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Unread 2015-08-18, 08:47 PM   #76
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Fingerprint Scanner


The fingerprint scanner is one of the big selling points of the OnePlus 2 without a doubt, featured on the initial tease of specs from the company and continuing on into some of the marketing that’s being used for the phone. OnePlus uses a unique capacitive solution that scans fingerprints via a simple touch, much as the iPhone 6 or Galaxy S6 do for instance, and can scan fingerprints saved at any angle. This makes it convenient to pull the phone out of your pocket and quickly unlock the device by just placing your fingerprint on the button, which is situated in a place that you’re already likely to grab the phone from anyway. The phone can be unlocked either with the screen on or off, giving you the option to see lockscreen notifications first or just jump right into the last open screen without delay. The scanner itself was at least 90% accurate in my usage of the phone, possibly higher, and I registered both my thumbs so that I can pull it out of any pocket and quickly unlock it.
There are a few shortfalls with the fingerprint reader though, one that should be easy to fix and one that never can be. Firstly I found that sometimes the button doesn’t work at all, vibrating as if it were supposed to be registering a print but never actually doing anything. Unlocking the phone via PIN and relocking it consistently reactivated the button, an obvious software glitch and may very well be fixed before it even reaches most consumers hand thanks to the invite system. The second problem that won’t ever be fixed is the mobile payment situation, a hallmark of Android 6.0 Marshmallow that will unfortunately never reach OnePlus 2 owners. OnePlus didn’t include NFC, or Near Field Communication on the OnePlus 2 for reasons seemingly unspecified. Some have speculated that this was partly to keep heat down or maybe to even keep costs down, but there wasn’t a particularly compelling reason given by OnePlus as to why.
Sound


When the OnePlus One debuted I was blown away by the sound offered through the Yamaha chip paired with the CyanogenOS equalizer. After a few months OnePlus partnered with MaxxAudio, a company specializing in producing equalizers and audio codecs that enhance the sound output. OnePlus has kept that same MaxxAudio partnership with the OnePlus 2 and has taken it a step further, adding in more features and a brand new, even more powerful and customizable equalizer. Better yet there’s a super easy way to toggle between the included movie, music and game presets by simply pressing the volume rocker to bring up the volumes panel, followed by choosing the preset of choice. Accessing the full EQ is done by clicking the EQ icon in the top right of the same volume panel and offers preset and customizable sounds for each category, so for instance if you want your music master setting to use the Hip Hop preset for extra bass you can keep your movie preset toned more for voices, and games for whatever else you’d like. Audio output is just as good as the OnePlus one and remains one of the best sounding audio outputs I’ve ever heard on any device.
Back in the hardware section we talked about the new priority mode slider included on the left side of the phone for easy toggling. This priority mode slider works hand-in-hand with Android Lollipop’s notification management and features three positions that toggle between all notifications, priority notifications only or alarms only. As is the case with any Lollipop-powered phone users can select which sorts of notifications are important to hear, so things like calls or messages can be independently selected to be heard when in this mode. Toggling vibration still works the same, i.e. press the volume rocker then either drag the volume down to vibrate or simply press the little bell icon to toggle between sound and vibration modes.
Camera


This year OnePlus has eschewed Sony’s successful line of camera sensors for a company who’s name isn’t all that familiar to some. OmniVision, who likely got their biggest fame with the original HTC One M7’s UltraPixel sensor, are the makers behind the sensor in the OnePlus 2. This 13-megapixel sensor is exclusive to OnePlus this year and features larger 1.3-micron pixels than the 13-megapixel found in the OnePlus One, which features 1.12-micron pixels. On paper this means better low light support, lower ISO needed (and inherently less noise), and better dynamic range between the brightest and darkest points in a picture.
Software

Before we get into the meat of the pictures and video produced here let’s make sure to note that the camera software absolutely isn’t finished. It’s a pretty buggy mess right now and doesn’t include all the features OnePlus is planning on putting into the phone such as manual mode. The interface itself looks like the iOS camera and Google Camera had a baby, with the large red/white record/shutter button from iOS obviously present on the screen, while the slide-from-the-left navigation from Google Camera is also present. Swiping up or down anywhere on the screen moves between modes and provides a quick way to change it up, a similar concept to the One’s camera but different in practice. The biggest problem here is that panorama mode is stuck in portrait, so holding the landscape mode, so when holding the phone horizontally as a camera normally would be you need to swipe left or right to move between modes, an obvious bug that needs fixing.
Exposure ring Left-hand menu Overflow settings
Swiping out from the left side of the screen normally will bring up the navigation menu to select between modes, while swiping out from the right side of the screen pulls up the last taken picture or video. The biggest problem here is that the last taken picture is only a thumbnail, and clicking on it will bring it up in your gallery of choice. By default this is Google Photos, and for whatever reason it would not only sometimes bring up a picture that wasn’t full size (i.e. you can’t zoom in to see details), but you can’t swipe between pictures or videos taken once opened up in this mode. Other times swiping just wouldn’t work at all no matter what direction was pressed. All signs of early software for sure, but over the testing period we received an update to the camera that fixed some other qualms we had, so these are definitely being worked on.
When not running into the navigation issues above taking pictures and video is easy, although not having separate shutter and record buttons is a slight inconvenience for those used to such things. When clicking to focus anywhere on the screen an exposure wheel wraps around the focus reticule, allowing you to change the exposure on the fly without hassle. While this was nice to do I didn’t feel like the exposure level changed very much and could use some adjustment, but in practice this worked extremely well and was much nicer than going through menus to do the same thing. Without even adjusting any settings though the white and color balance of the shots are incredibly accurate. There was never a time in my testing when either of these categories weren’t spot on, and while the exposure wheel was there I never actually had to use it, just played with it for testing purposes.
Pictures and Video

Dynamic range is significantly improved from the OnePlus One and offers some of the finest dynamic range I’ve seen on a phone, providing an almost HDR-like quality to the shot’s dark and light areas without having to use the feature. HDR mode out of the box is also phenomenal for those areas of extreme dark and light, and not only takes the shot instantly but processes it in a fraction of a second, allowing near burst-mode speeds of HDR shots. Moving objects could appear blurry depending on the shot, but for the most part even in bustling environments with cars and people the shots were taken at such a speed that double imaging or ghosting was almost never present, and there aren’t any nasty haloing, cartoony colors or other tell-tale HDR artifacts either, just a more natural looking shot.
Clear image was one of the greatest things to ever happen to the OnePlus One’s camera. Essentially the way it works is take a bunch of pictures instantly and stitch them together, effectively taking the noise out of the photo (since noise is random) and creates more details at the same time. This time around OnePlus enables denoise by default and has a completely different denoise filter than is on the OnePlus One too, one that acts more like the kind LG uses. This means that when zoomed in things tend to resemble a watercolor painting, but zoomed out the shot appears completely noise free and clean. Thanks to the combination of OIS and a good denoise filter the Clear Image mode here presents some incredibly crisp, balanced photos with minimal processing time. It would be nice if this processing could be done in the background as Google’s HDR+ mode does on Nexus phones, but it’s not long enough of a processing time to get annoying.
Low light imaging is nothing short of phenomenal on the OnePlus 2. Auto mode does a great job of producing an image that seemingly grabs light out of nowhere, illuminating parts of a scene even in dark areas that the eye can’t see quite as well. Using Clear Image for these types of modes gives a superior low light image over most phones on the market without a doubt, drawing plenty of detail out of a low light scene while producing almost no noise. HDR mode is worth trying in low light situations as well, as the denoise isn’t quite as strong and the balanced lighting can produce a better picture at times. For the most part though auto is great in a pinch or for those times when a fast snap is needed, and Clear Image produces the best picture in any lighting situation where HDR doesn’t make sense.
Photos focus fast and accurately thanks to the laser auto focus, and the bugs I found at the OnePlus 2 unveiling event a few weeks ago regarding poor autofocusing have been fixed. Video quality is much improved as well, with crisp and clear 4K video that’s stabilized via a new hardware optical image stabilization (OIS) on board the camera module. Couple this with the larger pixels that accept more light and the wider dynamic range and you’ve got some truly incredible looking video coming from this phone in any light. Check out all the samples below to see for yourself. Other video modes include 720p 120/30FPS, 1080p 60/30FPS and timelapse mode. You can also take snapshots of the action while filming video via a small white circular shutter button under the red recording button.
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Unread 2015-08-18, 08:48 PM   #77
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Conclusion


Two years in now and OnePlus has presented us with what they call next year’s flagship killer, a controversial statement that’s meant to prove more that specs don’t mean anything and that user experience is everything. While it’s certainly plausible to think that the overall user experience could be better than anything else released next year, especially once OnePlus actually finishes developing the OS, there is one key thing missing that make it impossible to kill next year’s flagships. Lack of NFC is a major, major blow to the title, keeping users from enjoying the simplicity of mobile payments, an industry that’s likely to really take off when Google launches Android Pay with Android 6.0 Marshmallow this fall. So long as this isn’t a deal breaker for you and you don’t really care about paying with your phone you might just find that this could turn out to easily be one of this year’s best phones.
A killer camera with some super beta software, a phenomenal display, some of the best build quality of any phones on the market, interchangeable backs and stupendous audio output all come together to make this a must-have phone for anyone looking to spend under $400 on a brand new high-end device this year. There’s little to complain about here once the bugs gets squashed, a probability that’s very likely to happen by the time you’re actually able to order one. Once again the biggest stumbling block is actually getting one through the invite system, one that’s just started and has had a bit of a rough patch in just the first few days. Time will tell just how well OnePlus has improved the system, but if it can manage to get this into more hands than it did with the One there will certainly be more happy Android users out there than not. Is this a 2016 flagship killer? No, but it is one of the best devices you’re going to be able to buy in 2015.
Those looking to get their hands on the phone ASAP without an invite can buy it over at GearBest. This is the Chinese specific model so be sure to check the bands supported on the GearBest page to make sure your carrier of choice is supported.
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Unread 2015-08-19, 09:50 AM   #78
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OnePlus 2 review: a worthy sequel, flaws and all




I don't envy the team at OnePlus. After shipping a smartphone that made us rethink what we could get -- nay, what we deserved -- for $299, it was tasked with building an even better follow-up. If this were some schlocky '80s, teen coming-of-age film, it'd be time for a montage, but here we are a year later with a more confident, experienced startup and a new device that still promises to "never settle." At $329 for the basic 16GB model (or $389 for the 64GB version), the new OnePlus 2 isn't quite as wallet-friendly as the phone we got last year, and more than a few rivals have since come out with low-cost, high-power phones of their own. So, did OnePlus do the impossible again? Did it actually create a worthy sequel to a fan-favorite device, amid crazy competition in the world of cheap, fantastic unlocked phones? Well, yes, but it's not without its flaws.
Gallery | 24 Photos
OnePlus 2 review



Pros
  • Smooth, fluid performance
  • Great build quality
  • Alert slider should be standard on all phones
  • Did I mention the price?

Cons
  • Some lingering software bugs
  • Still no expandable storage
  • No NFC means no mobile payments
  • Fingerprint sensor/home button is hit-or-miss


Summary Smartphone aficionados have been clamoring for the OnePlus 2 since, well, the days of the OnePlus One. Now it's here, and it's mostly great, especially if you're looking for horsepower. The second-gen version looks more expensive than it is thanks to its impressive build quality, and its powerful internals help the phone punch above its weight in performance tests. Still, the lack of NFC and expandable storage, along with a few software bugs (we're told they're being worked on), mean the OnePlus 2 won't be for everyone.



Hardware

Last year's OnePlus One set a high bar for how much performance you could squeeze out of a $299 smartphone, and its sequel doesn't disappoint. Tucked away inside the 9.85mm-thick frame is one of Qualcomm's octa-core Snapdragon 810 chipsets partnered with either 3GB or 4GB of RAM, depending on which version you choose. You've also got a sealed 3,300mAh battery (and I do mean sealed; there's nothing but curved plastic under the battery cover), a tray that holds two nano-SIM cards (only one of which is usable) and either 16GB or 64GB of internal storage. As our comments section continues to make clear, the lack of expandable memory options is a downright dealbreaker for some of you. I'm more of a "streaming everything" kind of guy so the 53GB of free space in the higher-end model I tested was more than enough, but keep that limit in mind before you punch someone in the face for an invite. Oh, and there's no NFC this time around, a puzzling omission that'll keep your OnePlus 2 from doubling as a wallet whenever Android Pay finally launches.
There's so much going on inside the OnePlus 2, in fact, that the designers clearly didn't feel the need to give it a brand-new look. What we got instead is a thoughtful refinement of the original's design that makes the whole thing feel more premium than its price tag suggests. To wit: The chassis itself is made of polycarbonate, but a magnesium and aluminum band runs around its sides, with drilled vents for the speaker and a USB Type-C charging port along the bottom. A quick look at the phone's left edge reveals something new: a three-stage notification slider that lets you select how obnoxious you want the phone to be when tweets, status updates and emails roll in. This is, in short, a revelation. It's a staggeringly useful addition, and other smartphone makers would do well to add something similar.
The most eye-catching addition is the fingerprint sensor that doubles as a home button. Pity that it's not as sensitive as it should be. It sometimes took multiple tries to unlock the phone with my finger (a reality, sadly, for just about any smartphone with biometric security) and you have to hit it with more force than you might expect. It's nice, in a way -- an ill-placed glancing blow won't disrupt your gaming sessions -- but I'd prefer more touch-pressure consistency between the home button and the two soft keys on either side of it.
If you've played with the original model, the OnePlus 2's back will seem like a blast from the past. The changes here are pretty modest, and they mostly boil down to the fact that the 13-megapixel camera and dual-LED flash have been shifted south a few millimeters. This time, though, the camera itself is sandwiched between the flash and an LED autofocus module that promises to lock onto targets in as little as 0.2 second. My review unit came with the company's trademark sandstone black rear panel, which has been a point of contention among the people I've shown it too. Some (myself included) love the gritty, tactile feel of the sandstone finish because it's so drastically different from the glass-and-metal monoliths we usually play with, but it just left others scratching their heads. You can swap it out for bamboo, Kevlar, black apricot or rosewood covers for a little extra cash, and don't worry: It's much, much easier to remove this time around.
All told, OnePlus did a wonderful job putting its second-generation flagship killer together. It's light, but not too light, and there's not an iota of give when you start twisting the device (not that you should really do that in the first place). Between the OnePlus 2's handsome design, sturdy construction and Gorilla Glass 4 screen you've got a real looker that can stand up to even the silliest drunken drops. Just... trust me on that last bit.
Display and sound

We're looking at yet another 5.5-inch, 1080p IPS LCD display this year, which means the same number of pixels squeezed into each linear inch as the original OnePlus One (that's 401 ppi, to be exact). The rest of the madding crowd might be embracing those gorgeous Quad HD panels, but really -- we're hardly worse off with a full HD screen here, especially considering the cost. I wouldn't be surprised if a few people reading this could somehow pick out individual pixels on the OP2's high-def screen. Well, I can't anyway, and the staggering majority of people can't, either. You're not missing out on anything.
As you might expect from an IPS screen, viewing angles are great even from odd positions (good news for over-the-shoulder screen peekers). Just don't expect the punchy colors you'd get from a Samsung phone's AMOLED display. I happen to like when my retinas are scorched by saturated screens, but the OnePlus 2's is considerably less in-your-face. Things are even cooler and subtler here than on the LG G4's "Quantum display," which strove for eye-catching color accuracy above all else. All told, it feels a little dull, a little lifeless, but I might be in the minority on this one. Still, those subdued colors also mean viewing the screen in direct sunlight can be tricky (though cranking up the brightness helps).
Meanwhile, the single speaker on the phone's bottom side does a fine job belting out tunes, although things can get muddled when you crank up the volume. OnePlus included the MaxxAudio equalizer app for good measure, and you can toggle it from the volume shade if you need some extra oomph. Honestly, the equalizer's effects are more noticeable -- and more valuable -- when you're using them in tandem with a pair of headphones. Just be careful when MaxxAudio is enabled; I couldn't get the volume up to 50 percent without feeling like I was thrashing my eardrums.
Software

Before we go any further, a brief software note: Our OnePlus 2 is running a pre-release build (A2005_14_150807, if you're curious), and the company tells us an OTA update that's "close" to what I have is going live shortly.
Bon voyage, CyanogenMod. After a prolonged, public breakup (and at least one Taylor Swift joke), the OnePlus 2 comes loaded with a mostly clean version of Android 5.1.1 with just a handful of OnePlus' custom OxygenOS interface tweaks for added flavor. I really do mean "clean," too. As I mentioned earlier, my 64GB model had 53GB of storage ready for me to use out of the box, and just about all of that reserved space is taken up by Android proper. There are only two preloaded apps to be found here -- that MaxxAudio equalizer and SwiftKey's not-for-me keyboard -- and both can be disabled without much headache. Too bad you can't uninstall them. The rest is basically unfettered Lollipop and it looks and runs just as nicely as you'd expect it to.
Now we're left with those Oxygen tweaks, most of which are surprisingly useful. There's a dark theme if you're tired of Material Design's decided whiteness, and you can fire up some onscreen navigation keys if the insensitive physical home button really gets on your nerves. OnePlus also cribbed a few notes from Oppo with its onscreen gestures, so drawing a circle or a V on the display while the phone is off launches the camera and flashlight, respectively. Oh, and a double-tap on the screen will rouse the phone from slumber, a la LG's most recent G series devices. Perhaps the biggest question mark is the Shelf, which you can access by swiping right on your home screen. It puts your most frequently used apps and contacts in one place, and throws in your local weather report and some space for widgets down at the bottom. It's nice to have, I guess, but I've used the feature precisely zero times over the last week (unless you count the times I just showed people it was there).
Gallery | 21 Photos
A tour of the OnePlus 2's software


Alas, not all is well with the OnePlus 2's software. Some third-party apps -- Todoist, Fenix, Falcon Pro, AquaMail, and Relay for Reddit, among others -- don't display properly because of a bug related to the way OxygenOS invokes Material Design's Light theme. Relay's probably the best, most publicized foul-up, as none of the comments on any Reddit post are visible, since they're rendered in white on a white background. Fenix and Falcon Pro, on the other hand, refuse to switch into their light themes. We're told that the team's working on a fix to be delivered in an update, but there's no public word on when that will arrive. Beyond those aesthetic issues, the OnePlus 2 is prone to random restarts; in fact, it happened while I was writing this very sentence. These random restarts happened about three times over the course of the week: twice while trying to launch the camera and once while it was just sitting on my desk charging. I'm really not sure what that's about; hopefully there's an update for that coming too. For what it's worth, OnePlus told us at least two OTA updates -- the one dropping now and another that seems focused on camera tweaks -- are coming, but wouldn't confirm whether the random reboots were fixed.
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Unread 2015-08-19, 09:50 AM   #79
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Camera

Last year's OnePlus One had a camera that didn't make for many thrills, so it's no surprise the team paid a little more attention to imaging and optics this time 'round. That 13-megapixel rear camera sensor sits behind an f/2.0 lens and it's better at sucking up photons because of its (relatively) large 1.3-micron pixel size. All that boils down to a mostly great shooting experience, especially when the sun's out or your lights are on. Just about all of my test photos had poppy, vibrant colors, along with plenty of detail.
Still, the camera shoots at a 4:3 aspect ratio so photos look a little odd on widescreen displays. It's surprisingly easy to get some good-looking shots while using the Auto mode, and OnePlus' controls are dead-simple. A quick tap of the shutter button snaps a photo, and you can fiddle with the exposure by tapping to focus on something and dragging a Sun icon around the focus ring. Swiping right lets you jump into video, panorama, slow-motion and time-lapse modes (all of which work exactly the way you'd expect), while a Clear Image mode stitches together multiple shots into one super-crisp photo. I wound up hardly ever using Clear Image, though, just because my normal photos usually came out looking great.
Gallery | 17 Photos
OnePlus 2 camera samples


Smartphone cameras have a tendency to suck hard in low-light conditions, but the OnePlus 2 does a little better than you might expect. The autofocus (which normally works like a champ thanks to the laser module on the back) has a hard time doing its thing when your environs grow too dim, and after a while your photos come out murky and grainy. If your hand is steady enough, you can fire up the HDR mode to help mitigate some of these issues, but be prepared to see a bit of lag between shots while the phone processes your images. Really though, the steady hand trumps all; I managed to snap a sweet shot of the Ben Franklin Bridge without the help of HDR and didn't hate the results:
Performance and battery life

We can keep this bit relatively short: The OnePlus 2 moves with almost all the speed and fluidity you'd expect from a 2015 flagship phone. Qualcomm's octa-core Snapdragon 810 has gotten a bad rap since before day one because of its supposed overheating issues, but there's hardly any of that here -- just about everything runs incredibly smoothly, and games like Dead Trigger 2, The Talos Principle and Asphalt 8 didn't never produced any hiccups, even at max graphics settings. Yes, you'll notice some warmth in the top half of the OnePlus 2's body during prolonged gaming sessions, but the sandstone cover seems to diffuse it nicely. All told, the heat was never unpleasant, per se. The reason I've been couching things with words like "almost" and "just about" is because I occasionally saw some apps take longer to launch than normal, if only by a second or two. It doesn't seem like cause for concern; I'd wager it's just a little Android flakiness and really, the issue sticks out more than it should because of how fast the phone is otherwise. Seriously, the OnePlus 2 brings the speed.




Now, about that battery. We're working with a sealed 3,300mAh cell here, and it stuck around for just over nine hours in the ol' Engadget rundown test (looping a video with WiFi on and the screen brightness set to 50 percent, in case you forgot). That puts the OnePlus 2 just ahead of both the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge, but LG's G4 still wins with its 11-hour runtime. And mind you, that's with a smaller, removable battery and a Quad HD screen. I'd be concerned for your well-being if you just watched videos on a phone for nine hours without moving, and thankfully the OnePlus 2 fares even better when you're going about your day. On average, I've been able to get through a full 12-hour workday (with lots of Hangouts chatting and YouTube videos, plus the occasional game and work email) with 15 or 20 percent left in the tank. Most people will only have to charge their OnePlus 2's once a day, which is definitely a good thing -- there's no QuickCharge here so the USB Type-C connector takes longer to charge the phone than most other flagships.
The competition

I've said it before, and I'll say it again: There's never been a better time to buy an unlocked smartphone. This year's crop of no-contract hardware has been first-rate, so keep these alternatives in mind before you make your decision. ZTE's $450 Axon threw me for a loop with its top-tier spec sheet and more-or-less clean version of Android. Audiophiles will dig its music-friendly software enhancements and performance tweaks, and the Quad HD display is pretty too, but be prepared to give yourself over to the cloud. There's only 32GB of internal storage and nary a memory card slot, an omission it shares with the OnePlus 2. I don't mind the lack of expandable memory as much as others do, but man: limiting users to only 32GB is pretty ridiculous. I'd recommend you stay away from the 16GB version of the OnePlus 2 as that's even more limited, but its $329 price is hard to argue with.
I'm also looking forward to seeing how the OP2 stacks up against Motorola's new $400 Moto X Pure, which pairs a hexa-core Snapdragon 808 with 3GB of RAM and a bigger 5.7-inch Quad HD screen. You'll be able to customize the dickens out of it once it launches, but that's not even the most important thing here. You see, software updates usually take ages to pass through carriers' rigorous testing and distribution processes. Motorola software chief Seang Chau told me this won't be the case, though: Since the company isn't going to sell the Pure edition through carriers, it has full control over how quickly it will receive new updates, as well as new versions of Android. Oh, and you won't have to scramble for an invite to buy one, either.
Wrap-up

OnePlus has plenty to be proud of. After all, the company managed to make a phone that improved on the already-excellent original in every way that mattered. The OnePlus 2 is a powerful, well-built device, offering the best blend of price and performance you'll find in an unlocked phone. The thing is, the version I tried is still haunted by a few pesky software issues that should be fixed soon. Maybe it's a good thing you haven't gotten your invite yet.
Even if we put aside these fixable software flaws, it's clear this phone won't be for everyone. No NFC means you won't be using it to make Android Pay payments when the service launches later this year. The lack of a memory card slot means you'll have to be careful about what you download or shoot. It's easy to forgive these shortcomings because of the price -- the trade-off is a worthy one in my book -- but competitors like the Moto X Pure Edition didn't have to compromise nearly as much. In the end, the OnePlus 2 is worth your cash if you're looking for a capable, powerful Android phone on the cheap, but you'd do well to wait a few weeks to see how the competition stacks up.
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Unread 2015-08-19, 10:02 AM   #80
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OnePlus 2 review: There can be only one


Image Source: Zach Epstein, BGR


Call them Android fanboys, enthusiasts, geeks or whatever else you want, but the fact remains: avid Android fans tend to have great taste in smartphones. They don’t want to deal with cumbersome user interfaces from smartphone makers, and they always have a zero-tolerance policy for carrier bloatware. “Pure Android” that is free of clutter is always preferential, and that’s why Nexus phones are so popular among hardcore Android fans.
But in 2014, a new player emerged and blew Android fans away. The OnePlus One had style, power, a shockingly affordable price and CyanogenMod software, which is often heralded by fans as an even better option than pure Android. For many savvy Android users, it was the perfect phone.
If you thought the OnePlus One was great, just wait until you see the ONEPLUS2


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OnePlus will probably never be a household name in the United States or in most other major markets. This small Shenzhen, China-based company is minuscule compared to the giants it competes with. Despite its much smaller team and limited resources, however, OnePlus has managed to build what is easily one of the best smartphones the world has ever seen, inside and out.
And most impressively, it costs half as much as every other flagship smartphone on the market. Seriously… half as much.

Beginning on the outside, The OnePlus 2’s hardware is on par with the best flagship smartphones in the world. In fact, the phone is far more sleek and solid than flagship offerings from some leading phone vendors, which is surprising considering OnePlus’ limited resources.
The face of the phone is home to large 5.5-inch HD display with an ear speaker, front-facing camera, LED notification light and sensors positioned above it.
The display is one of the few areas where there is a discernible difference between the OnePlus 2 and leading rival smartphones. It’s a very nice display, don’t get me wrong, but it’s nothing like the gorgeous Super AMOLED screens on Samsung’s phones or the vibrant LCD displays on Apple’s latest iPhones. Comparatively, colors on the OnePlus 2 screen are slightly faded, and the display doesn’t get quite as bright as other flagships.
Beneath the screen, you’ll find an oblong capacitive home button with an embedded fingerprint scanner flanked by two capacitive navigation buttons.
OnePlus’ second flagship phone is all about flexibility and customization, and that extends to the buttons on the face of the phone as well. The left navigation button is configured as the back button by default, and the right button opens the app switcher. But a “Buttons” section in the device’s settings menu allows the user to swap the two buttons in a matter of seconds, if he or she so desires.
Beyond just swapping button positions, the user can also set long-press and double-tap functions for each of the three buttons under the display. On my OnePlus 2, for example, I have the home button set to launch Google Now when I press and hold it, and a double-tap on the home button puts the phone to sleep. A long-press on the app switcher button opens my most recently used app, and a long-press on the back button opens the phone’s camera.
Of note, I have had some intermittent issues with the capacitive home button not recognizing a tap, and the fingerprint scanner is nowhere near Apple’s in terms of sensitivity and reliability. It’s probably roughly on par with the scanner in Samsung’s Galaxy phones.

Moving to the metal frame that surrounds the edges of the OnePlus 2, the right side of the phone is home to a volume rocker and a power/sleep button, while the left side holds a three-position sliding toggle that switches the phone from “all notifications” mode to “priority interruptions only” mode, and finally to “no interruptions” mode, which disables all audio and vibrating notifications. All three physical buttons on the OnePlus 2 are metal to perfectly match the metal frame.
A standard quarter-inch audio jack and a secondary microphone can be found on the top of the phone, while the bottom is home to the primary mic, a bottom-facing speaker and a USB Type-C port.
Regarding the new USB-C port on the bottom of the phone, there are really only two things you need to know. First, the days of trying to connect your charger upside down are over, because USB-C is reversible, just like the Lightning ports on the iPhone. Second, the hundred or so Micro USB cables lying around your house are all about to be completely useless, because they won’t connect to the OnePlus 2’s new port.

Around back, you’ll find a dual-LED flash and a 6-lens, f/2.0 camera that captures 13-megapixel photos and HD video at resolutions up to 4K.
Images and videos captured with the OnePlus 2 are impressive, though not quite on par with class leaders like Samsung and Apple. Color reproduction is solid and clarity when zoomed out is good, but zooming in to 100% reveals noise and blurring that is a bit more pronounced than it is on photos captured by phones like the iPhone 6 and Galaxy S6.
Surrounding the camera is any one of five interchangeable back covers that include options in Kevlar, three different kinds of wood, and a “grippy” textured plastic that OnePlus calls “sandstone black.”
My review unit came with the sandstone cover and I’m a huge fan. The look is very unique, as is the feel, which is something akin to very course but dull sandpaper. Think of it as the polar opposite of the iPhone 6, which features an aluminum housing that feels like it was designed specifically to slide right out of your hand.
Of note, you’ll find dual nano SIM card slots beneath the interchangeable covers, but you won’t find a user-replaceable battery or a memory card slot.

The OnePlus 2 is sleek and refined on the outside, but inside is where things really start to heat up.
Powering this new OnePlus flagship phone is a 1.8GHz octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 CPU. While the clockspeed on this 64-bit chipset isn’t cranked up quite as high as some rival smartphones, this phone is no slouch. AnTuTu benchmark performance tests I ran on the phone yielded an average score of 58,698. According to AnTuTu’s website, that makes the OnePlus 2 the third highest scoring Android phone in the world, behind only Samsung’s Galaxy S6 and S6 edge.
I rarely include performance test results in my reviews, but I felt compelled to do so considering the target market for this particular phone.
Far more important than test scores on paper is how the phone performs in real life, and I can assure you that the OnePlus 2 has been as smooth as butter during my tests. Under the normal load of everyday usage, the phone takes everything in stride. Even when I turned up the heat and ran multiple resource-intensive apps at once, the phone was still quite difficult to trip up.
Supporting the octa-core Snapdragon chipset is supported by either 3GB or 4GB of LPDDR4 RAM, depending on which model you purchase. My review unit is the 64GB model that includes 4GB of RAM, while the less expensive 16GB version ships with 3GB of RAM.
For the specs hounds out there, OnePlus uses speedy eMMC v5.0 flash memory chips in the OnePlus 2. eMMC v.50 chips are not quite as fast as newer and pricier UFS 2.0 chips found in Samsung hones like the Galaxy S6, but they still offer impressive performance and support bandwidth up to 400Mbps.
Where connectivity is concerned, the OnePlus 2 supports dual-band Wi-Fi (2.4GHz 802.11b/g/n and 5GHz 802.11a/n/ac) and Bluetooth 4.1. The version that will ship to the U.S. beginning next month also includes quad-band GSM (bands 850 , 900, 1800, 1900 MHz), five-band WCDMA (1/2/4/5/, and eight-band 4G LTE (bands 1/2/4/5/7/8/12/17). This means the phone will fully support LTE service offered by AT&T, T-Mobile and U.S. Cellular, but will not support one of Verizon’s three LTE bands (band 13) or any of Sprint’s LTE bands.
The OnePlus 2 does not include an NFC radio. For a very small number of people, this will be a deal-breaker. But truth be told, NFC is hardly a necessity for the OnePlus 2. The overwhelming majority of people who buy this phone will be avid gadget enthusiasts, and this phone will be ancient history by the time NFC-based mobile payment services really begin to proliferate in most markets.
In other words, if you buy a new phone every year and you’re complaining about the lack of NFC in the OnePlus 2… stop. You’ll have a OnePlus 5 in your pocket by the time NFC-based payments are accepted everywhere you shop.

OnePlus calls the software running on the OnePlus 2 “OxygenOS 2.0,” and it’s based on Android 5.1.1 Lollipop.
Think of it like this: OxygenOS offers everything great about Android with a few enhancements that are there if you want them, but completely unobtrusive if you don’t. You’ll also find none of the clutter that other vendors like HTC, Samsung and LG throw on top of Android, and it’s free of all the carrier junkware you would find on most phones sold in the United States.
Here are a few of my favorite Android Lollipop enhancements available in OxygenOS:
  • Themes: OxygenOS supports custom icon packs right out of the box. Third-party icons aside, you can also go to Settings > Customization and change the system-wide accent color in the user interface.
  • Dark mode: Speaking of settings available in the Settings > Customization menu, “Dark mode” is a beautiful dark theme that replaces Android Lollipop’s light theme with a dark one. It’s easy on the eyes, and it’s definitely my preference.
  • LED notification colors: In the same section of the Settings app, you can configure custom LED notification colors for four different indicators: Battery low warning, battery charging, battery full and global notifications. I should note that the 3,300 mAh battery in the OnePlus 2 lasted well past the one day I get out of most Android phones.
  • Gestures: Beyond the configurable capacitive buttons I mentioned earlier in this review, the OnePlus 2 also supports a series of gestures that can be enabled or disabled. Examples include double-tapping the display to wake the phone up from sleep mode, and drawing an “O” on any screen to quickly open the phone’s camera.
  • Enhanced app permission control: If you want full control over which apps can and cannot access your private data or certain Android processes, the OnePlus 2 is the phone for you.OxygenOS shows you every single permission for each app, and it allows you to block access to different permissions individually. For example, you’ll need to agree to let Twitter access your location in order to install the app, but with OxygenOS, you can block access immediately after you install it. Equally cool is the fact that it will show you whether or not an app is actually using each permission it has access to, along with the date of the last time each capability was accessed.

Sadly, demand for the OnePlus 2 is through the roof, but supply is extremely short. As a result, the company uses an invitation system to sell its phones.
Invitations are not easy to come by, but there are a few ways to get one. Someone who has already purchased a OnePlus 2 can invite you to buy one, or you can enter into one the company’s contests and try to win one.
Finally, you can sign up to OnePlus’ reservation list, but there are currently more than 3.85 million people on the list ahead of you.
For those of you who do manage to secure an invitation, it’s important to note that you’ll only have 24 hours to purchase a phone before your invitation expires. The 16GB OnePlus 2 with 3GB of RAM costs $329, and the 64GB model with 4GB of RAM costs $389.
Yes, those prices are simply incredible.
It certainly isn’t easy to purchase a OnePlus 2, but it’s well worth the effort. This gorgeous Android phone competes with and beats mass market flagship phones that are twice as expensive, and it offers the pure Android experience that so many users crave.
The OnePlus 2 truly is the best smartphone in the world by a staggering margin when taking quality, performance and value into account. In fact, no other mass market smartphone even comes close.


Have you reserved your place ? ONEPLUS2
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Unread 2015-08-21, 08:21 AM   #81
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OnePlus rolls out Oxygen OS 2.0.1 OTA update for OnePlus 2







OnePlus is rolling out its first update for the newly launched OnePlus 2. The new update dubbed 2.0.1 version will update OTA and fix a few bugs in the new UI.
In terms of improvement, the update is firstly patching out the Stagefright security exploit that is causing Android users a lot of trouble. In other features, the battery performance along with some bugs has been fixed. The user interface logic along with coherence has been improvised too.
In addition, the update fixes the issue faced while using the pinch-to-zoom feature in Google Photos along with the Dark Mode, which was said to be unstable with a few apps. The update also fixes an issue related to import/export of contacts stored on the SIM card. Also, this update will include additional support for global carrier APNs.
This OTA will be rolling out incrementally, starting in India, so it may take some time before the update reaches all OnePlus 2 devices.
(Also Read: OnePlus 2 full review)
OnePlus had launched its all new OnePlus 2 in the world’s first virtual reality launch event. Design-wise, the metal-frame design makes it look premium. It sports a 5.5-inch 1080p display. As promised, the smartphone also comes with a fingerprint scanner and USB Type-C port. The fingerprint scanner is faster than the iPhone TouchID and lets you save up to five fingerprints, says OnePlus.
On the camera front, it comes with a 13-megapixel snapper. It also gets a new camera and a new solution that allows you to take 50MP photos and there’s also the slow motion mode. It comes powered by Snapdragon 810 coupled with 4GB of RAM and houses a 3,300mAh battery.


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Unread 2015-08-21, 09:37 AM   #82
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OnePlus 2 tips and tricks





  1. Intro
  2. Fingerprint
  3. LED Color
  4. Home sensor
  5. SIM card
  6. Double Tap
Despite it's Nexus-ish outer appearance, the OnePlus 2 experience is fairly unique. There's some interesting hardware and software here, and when you really dig into OxygenOS and start poking around at the settings you'll find new ways to use this phone.
To save you some time, we've assembled this quick guide for things that are lurking in OxygenOS on the OnePlus 2 you might be interested in.
Take me to the guide!
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Unread 2015-08-24, 03:29 PM   #83
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OnePlus 2 Review: It's Powerful, It's Cheap, and Dangit, It's Exciting






Even as Apple, Samsung, and Motorola are pounding out their latest flagship superphones, the OnePlus 2 is easily the most interesting handset hitting the market right now. It’s different: An ambitious, powerful phone that won’t set you back too much loot.

What Is It?


A smartphone with near-flagship specs at a reasonable price. It’s got a 5.5-inch 1080p display. The phone runs OnePlus’ Android-based OxygenOS, packs a 1.8 GHz Snapdragon 810 processor, and up to 4GB of RAM and 64 GB of storage. It’s got a dual nano-sim slot, in case you want to hop on multiple carriers simultaneously—but in the US, it’ll only work properly with AT&T and T-Mobile. The price for the 16GB model will be $330 when it’s available. I tested the $390 64GB model.

Why Does It Matter?


Last year’s OnePlus One was an earthquake of a phone. A real viable upstart in smartphones is rare for the obvious reason that it costs a ton of money—not mention engineering talent—to develop a smartphone, and even more of both if you want to make a phone that’s good. The OnePlus overcame those hurdles with a device that wasn’t just good—its cheap price was unstoppable. That last point’s especially important because it’s increasingly looking like cheap phones are the future.




The OnePlus One wasn’t without its drawbacks. The company’s manufacturing proved too slow for both its customers and partners, and software upgrades were iffy. OnePlus’ key business ally, operating system maker Cyanogen, ditched the manufacturer to look for a more established OEM that could knock out product faster. Now OnePlus is out on its own, with its own, untested operating system. On the other hand, the new phone brings some improved hardware like a fingerprint sensor and top-of-the-line guts. Can it build on last year’s qualified success to create a real blockbuster?
Design


The OnePlus 2 is a big phone, roughly identical in size to its predecessor, and also comparable to the LG G4. Okay, maybe it’s slightly larger than the other two, and though it’s not exactly cumbersome to handle, its boxy design doesn’t use any clever shaping that would make it feel like anything smaller than a phone with a 5.5-inch display.

The phone ships with a very similar sandpapery grey-black back as the original. It’s the phone’s most distinctive design feature. While most people seem to like it, the scratchiness gives me chills like nails on a chalkboard. Luckily, OnePlus will be offering alternate backs for $27, including some very handsome woodgrain finishes. If I bought this phone, I would almost certainly swap the back out for something else. Again, most people find the stock cover attractive, so I’m willing to admit I’m in the minority here. For it’s part, the rough texture makes the phone ultra grippy. I’m always, always dropping phones, and I haven’t managed to lose this one to the concrete yet.


The OnePlus 2 is the first mainstream phone to adopt USB-C for charging, which is a mixed blessing. Yes, USB-C is the future of superfast charging, but it is precisely the future, which means nobody is going to have a USB-C cable when you need one. This will be very impractical for a while: Forget getting a quick charge from a bartender or at your friends’ house. As a consolation, OnePlus is selling the fancy, tangle-free spaghetti cables that shipwith the phone for $5 a pop, so at least you’ll be able to keep an extra virtually everywhere if you spend a little more.

Since last year, OnePlus has made some common-sense changes to the phone’s physical button design and layout. The home button and volume controls are now both on the right side of the phone, whereas previously the volume control was on the left. This isn’t just easier and more intuitive, it’s also how basically all Android phones work now. Additionally, the thin-line side buttons stick out from the phone’s body a little more than before, making them easier to find without fumbling. OnePlus’s new metal chasis feels wonderfully substantial, even if it adds thickness and weight. This is not a super-light smartphone.

The phone has two new additions to the button scheme as well. There’s a new fingerprint scanner right on the home button, which is now slightly recessed into the body of the phone. The result is a cozy little capacitive-touch nook. The OnePlus 2 also has a switch on the left side that allows you to toggle between “all notifications” and a customizable “priority notifications” setting. I believe this is the first phone to try this. I didn’t find myself using it at all, but it’s conceivably handy for quickly silencing your phone when you’re heading into a meeting, while still letting emergency calls from your relatives through.

The 5.5-inch 1080p display is the same size and resolution as the original, but it’s clearer and brighter this time around. Sure, it’s not a crazy QHD display like what LG and Samsung are popping into their top phones, but it’s still fabulous for watching videos or playing games. The speakers which face out the bottom panel are a little awkwardly placed, though this problem isn’t unique to the OnePlus 2.

Using It

Heading into the 2, perhaps the most crucial question is how well OnePlus’ new OxygenOS would run compared to the more established CyanogenMod that came with the original phone. The good news is that the upstart’s OS preserves all of the functionality of stock Android almost perfectly, while adding some useful little tricks. In particular, I like some of the gestures that work when the phone is asleep: a double tap wakes the phone up; drawing a “V” turns on the flashlight; drawing an “O” turns on the camera; drawing an “||” with both fingers stops and starts your music. (These are, by the way, the same exact same gestures from Cyanogen.)

You can also customize the functionality for different versions of the back, home, and recent buttons. For example, I set the phone so that double tapping the home button takes me back to the last app used.
OxygenOS manages to keep most of the best features of CyanogenMod, though some are not as minutely tweakable. For example, you can turn off the camera widget on the lockscreen in CyanogenMod, but not in OxygenOS. Who cares? That’s some insane nerd crap.

That said, OxygenOS adds a crazy power user feature you won’t find almost anywhere else: You can set permissions app by app. I suppose if you feel some app is far too intrusive in its required permissions this might be useful. Note that it’s probable that you’ll end up breaking your app this way.


Speaking of breaking apps, I followed up on a report from this HTC employee that apps with Material Design were breaking in OxygenOS. I was able to replicate his experience in the app Relay for Reddit, but I tested several other third party apps and they all worked fine.

Overall, the performance of the phone is solid, especially for a phone this modestly priced. It works well, and not just because of the software. The hardware is just well-designed. After acclimating to the fingerprint sensor, I get it right basically 100 percent of the time. In a week using the phone, I’ve gotten blazing fast at securely turning on the device: Double-tap the screen to wake it up, thumb down on the sensor, and I’m ready to go.
Still for all its streamlined simplicity, it feels like there’s noticeable lag on the OnePlus 2 compared to the Nexus 6, and even compared to the original OnePlus One—this despite the fact that the OnePlus 2 packs a newer chipset. It’s really only a fraction of a second, but you definitely notice that after tapping an app icon, or pushing a button in an app that the system hangs briefly. It’s annoying especially if you’re used to a zippy flagship smartphone.

This problem was never more noticeable to me then when using the camera. Sometimes, I’d miss shots when the camera loaded too slowly or when the shutter didn’t fire immediately. And that’s too bad, because this camera’s image quality is totally solid. As my colleague Sean noted in his hands-on, the OnePlus’ camera software doesn’t have any manual controls features or RAW support. But for Instagramming your road trip or taking family photos, the camera’s more than decent: it’s actually quite good. In low-light it’s fine, though definitely not as good as a top phone, but you will get your happy hour photo with your coworkers in a dark bar. It will just look like a drunk bar photo.


Finally, it’s worth noting some common features that the OnePlus 2 doesn’t have: There’s no NFC, which means no mobile payments and no easy tap-and-pair with Bluetooth devices. There’s no microSD slot, which means you can’t expand the storage. Oh and no wireless charging. These are all fairly niche features right now, but Apple and Samsung are doing their best to make them things we expect are phones to do.
This is a powerful phone, but it does reasonably well on battery: A full charge will get me from morning to dinner under pretty heavy use.

Like

Beautiful design, and overall solid performance. Amazing phone for the money.
No like

Though OxygenOS is a nice streamlined Android concept that tries to stay out of your way, it lags annoyingly at times.

Should I Buy it


Sure. This is a very good phone that’ll run you $100 less than its closest competitor, which in this case will likely be the forthcoming Moto X style, which starts at $400 for the model with 64 GB. You have time to decide whether you want to buy this phone or the pricier Moto X Style, because as with the One before it, the OnePlus 2 isn’t immediately available—you’ve got to sign up for an invite.

This underscores something that’s worth pointing out: As a concept, the OnePlus 2 is really enticing, but the company still hasn’t fully delivered on its promise to make a phone that can kill flagships. It’s cheaper, sure, but you pay for that cheapness with performance. And you don’t have to beg to buy a flagship Android phone.
Maybe the smartest thing to do is wait for a minute. A simple software update could fix the lag issue, and we’ll know within a couple of weeks whether the Moto X Style is worth the extra loot.

If you really can’t wait, you’ll be well served by the 64GB OnePlus One, which is still available for $300 and no longer requires an invite to purchase. Sure, the spec sheet is a little out of date, but it’s still a lot of phone for the money.
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Unread 2015-08-24, 09:01 PM   #84
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The OnePlus 2 verdict: probably the best phone at this price point






Our friends over at SlashGear have put out their verdict for the smartphone that was dubbed “the flagship killer”, also known as the OnePlus 2. We’ve seen a lot of this new phone over the past few days, as more and more people are getting their hands on OnePlus’s new baby. And from what word that we’re getting from people who have used it, played around with it, made it their main phone for the past few days, we hear that the OnePlus 2 strikes a good balance between good things and not-so-good things. And at its price point, you might not see a better deal.

The internal hardware is top notch, that much we knew even before it was released. The “new version” of Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 810 – the one that (we hope) doesn’t overheat – combined with 4GB of top-of-the-line LPDDR4 RAM will give you buttery smooth, lag free performance from your OnePlus 2 – that much SlashGear was willing to say. Internals really don’t matter that much if they don’t perform, and they do perform here. This phone can take on pretty much any app you throw at it from today until the next few years – without missing a beat.

The external aesthetic is not a big separation from the OnePlus One, but you will feel that this is an upgrade from its predecessor. Chalk that up to the magnesium-aluminum alloy that serves as the outside rim around the phone. Corning Gorilla Glass 4 should be up to spec – the hardest glass surface protection you can find in the market to date, and OnePlus throws in a free screen protector out of the box just to be really sure you’re protected.


What about the things that it doesn’t have? For one, NFC is not present, and people who like to pay for stuff using this will probably see this as a deal-breaker. In fairness, if this feature is not one you really use, you probably won’t notice it. Also, under the “sandstone” textured back, you will not find anything much other that the dual SIM drawer. There is no microSD expansion slot, so get the 64GB variant of the OnePlus 2 if you consume storage like crazy.

The battery is rated at 3,300mAh, and SlashGear confirms that it will probably last you through the day, and then some. Maybe the “pretty standard” 5.5-inch 1080p display has to do with that. OnePlus could have gone 2K or 4K on the display, but that would have bumped up the retail price, as well as affect the battery performance negatively. The battery is non-removable, by the way, and there is no wireless charging out-of-the box, if you can live with that.


As the review says (check out the source link below for more details), at the USD$389 price point for the 64GB variant, this phone performs beautifully for your everyday tasks. Flagship phones from the bigger manufacturers usually cost over USD$500, for comparison. In fairness to the big brands, you do get all the bells and whistles that the OnePlus 2 just doesn’t have. But at this price point, this phone is unbeatable – if you can live without the incidentals.
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Unread 2015-08-26, 08:38 PM   #85
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you'll need a few Here are the places you can buy USB-C cables for your OnePlus 2



Starting the USB-C transition.
MicroUSB has been the golden standard with Android phones and tablets for several years now, but over the next year there's heavy expectation that we'll see the new USB-C connector take its place. We've seen USB-C show up on the new Chromebook Pixel, but now that this new standard has arrived on smartphones and tablets you're going to need to know where to get some new cables and adapters.
Here's a quick list for you new OnePlus 2 owners, who have undoubtedly become aware of the need for more than the single included USB-C cable.
Show me the cables!
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Unread 2015-08-27, 09:55 AM   #86
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Cyanogen OS 12.1 is now rolling out to the OnePlus One! This is probably the biggest update Cyanogen OS is going to get ahead of Marshmallow availability. It brings a ton of great new features and changes you’ll want to get your hands on ASAP.
Here’s everything that’s changing as part of this update (which is based on Android 5.1 Lollipop, mind you):
  • Smarter Screen: LiveDisplay intelligently adjusts your screen based on environmental conditions.
  • Calendar Together with Email: Enjoy the latest Boxer powered experience where you can seamlessly share your availability and schedule appointments.
  • Cyanogen Browser: Cyanogen browser delivers search results and loads web sites faster and more securely than leading browsers.
  • Redesigned Launcher: App Drawer and Folders have been redesigned for one-handed use.
  • Fresh AudioFX: user interface has been updated for consistency across all devices.
  • More Playback support: substantially increased our support of codecs for video and audio playback.
That’s a lot to dig into, so be sure to set some time aside later on to play around with all the new goods. Those not on a OnePlus One — including Andromax Q, Yureka, Yureka Plus, and Yuphoria owners — can expect the upgrade to begin seeding into the market in due time, and we’re sure Cyanogen will have specific announcements for those devices when the time comes.
[via Cyanogen]
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Unread 2015-08-27, 08:37 PM   #87
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OnePlus hit a bit of a snag in their timeline for dishing out those all-important OnePlus 2 invites, but the company says the wait won’t be long from here on out. Carl Pei on Twitter confirmed their “aggressive invite rollout” will happen starting next weekend, which could be seen as September 4th.

We’re still not exactly sure how aggressive OnePlus plans to issue these things, but the company did previously state their there would be a significant increase of availability compared to the first device they launched. Whether this amounts to 10s of thousands more invites available upon release compared to the original OnePlus remains to be seen.
Either way, we expect it to be rather easy to grab an invite once they start rolling out. If it’s anything like last year’s, OnePlus will hold various contests and ship them out in first come, first serve basis to those who signed up for one. The people who get an invite should also get an extra one to send to a friend or give to a needy soul on the internet.
To maximize your chances of snagging one, we recommend signing up over at OnePlus’s forums as they often do member-only invite promotions. It’s also not uncommon to simply ask for an invite and have someone ready to throw one your way in no time. Keep your eyes on Reddit, too, and checking up on Twitter, Facebook or Google+ every now and then also doesn’t hurt. Anyone should be able to get an invite in timely fashion if they really want one. But for now, we’ll wait and see just how plentiful these things are going to be!
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Unread 2015-08-28, 10:54 AM   #88
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INVITES SHOULD BE ROLLING OUT SOON!


Have you reserved your place ? ONEPLUS2
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Unread 2015-08-28, 02:27 PM   #89
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OnePlus 2 Battery Benchmark: Lower Score Than OnePlus One






Towards the end of the last decade, when smartphones as we know them today were just beginning to enter the consciousness of mainstream phone buyers worldwide, the one very crucial but often ignored criterion for choosing a handset used to be the battery life. With the passage of time however, as smartphones have become mainstream to the point of being integral to our daily lives, battery life is increasingly becoming a more important criterion, which can help or hinder purchase decisions for buyers. That being the case, PhoneArena decided to pit the newly-launched OnePlus 2 against a bunch of other premium handsets to gauge the smartphone’s battery life vis-ŕ-vis some of the devices it is supposed to be competing with in the market.
If you are an OnePlus 2 user however, the results are not exactly going to make for very pleasant reading. While the Motorola DROID Turbo with its massive 3,900 mAh battery occupies its pride of place at the top of the pile as having the best battery life amongst all premium flagships, the OnePlus 2 comes in only at number 9. That is significantly below the company’s previous flagship, the OnePlus One, which comes in at number five beneath a bunch of Samsung devices like the Galaxy S6 Edge+, Note 5 and Note 4 that come in at numbers two, three and four respectively. According to the test results, the sophomore effort from OnePlus could only muster an average of 6 hours and 38 minutes on a full charge with its 3,300 mAh battery, even though its predecessor, the OnePlus One, managed as much as 8 hours and 35 minutes on a smaller, 3,100 mAh battery. Even with the less-than-impressive stats, the handset has still apparently managed to outlast devices like the iPhone 6 Plus, which gave a measly 6 hours and 32 minutes of usage on each recharge, while the LG G4 lasted barely 6 hours and 26 minutes.
While the OnePlus 2 continues to remain a decent device for the price it’s asking, the results are a further setback for the handset, after a report published by Toms Guide earlier this week indicated that the OnePlus 2 battery takes significantly more time to get charged as compared to most of its premium Android rivals. The only device that lagged behind the OnePlus 2 in that test was predictably, the iPhone 6. The Galaxy S6 from Samsung and the ZenFone 2 from Asus had emerged on top in that test. The Droid Turbo from Motorola emerged the best in terms of the milliamps-per-minute yardstick. PhoneArena vindicates those results by publishing data from its own tests, which seems to come to the exact same conclusion that the OnePlus 2 isn’t exactly the quickest charging Android smartphone on the planet right now. The website reports that it took them a full two and a half hours to get the OnePlus 2 battery to go from from zero to one hundred, which is actually forty minutes slower than what Toms Guide says it takes the device to get a full charge! The ZenFone 2 and the Galaxy flagships also maintain their dominance in this test, in line with the earlier report. The charts from PhoneArena’s battery benchmark test can be seen below.
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Unread 2015-08-28, 02:28 PM   #90
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“Youth” Suggests Next OnePlus Phone Not As Good As OnePlus 2






The OnePlus 2 was a long time in coming. Seems strange to say as the company’s debut device only landed a little over a year ago. However, the anticipation behind the second OnePlus device was so strong and for so long that it seemed as though the OnePlus 2 took a long time to arrive before it was fully unveiled back at the end of July. In a similar way, it seems the ‘other’ OnePlus device is taking equally as long.
It is no secret that the company is working on another smartphone. This is apparently not the OnePlus 3, although what it is, remains relatively unknown. OnePlus have kept very quite on what to expect with this additional device and all that is known is that it will arrive before the year is out. Although the specs are very much a mystery, a debate had circled around whether this will be a higher or lower spec device compared to the OnePlus 2. In fact, at the start of August, Carl Pei of OnePlus avoided answering the question directly by suggesting that he would find it hard to choose which one to use as a daily driver. Further fueling the notion that this might be more of a higher spec device then people are expecting. Another rumor which surfaced a few weeks ago did suggest this next phone will certainly be a mid-range device and maybe one which is geared towards emerging markets.
Well, Peter Lau of OnePlus took to Weibo last night and made a comment that alluded to what might be the next OnePlus device. the comment suggested that it will be a budget-range device. To provide some context to the comment, another company launched a few devices yesterday. The Company was QiKU and the three devices announced included a “Youth” version. This Youth variant is more of a budget range offering (compared to the others) and following the launch, Lau’s Weibo message hinted at their ‘Youth” version. Whether this does actually mean that the next OnePlus will be a budget-range device is still unclear. Although, the latest Weibo comment does at least suggest this device will not be comparable to the OnePlus 2.
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Unread 2015-08-28, 04:40 PM   #91
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USB-C has started its slow march to dominance, and I'm finally ok with that.


I was working in a mobile tech store when microUSB began its slow dominance of the mobile ecosystem. Everyone I worked with at the time glared at the massive wall of barrel connectors, weird plastic plugs with copper bits on the sides, and those huge 20-pin plugs with equal degrees of hatred. MicroUSB changed all of that, and eventually made it possible for almost every phone and tablet to use the same connector over the last couple of years.
It's been a good run, but after using what comes after microUSB for the last few weeks I am finally ready to say goodbye to this industry-changing port and welcome USB-C as the way of the future.

It wasn't all that long ago I was fairly unimpressed with this new USB connector. The port is physically larger than microUSB, the central connector stem inside the female end of the port looked fragile, and I've never been a part of the group that finds plugging in a microUSB cable frustrating. While the USB-C spec includes some exciting things for data transfer and charging, neither of those things affected me personally. I'm already using and loving Quick Charge 2.0, and because I live in a place where 802.11ac Wifi exists and high speed LTE flows freely, I rarely care about the transfer speed of my USB connection.
The experience was neither revolutionary nor earth shattering. Just a cable and a port, like the thousands I had used before it.
I'm also not a huge fan of the cable most frequently compared to USB-C. I own more than my fair share of Apple hardware, and personally I can't stand Lightning cables. The cables Apple includes with their hardware are often cheap and poorly made, and even the nice Lightning cables have dangerously fragile connectors. I've broken more Lightning connectors than I care to admit, either through accident and clumsiness or poor construction. By comparison, I've broken far fewer microUSB cables and use those cables significantly more frequently than I do Lightning.
Fortunately, I now know the truth about USB-C. Over the past couple of weeks I've used the OnePlus 2 and Asus ZenPad S 8.0 almost exclusively. This USB-C combination required me to replace the cables I use around the house and when I travel with the proper gear, which I did immediately. I didn't really notice any difference in my usage at first. Plug the cable in when I needed it, unplug it when I was done. The experience was neither revolutionary nor earth shattering. Just a cable and a port, like the thousands I had used before it. Also, neither of the devices I'm currently using have any of the extra magic that will make USB-C special in the future. These are essentially USB 2 ports in hardware with no Quick Charge capabilities or faster transfer speeds, so it really didn't seem like a big deal to me.
Halfway through the second week I needed to get something off of my Samsung Galaxy S6 edge, and it was in this interaction that I realized how different things were. It took me two tries to get the microUSB cable into the port, after which I immediately removed the cable to check the port because it didn't feel like the cable had seated correctly. When I re-connected the cable everything was fine, but the connection still felt loose and flimsy to me. I had already become a convert to USB-C.
A big part of what makes this connector special is its internal design. The oval connector is not only slightly wider and taller than microUSB, but longer as well. Inserting this port into a phone or tablet is met with a physical click every time, and the seated position means very little wiggling around. You wont, for example, be able to lean the connector up or down and watch as your hardware stops registering a connection. The connector pins are on both sides of the central stalk in the female part of the port, so as soon as it is connected it stays that way.

Fragility is not nearly as big a concern for me after using these connectors for the last few weeks, but it's still something I'm wary of. The USB-C connection in the OnePlus 2 is solid. Very little wiggle and in many ways more solid than most microUSB connections out there. A lot of that has to do with the metal frame and the position of the port. The ZenPad S 8.0, on the other hand, has a rounded plastic frame and the port is off to the right. This version of the port has a lot more wiggle to it, and feels as though a good drop on the cable would yield the same kind of breakage as microUSB. Since there's going to be a ton of hardware with this port in the not-so-distant future, it's clear overall quality will vary for some.
The bottom line is this — I'm a whole lot more interested in USB-C taking over the world nowadays. I like the way the cable feels when seated in the port, and when we start to see USB-C ports on phones with the USB 3.1 spec behind it, the doors will open for some interesting new features. We'll probably also start seeing more in the way of standardized USB accessories, but that's another matter for another day.
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Unread 2015-09-09, 09:05 AM   #92
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OnePlus’ Internal Memo Leaks, Reveals Company’s Plans






OnePlus has announced the long awaited OnePlus 2 at the company’s event back in July. The company’s 2nd-gen flagship, and second phone this company manufactured overall, is once again extremely well-equipped and quite affordable. Keep in mind that you’ll need an invite if you’d like to purchase it though, unfortunately. OnePlus 2 has been available for quite some time now, and we’ve already reviewed it, in case you’d like to check that out. That being said, let’s put OnePlus 2 on the side for a moment, and talk about the company in general, shall we.
This China-based company has had a really successful 2014 thanks to OnePlus One, and are looking to do even better this year. What are their plans though? Well, thanks to the alleged OnePlus internal memo which leaked recently, we might even know what OnePlus’ next step is. According to the source, this information comes from a letter signed by Pete Lau, company’s CEO. According to its content, OnePlus is currently mass producing the upcoming OnePlus-branded smartphone which is supposed to launch before the end of the year, the cheaper variant of OnePlus 2, allegedly cheaper that is. Mr. Lau has also mentioned that the company should start working on OnePlus 3 in the coming months, and that they need to continue polishing up the Oxygen OS in order to provide consumers with the best user experience possible. At the end of the letter, Pete Lau mentioned OnePlus’ global affairs, and the company’s expansion. They will, reportedly, try to consolidate their affairs outside of China, further into the US, Europe and Canada.
There you have it. We, of course, cannot confirm that this report is legit, so take the aforementioned info with a grain of salt. The content of the letter seems rather accurate though, these are all logical steps that OnePlus is looking to take. We haven’t seen a single rumor regarding the upcoming OnePlus Mini handset, or whatever will it be called in the end, since the company launched OnePlus 2. That being said, stay tuned, we’ll report back as soon as new info surfaces, as usual.
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Unread 2015-09-10, 03:30 PM   #93
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You’ll soon be able to buy the OnePlus 2 without an invite, but only for one hour






If you’ve reserved your spot to get a hold of a new OnePlus 2, odds are you haven’t gotten an invite yet. Despite announcing that it would soon start ramping up invite rollouts to patient customers a few weeks ago, OnePlus has still managed to rack up over five million reservations for the OnePlus 2, leaving many folks wondering when they’d get to purchase the new device.
In an apology recently posted on the OnePlus forums, company co-founder Carl Pei talks about how OnePlus not only messed up the One’s launch, but also the release for the 2. Pei says:
We know how it feels waiting and waiting for something you really want, while being given ETAs that go unfulfilled. We appreciate the trust and support that you have given to a relatively small and unknown company like OnePlus. We know that you are rooting for us, and want nothing more than to see us succeed. Therefore, it feels extra terrible to let you down this time around, again.
Even though the phone is finally shipping out to users, the company is still extremely behind schedule. To make up for it, OnePlus has announced that it will open up sales for the OnePlus 2 sometime later this month or early next month, for one hour only. This means that during this hour, you can purchase your very own “2016 flagship killer”, no invite required. Details are still pretty scarce, but the company says an exact date and time will be given to us sometime soon. We’ll let you know when we hear more information.
Tell us, are you still waiting to get your hands on the OnePlus 2, or have you moved on to bigger and better things?
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Unread 2015-09-10, 03:56 PM   #94
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Well, how’s that for being frank? OnePlus founder Carl Pei has taken to the company forums to apologize for the company’s rocky OnePlus 2 launch… or lack thereof.
After a series of annoying delays and a lack of ways to actually buy the phone (invites have been few and far between despite promises to the contrary), he has this to say:
We messed up the launch of the OnePlus 2.
Well, we messed up the launch of the OnePlus One as well. Although inventory levels ramped up eventually, months after the announcement, it was still extremely difficult to buy the device. We comforted ourselves to the fact that we were young, and that we’d learn and show the world we could do better next time around.
With the OnePlus 2, we made rosy plans. We were more confident, and prepared a lot more inventory. We told our users it would be 30-50x easier to get invites, and they needn’t worry. Yet, we only began shipping in meaningful quantities this week, nearly a month after our initial targeted shipping date. You can talk all you want, but in the end, flawless execution speaks much louder than unfulfilled promises.
I’d like to apologize on behalf of OnePlus for the delay.
To say it’s been a rough launch for the company is putting it lightly. It’s bad enough they can’t live up to their lofty promises, but the fan backlash from the exclusion of now-standard features like NFC when they’re calling their phone the “2016 Flagship Killer” has turned many potential buyers away.
One of the ways they want to make up for it is by holding an open sale for the OnePlus 2, where anyone can buy one without an invite. The sales window lasts an hour, and will take place sometime next month.
That “goodwill” gesture has to sting for those whose frustrations came from the lack of availability in the first place. Their other move is to stop promising dates and ETAs, and to let their actions do the talking.

But you know what? We wouldn’t blame you if you’re still just outright tired of the shenanigans, because we are, too. It was all fun and games when you were a new company, OnePlus. You had little experience, and despite having leadership who knows how a smooth R&D, engineering, manufacturing and distribution process works, the excuses for your oft-tacky marketing tactics were quite valid.
It’s 2015, though. You had 1 phone, and you had 1 year to learn from prior mistakes. The invite system is annoying and bad. Month-long shipping delays are even worse.
And sure, we understand that this sort of stuff might be unpredictable when you’re working on an ever-changing scale. You learned a lot from your first rodeo, but that doesn’t mean the second attempt doesn’t come without its own set of challenges.
But in a time where even companies like HTC are being threatened to bow out, you’d better make it priority #1 to fix these logistics issues and get people the phones they want. Otherwise they’re liable to get so fed up that they’d bite the bullet and “settle” for paying that extra premium for a phone they can actually get their hands on.
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Unread 2015-09-11, 02:11 PM   #95
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OnePlus Now Teasing “Bit Of Welcome Luxury” Coming Soon






It was only yesterday when OnePlus sent out a blog post admitting that they had “messed up” with the launch of the OnePlus 2. In explaining this, OnePlus said that it is difficult to deal with hardware and that they are still a young company and this had led to a disappointing number of invites being offered and devices being received by those interested. In concluding the announcement, OnePlus said that going forward they would no long make promises prior to a launch. However, the company never said anything about stopping their teasing of products before they are launched.
This is something the company has done almost routinely with each product they have unveiled. Although, the big tease was for the OnePlus 2, which continued for months on end with a drip-feeding approach to specs, the company has also adopted the teasing approach with some of their smaller products like the DR-1 drone they launched earlier this year. Well, a day after the ‘messed up’ admittance and OnePlus is back to teasing something that is “coming soon”.
An image sent out on various social media platforms this morning comes with the tagline “A bit of welcome luxury”. To further highlight that this is something new, the image also comes with the message “Something luxurious is coming to OnePlus. What could it be?” and again looks to be building excitement around an upcoming product. There has been sustained confirmation from OnePlus that there will be a third OnePlus device arriving before the year is out, however, it does seem unlikely that this is referring to that particular device. Due to the “luxury” comment, it seems highly unlikely this is referring to the next OnePlus device as that device is largely thought to be more of a mid or budget ranged offering which will not be more luxurious than the OnePlus 2. As such, the more likely option for this latest tease is that it is an accessory for the OnePlus 2. Possible a case or new back cover. Of course, if you have enjoyed the previous guessing games with OnePlus, then you can head over to any of their social media platforms and offer your guesses.
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Unread 2015-09-15, 02:13 PM   #96
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OnePlus began teasing “a bit more luxury” the other day, but we weren’t quite sure what it was. Well, now we know it wasn’t a new phone or a StyleSwap cover — it’s a carrying pouch for the OnePlus 2.

It’s leather, and comes from the quality leatherworking stations of Italian designer Hard Graft. It looks very nice. And it also costs a whopping $99. The pouch is hand-stitched and traditionally tanned, and the inside is lined with a grey felt material to protect the phone. The pouch also has secondary holding areas inside to store cards, cash or other small items.
And it’s $99. If you’re rich or have a deep affection for leather you can look forward to this thing becoming available sometime soon, but hopefully not sooner than you can actually buy the OnePlus 2.
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Unread 2015-09-21, 09:49 AM   #97
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New OnePlus Smartphone Render Leaks


Earlier in the year OnePlus promised a new smartphone that would be design oriented and maybe not focused on specs. A potential first render of that handset has now been posted online and seems to show a device that will be smaller than the OnePlus 2 flagship.
A OnePlus 2 Mini then? Well, that?s unknown because there is very little information about this device other than OnePlus co-founder?s confirmation in January and then August that the handset exists. For the time being though consumers will have to make do with OnePlus 2, which shouldn't be too much of a problem considering how excellent that handset is.
OnePlus really has gone above and beyond with the OnePlus 2 and it seems that it is an entirely new device that is replacing last year's debut. We will have to review the handset to have any lasting impressions, but it is refreshing to see a company avoid an incremental update in favor of trying to improve most facets of a product. The OnePlus 2 comes with USB Type-C which means the charging and connection cable is reversible like Apple's Lightning connector, removing the pain of fumbling around trying to plug in your device for charging. However, it is worth noting that the connection itself remains USB 2.0, so there will be no fast connection like USB 3.0. While it is not a big deal in Europe and the USA, many global consumers will be happy to see that OnePlus has included dual-SIM capabilities on its new smartphone. Another common feature that makes its debut on the OnePlus One is optical image stabilization (OIS), making the 13MP rear camera closer to the OnePlus 2's flagship rivals. The camera module also gets a laser autofocus that offers touch free auto focus in 0.2 seconds. It is becoming standard practice for companies to place fingerprint scanners on their high end devices, and the OnePlus 2 is continuing the trend. We always prefer to see the scanner mounted into the home button as opposed to the rear of the handset, so it is nice to see that OnePlus has done just that. StyleSwap was a bit of a mess on the original OnePlus One, mainly because the company could not get its inventory together. The system is now making a comeback and OnePlus says it has solved previous issues, meaning you can now swap your rear cover, with Sandstone Black, Bamboo, Rosewood, Black Apricot, and Kevlar the options so far. While some late rumors suggested that the OnePlus 2 would employ a Quad HD screen, but the Chinese company instead opted to stick with 1080p Full HD once more, while also maintaining the 5.5-inch size. A Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor sits under the hood and is helped by a sizeable amount of RAM, 4GB to be exact. Yes, the Snapdragon 810 has had plenty of problems, but OnePlus is using the throttled version that does not produce overheating issues. Other specs include 16GB or 64GB internal storage options (sadly there is no micro SD slot), a 3,300 mAh battery, and Android Lollipop. The cameras have been overhauled, but the rear shooter stays with 13 megapixel resolution. It has had plenty of tweaks though, such as Super-Resolution Mode. This new software feature processes images to 50 megapixel quality, you may remember this feature first arrived on the Oppo 7 earlier this year. Around the front there is a 5 megapixel lens that will appease selfie fans. The OnePlus 2 arrives with the company's OxygenOS, which the company created amid the breakdown of its relationship with Cyanogen. The handset comes with version 2.0 of the software, and we have found it to be a rather agreeable Android skin. It is nice to see that OnePlus has kept it near stock Android, which means a clean interface and smooth performance, while still maintaining enough customization options to stay in line with what we expect from the platform.
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Unread 2015-09-21, 10:00 AM   #98
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Rumored OnePlus 2 Mini Smartphone Images Leak






OnePlus 2 was one of the most anticipated smartphones of 2015. This China-based company has unveiled this smartphone back in July, and even though it resembles its predecessor to some extent, this device is significantly different, not only in terms of the design, but specs as well. The OnePlus 2 is available for purchase as we speak, and has been that way for quite some time now. Keep in mind that you’ll still need an invite in order to buy this phone though.
That being said, we’re not here to talk about OnePlus 2, but the rumored OnePlus 2 Mini. This handset has been mentioned quite a few times in various reports, and the company has also confirmed that they intend to launch another device before the end of the year. According to various rumors this will be a mid-range smartphone, and might be called OnePlus 2 Mini, as already mentioned. We haven’t seen any rumors / leaks regarding this smartphone for quite some time now, until now that is. A new leak appeared in China sharing two mysterious renders allegedly showcasing the upcoming OnePlus-branded smartphone. Now, keep in mind that this is just a leak, so this design is not confirmed, far from it. The phone looks really sleek in these renders though, and it actually looks kinda high-end. There are two cameras on its back , and a dual-LED flash below them. As you can see, the fingerprint scanner is also available here, and it is placed on the back of this phone considering there’s not physical home button here. The speakers are available on the bottom of the device, and a Type-C USB 3.0 port is located in between them.
Looking at this image, you’ll also notice that this phone sports a metallic trim, just like the OnePlus 2. That’s more or less it as far as this leak goes. We still can’t confirm that OnePlus’ upcoming device will actually be mid-range, it is possible that the company intends to launch another high-end smartphone before the end of this year. We still don’t have any spec info either, but if anything pops up, we’ll let you know, so stay tuned.
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Unread 2015-09-21, 11:38 AM   #99
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OnePlus 2 Receives Update to 2.1.0 With Camera Enhancements and Bug Fixes


The OnePlus 2 is receiving an update today to OxygenOS v2.1.0 that should greatly improve the camera experience for “photography enthusiasts,” but we’re hoping it also fixes all sorts of bugs. OnePlus is calling this a “sizable” update full of bug fixes and improvements, so it should.
The update highlights are as follows, according to OnePlus:
  • We’ve added manual mode for all you photography enthusiasts. Hope this will give you more control for capturing that perfect moment.
  • Raw support is now enabled for 3rd party camera apps that support this format
  • There’s a new color balance slider in Display for adjusting the color tone of your screen. You can now go warmer or cooler as you please.
  • Added Exchange support.
  • We fixed some issues that were causing problems with popular 3rd party apps.
  • Telephony service improvements so you no longer get the lag when you turn on/off airplane mode.
The update will rollout over-the-air (OTA) starting today to a small number of users before arriving on most phones tomorrow and throughout the rest of the week.
Let us know if you see it and if it enhances the phone’s experience.
OnePlus 2 StyleSwap Covers Look Nice, But Add Thickness


Thinking about dropping $26.99 on a StyleSwap cover for the OnePlus 2? I urge you to possibly rethink that choice, as you may be left with a bulkier, more slippery device. When we picked up our OnePlus 2, we opted to grab a few StyleSwap covers to go with it, just so we can add a bit of character to the device, and to go over their quality for all of you. While the quality of the covers feel great, and look exceptional, we find that the covers add unnecessary thickness to the phone, taking away from the flush, smooth outline that the Sandstone Black cover offers straight out of the box.
With the stock Sandstone Black cover, there is no lip surrounding the device’s backside, but with both the Bamboo cover and Black Apricot cover, a hump — or lip — goes around the entirety of the phone’s backside. In-hand, you can actually feel this raise quite a bit, and when compared to the in-hand feel of the flush Sandstone cover, the little hump does not feel very good.
The photos below detail exactly what we mean. As you can see, the StyleSwap covers add a lip around the backside of the phone, and for those who have slight OCD, this may cause an issue. It did for me.
In the grand scheme of things, I would have much rather preferred that OnePlus attempt to keep the flush, smooth feeling with all StyleSwap covers, but it is possible that this was undoable when working with the wood material. This is likely something we will never know.
I always enjoyed the idea of having bamboo or other various types of wood on my smartphone, so I was very excited to give these StyleSwap covers a try, but after installing them and seeing how they fit, I would not recommend them to anybody. As for the added slipperiness, the wood StyleSwap covers are exceptionally more smooth compared to the Sandstone Black cover, but that’s a given, considering the Sandstone is extremely porous and rough.
If a little lip around the back of your phone does not bother you, you can pick up the covers here, no invite required.
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Unread 2015-09-29, 08:19 PM   #100
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AH OnePlus 2-6
Carl Pei Of OnePlus Reaches Out To Samsung For Guidance



No matter which side of the OnePlus fence you sit on, the one thing about the company is their consistency to the way they do things. They are not afraid to do things differently and love them or hate them, they do make an impact with their approach. That said, the impact is not always a positive one. The OnePlus 2 launch was one of the big talking points of the year and as such, with the actual launch of the device and the follow up invite and purchase system that has been in place, a number of OnePlus users have been left feeling let down by the whole process and therefore, by the company.

This is something which has not been lost on OnePlus and the company has come out a couple of times over the past few weeks and made it clear that they do accept things could have been done better and they had messed up. Well, to follow on from that point, it now looks as though Carl Pei, OnePlus CEO, is looking to some unexpected people for help in better preparing for such events. The company in particular that Pei is reaching out to is Samsung. In a blog post sent out by Pei, the CEO talks about how there is no one better at preparing for a device launch than Samsung. Pei notes that when thinking about who they “could learn from’, Samsung is the first company that comes to mind. Further noting that Samsung’s ability to ship so many devices and through so many sales channel is something that they cannot “help but admire“.

As such, in the blog post, Pei is directly reaching out to Samsung with a very clear proposal. Pei is reaching out to Samsung to see if he can effectively spend some time as their intern and in his words “learn from your team about how you’ve been able to scale, run, and manage your business so successfully.” That said, Pei is not looking at the possibility of working with Samsung as something that will only benefit them as he also is offering Samsung the option to send one of their execs to OnePlus. In a sort of exec intern swap. Again, according to Pei, “I would be happy to share what we’ve learned about how to engage with our community and implement their feedback to deliver a better user experience.” It is not clear yet as to whether Samsung has responded to Pei or indeed will, but it would be interesting to see one of the industry leaders intern swap with one of the industry newcomers.
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