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Unread 2015-11-13, 11:20 AM   #126
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OxygenOS 2.1.2 with camera improvements and more now rolling out for the OnePlus 2




If you are sporting a OnePlus 2, you'll want to be on the lookout for an OxygenOS update to hit your phone with improvements for the camera and more. The update, which is rolling out in increments, bumps the software version to OxygenOS 2.1.2, and brings a number of changes to the phone. These changes include:
  • Improved UX for preview in Camera
  • Performance improvements on app install and launch
  • Individual icon customization support -Fixes for RAW format on 3rd party camera apps
  • Russian & Turkish language support
  • Lockscreen wallpaper support
  • Security patches
  • Bug fixes to System Update to improve OTA stability
  • General bug fixes and performance improvements
Remember, if you aren't seeing the update just yet give it a few days. OnePlus does not give a timeline of when all users should have the update, but it hopefully won't take long to get out to all users. If you receive the update, be sure to let us know in the comments below how it goes for you.
Source: OnePlus
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Unread 2015-11-13, 12:44 PM   #127
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OnePlus X US LTE Tests and Reliability





The latest OnePlus phone continues to build the brand in an interesting and cost-effective way. It comes in a brand new design that looks very little like the OnePlus One or OnePlus 2, yet still retains that classic feel of a OnePlus phone. Itís solidly build from ceramic or glass depending on which version you choose, and while the first month is going to be invite-only those who have patience to wait for the new year should be able to net one relatively easily if OnePlus is correct in their production numbers. Of course those not willing to wait can pick one up for a slight premium, but what about compatibility with your network of choice?
Thereís been some confusion over which networks the OnePlus X supports and which it doesnít. We ran an article not too long ago explaining that the OnePlus X doesnít support all the bands necessary to deliver the absolute best LTE signal on either T-Mobile or AT&Tís network, and now that we have one in house weíre dual-SIMing it with one T-Mobile and one AT&T SIM card to see which gets the best signal and where. The results are interesting to say the least and speak volumes about how network topology is built. I live in a more rural section of Orlando about 45 minutes outside of the downtown city limits, and as such LTE isnít always an easy thing to come by on every carrier. T-Mobile has generally delivered the best LTE signal in my area when it comes to GSM carriers but AT&T does have a signal out there, albeit a weak one.
LTE Signal HSPA Signal Speed Test on LTE
The OnePlus X supports 2 out of the 3 main bands that AT&T uses for LTE yet I got no LTE signal at my house most of the time, however one morning I got a single bar of LTE. Driving further into Orlando I found that the OnePlus X picked up an LTE signal on AT&T without issue; in fact it was a very strong signal too, although Iíve seen other phones run faster on AT&Tís network. Network speed relies on a number of factors so this isnít necessarily always going to be the case, but itís worth noting that I got less speed on the OnePlus X on AT&Tís network than Iíve seen from other AT&T phones lately like the LG V10. Elsewhere AT&Tís 3G HSPA signal was the backup for me and wasnít too bad, but 3G has some pretty heavy latency and AT&Tís 3G network in particular is much slower than AT&Tís, so that may be a deal breaker for some.
LTE Signal Speed Test on LTE
On the T-Mobile side of things I found that while the OnePlus X still only supports 2 out of the 3 main bands on T-Mobile, I got better LTE strength and signal in more places than AT&T. I also found the general network speed to be consistent with what I expect from T-Mobileís LTE too, so thereís no discrepancy here as I saw on AT&T when it comes to speed. All of this shows just how much it might differ depending on where you live simply because of the bands supported. We saw this in a way with the OnePlus One, which makes sense since that uses the same chipset as the OnePlus X, and band support is dependent upon which version of a chipset an OEM chooses.
In conclusion weíre looking at spotty coverage in some areas and great coverage in others, but overall youíre not going to be getting the absolute best in network coverage with LTE on T-Mobile US or AT&T with the OnePlus X. That doesnít mean weíre not still going to recommend the phone though, and honestly with congestion less than ever on 3G networks the 3G HSPA coverage on either network will work just fine for most people, but expecting an LTE signal everywhere youíre going to get one with a more expensive phone just isnít realistic here. This isnít uncommon in the sub-$300 market of phones either, where the majority of phones have zero LTE support in the US as it is. 2 out of 3 certainly isnít bad and while it isnít ideal thereís a reason the OnePlus X is less money than the OnePlus 2 or other more feature-rich phones out there.
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Unread 2015-11-13, 04:56 PM   #128
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OnePlus X Review: Great on the Outside, Just OK on the Inside






When OnePlus founder and CEO Carl Pei first showed off the new X in our Manhattan office, I was impressed. Nice glass design, kind of a hybrid iPhone/Xperia look. The textbook definition of ďpremium.Ē But itís really what he said next that got me.
ďItís 250 bucks.Ē Wait.....what?
Thatís the exact reaction the OnePlus X is going for with the new Xóa super affordable smartphone that doesnít look the part. Itís a conundrum because while the OnePlus isnít a perfect smartphone, its ludicrously low price makes it hard not to recommend if youíre hunting for the very best for the very least.

But alas I must because for just a little more you can get a OnePlus 2, which is by most accounts, a better phone.
What Is it?

A $250 16GB smartphone from Chinese smartphone maker OnePlus, creators of the highly lauded OnePlus One in 2014. In fact, this phone runs on the same processor, the Snapdragon 801, and OnePlusí Oxygen OS, which originally debuted on the OnePlus 2. The X comes in two different options. First thereís Onyx, which is just a straight forward black and chrome design. Then Ceramic, which looks very similar but instead sports an all-ceramic backplate and is a bit more hefty and pricey because of it.

Warning: Before I go any further, the OnePlus X is available in the United States but may not be a great idea if you live here. The X misses two important LTE bands (12 and 17) that allow the phone to talk to important networks on T-Mobile and AT&T (itís not even available on Verizon and Sprint). These low-frequency, 700MHz bands allow for better LTE coverage in suburban and rural locations. The majority of this review takes place in neither a suburban nor a rural location; quite the opposite actuallyóNew York City. I ran into almost zero connectivity issues on T-Mobile though the carrier is still in transition to Band 12. I canít guarantee that the experience I have with LTE connectivity will mirror yours. If youíre willing to take a chance on the OnePlus X, keep the receipt.

Why Is It Important?

OnePlus is royalty among the smartphone affluent, but still a stranger to basically anyone else. The look and price of the OnePlus X could help the company makes its way into the pockets and purses of people outside its little mobile bubble of influence.
But more importantly, itís one of the most intriguing entrants in the growing list of cheap smartphones. The Nexus 5 showed that you can make something great thatís cheap, but not necessarily great-looking. OnePlus X tries to tick off all those boxes:
  • Cheap.
  • Works well.
  • Looks great.
Letís see how it did.

Design

The most remarkable thing about this phone is the way that it looks. If youíre seriously considering the OnePlus X, design is probably one of the top reasons why. In terms of specs, itís admirable at $250, but nothing else about it really screams MUST HAVE. Yet the design is a force to be reckoned with because this is up there as one of the best looking Android phones in 2015.
Itís not plastic-y like the Nexus 5X, not decidedly mid-tier like the Moto G, and not an Apple wannabe like the HTC A9. Like I said, it pulls a few visual cues from Sonyís Xperia lineup (front and back glass panes) and Appleís iPhone (bubble up glass display like the 6), but it stands on its own.
On the right is the SIM tray that lets you pack in a nano SIM and a microSD card or microSIM, whichever you prefer. Right below that are the volume and power buttons. I wish OnePlus wouldíve added one more design influence on the list and co-opted Motorolaís different key textures to help differentiate between the power button and volume rocker, but itís a little thing.

On the left, one of OnePlus 2ís more standout features returns with a three-setting slider that can silence all notifications or only let the priority ones slip through. On the bottom of the AMOLED display, there are actually three haptic navigation buttons, but you can add-on software navigation if you prefer thanks to OnePlusí own Oxygen OS. A 3.5mm headphone jack and a microUSB charging port(not USB Type-C) rounds out the tour.

The OnePlus X seems like it was crafted specifically to appeal to my personal tastes. It takes the Xperia design approach, which Iíve already waxed poetic about before, and combines it with the same slightly rounded, bubble-up display on the new iPhone 6 and 6s to make a phone that is just damn good-looking. Yes, two panes of glass means fragility and fingerprintsĖlots of fingerprintsĖbut Iím sure-handed and on an all-black device, the prints didnít bother me so much.
The bezel has seven etched lines that wrap around the edge, that reminded me a bit of the styling Samsung puts on its Galaxy S smartphones with the S4 and S5. Itís implemented much more elegantly here, but itís not exactly my favorite. Still, this is a very ďto-each-their-ownĒ kind of critique.
Despite all the talk of premium materials, just the fact that this phone is only 5-inches is incredibly refreshing. I can actually hold it firmly, reach everything on the screen comfortably, and get it in and out of my pocket no problem.
Finding design faults with the OnePlus X as a $750 device would be tricky. At one-third that price, itís even more amazing. I guess what Iím trying to say is that I like it, and itís good.

Using It

Right now, the X has two out of threeógreat design and price. But how well does it perform? The short answer: Itís kind of a mixed bag.
Despite what many would call an aged processor, the OnePlus X doesnít feel any less zippy than other flagship phones out there. The Snapdragon 801 is a 32-bit processor rather than a 64-bit like the 808, 810, and Appleís A series processors, meaning it doesnít handle RAM management as efficiently as some newer devices. But after hoping in and out the app carousel, while listening to Spotify and playing Clash of Clans and then firing out a quick email, the OnePlus X handled these tasks easily.
Sometimes, if Iíd return to the homescreen after a particularly long binge-watching session of The West Wing, the phone would get hung up a second or two, but there wasnít a single moment where an app crashed or I needed to restart the phone for whatever reason. Just fluid flagship performance from gaming, to productivity, to texting.

OnePlus includes several gesture shortcuts for launching the camera, flashlight, etc.
I was a long-time user of the OnePlus One, giving it top marks among many of its contemporaries, and having fiddled around some with the OnePlus 2. I was skeptical that OnePlus was really able to replicate the magic that was having Cyanogen software. But I actually enjoy what theyíve been able to accomplish with Oxygen OS.
To the untrained eye (or an eye that simply doesnít give a shit), the OS looks just like stock Android. And unlike other phone makers, OnePlus doesnít add on gratuitous applications youíre never going to use. In fact, they only add one: an FM radio application called OnePlus Radio. Other than that, itís all the applications you actually want on your phone.

But what I really love about Oxygen OS is its customization options. Dig into settings a little bit and you can find lots of neat tricks. You can turn on software navigation keys or use the haptic keys buried in the bottom bezel. You can select an accent color for the entire OS, reassign navigation button short cuts, and even change the LED color on the top right corner above the display so you can get basic info at a glance.

Unique Oxygen OS options for shortcuts and notifications (notice onscreen navigation in the middle).
Really, the only thing I donít like about Oxygen OS is its Shelf feature, which is the menu accessed when you swipe right from the home screen. (Itís where Google Now, My Magazine, or Blinkfeed is on other Android devices.) It just isnít really that helpful. Thereís a frequent apps pane, frequent contacts, and you can attach any widget youíd like. But Iíd rather use the apps carousel for recent apps. I honestly donít call people enough for a large recent contacts widget, and all the other widgets I can just put on the homescreen like always. Itís just redundant and not nearly as useful as Google Now, but itís optional and you can just switch it off in settings.


The Shelf and included customization options.
Oxygen OS is also based off of Lollipop and though Pei says Marshmallow capabilities are coming, theyíre not committing to a firm date for when the new version will be available. Luckily, Oxygen OS brings some Marshmallow features already with app permissions, customizable quick settings, and even its own implementation of the Android Sensor HubĖthe neato little feature that stretches battery life while your phone is idle.

Speaking of battery life, the OnePlus X comes with a concerningly small 2,525mAh battery, so the OS also ships with a dark theme by default so the X can take advantage of its AMOLED display. Remember: AMOLED means the screen activates individual pixels, so if something is black that pixel is turned off. That makes for blacks so dark that they bleed into the surrounding onyx-colored bezel, which benefits battery life as well. Itís a good, old-fashioned ďtwo birds, one stoneĒ situation.
The result is a smartphone that will last all-day if you primarily use it for notifications, calling, texting, and maybe two or three hours of other stuff, like maps, reading, or streaming video. However, one day I took the OnePlus X off the charger at 7:45am and used it heavily for two hours during a Tag Heuer press event (photos, posting to social media, wifi hotspot). My phone died later that night around 9:45pm. So if youíre a power user, bring a charger.
For $250, the OnePlus X seems almost too good to be true. And then you get to the camera. The Xís 13MP, f/2.2 camera is so bad, I had to question if my particular review unit was broken (turns out it is). For one, the lens canít focus accurately for shit and makes a weird ticking noise every time it tries.

Sometimes Iím able to get a shot in focus but then the image wobbles in and out, like the lens is constantly focusing, and I end up with unforgivably blurry and bad pictures. I was able to snap this picture with decent clarity, which Iíve compared with the Nexus 5X and the LG G4, considered one of the best Android cameras out there. Hereís a quick comparison:

LG wins out with color accuracy and the 5X isnít too shabby, either. But the OnePlus X is washed out and a little unfocused (I took several shots and this was the best one).
And hereís what I was able to come up with when using normally:



^ So blurry and terrible.
Yeah, itís not great! Just a general lack of detail, and the lens is a frustrating mess. I will update this post when OnePlus sends another test unit, so stay tuned. But until then, I cannot recommend the OnePlus X if you want a good smartphone camera.
Like

The look. People have describe the OnePlus X as an iPhone 5 look alike and honestly, I donít see it. I think OnePlus has added enough of its own personality to make it stand out, especially in the sub $300 range.
The display. This OnePlusí first AMOLED display and it looks great. Not to mention that itís a very palm-able 5 inches. Iím a fan.
The price. Itís incredibly competitive for a phone that looks great and a snappy operating system.

No Like

When you really scrutinize the spec sheet, there is a lot missing you might actually want: NFC, fingerprint reader, 5GHz wifi support, only 16GB onboard storage (with expandable storage but without Android flex storage), and USB Type-C. That last one would be especially nice since the phone has no removable battery and is prone to draining within 20 or so hours. All those features are the trappings of a truly premium (and expensive) phone, which the OnePlus isnít.
The camera. No way that this comes close to being the best Android cam out there, even though my unit has mechanical issues. Either way, Iím questioning quality or longevity here, neither of which is a good thing.
The bands. This could be a very big issue for you in the U.S. If you live elsewhere, do you homework and make sure the included bands (1/2/4/5/7/ work for you and your carrier. Being stuck on sub-LTE in 2015 suuuuuuuuucks.

Should You But It

I wouldnít. For just $80 more you can get the OnePlus 2 (on the far right) thatís overall a better phone.
The X is one of the most interesting sub $300 phones Iíve used in a long time. From display, to processor, to operating system, I have no problems. But it does cut out a lot of hardware you might want. I personally HATE not having a fingerprint sensor for quickly getting past the lock screen. I can use my Pebble watch as a trusted device sure, but thatís way less secure. Oh, and the camera is just plain bad.
Still itís exciting to see a phone that looks this good for the price. The X isnít quite the miracle phone it seemed when I first saw it, but itís damn compelling. I hope OnePlus keeps working on the idea that a phone can be cheap but look otherwise.
OnePlus X Specs

  • OS: Oxygen OS 2.0 based on Android 5.1
  • CPU: Snapdragon 801 processor
  • Screen: 5-inch 1920x1080 AMOLED (441 PPI)
  • RAM: 3GB
  • Storage: 16GB + MicroSD up to 128GB
  • Camera: 13 megapixel rear (f/2.2 and 1080p video) / 8 megapixel front
  • Battery: 2,525 mAh
  • Dimensions: 5.51 x 2.72 x 0.27 inches
  • Weight: 4.86 ounces (5.64 w/ ceramic)
  • Colors: Onyx and Ceramic
  • Price and Availability: $250 - $350 (depending on material); Available November 19 via invite
  • Extra Notes: SIM tray can use nanoSIM and microSD or a microSIM, no USB Type-C, no NFC, poor LTE band support
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Unread 2015-11-16, 08:29 AM   #129
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A Google Engineer Is Publicly Shaming Crappy USB-C Cables




All cables are not created equal: some will charge most efficiently, others might just fry your battery. Google Chromebook engineer and Caped Cable Crusader Benson Leung has been testing USB-C cables off Amazon, and itís not just the no-brand products that have been failing.
Leungís campaign mostly consists of ordering USB-C cables off Amazon, testing them to see if they meet the minimum standards or if theyíre just knock-offs, and then leaving Amazon reviews. Cables and chargers fail in all sorts of different ways, although incorrect resistors seem to be a common problem that Leungís been finding.
Although the bulk of problematic adapters are coming from no-brand acccessory resellers, thereís one particularly interesting failure: Leung has called out the OnePlus USB-C cable and adapter. Theyíll work just fine if you only ever use them with OnePlus devices, but if you ever get crazy and try and use that USB-C cable to charge another USB-C deviceósay, a Nexus 6Póyou might damage your shiny gizmo.

[Google+]
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Unread 2015-11-16, 09:46 AM   #130
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Marshmallow upgrade schedule for OnePlus devices







Many of you have been wondering about Android M and when exactly itís coming to your OnePlus device. Although we donít want to promise specific dates yet, we want to share some more detailed answers with you today.

For the OnePlus One, Cyanogen OS will be updating to Marshmallow in the first quarter of 2016. We created a community build of OxygenOS for the OnePlus One, but this isnít what the product officially ships with. We will be updating the community build of OxygenOS for the OnePlus One when time allows.

The OnePlus 2 will also be updated in Q1, and the update will include the new standard Marshmallow API for the fingerprint sensor. Weíve heard requests for us creating an API for the current fingerprint implementation in OxygenOS, but have decided against this since weíre switching over to the standard Android M implementation soon.

We are working hard to bring Marshmallow as soon as possible to the OnePlus X, and will update you on a time frame at a later time.

In the meantime, weíll keep rolling out updates as soon as possible for OxygenOS!

PS: We just pushed kernel sources for the OnePlus X here: https://github.com/OnePlusOSS/androi...neplus_msm8974
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Unread 2015-11-16, 11:25 PM   #131
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OnePlus responds to allegations that its USB Type-C accessories are out of spec




A few days ago, an investigation by Google engineer Benson Leung found that OnePlusĎ USB Type-C accessories might be out of step with the standard. OnePlus has now responded to the claims, saying that its accessories Ė its cable and adapter Ė are compliant with USB 2.0 and Type-C 1.0 standards, curiously omitting the 1.1 standard for USB Type-C which is arguably the more important one. With USB Type-C 1.1, a connected device can be charged with up to 3A Ė this is what the Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P are designed to do. However, if you use anything lower than 1.1, you risk damage to your device Ė as Leung explains it:
ďHaving a weaker than 3A charger is actually a risk factor because the device being charged will always try to charge at 3 and if the older adapter canít handle 3A, that is when it might be damaged.Ē
OnePlus confirms that its own cables are right for the OnePlus 2 to be charged and transfer data, but itís clear the cables shouldnít be used for more recent devices like the new Nexuses where damage is possible. Looks like weíre going to have to wait a little bit longer before USB Type-C is truly a mainstream standard.
What do you think about OnePlusí response to Benson Leungís findings? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.
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Unread 2015-11-16, 11:37 PM   #132
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Featured Review: OnePlus X






The tech world moves fast, and so do the companies that supply the seemingly never ending swath of new phones. Every now and then though one of those startups makes a name for itself right out of the gate, one that sets it apart for a long time to come no matter what product is released. OnePlus has been one of those companies since its inception nearly two years ago, and itís year and a half old original flagship, the OnePlus One, is still held in many peopleís minds as a successful product in every way. It broke the misconception that a good smart phone had to cost $600 or more, and while the OnePlus 2 may have done some damage to the companyís reputation theyíre back with a third phone to try it again. This time around OnePlus is aiming for the mid-range price segment of the market and is pumping its new phone with most of the same specs as its flagship from last year, all that along with an amazing new build and design. Letís see what $250 nets and if itís worth it when compared to the competition.
Specs


The 2.3GHz quad-core Snapdragon 801 (MSM8974Pro-AA) processor that powered the OnePlus One is found inside the OnePlus X, as well as the same Adreno 330 GPU clocked at 578MHz. 3GB of LPDDR3 RAM keeps apps in RAM for a long time, especially since thereís ďonlyĒ a 1080p 5-inch AMOLED display up front with Gorilla Glass 4 covering it. Inside is 16GB of internal storage and thereís support for up to 128GB microSD card expansion here inside of the dual-SIM tray. On the back is a 13-megapixel ISOCELL 3M2 sensor with f/2.2 aperture and dual-LED flash, as well as an 8-megapixel OmniVision OV8858 sensor with f/2.4 aperture up front. Powering the whole experience is a 2,525mAh battery packed inside of the sleek frame which measures 140mm high, 69mm wide and 6.9mm thin, and either weighs 138g for the Onyx version or 160g for the Ceramic one. Last but not least thereís support for 4G LTE bands and OxygenOS 2.1 is packed in on top of Android 5.1.1 Lollipop.
In The Box

OnePlus isnít just selling a phone and a charger for $250, itís also including a case with the phone as well. Inside of the box youíll find that case and the phone of course, a SIM eject tool as well as a wall charger and the same microUSB cable that was included with the OnePlus One. This cable has a unique looking end to it for plugging into the standard sized USB port but is not reversible as we saw on the OnePlus 2ís cable. Either way itís unique looking and quite attractive in the white and red OnePlus color scheme.
Display


For the first time OnePlus is eschewing LCD for an AMOLED display, a move thatís geared toward both delivering a higher quality display and saving extra battery. AMOLED displays have become increasingly common in Android phones this year, more significantly though is that phones under the premium price-point level are now seeing this technology at their forefront. AMOLED panels deliver perfect black levels, significantly higher contrast ratios and more vibrant colors among the list of advantages over LCD. Usually though these panels arenít quite as bright outside and end up choosing that wow factor for vibrant colors over color accuracy. While Android 6.0 Marshmallow introduces a new sRGB color space to help with these overly saturated colors, that option isnít available for the OnePlus X just yet since itís still on Android 5.1.1 Lollipop.
As expected the colors and black levels are incredible here and deliver a significant wow factor when using the display. Unlike some AMOLED panels this one is quite bright and is very easy to see outdoors, even in bright sunlight, although not as easy as some LCD panels out there. Viewing angles are mostly fantastic and color shifting is only readily apparent when holding the screen at extreme angles, something no one would ever do in daily use. White balance is a little on the cool side but not too bad, and the refresh rate of the panel is incredibly good, leaving no trailing or color changes even when scrolling highly contrasting patterns slowly. This is a better panel in every respect when compared to the ones on considerably higher priced phones that just launched like the Nexus 6p or HTC One A9. The panel also feels like itís floating on top of the glass, an effect that the ď2.5D glass,Ē as itís called, delivers via the slightly curved sides. Even the digitizer is phenomenal, something that OnePlus struggled with on its first phone for quite some time, and responds perfectly every time I used it no matter how fast I typed.
Hardware And Build


First impressions are everything, and if the screen doesnít grab you than the build certainly will. OnePlus has crafted a phone thatís not necessarily super unique looking in the space of smartphones in every way, but it doesnít necessarily look like every other phone out there either. Thereís plenty of influence here with trends across the industry, but overall the phone looks like itís been unmistakably made by OnePlus. The front and back of the Onyx version that we have (which is the standard version of the phone) features Gorilla Glass 4 all the way up and down for extra scratch resistance. Both the front and back have smooth curves to all edges of the glass that keep your finger running smoothly to the metal frame that surrounds the glass. 17 micro-cuts in this metal frame give it an interesting and delightful texture, while the power button and volume rocker on the right side feature a circular cut pattern on them. The dual-SIM/microSD card tray rests above these buttons and nests snugly within the frame.
Priority Slider Set to All Priority Slider Set to Priority Only Priority Slider Set to None Curves and Grooves
On the left is a grid-textured priority slider button, and it works exactly as it did on the OnePlus 2. On the bottom youíll find dual-speakers and a microUSB port inbetween them, while up top thereís a 3.5mm headset jack and noise cancelling microphone. On the front youíll find three capacitive buttons below the home screen designed similarly to the OnePlus 2. This time around the home button is just a circular capacitive one with two non-descript dashes on either side since custom actions can be assigned to them. This phone feels incredibly good to hold and the slick material OnePlus put on it gives it an ultra high quality feel, delighting the hand every time the phone is picked up. Unfortunately that means that this is one slippery devil and will likely fall out of your hands at some point, especially if you live anywhere thatís even remotely cold. Thatís a shame too because it likely means most people will be covering this beauty up. Thereís also no NFC here, a big negative thatís likely to impact OnePlusí sales of the device in regions where NFC has become mainstream. That means no mobile payments and no tap to share or NFC pairing, among other things of course.
Bottom Top Right Size
Letís of course not forget about size in this little overview of the hardware though. So many users have complained of smartphone size crawl for years, and itís not only refreshing to see one with this size screen but one that keeps the footprint of the phone down too. The biggest offender of size here is that chin, as the capacitive buttons likely make it artificially larger than it needs to be, but itís not exactly huge and it gives a nice place for grip at the very least. Being thin and small makes this one almost invisible in any pants pocket, and even the tighest of skinny jeans shouldnít have an issue putting this one in effortlessly.
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Unread 2015-11-16, 11:39 PM   #133
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Performance And Memory


The Snapdragon 801 was no slouch when it launched at the beginning of 2014, and while itís definitely showing its age itís likely faster than anything else youíre going to find in a phone at this price point. Performance wise youíre looking at something just under last yearís Galaxy Note 4 which was packed with the more powerful Snapdragon 805 processor, a testament to how much resolution can affect performance. Daily tasks were mostly lag free although I did run into a bit of random jitter and framerate drops in the strangest of places, and I could never consistently replicate any of these stutters. Something feels weird about these performance hitches and makes me think OnePlus is downclocking the phone as often as possible to save battery, so a future update could eliminate these if thatís the case, as this isnít something that shows up on the OnePlus One with nearly identical specs.
Gaming was mostly good although again, that Snapdragon 801 and Adreno 330 GPU are starting to show their age. Most games ran just fine but I found that more graphically intense games like Lara Croft Go, and Need for Speed: No Limits had some framerate issues to deal with. Dialing down the detail a bit in games that support it might be advised if youíre looking for that perfect 60fps all the time, but users that are less finicky about their framerate performance will likely be just fine here. Multi-tasking was absolutely perfect though and I never once had an app reload on me. 3GB of LPDDR3 RAM is fast, and at 1080p youíre looking at less of a footprint for each app to fill that RAM up, keeping most apps paused in the background for instant loading when switching back and forth. That dedicated Overview button is a massive change from most phones in this price range, especially ones from China, and makes all the difference in the world.
Benchmarks


Benchmarks are on par with the OnePlus One, which should be expected given that itís basically the same hardware. Thatís nearly on par with performance in some aspects, although internal storage speeds leave a bit to be desired and are an obvious place that OnePlus seems to have skimped to keep that price point down. The memory speeds arenít horribly slow or anything, however given the fact that itís not encrypted out of the box and still has slower storage speeds than phones that ship software encrypted is disappointing.
3DMark Icestorm 3DMark Icestorm 3DMark Slingshot 3DMark Slingshot 3DMark Slingshot Internal Memory Speed GeekBench 3 AnTuTu AnTuTu
Phone Calls And Network


The OnePlus X supports plenty of different bands worldwide and even includes FDD-LTE bands; something most phones sub-$300 just donít support, particularly in the US. The catch here is that it doesnít support all of the bands that T-Mobile US and AT&T use, namely Band 12 and Band 17, which takes away some significant portions of the LTE networks of both carriers. Still Bands 2 and 4 are supported and I generally got excellent LTE coverage in the greater Orlando area no matter where I went, especially on T-Mobile. Check out our more detailed LTE tests here but know that coverage is going to wildly depend on the network topology in your region. At the very least thereís 3G HSPA fallback for both carriers here and full support for all of those bands.
I ran the phone with dual SIM cards the entire review period, one T-Mobile SIM and one AT&T SIM. I found this to be incredibly effortless thanks to Android 5.1 Lollipopís native dual-SIM support, and all apps that needed to choose between networks asked me before doing so. Default data is selected within SIM card settings so you donít have to select that every time it needs to be used, and both SIM cards can be labeled to keep headaches from happening when having to choose between the two. I generally got an incredibly strong signal everywhere I went and found it to be better than most phones impressively enough. Call quality was good, but I didnít have HD Voice support on either network, something that will surely be missed by anyone whoís experienced it. Check out all the supported bands for each of the two versions of the phone below:
US variant:
3G HSPA Bands: 1/2/4/5/8
4G FDD-LTE Bands: 1/2/4/5/7/8
Asia & Europe variant:
3G HSPA Bands: 1/2/5/8
4G TDD-LTE Bands: 38/40
4G FDD-LTE Bands: 1/3/5/7/8/20
Battery Life


A 2,525mAh battery isnít all that big, but for a phone of this size itís not uncommon to see. OnePlus used an AMOLED panel here and even changed the default color scheme of the OS to be blacked out in many places, and has even included plenty of mostly-black wallpapers for that visual effect of extra contrast, all while saving battery. Since AMOLED panels can turn off individual pixels it makes sense to black out the UI, as the only pixels that are being lit (and therefore, powered) are the ones displaying light and color. This leads to significant battery savings and I found that it lasted just as long as my trusty OnePlus One in everyday situations despite the smaller battery. That equates to about 4 hours of screen on time on most days, including heavy usage days filled with lots of music streaming, Bluetooth connectivity and phone talking. Very heavy users will find themselves needing a recharge sometime during the day without a doubt, but thatís not too bad since thereís 10-watt quick charge here which will charge the phone from 0% to 100% in about an hour and a half total. Battery life tests showed quite a bit higher than I was able to achieve, leading me to believe this phone might have wildly different battery life depending on how you use it.

Sound


One of OnePlusí specialties with its previous two phones was in the audio department where they continue to be one of the only OEMs to ship a high powered DAC and a fully customizable EQ along with it. The OnePlus X is a bit of a defector here, as it doesnít come with the AudioFX panel or any of the additional audio capabilities that OnePlus added in its other phones. This is a shame and I found myself being incredibly disappointed with the lack of customization in this area, however, itís at least worth noting that the audio quality from the phone is excellent and ranges among the higher quality audio Iíve heard from an Android phone. Everything is mostly well balanced although itís a bit heavy on the bass side of things, but thankfully still gives lots of audio range and keeps the mids from sounding tinny. Youíll find that the OnePlus X can easily stand toe-to-toe with phones significantly more expensive in this department, a joy thatís liable to be felt by everyone saving that cash this year.
OnePlus built in an FM tuner which means as long as youíve got earphones plugged into the 3.5mm headset jack you can use this as an FM radio. In addition to that, theyíve built an incredibly beautiful and easy to use app for the FM radio, something that shows theyíve put real thought into this functionality. Sound from the speakers on the bottom wasnít bad in quality, but it was a little too quiet in general. Speakerphone is difficult to hear in a moving vehicle on it and of course, music will just be passable while listening through these speakers. Their placement is bottom facing, so while itís not as good as front-facing speakers are itís much better than a rear-facing speaker. The earpiece was clear and loud, though, so talking on the phone while other noise is happening shouldnít be an issue.
Software


OnePlus is launching the OnePlus X with OxygenOS 2.1.2 built upon Android 5.1.1 Lollipop. This is the latest build of their custom version of Android and sticks with all the same features youíll find on the more expensive OnePlus 2. Thatís great for users not wanting to spend too much cash but still wanting that look and feel of OxygenOS, a modification of Android thatís more style than substance at this point. Thereís a good amount of features here that will keep users happy, especially ones used to just stock Android, and even users who are used to heavier skins from the likes of Samsung and LG will feel a breath of fresh air with OnePlus OS design. Users looking for an Android 6.0 Marshmallow update should be happy, as OnePlus has confirmed that theyíll be delivering one in the near future, although no particular timeline has been announced.
Homescreen Shelf App Permissions App Permissions
Security is a big concern for many, and on that front privacy as well. OnePlus has implemented a full app permission dialog within system settings to control this, and while itís not quite as elegant as the official implementation in Android 6.0 Marshmallow itís certainly better than nothing. Apps wonít ask you to approve permission before launching for the first time, but users can retroactively go into this app permissions dialog and allow or deny specific permissions for each individual app.
Gestures and Notifications

Ambient Display Mode

The signature OnePlus gestures make a full comeback here and are better than ever. These four are all activated by tapping or drawing on the screen while itís off, launching the camera, toggling the flashlight or pausing the music by simple swipes. In the past, these gestures could be hit or miss but this time around OnePlus seems to have upped its digitizer and sensor game and provided a solution that not only never once went off in my pocket but always responded to my deliberate gestures when I wanted them too. We saw this improvement on the OnePlus 2 from the OnePlus One and now itís even further of an improvement.
Display Options Display Options Gestures
In addition to this, the Ambient Display mode from Android 6.0 Marshmallow and various Motorola phones is here in all its heavy breathing glory too, giving you quick glances at your notifications as they come in without wasting battery or having to pick the phone up. Those wanting to do a quick check of these notifications can simply swipe their hand over the top of the phone near the earpiece, which will activate a single ďbreathĒ of the Ambient Display to give you a quick glance at any notifications that might be awaiting your response.
Notifications in general, are controlled via the priority slider on the left side of the phone, which features three toggles that correspond to Android Lollipopís All, Priority or None notification modes. This is a phenomenal implementation of Androidís priority modes and shows some real innovation in hardware-software synergy on OnePlus part. This was included in the OnePlus 2 but is here as well. The biggest disadvantage here is there appears to be no way to schedule priority modes since itís tied to a hardware slider and canít be moved on its own, so if you forget to slide it to priority before bed you might be woken up in the middle of the night by an annoying email.
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Unread 2015-11-16, 11:40 PM   #134
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Customization and Themes

OnePlus styled the Android community when CyanogenMod launched on the OnePlus One, making it the most customizable phone out of the box available on the market. While this phone doesnít feature quite as much customization itís still more than most Android phones will allow you to do, and includes changing the system theme between white or dark and selecting different colors for highlights and the notification LED. Thereís 8 colors to choose from in addition to the default color (totaling 9), and any of these colors can be chosen for either the accent colors throughout the UI or that notification LED. Custom actions can be selected for the hardware capacitive buttons including ones for both short and long pressing each button. If you donít care for these you can enable the standard software buttons which come with less customization but might be preferable for some users, as it gives an extra lip to grab the phone.
Colors and Themes LED Colors Button Options Button Options
Camera


Cheaper phones have to come at the cost of something, and in this case, it seems the camera was the casualty of this decision. While the camera isnít bad by any means, itís not great either and uses Samsungís 3M2 ISOCELL sensor at 13-megapixels. Users of the Galaxy S5 will likely recall that photos from the device arenít horrible, but they arenít great either, often times ending up muddy and soft looking, especially in low light. Thatís definitely the case here and many photos look muddy or soft when zoomed in thanks to a ridiculous denoise algorithm that seems to be attached to these ISOCELL camera sensors. One of the benefits of ISOCELL was supposed to be that it could push higher ISO than other sensors. This means bringing in more available light but at the cost of producing more noise. This wouldnít be a problem if the denoise algorithm wasnít so aggressive, but as it is even in bright light this algorithm kills any semblance of detail when zooming into the picture. This makes for pictures that really only look good on a smaller display like a phone or on social networks where picture resolution is often cut down significantly.
In addition to this it doesnít even seem like ISOCELLís advantages are being used here, as low light photography was poor to say the least. Dining in a restaurant with normal dim restaurant lighting resulted in pictures that were too dark to make out any real details, or when you could they were often soft and unpleasant. Color accuracy drops significantly at this lower light level and overall this just isnít a great low light camera by any means. HDR is also hit or miss thanks to both a slower shutter speed between exposure brackets and lack of optical image stabilization (OIS). While OIS was a big part of the OnePlus 2ís camera it isnít present on this module, and itís likely due to the cost of such mechanical parts. Daylight shots are passable and can be seen below, but none of them can really be called great, even at this price range. Honestly, I was much more impressed with the 8-megapixel front-facing camera, and I almost think we would be better off if OnePlus used that as the rear-facing camera instead.
Manual Exposure Ring Changing Photo Modes Changing Camera Modes Barebones Settings
The same camera software that launched with the OnePlus 2 is here in all its features, and not much has been changed since then either. The interface features a single swipe up or down to move between camera modes, in all including photo, video, slow motion, panorama and time lapse. The navigation issue when moving to panorama mode is still here and hasnít been fixed unfortunately, which means moving your phone to vertical mode to swipe back to other modes or taking a panorama. Itís awkward and annoying and needs to be addressed. Thereís also no manual modes here as the most recent OnePlus 2 camera update brought, which could always be added in with a future OTA. Thankfully the manual exposure ring is still here and is great to see in a time when even Google doesnít include such a thing on its flagship phones. This allows exposure to be adjusted on the fly after clicking to focus.
Video is mediocre at best and really only worthwhile in broad daylight. Even under the canopy of trees there wasnít enough light to keep the video looking good, and it often ends up a blurry mess. Lack of OIS and stabilization makes things shaky when walking or doing anything at all besides standing still. Dynamic range is not great to say the least and any overly bright or dark sections will seem more extreme on the video than they are in real life. Overall this one needs a lot of help in the video section, and even though thereís some slow-motion video here none of it is really worth using outside of some simple quick shots for social networks and the like. Check out the full gallery below including plenty of sample photos and videos.


The Good

Low price, high value
Fast device, great multi-tasking
Amazing build
AMOLED screen
Size of the device
Dual-SIM, good network band support even in the US
OxygenOS with plenty of tweaks
FM Tuner
MicroSD card support
The Bad

Camera is just bad in most situations
Battery life was all over the place
LTE could be spotty in the US
No NFC
Final Thoughts


Thereís a reason the list above is almost all positives and a few negatives, but those few negatives could be a huge deal breaker for some. Still for $250 itís very difficult to be overly critical of a device thatís built this well and performs nearly as well, all with the latest build of OxygenOS and promises of Android 6.0 Marshmallow updates right around the corner. The camera is bad but could be tweaked, as OnePlus has done in the past, and the exclusion of NFC once again will alienate users that need it for payments and other uses. Still thereís so much good here itís nearly impossible to not recommend the OnePlus X, which is definitely one of the better small phones of the year without a doubt.
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Unread 2015-11-16, 11:41 PM   #135
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OnePlusí Carl Pei on NFC, Meeting Demand & ďNever SettleĒ






OnePlus has come under fire recently, with the OnePlus 2 and its missing features failing to ignite consumersí desire and the OnePlus X garnering tepid adoption despite fairly good reviews. Things like the OnePlus 2ís lack of NFC and the continued misexecution of OnePlusí controversial invite system have managed to spur consumersí ire and push OnePlus further towards obscurity. OnePlus founder Carl Pei, however, may have a different take on recent events.
Pei pointed out that, as far as meeting demand, launching the OnePlus X and OnePlus 2 so close together was not intentional. The OnePlus 2 took longer than planed, a full 15 months, to develop and bring to market. Pei summed it up quite nicely. ďThe entire team is tired, having launched two product in only three monthsÖ If we had released the OnePlus 2 a quarter earlier, that wouldíve made things much easier for us.Ē The supply issues will likely get better over time, but for now, things are in a bit of a crunch. Future plans to bring two new phones to market per year indicate that there is some kind of plan to improve the supply chain.
As for the invite system. Pei claims that it helps to manage inventory simply because the company canít build to order. ďWe canít really build to match demand, because for us the lead time is two to three months,Ē said Pei. ďSo right now, we have to foresee whatís going to happen three months from now. And a user is never going to wait three months for a phone. The invite system helps us deal with it in a way thatís more user-friendly. And it helps us manage our inventory a little bit better.Ē Pei said that the invite system wasnít a total success, leaving them with some components to sell on the third party market, but not as big a bust as some companies. Despite criticism, Pei is sticking to the invite system for the foreseeable future.
On NFC, Pei made it clear he and his team didnít think it was mainstream enough to warrant the cost of inclusion, saying, ďNFC became a big thing for the OnePlus 2, but in reality after people calmed down and thought about it, they really donít use a lot of NFC. When it becomes the mainstream, weíll bring it back.Ē
On the companyís ďNever SettleĒ motto, Pei said that it meant making the best choices for the most users. He made an analogy about it, saying it was like ďa chef who has access to a lot of ingredients, but a good dish is not a sum of all the ingredients. There has to be a curation.Ē Although the motto may, at face value, seem to indicate that one would have to make every possible inclusion for the maximum possible usability, Pei clearly sees it differently.
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Unread 2015-11-18, 09:26 AM   #136
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Can you find the ‪#‎OnePlusX‬ invite code hidden inside this image? Don't forget you can sign up for the reservation list here: onepl.us/invites






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Unread 2015-11-19, 04:20 PM   #137
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If youíre lucky enough to be the owner of a OnePlus X invite, youíll be happy to know you can now buy one in the United States and Canada. Itís running for $249.99 before taxes, and you do get a pretty decent smartphone for that amount.

In case you missed our hands-on coverage earlier in the year, ďdecentĒ means exactly what it is: there arenít many of the typical ďbells and whistlesĒ youíd want in a smartphone. Thereís no USB Type-C or fast charging, no WiFi AC, and we still donít have NFC despite earlier rumors suggesting OnePlus would include it.
But you do get a phone that has flagship-like power thanks to a Snapdragon 801 chipset, bloat-free OxygenOS, and the beauty to rival any smartphone on the market to date. If your budget is locked squarely at $250 then there may not be a better smartphone to get, so once you have your invite (sign up for one here if you havenít already) be sure to place your order over at their website.
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Unread 2015-11-23, 04:05 PM   #138
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You know thereís something wrong with your sales model when, as part of hundreds of Black Friday deals going live in a few days ó youíre simply giving people the ability to purchase your phone. Thatís it.
And thatís what OnePlus is doing this coming Thanksgiving when the OnePlus 2 will officially be available to anyone willing to throw down $350 on a new smartphone. The open sales event kicks off this Friday, November 27th, and goes all the way until Monday, November 30th.
OnePlus also mentions in the the flyer they posted on social media that there will be other ďholiday dealsĒ as well, but we donít expect the OnePlus 2 or newly announced OnePlus X to be discounted at all. More than likely, select accessories and whatnot will be marked down.
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Unread 2015-11-24, 10:26 AM   #139
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First CyanogenMod 13 nightlies now bringing Marshmallow to select phones



CyanogenMod has announced that the first nightly builds of CyanogenMod 13 (CM13), based on Android 6.0 Marshmallow, are now available for download. Being nightly builds, the initial CM13 builds are naturally not as stable as Snapshot releases, and the initial batch is limited to a pool of the following seven smartphones:
  • OnePlus One (bacon)
  • Nexus 7 (deb & flo)
  • LG G4 (h815)
  • Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4 (mondrianwifi)
  • LG GPad 7.0 (v400 & v410)
  • LG G3 Verizon (vs985)
  • Moto X 2014 (victara)
CyanogenMod points out a few caveats to be aware of if you're planning on checking out the initial CM13 releases. Firstly, it's recommended that if you plan to dirty flash your device (that is, flash without using the "Wipe Data/Factory Reset" option), you must also update third-party add ons in the same pass. And if you're currently using an unofficial, third-party distribution using CM13 source code, it's recommended that you do a full wipe before switching to official nightlies. Finally, CyanogenMod recommends that anyone on the CM 12.1 YOG4P or CM 12.1 YOG7D releases forego the nightlies and stick with the Snapshot release channel.
The list of supported devices will expand quickly from here on out, so if you don't yet see your device just be patient. If you need any help with getting CM on your phone, be sure to hop into our forums for help!
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Unread 2015-11-24, 01:05 PM   #140
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Tried an unofficial build and after 3 battery pulls it still got stuck on Update Apps.

I'll stick with my 5.1.1 AOSPAL build.

Sent from my LG-LS990 using Tapatalk
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Unread 2015-11-25, 10:57 AM   #141
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OnePlus has announced a software update for the OnePlus X and its OxygenOS. The update brings us up to version 2.1.3, and while the changelog isnít terribly long ó most of it is your typical performance improvements, bug fixes and monthly security patches ó they did spend a good chunk of the listís length to talk about some optimizations theyíve made to memory card performance.

Hereís whatís new:
  • SD card related improvements including:
    • UX improvements
    • exFAT SD card support
    • Ability to move apps to and from SD card
    • Fixed reboots caused by removing SD card in an active state
  • Security patches
  • General bug fixes and optimizations
OnePlus says the update is a gradual rollout, so only about 10% of the userbase will receive the upgrade today. This is so OnePlus can tackle any critical issues that may turn up. Once they are assured things are fine (usually within 24-48 hours) youíll be able to force the OTA to your phone through the settings menu. Stay on the lookout for it if you have one of these.
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Unread 2015-11-26, 11:51 AM   #142
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OnePlus won't replace the 2's flawed USB Type-C cable

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Google engineer Benson Leung recently tested the OnePlus 2's USB Type-C cable and said it "may cause damage to your charger, hub or PC USB port" if used on a fast-charging device. OnePlus has now admitted that it doesn't conform to the USB Type-C 1.1 spec, and has agreed to give refunds to its customers. There's one large caveat, however. Since the cable can't cause problems with the OnePlus 2 itself (it's not a fast-charging phone), the company won't give refunds or replacement cables to buyers of the handset. Instead, it will only refund customers who purchased the cable separately.
The company's logic is that the cable works fine for its intended mission, charging the OnePlus 2. However, someone unaware of the issue could grab the cable (it's bright red!) and use it to charge another phone or a laptop like Google's Chromebook Pixel. Since it has the wrong resistor for the USB Type-C 1.1 specification (10 k-ohms instead of 56 k-ohms), the device could draw more power than the charger itself is able to support. A good USB charger will cut off without damage, but a bad one (and there are many out there) could fry, or worse, cause an electrical fire. A better solution might be to recall and replace all the cables out there, but if you're planning to keep it, Leung recommends that you "mark it with a tag so you don't forget it's special."
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Unread 2015-11-28, 07:41 PM   #143
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OnePlus X teardown: you better not break the screen





Youtuber JerryRigEverything has uploaded a video in which he performs a full teardown of the OnePlus X.
The newest Smartphone from OnePlus, which costs $249, doesnít come with a removable back cover, unlike the OnePlus 2. Thatís bound to make disassembling the device harder, correct? The expert way in which JerryRigEverything performed the teardown makes it seem like a breeze, but itís probably not. ďIt is a fairly difficult phone to take apartĒ, said Jerry.




Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNUiF12Gc-s

n the 4-minute OnePlus X teardown video, the deviceís glass back cover is removed first, which requires to be heated for the glue to come off easily. After that, the first component to come off is the battery, followed by a bunch of screws that give you access to the logic board that houses the processor, RAM, etc. The bottom half of the device houses the loudspeaker, the module containing which can also be removed easily. Meanwhile, thereís the 13MP rear camera module on top.

After removing nearly all the screws, the YouTuber was able extract the module containing the charging port. Good news, that fragile port can indeed be repaired in case something goes wrong. Users will also be able to get the deviceís battery replaced, if required, which is the most easily accessible component. Do note that the screen is solidly glued to the frame of the device, which makes replacing it very difficult.

To wrap up, the OnePlus X teardown reveals that the battery, charging port, camera, and logic board can be repaired/replaced fairly easy. However, in case you crack the screen, prepare for some headaches.
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Unread 2015-12-01, 10:23 AM   #144
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Of all the things OnePlus could look to manufacture and announce, theyíve decided an iPhone case was the next logical step. This case gives you a nice OnePlus flair to an iPhone 6/6S in the companyís trademark Sandstone Black material. No, itís not April Fools and youíre not being deluded ó this is an actual iPhone case that you can buy.

Buying said case, which will take $19.99 out of your pocket, does come with a bit of a bonus ó youíll get an invite to buy the OnePlus X. Weíre not sure thatís worth the $20 cost of admission, but it could be a nice way to snag an invite if youíre having trouble in the early going.
What to do with the case? Thatís another tricky situation on its own. We imagine OnePlus hopes youíll gift the case to an iPhone user and persuade them to convert to the land of the Ďdroids (theyíre hoping some light #NeverSettle marketing on it will help spur interest), but we wouldnít be surprised if many of these cases end up being turned into table coasters.


One last thing: a tiny amount of these cases will come with a ďsuperĒ invite thatíll get you the phone for free. Not a bad promotion even if thereís a cost to taking part.
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Unread 2015-12-03, 12:54 PM   #145
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No invite needed OnePlus 2 will no longer require an invite, OnePlus X goes invite-free Dec. 5 - 7





Starting December 5, OnePlus will no longer have an invite system in place for the OnePlus 2. This means you'll be able to purchase it like you would any other smartphone, by simply heading to the company's site and placing your order. In addition, OnePlus will be offering the OnePlus X invite-free from December 5 through the 7. To get a little more in the holiday spirit, OnePlus will offer a few extra deals during the same time period, and those include:
  • OnePlus 2 StyleSwap Covers are 50% off
  • Select OnePlus One accessories are 90% off
  • All other accessories are 10% off
  • As a special holiday gift, a limited number of first orders will receive an exclusive Never Settle mousepad!
OnePlus has stated that any orders placed before December 7 will be delivered by the holidays, guaranteed.
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Unread 2015-12-09, 05:44 PM   #146
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Ready for another new flagship rumor? According to a popular Weibo leakster, OnePlus is working on a OnePlus 3. Itís slated to have Qualcommís Snapdragon 820 chipset and 1080p resolution, though not many details could be had at this point.

Some outlets took the photos you see above and below as final renders of the product in question, but reading more closely reveals that the images coul be concept renders of what the device could look like once it reaches store shelves, or renders based on what the insiders have seen. Itís nothing crazy, mind you, so itís totally possible OnePlus would look to introduce a device.
Said render seems to show the exclusion of a fingerprint sensor, which would be odd considering one is present on the OnePlus 2. It also shows a front-facing speaker, which could be a nice quirk for those whoíve been clamoring for that.

The OnePlus 3 is still likely at least half a year away, so for the time being we wonít worry too much about the early chatter. Weíre sure many of you are just looking forward to the OnePlus 2 going off its invite-only system, which will happen in the middle of this month.
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Unread 2015-12-14, 10:02 AM   #147
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OnePlus 2 Mini tipped for flagship power in smaller body



Just a month after the OnePlus X


OnePlus is yet to give us a small smartphone, which is annoying for those who literally can't get to grips with the current crop of hand-stretching handsets from various manufacturers.


The OnePlus 2 boasts a sizable 5.5-inch display, while the new and smaller OnePlus X still pushes your palm with its 5-inch screen. But salvation may be around the corner, with details of a supposed OnePlus 2 Mini leaking.
Dutch site TechTastic reports that the phone was discovered on GFXBench, an app that runs benchmarks on phones to check performance, with the OnePlus 2 Mini showing up in its database despite no official announcement from the Chinese startup.
Article continues below

According to the details revealed in the benchmarking results the OnePlus 2 Mini is tipped to pack a 4.6-inch display, which would see it compete with the iPhone 6S when it comes to screen size.
iPhone competition

On the inside the phone is apparently identical to the full size OnePlus 2, with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 CPU and 4GB of RAM.



It will apparently come with 64GB of storage, a 12MP rear camera with laser auto-focus and optical image stabilisation, a front-facing 5MP camera for selfies and, like the OnePlus 2, no NFC Ė a feature that bizarrely was included on the OnePlus One but not its successor.


What seems slightly bizarre about any new device is that OnePlus already has a slightly smaller phone in the shape of the OnePlus X, which was launched last month. It isn't clear when OnePlus will announce any new handsets officially, although we're guessing it won't be until after Christmas at least.
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Unread 2015-12-14, 07:17 PM   #148
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OnePlus X Is Now Available Invite-Free Every Tuesday





Chinese smartphone manufacturer OnePlus has announced that the companyís latest handset, the mid-ranger called OnePlus X, will now be available without the much-reviled invite system every Tuesday. Through a post on microblogging site Twitter, the company announced as much, stating that the Ďinvite-free Tuesdayí will start from the 15th of this month, and obviously, repeat on every Tuesday thereafter. This must be music to the ears of numerous OnePlus fans who would love to own the device, but is put off by the very thought of having to stand in the queue to get an invite to be actually able to buy the device. The company has generally struggled to keep up with demand for both its earlier releases, thereby earning a whole lot of criticism, but with the OnePlus X, it seems as though OnePlus is confident of being able to handle the demand once the device goes invite-free.


The OnePlus X of course, is the latest smartphone from the Shenzhen, Guangdong-based company. It is the first ever mid-range handset and the third smartphone overall from OnePlus after the OnePlus One from last year and the OnePlus 2 from earlier this year. The device features a 5-inch AMOLED capacitive touchscreen with a 1080p display resolution, and is powered by the Snapdragon 801 SoC from Qualcomm, which comes with an integrated 32-bit quad-core CPU clocked at a frequency of 2.3 GHz. The embedded GPU within the SoC happens to be the Adreno 330. The OnePlus X comes with 3 GB of RAM, but only 16 GB of storage out of the box, which can however, be further expanded by up to 128 GB with the help of a microSD card.
Imaging options on the smartphone include a 13-megapixel rear-facing primary camera with phase detection autofocus and an LED flash; along with an 8-megapixel front-facing selfie-cam. Both cameras are capable of shooting 1080p videos at 30fps. Sensors on the OnePlus X include a fingerprint scanner, an accelerometer, a gyroscope and a proximity sensor along with A-GPS and GLONASS, while connectivity options include LTE, HSPA, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Wi-Fi hotspot and Bluetooth v4.0. The phone also carries a 2,525 mAh Li-Po battery and comes with Android 5.1.1 Lollipop, in the form of Oxygen OS 2.0.
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Unread 2015-12-21, 09:42 AM   #149
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Hi everyone,

We've started rolling out OxygenOS 2.2.0 on the OnePlus 2. Here's what's new in this update:
  • Fixed dual SIM preference selection issues in settings
  • Added NTFS and exFAT support for OTG
  • Fixed Google Camera photo-sphere and panorama bugs
  • Screen temperature can now be adjusted from quick settings
  • Added hide search bar option in launcher settings
  • Security patches
  • Holiday wallpapers
  • General bug fixes and optimizations
The rollout will be incremental per usual. Please be patient if you don't get it right away and let us know what you think.
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Unread 2015-12-21, 11:38 AM   #150
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Rumor: OnePlus And Oppo To Become One, Merger A Possibility?





OnePlus and Oppo are two separate China-based companies, but some documents leaked last year proving that OnePlus is actually owned by Oppo. The company has denied that, in a way, though they did admit that one of their investors is Oppo Electronics (not Oppo Mobile). Either way, all of this is really confusing, but becomes really interesting if we take the latest rumor into account, read on.
A new rumor has surfaced in China recently which says that Oppo and OnePlus might actually merge soon. Now, some documents even leaked adding some fuel to those rumors, and according to those documents, the new company will feature the words ĎOppoí and ĎPlusí in its name. Rumors are also saying that Hydrogen OS might become a thing of the past, and OnePlus might actually blend into Oppo as soon as this new company comes to life. Now, before anyone starts panicking, please do note that this is not an official confirmation, nor anything of the sort. This is a rumor accompanied by a rather unreliable document, and it remains to be seen what comes next.


Make sure to take this rumor with a grain of salt because OnePlus has been doing really well ever since the company was founded. They have been lacking in China as far as sales go, which is probably why these merger rumors surfaced in the first place. Oppo is doing quite well in China, while OnePlus is doing really well outside of it. Either way, we cannot confirm, nor deny these rumors, for now, and will be on the lookout for any additional information which will shed some light to all this.


It is worth saying that most of you are quite probably more familiar with OnePlusí smartphones, than with Oppoís offerings, which is completely understandable. Oppo is, first and foremost, a China-focused smartphone manufacturer which is not that present outside of Asia, OnePlus is a completely different story. This company actually sells their handsets all over the world, many people can purchase one of their devices from their official website and the company will ship the device your way. Either way, stay tuned for more info.
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