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Unread 2015-07-28, 02:52 PM   #51
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A look at the five different StyleSwap covers for the OnePlus 2 [PHOTOS]







The OnePlus 2 has finally been announced, and one of the best features is the replaceable back covers. This is certainly not a new or innovative feature by any means. OnePlus promised this same thing for the OnePlus One, but that never came to fruition. This time OnePlus says they’ve improved the “StyleSwap” system, and it’s ready for the prime time. We were able to get our hands on all five StyeSwap covers. Here’s what they look like. (click to enlarge)

Kevlar


Black Apricot


Bamboo (right)


Rosewood


Sandstone


The black sandstone is the stanard cover that will come on ever OnePlus 2. The other four options will be available for $27 a piece. What do you think of the materials? Will you be buying an extra back cover for your OnePlus 2?
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Unread 2015-07-29, 09:18 AM   #52
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OnePlus CEO: We Will Sell Our USB-C Cable At “Around $5″





Hong Kong-based smartphone vendor OnePlus will sell its much talked-about USB-C cable to anyone interested, for “about $5”, according to the company’s CEO, Mr. Carl Pei. Stocks for the same will start arriving by end-August or early-September, according to Mr. Pei. Although he claimed the $5 price-tag is less than the cost of its manufacturing, it would be in the company’s interest to have USB-C cables widely available, seeing as the technology is still a fledgling one, although it is said to be the technology of the future. OnePlus’ latest smartphone, the OnePlus 2, is but one of the devices to sport the new USB-C port, alongside other new devices like the Chromebook Pixel or the 2015 MacBook, both of which feature USB-C ports for connectivity, in lieu of USB 3.0 ports.
Coming to the cable itself, it has been designed in-house by OnePlus, and follows a similar design principle as the Micro USB cable that came bundled with the OnePlus One. The cable comes with a flat, tangle-free design, and features thick shielding for increased longevity, along with a silicone tie for hassle-free cable management. However, the single most interesting feature of the new cable lies in its USB-A end. For the uninitiated, the USB-A male connector is the end which is attached to the USB ports on a PC or a charging adapter. That particular end on the USB-C cable from OnePlus happens to be reversible. OnePlus has already applied for a patent for this unique feature, which in essence, turns the humble cable into a smart one, via a small chip inserted into the cable, which allows it to be plugged in both ways, without changing the connectors at either end.
Coming to OnePlus, the company already sells its Micro USB cable for $9.99 on its website, alongside a number of other accessories including power banks, charging adapters, OTG cables and earphones etc. The company recently introduced its second generation flagship smartphone, dubbed the OnePlus 2, which features a 5.5-inch 1080p display, and is powered by the Qualcomm MSM8994 Snapdragon 810 SoC (v2.1). The device comes in two different variants – one with 4 GB RAM and 64 GB storage and another with 3 GB RAM and 16 GB storage. While the first variant will come with a $329 price-tag in the US, the more premium version will cost $389. The device comes with dual SIM, dual standby, and runs on a 3,300 mAh battery. The OnePlus 2 features a fingerprint sensor which can carry up to five different profiles. The phone also features a 13-megapixel primary camera on the rear and a 5-megapixel selfie-cam on the front.
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Unread 2015-07-29, 11:17 PM   #53
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I'd sell the shit out of my Note 4 to get one of these.
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Unread 2015-08-01, 12:46 AM   #54
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OnePlus 2 pre-invite waiting list exceeds 1 million signups





Even if that pre-launch leak didn’t paint the phone in the best light, it seems a lot of people are excited about the OnePlus 2. So many, that OnePlus’ pre-invite reservation list has now topped over 1 million signups. That’s pretty impressive given they hit 300,000 before the phone was even made official.
Keep in mind these aren’t actual pre-orders — nobody is dishing out actual money yet. These are just people waiting for the chance to possibly get an invite on the off chance that some become available for “special cases.” Whether these people would sit on an invite, sell it off, or buy the phone remains to be seen. As far as whether or not OnePlus can keep up with such seemingly high demand, this year OnePlus says they’ll have much more stock than they did last year, so hopefully you wont be waiting forever to snag a OnePlus 2 invite for yourself.
OnePlus co-founder Carl Pei mentioned in an interview with Greenbot that last year they became “arrogant,” ordering too many units that they recently had to sell back to suppliers at a discount. With the recent discovery that the OnePlus 2 is one of the few smartphones available that doesn’t offer NFC or fast charging, we’re sure these could be major deal breakers for some. Let’s hope they don’t make the same mistakes this time around, while still getting invites out to those who really want it.
OnePlus offers signups the chance at getting bumped up in the queue for anyone signing up using their personalized link.
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Unread 2015-08-01, 01:50 PM   #55
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Download: 25 Wallpapers From the OnePlus 2


The OnePlus 2 may not arrive until August 11, but one of their lead OxygenOS designers just handed out the phone’s wallpapers ahead of time to “keep the hype up.” There are supposed to be 27 wallpapers in the bunch, but we’re only counting 25. Still, here are 25 free wallpapers that will probably look good on any device, not just the new OnePlus 2.
Below, we’ve put together a mini preview of the lot, but if you head through the download link, you can grab a .zip of all of the papers in full resolution.
You may not be interested in the OnePlus 2, but who can say “no” to hot wallpapers on a Saturday afternoon?
Download Link
Via: OnePlus
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Unread 2015-08-03, 03:40 PM   #56
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OnePlus 2 lacks NFC because “very few people” use it; second device to launch later this year





OnePlus’s Carl Pei had a sit-down with USA Today, and as we have come to expect from the founder’s interviews he dropped some pretty interesting nuggets. The first is confirmation that the company will look to launch another smartphone later this year, with the word “Christmas” casually sprinkled in there.
He didn’t go into much detail, but he says the phone looked good enough that he would make it his daily driver when it launches. That’s a given — he should want to use his own company’s latest phones. Unfortunately he didn’t say why he felt that way, and said it “may or may not be” specced higher than the OnePlus 2 was.

We’d hope it was higher, because — despite it being a fine phone in many respects (see our hands-on here) — folks are of the opinion that the OnePlus 2 lacks in a couple of important areas. One of those areas is NFC, a feature we’d expect a so-called “2016 flagship killer” to auto-include. Speaking of which, Carl Pei continued to defend the company’s move to pass on it for their 2015 option:
I thinkthe entire issue of NFC is overblown. Very few people are using NFC, so we cut it. It’s as simple as that.
I know that Android Pay is coming but all that is in the future. It (NFC) is going to gain widespread adoption in stores 12-18 months from now. By that time people will have moved on to the next device.
Ultimately, Pei just admitted the OnePlus 2 is akin to a band-aid. It’s a temporary stop gap that didn’t need all these advanced features because people are just going to upgrade again when the tech is more widespread. The motto is Never Settle, but they have, in fact, settled, and they’re asking us to do the same.

While Pei might have a point in noting that a lot of people don’t use or need NFC, there’s no excuse to yank it away from the many folks who do. NFC chips are even starting to appear inside mid-range smartphones, and we wouldn’t be surprised if entry level options started using them given how cheap the component is to produce.

We find it necessary to think of all possibilities, though. What if Android Pay doesn’t take 12 to 18 months to mature? What if I don’t want to upgrade for another two years? What if someone is quietly working on the killer app that would make NFC a must have, and it launches tomorrow?
What if I wanted a smartphone that could make every last one of the previous questions irrelevant because it’d be future proofed for anything I need? In that case, the OnePlus 2 is not the answer. Guess we’ll have to wait until Christmas to see if they have anything more in store, otherwise Motorola’s 2015 offerings are really starting to sound nice.
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Unread 2015-08-03, 09:19 PM   #57
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How I “hacked” the OnePlus reservation system.



https://medium.com/@JakeCooper/how-i...m-120ea1a7ad82
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Unread 2015-08-04, 10:13 AM   #58
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OnePlus Co-Founder Talks NFC Backlash, Another “Amazing” Phone Coming Later This Year


OnePlus co-founder, Carl Pei, sat down with USA Today over the weekend for a short interview that touched on a number of subjects from the company’s early beginnings to its new phone and beyond. Two topics stood out to us, though – one as a response to the backlash heard over the company’s decision to leave out NFC in the OnePlus 2, and another that talks of a new OnePlus phone coming later this year that will be “amazing.”
Carl was asked about OnePlus not including NFC in the OnePlus 2 and why that decision was made. He said he thinks the “entire issue of NFC is overblown” and that “very few people are using” it. Because of that, they cut it out – “it’s as simple as that.” Expounding on the idea that no one uses it, Carl suggests that because NFC may not be a thing for another 12-18 months, that you won’t need NFC in a device today. He also mentions that in those 12-18 months, “people will have moved on to the next device,” which we are assuming means a OnePlus 3 or phone from another manufacturer that has NFC? That’s kind of an odd statement, if you ask me.
While I appreciate the honesty here, I can’t say that I’m exactly excited about that kind of approach. When your company’s motto is “Never Settle” and the tagline for your 2015 phone is “2016 flagship killer,” you are basically saying that your phone won’t have a feature that will likely be big in 2016, which you realize to be the case, yet still left it out. Because of that, you are also asking your customers to settle for the time being.
On a semi-related note, Pei did briefly touch on the subject of the near future, which includes another OnePlus phone. He said that it “may or may not be” higher spec’d than the OnePlus 2 and that the first words out of his mouth when seeing it were “Holy sh*t that’s going to be my daily driver.” Umm yeah, so the OnePlus 2 is great and all, but the next phone might be even better.
I don’t know what to tell you anymore.
But hey, hopefully we’ll have a OnePlus 2 review unit soon! Maybe.
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Unread 2015-08-04, 11:46 AM   #59
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OnePlus Respond To Reservation Hacking Reports





At the moment, it seems there is OnePlus news emerging pretty much on a daily basis. The company did only recently launch their latest device, the OnePlus 2, so the uptake in news coverage is somewhat normal. However, thanks to a number of additional factors, like the invite system, the OnePlus news is in even more abundance. Take yesterday for instance. A report emerged late yesterday afternoon detailing how someone could essentially hack the OnePlus invite reservation system. Although, the hacker, Jake Cooper, did not provide a detailed explanation on how others could hack the reservation process, he did provide enough information to highlight that the system can be hacked and that he had done it. Cooper also noted that he had contacted OnePlus to make them aware of the issue, although at the time OnePlus had yet to respond.
Well, OnePlus has now responded through a forum announcement. In short, the response does pretty much confirm that the method of hacking is one which is possible. “We knew this was possible, and we’ve been monitoring the list for such behavior.” In response, OnePlus have noted that they have already implemented ways to try and mitigate against the issue. Further noting that as invites have not begun going out yet, they will be going through the reservation list and identifying those which they consider to be fraudulent entries. According to OnePlus, there are multiple ways for them to identify such fraudulent reservation requests.
Interesting, OnePlus also took the opportunity to admit that there seems to be some cheating going on in their #WWYDFT2 contest and once again noted that they will be looking to identify those who are trying to find a loophole in the system and exploit it. In fact, the overriding theme of the blog post seems to suggest that they are looking to reassure valid reservations that such cheating will not be tolerated. Although, in the same sentence they also announced that they will be sending Cooper an invite “for his efforts”. So in spite of the reassurance to those abiding by the system and rules, it does seem if you find a way to bump yourself up the queue unnaturally, it could be worth an invite anyway.
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Unread 2015-08-04, 11:46 AM   #60
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1,827,363
people are on the reservation list
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Unread 2015-08-04, 03:56 PM   #61
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30,000 OnePlus 2 units were sold in 64 seconds in China





The OnePlus 2 recently went on sale in OnePlus’s home turf in China, and those lucky folks were able to snag up 30,000 units without the need to chase down pesky invites. So how well is it doing?
Contrary to what you make think of the phone, it actually did pretty well. OnePlus was able to move 30,000 units within 64 seconds. That’s a far cry from the millions of units other manufacturers long for, but for OnePlus it means their brand name has a bit of staying power and has a strong core that resonates within their community.
What we don’t know is whether those 30,000 units were the only bit of inventory OnePlus had ready to go. OnePlus previously mention they’d increase production 10-fold this go-round, though, so we imagine many more are in the pipeline if they don’t already have another stack of devices to push out of the door.
Of course, they’re going to need to hold back if they want to meet demand in other markets. With over 1 million users pre-registering for an invite it won’t be easy to live up to the lofty expectations they’ve set for themselves.
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Unread 2015-08-05, 11:18 AM   #62
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The world’s first OnePlus 2 invite is going for $1,000 on eBay





OnePlus has started promising up the world’s first batch of OnePlus 2 invites. They’re auctioning them off through eBay! It sounds tacky at first, I know, but all proceeds of the auction are headed for a good cause, namely UNICEF’s Tap Project that helps bring healthy water to underprivileged children in countries where fresh water supply is limited.

The company actually did the same thing last year (albeit a bit after general invites were already issued) so it’s not a new trend for them. Here’s their explanation as to why they’ve decided to hold the auction a bit sooner this time around:
From past experiences, we’ve seen some people selling their OnePlus invites on third-party websites. While this is technically not violating any rules, we don’t think that it is very fair to our fans or in the spirit of what we’re trying to create. If we can’t beat them, we thought, let’s join them. This way, those who are willing to buy invites can bid on one officially from OnePlus instead of someone looking to make a profit, and 100% of the auction proceeds will go towards a great cause.
100 invites are being dished out in all, with the first 50 having gone up for auction today and another 50 going up tomorrow. We were curious to see what the invite stamped “#1″ was going for, and sure enough it’s leading the pack at 57 bids for $1,000 right now. We’re not sure if having the #1 invite means much more than having invite #50, but someone cares enough to make sure they get it.
Other invite auctions vary from as high as $631 to a low of $225.50. OnePlus says all invites will be delivered August 10th following the closure of all the auctions, and that users will have a full week to buy the phone (it’s for the 64GB Sandstone Black model) as opposed to the usual one or two days you’d have for a normal invite.
And that’s that. Nothing special for having these particular invites aside from the good feeling you’ll get when you realize you’re helping a poor soul the world over.
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Unread 2015-08-05, 03:34 PM   #63
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Does the OnePlus 2 Work on Verizon? No.


I know that most of you know/knew the answer to this question, but it’s become obvious to us over the past couple of weeks that not everyone is clear on the situation involving the OnePlus 2 and Verizon. Does it work on Verizon? Will it ever work on Verizon? Why doesn’t it work on Verizon?
The short answer is, no, the OnePlus 2 does not and will not ever work on Verizon. The phone doesn’t support the frequencies or network bands that would allow it to function on Big Red’s network.
Here are the official network bands supported by the OnePlus 2, pulled from their official specs list:
  • GSM: 850, 900, 1800, 1900MHz
  • WCDMA: Bands 1/2/4/5/8
  • FDD-LTE: Bands 1/2/4/5/7/8/12/17
See anything missing? (Feel free to reference our US wireless band cheat sheet.) First of all, there isn’t a mention of CDMA2000, which is the network technology that powers Verizon’s 3G network and is the backbone that allows you to make/receive phone calls. Outside of that missing tech, the phone is also missing Verizon’s LTE band 13. Now, Verizon does use band 4 in markets where they have deployed XLTE, but it is band 13 that has the LTE reach across the nation and that you typically connect to.
The OnePlus 2 is sold as an unlocked phone that is capable of connecting to GSM networks, which are typically thought of as the more “open” type of wireless network. Adding CDMA compatibility probably would have driven the cost of the phone up, as well as the testing time.


So there you have it. The OnePlus 2 does not and will not work on Verizon.
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Unread 2015-08-06, 02:30 PM   #64
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Over 2 Million Registrations For OnePlus 2 Invites

The legend of the OnePlus brand just grows ever more even without any real advertisement – certainly not in traditional media. It was just last week that the startup launched its second generation flagship smartphone, the OnePlus 2, which kept the controversial ‘invite’ system that the company’s first generation flagship smartphone, the OnePlus One, came with initially. What started off ostensibly as a ploy to manage inventories, has turned out to be a marketing masterstroke for the brand, and has become a trademark of OnePlus’ marketing strategy, even though it’s not exactly without its fair share of critics.


Coming to the OnePlus news of the day and the whole point of this article, the long line of reservations is now reportedly two million strong, meaning over two million people are presumably waiting in line just to get their hands on what is turning out to be one of the most elusive and hence, much coveted smartphones of the year. Which is quite a feat, considering that we’re only talking about a seven day period here, since the reservations were opened on July 30th – a couple days after the launch of the device on July 28th. Announcing the news on Twitter, the company’s official account on the microblogging site @oneplus posted, “Over 2 MILLION reservations for the #OnePlus2. Thank you for your overwhelming support!” along with a screenshot of the company’s invite page. The number of people in the waiting line was already nearing a million after just two days of opening up registrations. The lucky few will start receiving the invites for the 4 GB / 64 GB version from the 11th of this month onwards. The 3 GB / 16 GB version will reportedly be made available later for $329.
As for the OnePlus 2, the smartphone features a 5.5-inch Full HD 1080p display, and is powered by a Qualcomm MSM8994 Snapdragon 810 SoC (v2.1), which comes with an embedded 64-bit octa-core CPU clocked at a maximum of 1.8 GHz, and an Adreno 430 GPU. As mentioned already, the device comes with a choice of either 3 GB RAM + 16 GB ROM or 4 GB RAM + 64 GB ROM, and runs Android 5.1 Lollipop out the box, in the form of the company’s proprietary Oxygen OS. The smartphone includes a 13-megapixel primary camera and a 5-megapixel secondary camera. The phone carries a 3,300 mAh Li-Po battery and is one of the first mainstream smartphones to support microUSB 2.0 Type-C connectivity.
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Unread 2015-08-10, 01:51 PM   #65
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OnePlus 2 shipments to the US and Canada to be delayed by two to three weeks



The upcoming OnePlus 2 smartphone won't be coming to US and Canadian buyers as quickly as first announced. OnePlus revealed today that shipments of their latest phone will be pushed back by two to three weeks after shipments are sent out to its European buyers, "due to production schedules".
OnePlus did not go into any specifics on the changes in the production schedules that led to this shipment delay, but it did say that it will not affect its plans to send out the first invites to people who have reserved their purchase of the OnePlus 2 online on Tuesday, August 11. The company added:
We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused. Although some fans may be disappointed to hear this news, we would rather be transparent about the situation. Thank you for your understanding and continued support!"
The company has already received over 2 million reservations to purchase the OnePlus 2.
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Unread 2015-08-11, 09:07 AM   #66
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The OnePlus 2 officially goes on sale today









While the OnePlus 2 saw a big soft launch in China, the device is now officially available in more regions around the world. The regions included in this initial launch include North America, Taiwan, EU, Hong Kong and India.
But as you know, buying one isn’t as easy as clicking this link and being whisked through checkout. You’ll need an invite (sign up for one here), which we don’t imagine have yet been sent to anyone other than those who bought one during the company’s charity-fueled eBay drive for them.
And even if you have an invite, the wait times vary greatly depending on which region you’re in:
  • North America & Taiwan: 10-15 business days
  • EU & Hong Kong: 3-5 business days
  • India: 5-7 business days
OnePlus was quick to note that the original delay they announced for the North America has been factored into that region’s figure, so nothing effectively changes. Those in the EU, Hong Kong and India don’t have it as bad, though, so if you’re in those regions then you’ll just have a mere week to wait.
What are your options to get one without an invite? Well, you could wait… or you could take these guys up on their offer. They’re dishing out OnePlus units in nearly every variation without the need to get an invite. There are just a few gotchas to be had:
  • These handsets are the same SKUs that went on sale in China, and as such their data bands are only fully compatible with that country’s and a sparse few EU countries’ carriers. You can still use it on an HSPA+ carrier if that’s all you care about, but no LTE.
  • These babies are heavily marked up. You’re paying upwards of $150 more than what you’d get it for from OnePlus, though that’s the cost of being able to grab one of these without having a proper spot in line.
Beyond that, all you can do is cross your fingers and hope you’re able to grab a free invite to buy one straight from OnePlus without an issue. The lucky few who already have one can get started right here.
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Unread 2015-08-13, 09:33 AM   #67
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OnePlus 2 carefully dismantled to see just how many flagships it can kill



The OnePlus 2 is the second smartphone to be launched by the Chinese company, billed as the flagship killer for 2016. While the appearance of the successor may not be different from the OnePlus One, iFixit has taken a look at the smartphone to see what's inside and how all the components are packaged together.
Compared against the original OnePlus One, the successor proved to be much easier to repair, should you encounter any issues with specific components. The majority of components are modular and can be replaced independently. While not removable without being disassembled, it's possible to extract the battery without much effort.
The only negative from the report is replacing the LCD and glass. You'll need to utilize heat to remove the combined fixture from the midframe. Be sure to read through the full report over on the iFixit website.
Source: iFixit
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Unread 2015-08-13, 09:42 AM   #68
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First batch of OnePlus 2 invites have supposedly begun rolling out today





After the OnePlus 2 officially became “available” for purchase yesterday, OnePlus announced on their Google+ page that it’s only today the first wave of invites have officially rolled out. Since this is what you’ll need to actually buy the phone, we’re not sure how the phone was available yesterday, but we’re guessing only a select few had early access to invites.
OnePlus continues to push signing up for their pre-invite reservation list. This is where you have the opportunity to wait for your chance at securing an invite. These are given out during special instances and even allow signups to increase their chances of snagging an invite by moving up on the list using referral links. Upon signing up, click the link sent in your confirmation email to see where you rank.
With over 3 million signups already, you could be waiting awhile. We are currently in the 2,937 position and have yet to receive our invite, if that’s any consolation. Link to purgatory the waiting list provided below.
ONEPLUS2




I think everyone should sign up (even if you are not interested) could sell off the invite etc...
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Unread 2015-08-14, 02:45 PM   #69
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Top 10 things to know about the OnePlus 2

We've had the OnePlus 2 for a couple of days now, with retail software onboard and everything. While many of the conclusions drawn about the hardware in our initial hands on remain true, a closer look at this device has revealed some interesting stuff. In some ways our positive opinions of the device were cemented, but there are a few peculiarities that stand out and make you wonder what went wrong when this phone was being created.


Have you reserved your place ? ONEPLUS2



We're not quite ready for a full review yet, but in the mean time we've assembled a list of things about the OnePlus 2 for you to chew on.
Read now: 10 things to know about the OnePlus 2
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Unread 2015-08-14, 02:51 PM   #70
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OnePlus rolls out OxygenOS 1.0.2 update to address 'Stagefright' vulnerability



OxygenOS version 1.0.2 has just been released to the public. OnePlus has provided the means to flash the update, which is set to address the "Stagefright" vulnerability that could lead to your phone becoming compromised.
OnePlus One owners are advised to back up data before flashing, and those already using OxygenOS will not be required to reset their smartphone. It's positive to see more manufacturers working to get said security vulnerability holes plugged.
Rocking OxygenOS? We highly recommend you take the time to update. More details about installation and flashing can be found over on the OnePlus website.
Source: OnePlus
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Unread 2015-08-18, 08:45 AM   #71
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Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njkhYhMRSu8
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Unread 2015-08-18, 08:56 AM   #72
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A more premium feel

OnePlus 2 Hardware

Despite its high end internals, the OnePlus One didn't exactly have a premium feel on the outside. The sandstone coating on the plastic was nice for grip, but it still felt like a flexible, plastic phone. This year OnePlus has switched to aluminum for the outer rim of the phone, and the difference is substantial. It's cool to the touch, feels rigid and durable in the hand, and it looks great. The back plate offers a personalization aspect though additional StyleSwap colors available in different materials, but this review unit sticks with the classic sandstone black, which continues to offer a nice, grippy texture to the back of the phone.
Positioned almost a quarter of the way down the back of the phone is the camera, with a two-stage LED flash above and a laser autofocus below. The placement of the camera is a little lower than most would expect, and it looks a little odd at first. Surrounding the camera and accessories is the same dark aluminum you find around the edges of the phone, raised just slightly from the backplate.


The buttons that live on either side of this phone are made of the same aluminum as the rest of the body. The volume button is well seated and slightly raised off the side of the phone, and the power button that sits beneath it is cut to match. The Alert Slider on the left side of the phone is raised slightly higher, with a textured etching to make sliding the switch into either of its three positions easy. Each position is recognized with a satisfying click into place, followed immediately by a short vibration to confirm the mode you've just set the phone to.
The fingerprint authentication part of this experience works great.
It's odd to be excited by a switch, even though buttons and switches are things so many devices get wrong in misguided attempts to cut corners. That's one thing you absolutely can't accuse OnePlus of here. The casing that surrounds these internals is remarkable, if a little heavy. The OnePlus 2 scores points for avoiding the "our phone is thinnest" contest, but the added heft of this 6.2-ounce phone is undeniable.
Around the edge of the glass on the front of the OnePlus 2 you have a slight lip, which has a similar feel to the indentation where the fingerprint sensor lives at the bottom of the phone. It's a subtle decision that makes a huge difference when running your thumb over the glass to find the sensor without looking at the phone, and keeps the OnePlus 2 from looking like a plain flat slab on your table. This sensor doubles as the home button, and if you've got the fingerprint sensor set as the lock screen security method you'll be able to place your thumb on the sensor when the screen is off and immediately wake and unlock the phone. The fingerprint authentication part of this experience works great, though occasionally it fails to wake the phone the first time you place your thumb down.



OnePlus made a point of highlighting the 600-nit brightness on this new phone to help compensate for the display only being 1080p, but that explanation rings hollow once you take the phone outside. In direct sunlight the OnePlus 2 struggles to show you much of anything, and it's noticeably worse than the Galaxy S6 and even the LG G4 in side-by-side comparisons. Indoors the display is great, and the overall image quality is a big part of that. You'd have a hard time finding someone who could point at this display and say it was demonstrably worse than any other high-end display indoors. The lower resolution isn't noticeable in most situations, which is to OnePlus' credit. Outside, specifically in direct sunlight, you had better get used to squinting.
With a disappointing speaker, you'll want to look to Bluetooth or a wired connection for audio playback.
The bottom of the OnePlus 2 is a nice looking array of holes on either side of a USB-C port. This particular USB-C port is only USB 2.0 in capability, but the future-forward design makes it so you'll be able to use any USB-C cable or accessory with it. Unfortunately, that means you won't be able to use any of your existing microUSB cables without an adapter. As ports go, this one is fairly similar to Apple's Lightning cable in use. You don't have to flip the cable around for a "right" way to put the cable in. Unlike Lightning, the port is deep and wide enough that the cable snaps in securely and doesn't wiggle around. It's a solid connection, and while there will be growing pains while the industry switches to this new standard it looks like we'll all be better off.
The speaker that lives to the right of this nice new USB-C port is decidedly less so. Audio quality is poor for just about everything. It's the sort of speaker you're likely to only use for phone calls, and even then it's not as loud as most new Android phones being released this year. Fortunately the headphone jack at the top of the phone offers a much better way to consume music and movies, because the speaker on this phone is truly not worth using.
With NFC and Quick Charge curiously absent from this phone, the OnePlus 2 lives squarely in the mid-range tier. In any category it's a well-built phone with some clever design decisions and a customization option that will make a lot of people happy, but it's not quite capable of being directly compared to the best being made by HTC, LG, and Samsung.



A Snapdragon 810 by any other name

OnePlus 2 Performance

Many pixels have given their lives in the debate over the performance and capability of the Snapdragon 810 processor and its ability (or lack thereof) to manage heat. It's not all that debatable that Qualcomm's latest processor is an upgrade over the Snapdragon 801 in name only, and heat management has a fair bit to do with that experience, claiming this processor overheats is demonstrably false. That didn't stop OnePlus from jumping on the chance to claim "its" version of the Snapdragon 810 was somehow special when compared to all other instances of the processor, from claiming they had the "cool" version to explaining their processor was seated in a special way on the board — and even claiming their 810 was handling processes as they entered the chip in a special way.
Marketing fluff and misdirection aside, this Snapdragon 810 looks and behaves quite similarly to all of the other 810-based phones we've come across this year that weren't pre-production, with two curious differences.
At no point during this review did the phone ever feel sluggish or stuttery, even under load.
It became clear early on in Snapdragon 810 testing that, due to heat management, there were few situations where all eight cores were actually running at the same time. When an 810-powered phone starts doing something complicated, two of the high-power cores would shut down, and the phone would essentially run like a Snapdragon 808. Instead of picking two cores and making those two cores the default off, OnePlus alternates every few minutes between the four most capable cores in the chip, supposedly to better balance the heat. As a result, there were no situations during our testing where all eight cores were running to complete any task. This included browsing, camera, games and even basic navigation.
Whatever justification OnePlus uses for this behavior, the results are clear. At no point during this review did the phone ever feel sluggish or stuttery, even under load. Like all phones it gets warm under heavy use, but never enough to be uncomfortable to hold. Heat radiates from the top of the phone down, so if you're holding the phone vertically you're unlikely to even notice it get warm. During gameplay, you'll notice your left hand getting warmer faster. Animations are smooth, games loaded quickly, and the browser rendered everything just as fast as you'd expect from this hardware. Like every other Snapdragon 810 phone we've come across, with one early exception, the software shines even though this processor isn't a massive upgrade over its predecessor.

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Unread 2015-08-18, 08:57 AM   #73
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A collection of clever ideas

OnePlus 2 Software

We've known for a while that OnePlus was ditching Cyanogen OS for their internally made OxygenOS, but this is the first phone to actually ship with the OS. OxygenOS is all about being lightweight and as close to Nexus-style Android as possible, and in many ways this OS delivers on that promise. If you're used to what most would call Stock Android you'll feel right at home on OxygenOS. A big part of this is a deliberate effort to make the OxygenOS enhancements look like a part of Google's setup, which helps keep the UI together in ways not many other companies have figured out yet.
For starters, the relationships OnePlus acquired through the release of the OnePlus One are still here in OxygenOS, which means MaxxAudio as a baked-in equalizer and SwiftKey as an included keyboard, but the bloatware stops there. Choosing between SwiftKey and Google Keyboard is part of the initial device setup, so if one's not your thing you never have to worry about it again. MaxxAudio is there in the app drawer, but it can be turned off and disabled if you've got another app you prefer for audio enhancement.



Quick Settings in OxygenOS look almost exactly like Stock, save for a little toggle up in the top right. From here you can change where the icons live in your tray, and place priority on other icons depending on your use. It's the kind of subtle change a lot of users would love, and one of several things many consider flashing third-party ROMS to access.
If you're a fan of making your phone do exactly what you want it to, permissions control is your new best friend. We're still a little ways out before final Android 6.0 Marshmallow builds are in the wild, but that didn't stop OnePlus from implementing its own system under the current permission system. It's a simple thing, for better or worse. You can see the permissions each app asks for, and with a simple toggle flip you can disable whatever you want. This raises the same concerns as a third-party system accomplishing this through root access — the apps don't know you're removing that permission. It's really easy to break apps with this setup, since the apps aren't built to handle failure here, which they will be under Marshmallow. If you know what you're doing, the ability to turn off permissions for certain apps is great. If you wander in there and start unchecking everything because you thought it would fix something, you'll quickly discover just how broken your phone can get without access to those apps.



While OxygenOS lacks a full theme engine like the one seen in Cyanogen OS on the OnePlus One, a Dark Theme with control over accent colors has been made available. This Dark Theme skins the Material elements of Android 5.1.1 in shades of black and grey, but not the apps themselves. It's great is you want a dark app drawer or settings panel, but not nearly as comprehensive as its predecessor. The accent colors are a nice touch, but are only available in the dark theme. In the light theme, you're limited to the standard color scheme.
Unfortunately, the build we're using for this review isn't what most would consider stable. There's some rendering issues with a handful of Material Design apps that clearly point to a build that hasn't passed Google's Compatibility Test Suite. Beyond this, at several points during the review the phone crashed to a reboot after doing simple things like launching the camera. When it works, it works well. When it doesn't, you lose the ability to read text or have to wait for the phone to reboot in order to grab the picture you want. OxygenOS shows a lot of promise, but it couldn't be more clear the OS isn't ready for prime time yet.



The main event

OnePlus 2 Camera

Quality photography is rarely a feature you associate with mid-range Android phones, but 2015 has proven to be a remarkable year for cameras. And a comparably massive new OmniVision sensor (which we learned during an interview with OnePlus' co-founder was exclusive to OnePlus for a while) was used in this phone. A big part of what makes this sensor special is the 1.3-micron pixels used to capture images — noticeably larger than the pixel size found in your average smartphone sensor. Bigger sensors are always a good thing, and in this case it helps set the OnePlus 2 right up there with the Galaxy S6 and LG G4 in image quality.
The OnePlus camera app is fairly generic. Because the sensor is 4:3 and not 16:9, there's a lot of black space where the shutter and settings live on the UI. You can crop the image to 16:9 and fix this, but lose some of your picture size in the process due to the crop. The app includes simple flash, HDR, and Clear Image toggles as well as a Beauty toggle for facial smoothing. Clear Image mode increases sharpening, while HDR and flash are fairly self explanatory.
Taking photos in full auto is fantastic. The camera quickly focuses on a target and stays focused even if you shift the phone slightly. You can tap to focus if you feel the need, and doing so brings up a brightness wheel right where you tapped. You can quickly adjust as needed, which is a nice way of offering those controls. The brightness wheel only works in full auto, even though it shows up and animates if you tap to focus in any of the other modes. It just doesn't do anything if you move the little sun around on its wheel in the other modes, which is kind of irritating.


Shooting in Clear Image mode is only useful if you're taking a photo of a large scene with lots of activity in the distance. The sharpening doesn't offer much up close, so while it's a nice option to have it's unlikely be used particularly often. HDR mode gets the job done if you're dealing with too much light, but it's not quite as capable as it could be. It does a great job avoiding those aggressive light bands you frequently see with smartphone HDR, but colors in the foreground have a tendency to appear slightly washed out. You'll also notice a significant delay in shooting either HDR or Clear Image modes, ranging from a half-second to a painful three seconds depending on the image, during which the camera offers little more than an animation with the word processing above.
On the left-hand side of the UI you can swipe in to access video, panorama, slow-motion, and timelapse. Video offers a similarly bland UI with resolution toggles up to 4K, with a warning as you start recording to let you know you can only record 10 minutes of 4K at a time. Unlike the normal camera mode, shooting in 4K presented a series of focusing issues unless you tapped in a specific area. The camera clearly struggled to focus on something in motion, and trying to correctly focus when this happens takes the camera far too long. Fortunately, this issue didn't present itself when recording below 4K.
Getting a great photo in daylight isn't ever a problem, but when the sun sets or you're in a dark room things get a little more complicated.
Panorama mode puts the phone in portrait, and offers a simple set of guiding dots to follow during capture. These dots move quickly if you aren't following to help guide you back tot he path, and the simple stop button on the screen lets you choose when the panorama has finished. The stitching in this mode is quite good, both with objects up close and at a distance. The only time the panorama mode seemed to struggle was with obvious things, like heavy motion from the subject you capturing.
Slow Motion and Timelapse both prefer landscape, with a gentle animation directing you to the right way to hold the phone. There are no settings for Slow Motion, and Timelapse only offers 720p, 1080p, and 4K options for capture. Both interfaces are simple one button affairs, with the results appearing in the gallery when you're finished. It's a simple setup, but gets the job done and looks nice in the process.
There's clearly a lot to like about this camera, but it's not without flaws. Getting a great photo in daylight isn't ever a problem, but when the sun sets or you're in a dark room things get a little more complicated. OIS seems almost disabled in the dark, judging from the results of the photos taken over the last week. That's not to say you can't get a decent photo in low light, it just usually requires a steady hand. Focusing in low light works surprisingly well still, almost no need for tap to focus, but once you see that processing animation there's a good chance your photo isn't quite what you had hoped it was going to be.
Currently this camera is missing a Manual mode for smartphone photographers who want more control, but OnePlus claims an update will be coming soon to add the feature. With OnePlus continuing to focus on camera quality after launch, it's not hard to see this phone offering even more competition to the other smartphone cameras out there.



Just shy of great

OnePlus Battery

Knowing that we're using unfinished software on a version of the phone lacking some of the bands needed for full use here in the U.S., we're not going to say a whole lot about the battery just yet. During the week we've had the phone, connected to a Moto 360 90 percent of the time, we were able to get through a 15-hour day with 25 percent of the battery remaining. This was an average of 3.5 hours of screen-on time with at least half an hour of gameplay at some point in the day and Adaptive Display on the whole time. While that's not the best battery life out there, it's a full day by most folks standards.
It's also a 3300 mAh battery with results similar to the Verizon Wireless LG G4, which only has a 3000 mAh battery and is connected to all the right bands. From what we can see here, again pointing out the unfinished nature of the software and the wrong hardware for the region, the OnePlus 2 isn't quite as good at conserving battery as it probably should be.



Not quite polished

OnePlus 2: The Bottom Line

OnePlus has put this phone in an awkward position. If you set aside all of the hype, doublespeak, and over-promising done by OnePlus over the last couple of months, you walk away with a $400 smartphone that could offer a great overall experience to everyone. It's a capable phone with a lot of great ideas waiting to be pulled together into a complete thought. The fingerprint sensor is well-done, and implementing it without including a physical home button is great. The Alert Slider is a fantastic idea that works well. The camera alone makes this phone something worth checking out.
Software is an important part of the experience, and OxygenOS on the OnePlus 2 just isn't ready yet. On their own, most of the software issues we found wouldn't be considered a particularly big deal. Together, you get a piece of hardware that borders on high end with a truly exceptional camera that stumbles at the finish line. It's certainly possible for OnePlus to fix these issues, and if that happens this phone will be a lot easier to recommend.
Should you buy the OnePlus 2? Not Yet

As a general rule, phones that crash to a reboot aren't ready to have money spent on them. Perhaps more important than the software is the position the OnePlus 2 currently sits when compared to other Android phones on the market today. Shelling out $400 for a OnePlus 2 — which you can only spend once you've made your way through the OnePlus Invite System — is a big ask when surrounded by hardware that is less expensive, more capable ... and immediately available. If you're looking at the OnePlus 2 as a great phone for the price, you'd probably find the 2015 Moto G to be an incredible bargain at $220. If raw power is your goal, the LG G4 is available unlocked right now for an additional $80 and includes NFC, Quick Charge, and Wireless Charging with an added case.
If you're looking for reasons to buy a OnePlus 2, chances are you're going to find something else available today that better suits your needs. If you're a fan of OnePlus, you like what you see, and you're a fan of OxygenOS, you will thoroughly enjoy this phone
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Unread 2015-08-18, 08:45 PM   #74
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Featured Review: OnePlus 2 – The 2016 Flagship Killer?






OnePlus is well known for their controversial marketing, and their flagship phones are at the center of it all. Last year the OnePlus One changed paradigms with its #NeverSettle campaign where they packed high-end specs into a phone that’s half the price of the big names out there, and that device was arguably one of the finest of year year despite some significant problems early on in its production cycle. This year OnePlus has upped the ante with its marketing, so unlike last year where OnePlus was satisfied with saying that its 2014 phone would be the 2014 flagship killer, this year they’re going full force stating that the OnePlus 2 is the 2016 flagship killer. Mighty big words for a sophomore device, but do they hold up in practice? Let’s take a look!
Specs


This year the OnePlus 2 is a little more expensive than last year’s OnePlus One when it debuted, dropping at $389 for 64GB of internal storage and 4GB of RAM. In a few weeks or months a second less expensive version of the phone is slated to launch for $329, coming packed with 16GB of internal storage and 3GB of RAM. Having two different models isn’t anything different for OnePlus, who debuted a Chinese and an International version with the One, but the 2 only differs in the amount of internal storage and RAM. Let’s take a look at what’s inside the devices:
  • 5.5-inch 1080p JDI IPS Display
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 810, 1.6GHz Octa-core CPU MSM8994 (listed as 1.8GHz)
  • Adreno 430, 630MHz GPU
  • Choice of one of the following:
    • 4GB of RAM, 64GB internal storage, no microSD card support
    • 3GB of RAM, 16GB internal storage, no microSD card support
  • 3,300mAh Li-Po battery
  • Android 5.1 OxygenOS 2.0
  • 13MP rear-facing camera, LED flash
    • Omnivision OV13860, 1.3-micron size pixels, 1/2.6″
  • 5MP front-facing camera
  • 151.8mm tall x 74.9mm wide x 9.9mm thick
  • 175g
  • Dual-SIM card support (nano SIM)
  • TouchID Fingerprint Scanner
  • USB Type-C Port
In the Box


Unlike last year’s OnePlus One this isn’t a fancy box, rather the OnePlus 2 comes in a bright red box of similar size and shape to most phone boxes on the market. Inside you’ll find the phone, a pack of manuals, a wall charger and a brand new USB Type-C cable. Owners of the OnePlus 2 will need to remember to either carry this cable around with them or purchase additional USB Type-C chargers, as a microUSB cable will not work with this phone. In addition to having the new USB Type-C port on one end, the other regular-sized USB end of the cable also features a reversible design; a moment of sheer brilliance from a team that’s been pretty consistent about great design. Also worth noting is that a screen protector is included and already adhered to the screen of the phone, adding in a layer of extra protection without having to do anything or adversely affecting the feeling of the screen.
Display


OnePlus swore by JDI’s IPS LCD displays last year, and this year they haven’t changed their tune at all. JDI’s IPS displays are known for their color accuracy and overall quality image, although being an LCD inherently means that black levels aren’t the best when compared to something like an AMOLED display. That being said black levels were actually pretty incredible for any sort of LCD, providing nice deep blacks and great contrast with lighter areas. Viewing angles destroy the black levels without a doubt but only from certain angles, and at the it’s not enough to ruin the image quality when showing someone a YouTube clip or something like that. Predictably the colors are fantastic and refresh rate is about as good as it gets.
This 1080p panel is lower resolution than some other flagships with 5.5-inch displays, and because of that there will likely be some turned off by the prospect of buying a flagship phone in 2015 without a Quad-HD resolution screen. In all honesty though I have to agree with the many QHD naysayers out there that say the resolution is simply too taxing without any good payoff, as this panel looks phenomenal and I never once felt myself wanting more. Those wishing this could be a mobile VR machine might think otherwise though, as the difference between 1080p and QHD is pretty substantial when looking at pixel structure up close.
Last year OnePlus had some substantial problems with the digitizer used in the OnePlus One, a problem they weren’t likely to reproduce in this year’s device. That is indeed the case here and this is just as good as any other top-notch digitizer I can think of, registering up to 8 touch points without spazzing out like last year’s device did. Because of the significant issues seen in last year’s device before the fix we always test the digitizer of each phone we review and note when digitizers aren’t exactly up to snuff, as this causes many problems when typing fast and using multi-touch apps.
Hardware and Build


The $40 price difference at launch between the OnePlus One and OnePlus 2 is mainly being cited due to the increased build quality of OnePlus’ sophomore phone. In that regard it’s certainly possible that the build quality and design of the device is easily the best part of the upgrade from the One to the 2. Unlike the One the OnePlus 2 features a fully metal build that’s likely to please even the harshest of critics. The device feels solid in the hand, has a very nice weight to it, and feels incredibly sturdy in general. Even sitting in my pocket I could notice the difference between the two devices without even trying, this is one seriously well-built phone. It’s funny to think but even something as miniscule as the vibration motors feel higher quality and have a distinct solid feel to them, giving off a more subtle yet crisp feedback through the metal frame.

The metal frame extends to the trim that wraps around all edges of the phone, as well as the strip found on the back of the device. It’s this metal trim that seems to be the secret in dissipating the heat caused by the Snapdragon 810 processor, a move that feels nothing short of brilliant when considering the ramifications the 810 has had throughout the industry. Around the edges you’ll find the volume rocker and power button on the right side, followed by a unique priority mode slider on the left side. We’ll cover this slider in more detail in the software section. Up top is a 3.5mm headset jack and a noise-cancelling microphone, while the bottom houses the new USB Type-C port flanked by stereo speakers drilled into the frame via some very familiar looking holes.
Unlike the One, the OnePlus 2 features a fully removable back which comes off easily via a set of clips situated around the edge of the plate. Pulling off the plate takes only a little bit of effort, giving the feeling that this won’t be coming off accidentally but isn’t anywhere as near as difficult to remove as the OnePlus One’s back. OnePlus ships with the Sandstone Black back but 4 additional backs can be purchased: Kevlar, Black Apricot, Bamboo and Rosewood. These are all real materials rather than just painted plastic, so they should be built to last. We’ll have to see if the Sandstone back stands up to the test of time though, as the original One’s back rubbed off after a few months’ usage.

The back of the phone has a pretty unique looking placement for the camera lens, one that initially doesn’t look all that great. As soon as I started to use the device, however, I quickly realized the reason for this placement. When holding the device and taking pictures typically your fingers will rest on the corners of the back of the device, and if the camera placement is right up to the edge the lens will be covered by fingers. Dropping the placement down about an inch as it is clears this area for your hands, and the advantage logically follows. Above the lens is a dual-LED flash, while below it sits the laser auto focus unit for the camera.
On the front of the device sits the 5.5-inch screen surrounded by smaller bezels than its predecessor. Capacitive keys are still here from the original phone but the home button has been enlarged and now has a rounded-square raised edge around it, resembling a physical button that clicks but rather is a capacitive home button that houses the new fingerprint scanner. On either side of this home button sit two anonymous buttons that can represent practically anything, as they can be changed easily in the software.
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Unread 2015-08-18, 08:46 PM   #75
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Performance and Memory


Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 810 was the company’s first big 64-bit octa-core chipset when it debuted in Spring 2015, and a lot of hopes were riding on its performance in the market. Once the bad news about the heat problems with the processor came in people started to worry though, and some phones that pack the processor have significant performance and overheating issues after prolonged usage. We’ve chronicled the problems with the processor for months now so it is likely not a surprise to hear about these issues, but it was a surprise to hear that OnePlus was using it in their first 2015 flagship device. Thankfully OnePlus seems to have been able to successfully engineer a solution to these issues, and through a series of grueling tests we were able to confirm that the OnePlus 2 not only doesn’t get any hotter than any other phone on the market after prolonged use, but also that the performance of the device doesn’t falter like other Snapdragon 810-powered phones have been.
GFXBench 3.1 GFXBench 3.1 GFXBench 3.1 Geekbench 3 3DMark Slingshot 3DMark Slingshot 3DMark Slingshot AnTuTu AnTuTu PCMark PCMark Internal Memory speed 3DMark Ice Storm Unlimited 3DMark Ice Storm Unlimited GPUBench
Running through our usual suite of benchmarks shows just how powerful this phone is, pulling 60k in AnTuTu and the best scores among any mobile device out there for every benchmark that was run. For reference these scores were on average nearly double what the OnePlus One achieves. The GPU/OS combination here even supports the latest in mobile graphical standards, OpenGL ES 3.1, ensuring games that support it will look and maybe even run better than their 3.0 counterparts. Internal storage speeds were excellent and shouldn’t cause any obvious bottleneck, and the 4GB of RAM found on our review device proved plenty no matter what was being done on the phone. Multi-tasking is a joy both thanks to the dedicated Overview button as well as plenty of RAM, and I never once saw even the most demanding of applications have to reload when switching back and forth between tasks. Overall the phone absolutely flies through everything, with no noticeable stutters anywhere, no slowdown of any kind, and no sign of any sort of thermal throttling. This is easily one of the fastest and most fluid phones I’ve ever used on any operating system or platform.
Battery Life


Using a newer processor, the same resolution screen and a 300mAh larger battery than the OnePlus One might make you think you’ll easily get better battery life from this phone than many on the market. Unfortunately that was not the case in my time with the phone, and no matter how easy I went on it I couldn’t achieve the same results as I can with the OnePlus One. Often times I found myself having to recharge the phone after a normal work day, with maybe 25% of the battery left by mid-afternoon on most days.

This was an incredible disappointment given the previous phone’s longevity, and possibly even more problematic since the battery isn’t removable. Heavy users will definitely want to carry around one of those handy external batteries that charge the phone if they’re planning to make it til the absolute end of the day. This is something that can be fixed with software, and hopefully will as OxygenOS matures. In my time of using it the phone took about 2 hours to charge fully from completely dead to 100% battery, a time period that’s not super fast but isn’t exactly a long time either.
Phone Calls and Network


Just as the OnePlus One supported almost every international band you can think of, so does the OnePlus 2. I had no problem pulling great LTE connections on T-Mobile and AT&T, with fantastic reception no matter where I went. Call quality was fantastic and clear, with a loud earpiece speaker that supports HD Voice through Hangouts calls and possibly your carrier of choice. The speakerphone was nice and loud as well, easily audible in the car on the highway and both parties could easily hear eachother with no problems. With the number of bands supported it feels almost impossible not to have coverage no matter where you live in the world, in fact the list of bands not supported is likely a shorter list than what you’ll find below.
2G: 850/900/1800/1900MHz
3G HSPA: 850/900/1700/1900/2100MHz
4G LTE: Bands 1 (2100MHz), 2 (1900MHz), 3 (18000MHz), 4 (1700/2100MHz), 5 (850MHz), 7 (2600MHz), 8 (900MHz), 12 (700MHz), 17 (700MHz), 20 (800MHz), 38 (2600MHz), 40 (2300MHz), 41 (2500MHz)
Software


It was only a handful of months ago that OnePlus released their very first original build of Android called OxygenOS. Much like CyanogenOS that powered the OnePlus One, OxygenOS is a non-skinned version of Android that carries loads of features with it. It’s likely that the increase in price for the OnePlus 2 over the original phone’s pricing is also due to OnePlus now having to pay a team of software developers too, unlike last year where Cyanogen developed for them. It’s this team of talented developers made up from the Android development community, famous for popular Android ROMs like Paranoid Android for instance, that give OnePlus a new level of flexibility and control over unique features for their phones. OxygenOS 2.0 powers the OnePlus 2, a release that’s likely to come for the OnePlus One shortly, and has feature parity with much of the CyanogenOS that currently powers the One. It’s especially important for OnePlus to carry these features over for power users and it’s pretty obvious that OnePlus is intending to continue to add features to its homebrew OS if the massive leap from OxygenOS 1.0 to 2.0 is anything to go by. Check out of full software overview below to see what it’s all about.
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