Mirror Finish Polishing ~ 1-816-529-6089 ~ sales@mirrorfinishpolishing.com ~ mirrorfinishpolishing.com For the best rate on home, auto, life or business/commercial insurance call me at 888-959-0955, cell 636-734-1310 or bricehazelwood@weiss-ins.com. Never Done Garage - donewhenimdead.com Peerless Automotive Reconditioning - 1155 W. Dennis Ave, Olathe Ks, 66061 - 913-893-1201 Mark H. Epstein ~ The Epstein Law Firm, LLC ~ 913-396-5123 Wilkes Automotive ~ wilkesautomotive.com ~ 246 Marion St, Olathe, KS 66061 ~ 913-254-7171 Skandalous Inc ~ www.skandalousinc.com DIY Auto Repair Inc ~ www.diyautorepairkc.com ~ 11509 Strangline Rd, Olathe KS 66062 ~ 913-226-3806 Your advertisement here! The Law Offices of Jeremiah Johnson, LLC ~ 104 E. Poplar, Olathe, KS 66061 ~ (913)764-5010 ~ www.kcatty.com - www.johnsoncountydui.com ~ jeremiah@kcatty.com Santa Fe Body, Inc ~ 8717 Lenexa Drive, Overland Park, KS 66214 ~ (913) 894-6090 House of Boost LLC Nude? HouseofHID.com - The #1 source for HID The Print Shop KC 816.200.6694 or Ryan@RMD-Photography.com the art of tyleR ~ http://tyleR.bigcartel.com ~ TYLERcoey.com ~ MUTTtoy.com ~ MUTTtoy@gmail.com W-K Chevrolet Buick Pontiac Cadillac GMC ~ 3310 W. Broadway, Sedalia, MO 65301 ~ 800-382-5088 ~ Cell 660-553-8928 ~ dustin@wkchevy.com ~ www.wkchevy.com

Go Back   KCSR - THE Kansas City Forum > General Forums > Computers, Teh Interweb, Gaming, Electronics

Reply
Thread Tools
Unread 2015-08-12, 09:00 AM   #1
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 157,674
Post Thanks / Like
Lightbulb Amazon’s Dash Buttons hint at a future of interface-free shopping

You had to know a 'Buy Me!' button was coming






Last Friday, 16 Larabars and an 80-count box of Glad garbage bags arrived at my door. These items are unremarkable, except for this: I ordered them by pressing some buttons on or near my kitchen countertop. Online shopping — or we’ll-certainly-need-this-for-the-apocalypse impulse shopping — can now be done with a light press on a small, plastic "Buy Me!" dongle made by Amazon.
There are a couple different ways to look at Amazon’s Dash Buttons. The first, and most obvious, is that they are a gimmick. There is something ludicrous about spending money to spend more money. At least, I felt this way when I went to Amazon.com and loaded up my virtual shopping cart with buttons, my total coming to $16.29 for three of them (each one costs $4.99, plus tax).
This is it? I thought when the 3-inch dongles arrived a couple days later. Each one was housed in tiny cardboard, like Amazon boxes for the modern dollhouse. This is Amazon’s vision for the future of shopping? There are buttons for Bounty, and Smartwater, and Gillette, and Huggies, and Gatorade, and about a dozen other brands right now. These brands have reportedly paid Amazon real money to have their own plastic Dash Buttons. Every which way, Amazon is getting paid.
There is something ludicrous about spending money to spend more money
But these buy buttons also support a shopping experience that involves almost zero interaction, whether that means browsing store shelves (IRL!) or tapping a touchscreen to browse and buy virtually.
Sure, when you first set up a Dash Button, you'll have to go into the Amazon mobile app. You'll select the specific batch of product you want to order and reorder, whether it’s a three-pack of scented Clorox disinfecting wipes scented for $9.97 or a six-pack of the citrus blend variety for $23.82.
And when it comes to actually "shopping"? You just press the Dash Button. A tiny light flickers white, until it turns green, indicating your order is on its way.
Tyler Pina for Vox Media
The notion that the best interface may be no interface is not a new one, but in an e-commerce scenario, it makes a surprising amount of sense. Even one-click purchasing requires opening an app or website. This does not. Dash Buttons are also not the first product from Amazon to embrace this idea. Prior to this there was another Dash stick, one that works with Amazon’s grocery delivery service in Manhattan. You could speak to this wand, say "meat," and you would get meat.
Echo, a new wireless speaker from Amazon, is a voice-controlled virtual assistant packed in a black cylinder, one that will dim the lights, set a timer or play a Saturday morning music playlist for you. While the Echo’s music picks aren’t always the greatest, there is something immensely convenient about not having to open an app and search for something. The greatest irony of "smart" products is that they can make you feel dumb while you’re scrolling through an app.
Did I mention you can also buy things with the Echo? (You didn’t think Amazon would stray too far from that, did you?) "Alexa," you can say to it, "Reorder trash bags," and trash bags you shall receive.
Dash Buttons are a way to shop without shopping
The Dash Buttons, then, are another means to an end for Amazon. It’s a let’s-throw-these-at-the-wall-and-see-if-they-literally-stick attempt. To call these "hardware" would be a stretch, and it's not the hardware that really matters, anyway; it's getting you to buy stuff.
For consumers, the Dash Buttons are a way to shop without shopping. It’s easy to forget that you’ve spent real money, until you get the standard email receipt from Amazon.
"Can I press one?" three fully grown human beings asked me when they saw the Dash Buttons. Is it because they look like toys? Or because the idea of ordering something by simply pressing a button, as though it's a doorbell to an Amazon distribution warehouse, is just too tempting?
"I would prefer not to have 96 more Larabars show up at my front door," I would say, especially because the bars I ordered tasted more like an Amazon box and less like peanut butter and chocolate. A doorbell to an Amazon distribution warehouse
I asked Amazon what would happen if a child, or a pet, or a fully grown human being were to press a Dash Button multiple times. It turns out Dash Buttons only respond to the "first press" until your order has shipped and arrived. Also, if you’ve opted into notifications, you will know if someone has placed six orders of Larabars, and can cancel orders if necessary.
There’s also the practical question of how often you’ll really use the Dash Buttons. Right now, I don’t plan to reorder the Larabars. Eighty trash bags should last me for awhile. So should three canisters of bleach wipes. Ideally, there would be more brands participating, or the buttons could be programmed to order different kinds of things.
But Amazon, not surprisingly, seems to have grander plans for this. Its Dash Replenishment Service involves partnerships with appliance makers — like Whirlpool and Brita — that can either have physical buttons or built-in sensors that would trigger a new purchase. In this scenario, shopping isn’t just interface-free; it’s based on behavioral patterns, such as how often you run out of printer ink, or how frequently you replace the water filter.
I did experience one glitch with Dash Buttons: I never got my Clorox bleach wipes. The order didn’t process after I first set up the Dash Button. Once I realized this, I walked into my kitchen and pressed the Clorox-branded Dash Button again. They should arrive by Thursday.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-08-12, 09:04 AM   #2
Karlen
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Manhattan
Posts: 32,544
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 887
Thanks (Received): 482
Likes (Given): 4078
Likes (Received): 4368
Dislikes (Given): 99
Dislikes (Received): 168
Default

Seems like a waste of plastic to make these things.
__________________
Post Thanks / Like - 0 Thanks, 1 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Likes Prolific liked this post
Karlen is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-08-12, 09:32 AM   #3
BuddyLee
 
BuddyLee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Posts: 28,665
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 24
Thanks (Received): 257
Likes (Given): 61
Likes (Received): 1932
Dislikes (Given): 4
Dislikes (Received): 35
Default

I think it's a cool idea, however I fear the damage my kids could do with access to one of these things.
__________________
XBL: Buddyl33
PSN: KC_Buddyl33

Post Thanks / Like - 0 Thanks, 1 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Likes Prolific liked this post
BuddyLee is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-08-12, 09:38 AM   #4
ReidStylez
Yahh Trick Yahh!
 
ReidStylez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Overland Park, KS
Posts: 27,160
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 9
Thanks (Received): 98
Likes (Given): 41
Likes (Received): 929
Dislikes (Given): 11
Dislikes (Received): 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BuddyLee View Post
I think it's a cool idea, however I fear the damage my kids could do with access to one of these things.
I get an email notification as soon as I order something on Amazon and you normally have a few hours to cancel no questions asked if you want. That should stop the kids pushing the button issue if it's within reach of them.
__________________
2011 Toyota Tacoma DCLB SR5
ReidStylez is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-08-12, 09:41 AM   #5
BuddyLee
 
BuddyLee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Posts: 28,665
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 24
Thanks (Received): 257
Likes (Given): 61
Likes (Received): 1932
Dislikes (Given): 4
Dislikes (Received): 35
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReidStylez View Post
I get an email notification as soon as I order something on Amazon and you normally have a few hours to cancel no questions asked if you want. That should stop the kids pushing the button issue if it's within reach of them.
You don't have kids do you
__________________
XBL: Buddyl33
PSN: KC_Buddyl33

BuddyLee is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-08-12, 10:18 AM   #6
ReidStylez
Yahh Trick Yahh!
 
ReidStylez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Overland Park, KS
Posts: 27,160
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 9
Thanks (Received): 98
Likes (Given): 41
Likes (Received): 929
Dislikes (Given): 11
Dislikes (Received): 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BuddyLee View Post
You don't have kids do you
No, thank god!
__________________
2011 Toyota Tacoma DCLB SR5
ReidStylez is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-08-19, 09:06 AM   #7
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 157,674
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Hack Amazon's Dash buttons to do things other than buying stuff




Amazon's Dash buttons are tiny adhesive physical triggers that can order for you, through the magic of WiFi, anything you need to stock up on. But that's not the limits of their power, if you're willing to tinker with them. Ted Benson, (who works at a company that likes to regularly perform such shenanigans with the aid of its web tools), reckons it''ll you take under 10 minutes to repurpose Amazon's physical iteration of Buy It Now. (I think he's underestimating the degree of incompetence this editor possesses, but anyhow.) Benson managed to hack a diaper-ordering Dash button to act as an Internet Of Things-style tracker for how often his (adorable) baby poops. Or how many times he wakes up in a night. The trick lies in the fact that Amazon's buttons aren't constantly connected to WiFi. For the sake of battery life, the buttons only come to life when pushed, meaning the workaround picks up when your button is trying to access the internet, and registers that as a trigger for anything but buying stuff from Amazon.




Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKSqV44RZ3E


With a little bit of python code, a simple program can track when the button tries to connect to the WiFi, and once it gets a hit, record a datapoint. (In this case, inside a Google Doc spreadsheet.) Of course, you need to ensure you've setup the button not to order something every time you press it --easily done when you first start using the button. If you're looking to make the idea of smart diapers seem suddenly very stupid, you can find all the code and instruction needed in the Medium post right here
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-08-23, 04:42 PM   #8
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 157,674
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Life with the Dash button: good design for Amazon, bad for everyone else




On a sunny Saturday morning, seven Amazon Dash buttons arrived to my apartment. Dash is a decidedly Jetsonian future come to life. A Wi-Fi connected button for my every need! Push one in my toddler's bedroom, and Huggies diapers would appear at my doorstep. Push another by my bathroom sink, and Gillette razors arrive to shave my beard away. With this $35 shipment, I'd be able to stick a Dash button in every room; I could order products like Glad trash bags right from my kitchen, or Kraft Easy Mac right at the dining room table.


courtesy of the author
But after actually living with Amazon's Dash buttons, I realized that they are just the latest symptom of Amazon's slowly spreading disease. The company is no longer designing their products and services with a customer experience that will woo us to be loyal, but for profit maximization now that we're here. The Dash button is an unabashed attempt to disconnect customers from the amount of money we're spending. And frankly, even that would be fine, if only Dash buttons provided the instant product gratification they promise.
The Core UI Doesn't Actually Make Sense

Buttons are satisfying to press because they make things happen. Just watch two kids under the age of 12 fight for the privilege of pushing the elevator. Things light up! Doors swing open! Dings sometimes happen!
Dash buttons are just the latest symptom of Amazon's slowly spreading disease.
Yet as I laid suffering from a deathly cold on my bed, looking on at the Gatorade Dash button I'd placed within arm's reach on my nightstand—originally placed there as a joke, as if a marathon bout of lovemaking could leave me in such dire need of electrolytes that I'd slam the button for emergency hydration—I began to internalize the cognitive dissonance at the core of the Dash button's design. I could press this button when I desperately wanted some sugary fluid to fight my cold, and I'd conveniently receive it . . . 48 hours from now. Would I want Gatorade in 48 hours? Would I still be sick, or still be alive to drink it in two days time?
Amazon has same day shipping on many products, and maybe if the Gatorade applied, I'd have actually pressed the button on that mucusy day. But the core gesture of pressing a button to receive gratification days later fundamentally feels less like convenience than illusion.

The Products Are Limited, And Generally Expensive

Of course, we're not always ordering products on our potential deathbeds. The Dash button advertises products like razors, laundry pods, and diapers. These are things you might see that you're running low on with a bit of notice. And when that happens, the button is waiting there at the bathroom sink or by the changing table to let you order more in perfect domestic context.
But Amazon severely limits what you can actually order. Not only are Dash buttons currently limited to a few brands—you can, for instance, acquire a button to buy Huggies but not Pampers, or Glad trash bags but not Hefty—when you actually set up each button for the first time, you learn that the sub-selections are further limited to a preselected list.


Web interface, left. Dash interface, right.
The Dash button makes you pay for its supposed convenience by removing potential discounts.
Take razors. I buy Mach3 razors. (Now you know.) Gillette's button wants to sell me Fusions, or, at the very least, Mach3 Turbo razors. If I buy my Mach3s through Amazon's actual website, not only can I spend less money on more razors, I can choose from seven pages worth of other Gillette razor options, full of different sized packs, disposables, bundles, clippable coupons, and more. Plus, on other items, the website allows me to see price per oz or per sheet. Amazon's Dash button interface leaves these money-saving details behind along with Add-on Items and Subscribe & Save.
The Dash button narrows your options to what, at best, will be the stock Amazon price on what you wanted, and at worst, lack applicable discounts, optimally priced configurations, or even the option to buy the product that you loyally purchase through Amazon already. Why doesn't Dash just offer the option to program a button with any product you want, or at least any product you want under a certain brand? The Dash button makes you pay for its supposed convenience by removing potential discounts. It's not enough that you're hanging advertisements in the nooks and crannies of your home. You need to cough up extra cash to use the Dash, too.

Amazon No Longer Designs For Us

Unfortunately, this extra bit of penny pinching defines many of Amazon's worst designs. Consider that their Fire Phone had a dedicated button to scan and buy more Amazon goods. We're talking about a tiny piece of industrial design where every sub-millimeter matters—one skinned with the Amazon brand so you never forget who sold it to you—and they had to take just a bit more of the hardware for themselves.

Or consider the frustrations of shopping for goods on Amazon today. The Prime options are disappearing for bulk "Pantry" boxes with large minimum orders and "Add-on Items" that require other purchases. Through their entire item taxonomy, Amazon's store UX is no longer designed for your convenient shopping, it's designed for their profitable selling.
This extra bit of penny pinching defines many of Amazon's worst designs.
When Amazon puts the customer first, they've designed some of the best experiences of the modern era—and on a Walmart rather than Apple budget. The Kindle, through wireless, DRM-streamlined book buying and an e-ink screen that sips on battery power, brought e-reading the the masses in an era when smartphones were still nascent. Their Prime stick, a tiny dongle which sells for as little as $20, brings a decent streaming media UI to any TV. Even Prime memberships: For a flat, understandable rate, customers could buy expedited shipping on unlimited orders a year. Each of these moves wasn't just good for shoppers; they benefited Amazon by adding another tether of customer loyalty in an era when we could all google ourselves a better deal. How deep do these loyalties go? Just consider that Apple released their iPad, the way most iPad users bought and read books wasn't through iBooks, but through Amazon's Kindle app.
But the Dash button isn't a great product because it's not made for you or me. It's designed by balance sheet and wishful corporate thinking to make some middle managers very happy. Life with a home full of Dash buttons only served to remind me how unhappy I was with the modern Amazon.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-08-24, 12:27 AM   #9
SiCO
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Denver
Posts: 9,589
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 14
Thanks (Received): 51
Likes (Given): 86
Likes (Received): 207
Dislikes (Given): 2
Dislikes (Received): 11
Default

Dumb
__________________
2016 Audi S3 - JB1, Injen Intake, Technology Package, Black Optics Package, Band & Olufsen, OEM Resonator Delete
http://www.kcsr.org/showthread.php?t=166619
2013 Kawasaki Z1000
SiCO is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-08-24, 08:09 AM   #10
roman.GSR
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: indep/UMKC
Posts: 7,453
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 20
Thanks (Received): 55
Likes (Given): 294
Likes (Received): 391
Dislikes (Given): 52
Dislikes (Received): 54
Default

Maybe once we can get things instantly
__________________
1989 Mercedes 260E-SOLD
1997 Honda Civic-SOLD
2008 Kawasaki NinjaStolen /RECOVERED
Chevy Trailblazer- Snow mobile
roman.GSR is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-09-02, 08:49 AM   #11
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 157,674
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Amazon adds more Dash buttons after rollout








By Mae Anderson | AP September 2 at 9:07 AM
NEW YORK — Amazon’s futuristic “Dash” buttons appear here to stay.
The e-commerce powerhouse is expanding the number of available buttons, which reorder products at one touch. It’s also making them virtually free.
Last month, Amazon launched the “Dash” buttons — adhesive buttons designed to stick on any household surface near where you may need to reorder products — for about 18 brands, ranging from Bounty paper towels to Tide detergent.
Now they’re adding 11 branded buttons to the program, including ones for Ice Breakers Mints and Hefty trash bags. And for every $4.99 button customers buy, they’ll get a $4.99 credit back into their account.
The buttons are available to members of Amazon’s $99 annual Prime membership program.
They can be set up via Wi-Fi with a smartphone or computer, and an order alert can be sent to your phone in case you want to cancel.
Daniel Rausch, director of product management, said Amazon has been “learning a lot” from the way customers have been using the buttons. Some have been re-ordering items on a weekly basis, more frequently than expected, he said.
A popular feature with customers has been an option that lets the buttons respond only to the first order signal, until that order has been delivered — preventing accidental multiple orders.
Seattle-based Amazon.com Inc. has held a long-time strategy of investing the money it earns back into the company, including making inroads into the connected home. Earlier this year it launched the Amazon Echo, a Wi-Fi-enabled speaker that responds to voice commands and can reorder certain items.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-09-02, 08:50 AM   #12
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 157,674
Post Thanks / Like
Default

To order a button : http://www.amazon.com/b/?node=106678...o=digital-text
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2016-04-04, 06:14 PM   #13
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 157,674
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Amazon widens horizons for push-button e-commerce




Aaron Horn, an information technology director for the Iowa Interstate Railroad, recently decided to take convenience in his home to the next level.
Instead of running out to the store whenever he and his family needed Tide laundry soap, he installed a wireless button on the back of a cabinet door in his house in Swisher, Iowa. With one press of that button — called an Amazon Dash Button and made by the giant e-commerce company — Horn could reorder Tide anytime he needed, and the online retailer would ship him detergent.
Getting the button was about "90 percent convenience," said Horn, adding that 10 percent of the motivation was "wanting to play with innovative new tech."
Now, Amazon is about to make ordering a box of Trojan condoms — as well as Slim Jims, Doritos and more than 100 other consumer products — as unchallenging as Horn getting that Tide.
A year ago, Amazon, which is perpetually inventing new ways to buy things while using the fewest calories possible, introduced the Dash Button with a single purpose: to let customers order mundane products like garbage bags and toothpaste by pushing a button. At first, many people thought the Dash Button — which is a plastic widget the size of a car key remote — was a joke, since Amazon introduced it just before April Fools' Day. The idea behind a device that lets shoppers buy one thing, and one thing only, also seemed a little wacky.
Now 100 brands


The Dash Button is no joke. On Thursday, Amazon said it was expanding the program from the nearly 30 brands whose products have been available for ordering through the devices to more than 100. Now, Energizer batteries, Stayfree feminine pads and Zico Premium Coconut Water will each have their own Dash Buttons. Peet's Coffee, Red Bull beverages and Orville Redenbacher's Gourmet Popping Corn are joining the club too, as is Arm & Hammer cat litter.
"What we've heard from customers is they want more," said Daniel Rausch, director of Dash at Amazon. "Brands have been clamoring to be in the program."
Rausch said the use of Dash Buttons had been growing at a steady clip. The number of orders customers made with the devices jumped 75 percent during a week in mid-March compared with a week in mid-December, he said, without disclosing the underlying sales numbers. Dash Buttons are now pressed more than once a minute in total by Amazon customers, Rausch said.
How it works


Amazon charges its customers $4.99 per Dash Button, but refunds that same amount after their first order using the device, almost guaranteeing that customers use it at least once. The device is available only to people who pay for Amazon's $99-a-year Prime service, and items are delivered to customers with Prime's two-day free shipping.
Each Dash Button has a strip of adhesive for sticking it somewhere around the house, and a colorful logo for Tide, Orbit gum or whatever brand the button exists to serve. The widgets are effectively in-home advertisements for the brands, leading some analysts to believe that the brands are subsidizing the cost of the Dash Buttons bearing their names — something that Amazon will not confirm.
Amazon's founder and chief executive, Jeffrey P. Bezos, has been on a mission to eradicate every conceivable obstacle to shopping online since the 1990s, when he patented Internet ordering with a single mouse click. With the Dash Button, Amazon is removing the headache of one-click ordering on a PC or smartphone — as questionable as that burden may seem — and putting the button on a pantry wall, countertop or medicine cabinet.
The next step


Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at New York University's Stern School of Business, said Amazon would one day go even further by analyzing customer shopping patterns and proactively sending people replenishments of common household items.
"I think that's where this is all headed," he said. "I will get a box once a week with stuff they figure I need."
Amazon, based in Seattle, received a patent a few years ago for "anticipatory package shipping," a method of speculatively sending goods to customers before they have actually ordered them. And the company is also helping makers of washing machines, pet food dispensers and other products design them so that the products themselves can automatically order replenishments on their own. To some, the Dash Button is another symptom of a creeping societal laziness, although Galloway says he sees the device as no more insidious than a television remote control.One obvious risk of making online shopping so easy is inadvertent ordering. By default, the Dash Button won't allow a repeat order of a product until after an earlier order of the same item is delivered, a rule intended to prevent situations in which, say, a husband orders pet food right after his wife. But a child with a Dash Button can be a dangerous thing. Before Horn recently installed his Dash Button for Tide, one of his children got hold of it. "When our 6-year-old picked it up, my wife and I both yelled 'Don't push the button!' " Horn said.He was just in time: No unwanted shipment of Tide has shown up at his door.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2016-07-11, 08:03 PM   #14
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 157,674
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Got Prime? Amazon will basically pay you to try Dash buttons






Prime Day is tomorrow and, if you believe Amazon, it’s going to be amazing. But there’s one requirement that may stop you from joining in the fun – you need Amazon Prime.
Read more: Is Amazon Prime really worth it?
If you still need reasons to join Amazon Prime, here’s a cool one. Right now, Amazon will give you four dollars for every Amazon Dash button you order.
Here’s how it works. Normally costing $4.99, Dash buttons can be ordered today for 99 cents each. In addition, Amazon will give you back $4.99 in Amazon credit the first time you press the button. That means you effectively get $4 for each Dash button that you order and use.
Amazon Dash buttons are simple devices that you can place around your home that let you order one product only. Just tap the button and an order for that specific product will be placed on Amazon. Useful if you tend to frequently run out of toilet paper, coffee pods, Gatorade, or other household items.
Amazon Dash buttons are available exclusively to Prime members. The idea seemed rather crazy in the beginning, but Amazon has been very serious about adding more and more brands. Today, you can order more than 160 products with one tap of the Dash button and have them delivered at home with free shipping.
If you’re interested, you can sign up for an Amazon Prime 30-day free trial and take advantage of the Prime Day deals tomorrow and the Dash button deal right now. It’s easy to cancel afterwards, no questions asked.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2017-01-20, 12:38 PM   #15
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 157,674
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Amazon Dash Buttons Go Virtual


So now you can push a real Dash button or go online and push a virtual one instead.

Amazon is making it even easier to reorder your favorite products with just one tap.
Piggybacking on the success of its physical Dash Buttons, the Web giant this week launched new digital Dash options.



Prime members can now visit the Amazon.com homepage or mobile app to quickly purchase more diapers, deoderant, makeup, or any of the other of the "tens of millions of products that ship with Prime."
Taste testing Skippy peanut butter? Trying out Tide laundry detergent? The service automatically creates Dash Buttons for anything you buy that is, according to Amazon's algorithms, typically reordered. Virtual controls can also be manually added via the details page of any product available with Prime shipping.
Users have complete control over your buttons, and can sort (most-needed to least-used), label ("Stephanie's favorite"), and delete them as you see fit. As with the physical buttons, customers receive a notification with every order, and can cancel within 30 minutes if you make a mistake.


Not everyone in a household, however, shares the same domestic needs: You may have run out of FIJI Water, while your spouse needs new guitar strings, and the kids are hankering for more Play-Doh. So instead of sharing your phone's passcode or crowding around the computer screen, simply keep Wi-Fi-connected Dash Buttons in your home.
The tiny switches were initially mistaken as an April Fools' joke. But Amazon is serious about its Dash Buttons, and said customers are on board. Last fall, the program expanded internationally; folks in Austria, Germany, and the UK can reorder paper towels, laundry detergent, and coffee with one click.
Prime members can choose from more than 200 physical Dash Buttons, priced at $4.99 each (though a $4.99 Amazon credit means they're essentially free). When you register a Dash Button device, Amazon will automatically add a virtual button for the same product.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2017-01-20, 12:49 PM   #16
BuddyLee
 
BuddyLee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Posts: 28,665
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 24
Thanks (Received): 257
Likes (Given): 61
Likes (Received): 1932
Dislikes (Given): 4
Dislikes (Received): 35
Default

We have two of these things. One for TP and one for paper towels.
__________________
XBL: Buddyl33
PSN: KC_Buddyl33

BuddyLee is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2017-03-31, 10:33 AM   #17
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 157,674
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Grab Up to Three Amazon Dash Buttons For $1 Each, and Save $5 the First Time You Press Them





Amazon’s Dash Buttons were born two years ago today, and everyone assumed it was an early April Fool’s joke at the time. But they’re still alive and clicking, and Amazon’s running a fantastic deal right now to celebrate their birthday.

For one week only, you can buy up to three Dash buttons of your choice for $1 each with promo code DASHBDAY. And as always, the first time you use them to order an item from Amazon, you’ll automatically receive a $5 discount. That basically means if you maximize this deal and use all three, you’ll be getting $12 worth of value essentially for free.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
amazon, dash buttons

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

 

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:03 PM.


Design By: Miner Skinz.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.13.37
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright (c) 1993-2012, KCSR.org