, is often painfully simplistic – the type of script where characters literally spell-out their motivations in blunt, unsubtle ways. Yet everything else on display here transcends that material, resulting in a curious experience – a film that lacks a good story, but boasts an overall masterful display of craft. Phillips’s direction is exact and precise, overloading the film with homages to ’70s character dramas and wide shots that encompass the dirty, filthy world Arthur lives in. That direction is aided by Lawrence Sher‘s stunning cinematography – full of long, dark nights and burning artificial lights – as if existing in a world where the sun no longer rises. All of this is accentuated by Hildur Guðnadóttir‘s ominous, haunting score, which is full of long, drawn-out notes and chilling soundscapes.
It’s the 1980s, and Gotham City is a living hell. A garbage strike has resulted in thousands of tons of trash piled up in the streets – which in turn has given way to a new breed of giant super rats. The city is a powder keg ready to explode, as the rich get richer and the poor struggle to survive. Living among the downtrodden is Phoenix’s Arthur Fleck, a wannabe stand-up comic who makes his living as a party clown. He appears to love his clowning job as he prances and dances his way from one event to the next. But the cold, harsh world of Gotham City has no need for such mirth, and Arthur finds himself shunned and abused at every turn.
His finds solace in both his belief that he’ll one day be a famous stand-up comic, and his love of The Murray Franklin Show, a Tonight Show-esque late-night comedy show hosted by Murray Franklin (Robert De Niro, playing a kind of reverse version of the character he played in Scorsese’s The King of Comedy). But Arthur’s “jokes” aren’t very good. In fact, they’re non-existent. He’s also clearly mentally ill – a social worker has him on seven different prescriptions, but none of them seem to be working.
The only real human contact Arthur has is with his sickly mother Penny (Frances Conroy), who insists on writing a constant barrage of letters to her former employer, the wealthy Thomas Wayne (Brett Cullen). The Trumpian Wayne is planning to run for mayor, promising to clean-up Gotham in the process. Penny believes that Wayne will use his wealth to help her and Arthur, but Arthur has his doubts.
Thomas Wayne can’t help Arthur. In fact, no one can. And as the character finds himself more and more abused, he finally decides to lash-out, murdering three cruel stockbrokers on the subway. Arthur’s act spurns a full-blown “eat the rich” movement in Gotham, with citizens donning clown masks and staging violent protests. Arthur has created an entire movement – but he doesn’t seem to care about that at all. As he says himself, he’s not political – and he doesn’t believe in anything. Except himself.
A smarter script would take these ideas and turn them into something with deeper meaning. Phillips is presenting a wealth of possibilities here, dealing with social issues and class struggles. But like Arthur, Phillips doesn’t seem to care about that. It’s all just background noise – an excuse to turn Arthur into a full-blown psychopath; a chain-smoking clown prone to dancing his way through life. There’s a great film lurking within the frames of Joker – but sadly, we’ll just have to settle for a good one.
What elevates all of this is Phoenix, who is haunting, haunted and downright scary. Gaunt to the point of emaciation, the actor brings a great physicality to the performance, and Phillips often accentuates the character’s ghastly appearance by having Phoenix stretch and twist about with his shirt off, his ribs protruding from beneath his skin, his shoulder blades jutting like pieces of broken glass. Manic, creepy, and imposing, Phoenix manages to make his Joker empathetic, but never sympathetic. We feel for Arthur – but we can never really like him. He’s too detestable; too nasty. He suffers from a medical condition that causes him to utter wild peels of painful laughter, and he’s not above stalking his attractive neighbor, played by Zazie Beetz in a tragically underwritten role. And as Arthur becomes more and more unhinged and violent, any semblance of empathy for the character flat-out vanishes. He’s become what he was always meant to be: a supervillain. As Joker draws to its climax, Arthur’s violent tendencies explode, resulting in several ghastly, graphic moments that would be right at home in a slasher movie.
The cinema landscape is choked with comic book movies – a artistic shift that has resulted in an urge for more adult-driven cinema. Joker wants to be the answer to those cinephile prayers – a film that is the best of both worlds: a comic book property that’s also a dark, adult drama. But the film is so relentlessly bleak, and so intellectually slight, that the end result seems like a “be careful what you wish for” warning. Like Arthur Fleck, Joker doesn’t believe in anything. That’s both fascinating, and terrifying. This is the truly subversive comic book movie we’ve been waiting for. Now that it’s here, we might start to regret the monster we’ve conjured up.
/Film Rating: 8 out of 10
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Unread 2019-09-11, 06:01 PM   #146
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JOKER: Joaquin Phoenix Objected To Thomas Wayne Being Included In The DC Comics Adaptation

Joker director Todd Phillips has revealed that he believes star Joaquin Phoenix would have been much happier had the movie been titled "Arthur" instead, as he wasn't a fan of the comic book connections...




It's pretty obvious that Joker isn't going to be sticking to the source material, as it's a totally original take on the Clown Prince of Crime's origin story which doesn't appear to be borrowing all that much from the comic books.

Now, though, director Todd Phillips has revealed that star Joaquin Phoenix really wasn't on board with any references to the world of Batman! "[Joaquin] never liked saying the name Thomas Wayne," the filmmaker explains. "It would have been easier for him if the movie was called ‘Arthur’ and had nothing to do with any of that stuff. But in the long run, I think he got it and appreciated it."

Without any links at all to the wider DC Universe, this really would have just been a Joker movie in name only! As we noted earlier today, Phoenix and Phillips also butted heads over the actor's weight, and while they agreed that the actor needed to change his appearance, the star was reluctant to slim down for yet another movie role.

"It’s a horrible way to live," Phoenix says. "I think [Arthur] should be kind of heavy. Todd was like, ‘I think you should do the real thin person.’" Ultimately, he gave in to the filmmaker's vision and lost a whopping 52lbs to play this version of the Harlequin of Hate!
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Unread 2019-09-11, 06:16 PM   #147
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Joker Movie Was Specifically Written For Joaquin Phoenix

Joker, the new Todd Phillips film that follows the origin story of Batman’s biggest foe, has been a huge topic of discussion ever since it premiered at the Venice Film Festival late last month. The film is already garnering Oscar buzz for Joaquin Phoenix, who is another in a long line of actors to bring the comic book character to life. In a recent interview with Phillips and Phoenix, The New York Times revealed that while Phoenix was always the top choice for the part, he wasn’t originally sold on the film.


“He was not keen on jumping into costume in any comic-book movie,” Phillips explained. “It’s not necessarily in his five-year plan — although I don’t think he has one.”


Despite previous reports that Joker was considering casting Leonardo DiCaprio, Phillips revealed, “We wrote the movie for Joaquin.”


Phillips shared that he visited Phoenix’s house many times over the course of three months where he answered the actor's “many, many questions” about Arthur Fleck, hoping to win Phoenix over “through sheer persistence.”


“I asked him to come over and audition me for it,” Phoenix shared. “It wasn’t an easy decision, but he kept saying, ‘Let’s just be bold. Let’s do something.’”


Phillips added, “I kept waiting for him to just say, ‘O.K., I’m in,’ And he never did that.” Phoenix explained, “You just never get a yes. All you get is more questions.”
Joker also stars Zazie Beetz (Sophie Dumond), Robert De Niro (Murray Franklin), Brett Cullen (Thomas Wayne), Frances Conroy (Penny Fleck), Marc Maron (Ted Marco), Douglas Hodge (Alfred Pennyworth), Josh Pais (Hoyt Vaughn), Bryan Tyree Henry, Bryan Callen, Shea Whigham, and Glen Fleshler. You can find the official description for the movie below:

"Drama. Joker centers around the iconic arch nemesis and is an original, standalone story not seen before on the big screen. The exploration of Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix), a man disregarded by society, is not only a gritty character study but also a broader cautionary tale."
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Unread 2019-09-13, 02:26 PM   #148
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JOKER Chinese TV Spot Reveals New Snippets Of Footage Of The Clown Prince Of Crime's Maniacal Laugh

A brief Chinese "trailer" for Joker has been released, and while it's mostly made up of familiar footage, it also includes some new shots from the DC Comics movie, including the villain's iconic laugh...




As reviews for Joker continue to come in, excitement for what looks like the most unique DC Comics movie to date continues to build. Unfortunately, we still have a few more weeks to wait before it arrives in theaters, and now a Chinese TV spot has been released which features a few new snippets of footage from the Clown Prince of Crime's first solo outing.

The most noteworthy shot has to be what appears to be The Joker in the back of a police car as he maniacally laughs away to himself about... well, we'll just have to wait and see!


Due to Joker premiering so early, spoilers aren't hard to find, but Warner Bros. is clearly relying on fans wanting to see how things play out for the Harlequin of Hate and what Joaquin Phoenix brings to the role (speculation continues to run rampant that he could land an Oscar for his performance as the mentally unhinged comic book villain).

Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uR4CIN8y-P0
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Unread 2019-09-15, 06:46 PM   #149
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New Joker Photos Showcase Joaquin Phoenix, Robert De Niro, Zazie Beetz, and More

Joker is only a few weeks from debuting in theaters, but Warner Bros. has just given fans a pretty prominent new look at the upcoming film. The studio recently released a batch of over 20 photos from the film, which draws inspiration from the iconic DC Comics villain.
The photos showcase quite a lot of Joaquin Phoenix's Arthur Fleck, a failed stand-up comedian who is driven to madness in a corrupt Gotham City. Also present among the photos are Robert De Niro's Murray Franklin, Zazie Beetz's Sophie, and Frances Conroy's Penny Fleck, as well as several behind-the-scenes shots involving director Todd Phillips.


“We didn’t follow anything from the comic-books, which people are gonna be mad about,” Phillips explained in a recent interview. “We just wrote our own version of where a guy like Joker might come from. That’s what was interesting to me. We’re not even doing Joker, but the story of becoming Joker. It’s about this man.”
Scroll through to check out all of the photos!



Slide 1 of 21Arthur(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 2 of 21A Song in Your Heart(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 3 of 21Put on a Happy Face(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 4 of 21On the Run(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 5 of 21Menacing(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 6 of 21Ta-Da(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 7 of 21Deep in Thought(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 8 of 21Joaquin and Todd(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 9 of 21Dance(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 10 of 21Mother and Son(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 11 of 21Backstage(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 12 of 21Train(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 13 of 21Arthur and Sophie(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 14 of 21Makeup(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 15 of 21Performing(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 16 of 21Robert and Todd(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 17 of 21Applause(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 18 of 21Preparing(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 19 of 21Sophie(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 20 of 21Murray(Photo: Warner Bros.)
Slide 21 of 21Watching(Photo: Warner Bros.)
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Unread 2019-09-16, 04:33 PM   #150
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Joaquin Phoenix On Finding His Joker Laughs

When an actor is cast as the Joker in a DC Comics movie, one of the first questions fans of the iconic Batman villain asks is, "What will the laugh sound like?" There's also plenty of concern about the costume, the story, and whether or not it will all be accurate to a certain comic book. However, the element which pertains to the actor in the role is the laugh. For Joaquin Phoenix, finding a laugh for his Joker in the upcoming standalone movie was something which happened organically -- and came in threes.


"There was three different laughs in the movie," Phoenix tells ComicBook.com. Of that, one of those laughs will be the most memorable and attributed as his true Joker laugh. As it turns out, the actor spent time with his director Todd Phillips, simultaneously being convinced to play the role and developing the sound of that laugh.


"Well really, do you remember I basically auditioned myself?" Phoenix said to Phillips, who was sitting beside him. "I had you come over to audition the laugh because I didn't think I could do it. And you showed me some videos, of some laughs and I thought that's really good. In the script it described the laugh being almost painful, I thought that was a very interesting way to describe laughter. So you came over to my house, I tried and it was really uncomfortable, and I set up five minutes trying to work it up and finally you said, 'You don't have to do this.'"


At that time, Phillips told Phoenix, "You already have the part." There was never anybody else in consideration for the role but Phoenix wanted to push make sure he found his sound.


"I have to do this, because if I don't do this now, if I can't force myself to find it now, then forever, I'm going to f---ing p--- out," Pheonix said. "So we did it."


Did it, they most certainly did. Phoenix's performance in Joker is earning praise from critics who have seen the film as Oscar-worthy, building on the iconic works by the likes of Jack Nicholson, Heath Ledger, and even Mark Hamill in animated form.


"For him to summon it on the day of the shooting was always different and sometimes he would need time to do it honestly," Phillips explained. "I'm talking about the affliction laugh, that was to me probably, I can't speak for [Phoenix], but that was probably the hardest one to do. There's the laugh where he is fake laughing to be one of the guys or put in the comedy club. And then there's [redacted for spoilers] where he is genuinely laughing at something, but the affliction laugh I think was probably hard to muster up, so there were times on set where it would be a little bit pacing, where I would throw out a private joke to him that would try to make you laugh about somebody on the crew or something."

The two shared a laugh over the memory, though Phoenix pointed out, "I never made fun of people on the crew!" Phillips and Phoenix laughed together, seeming to have built a tremendous chemistry while working together on Joker, shining through with each impressive beat of the dark film. Comicbook.com's review calls it a "masterpiece."
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