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Unread 2014-04-03, 02:35 PM   #26
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Report: Google Wants to Become a Wireless Carrier



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Google bosses are dreaming about adding wireless service to the search giant's menu of offerings. A couple of unnamed sources "who have discussed the matter with Google" told Amir Efrati at The Information that it would roll out the service in the same areas where Google Fiber is offered. In other words, Google wants it all.
Think about it. Google already owns the fiber underground, not to mention the most popular browser. They help make the smartphone hardware and rule the smartphone software market with Android. And now they want to own the airwaves, too. If the search giant follows through on this wireless carrier plan, you could one day do all of your downloading, internet browsing, emailing, calling, texting—pretty much any and all forms of communication—without leaving the Google ecosystem.
Google as your one-stop wireless shop isn't necessarily a bad thing, though, especially given how broken our wireless system is right. Or at least, the idea of Google disrupting the wireless industry isn't. Everybody hates their wireless carrier. Customer service is awful across the board, and we're getting eclipsed in speed by the rest of the world. With AT&T and Verizon scooping up every small wireless carrier they can, we'll likely have even fewer bad choices in the future. So if what Google plans to do with wireless is anything like what it's done with Fiber, the move to become a carrier could be very good for consumers.
For now, it seems a little bit like a pipe dream, though. Google executives hope a lot of things. The average American, however, really should hope that some savior swoops in to clean up the mess that is the wireless industry.
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Unread 2015-01-21, 06:50 PM   #27
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The Information: Google Set to Launch their Own Wireless Network on T-Mobile and Sprint Networks





Here’s a pretty interesting piece of news on a Wednesday. According to a report from The Information, Google is looking to launch their own wireless network. It’s codenamed as “Nova”. And would run on both T-Mobile and Sprint’s networks. The network is aimed at lowering prices and improving user experience with mobile carriers. This same report is also stating that Google is working on new communication apps to go along with this service. This would mean that Google controls their users entire experience with their smartphone and tablet. From hardware, to software even to the network.
Google having it’s own wireless network. This is something we’ve wanted for a few years now. In fact, we even thought that they might buy T-Mobile to accomplish this since they are best friends with the magenta carrier (T-Mobile launched the very first Android smartphone as an exclusive, the T-Mobile G1. Or the HTC Dream outside of the US). Pair this with Google Fiber, and Google controls just about everything. It’s going to be interesting to see what the FCC does or has to say here. We’ll have to keep an eye out for that. But it sounds like Google will basically be an MVNO on T-Mobile and Sprint’s network. It’d be better if they were working with all four carriers though.
The report from The Information also states that the company has been working on this since last year. And it could launch as soon as this year. You can read the full report over on The Information’s website. However, it is behind a paywall, unfortunately. So if you aren’t already a subscriber, you’ll have to sign up to read it all. So what is everyone’s thoughts on this? Are you excited? Are you scared? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.
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Unread 2015-01-27, 11:30 PM   #28
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Google’s Nova MVNO will automatically switch between best available networks







It was only last week we caught wind of Google’s plans to become an MVNO to provide affordable wireless service and we’ve already gotten some early details. According to a report by the Wall Street Journal, Google’s use of both T-Mobile and Sprint’ s towers won’t make for awkward hand-offs or the need to buy phones specific to your market.
That is thanks to new cellular technology Google will utilize that can measure the quality of networks in your area — including any available WiFi hotspots — and hop onto the best one. T-Mobile and Sprint’s networks aren’t superstars alone, but combining the two with technology like this should squelch the fears of anyone who hopes to sign up for the service once it’s made available.
That’s as much as we know by now. It’s coming, it’s coming soon, and we hope it’ll be every bit as good as we’ve imagined a Google-made wireless carrier could be.
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Unread 2015-01-28, 08:11 AM   #29
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From reading through those recent articles, it would appear that Google can do no wrong. Hailed as the worlds wireless savior of sorts. I say pfft! I work directly with all the guys making AT&T, Google, etc, networks happen. This isn't cellular related but....all that drilling in the ground and installing the cable necessary for the networks is ending up in the hands of the cheapest bidder on Googles end. Google is becoming like Walmart in this perspective. The crews that spend money on their equipment and employees to get the job done correctly, have been migrating to AT&T because of Googles "slash all costs" approach in setting up their Fiber network. This may or may not be relevant or a concern to most of you since you would literally have no clue about how the network is getting installed. But when the bottom feeders start being the only ones doing the work, what happens to quality? Should be sort of a no-brainer conclusion. Since KC is Googles first fiber network, it would seem to be logical to ensure its success.
I would be interested in hearing if anybody else has noticed the same thing.
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Unread 2015-03-02, 11:29 AM   #30
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Google has confirmed its own MVNO, Android Pay and more


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In an event at Mobile World Congress this morning, Google confirmed a whole host of different rumors about the company. The first announcement from the press conference was about a third way that Google will work to improve global connectivity. Google has used Google Fiber in cities to improve Internet speeds, and has used Project Loon, balloons that function as portable cell towers, to expand coverage in rural areas. The third phase of its plan is Project Titan.
Project Titan comes after Google purchased drone manufacturer, Titan, in 2014. Project Titan uses a lightweight, solar-powered drone to hover in the stratosphere and beaming internet down in the same way as Project Loon. Unlike balloons, however, Google’s drones can be controlled to move to different areas depending on circumstances. For example, if the service goes down in an area due to a natural disaster, Google can send Project Titan drones to provide Internet service in the aftermath, creating a tool that could prove to be invaluable.
Sundar Pichai, who was leading the event, also confirmed that a Google MVNO is coming. Details were light, but Pichai says that the project will be on the scale of the Nexus project. It even seems as though the project will be optimal for Nexus users, as Google will then control the hardware, software and connectivity in order to provide the peak experience. While information about lower prices weren’t confirmed, Pichai said that the MVNO will feature new innovations, such as calls automatically reconnecting after they drop.
Pichai confirmed that Google is working and partnering with other carriers for the project.
Android Pay was also brought up and Pichai confirmed that it does exist and is an API layer that will be coming to Android later this year. The API allows any service to plug in, such as Google Wallet and other mobile payment systems. The only other confirmed fact about Android Pay is that it will feature NFC components for tap and pay.
As it looks, Google has some big plans in store for the next year. Now that it’s been confirmed, it’ll be interesting to see the way that Google tackles the project of becoming an MVNO. Android Pay is also bound to be an exciting addition to the platform. We’re sure to hear more in rumors and Google will likely provide an update on these projects at Google I/O in May.
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Unread 2015-03-02, 08:24 PM   #31
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How will this work constantly switching between Sprint and T Mobile's network? Also could they pick a shittier cell network to use?
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Unread 2015-03-02, 08:27 PM   #32
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Google Titan sounds insane.
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Unread 2015-04-06, 04:19 PM   #33
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Google's Wireless Phone Service To Boast Global 'No-Fee' Roaming

At the Mobile World Congress in early March, Google made its intention of tip-toeing into the mobile carrier market known. For many, the mere prospect is exciting - after all, we see what Google has done for home Internet, with Google Fiber. By entering this market carefully, Google is merely testing the waters, but that doesn't mean that its impact can't be profound.
Here's a good example of what I mean: the company will be trying to make roaming charges a thing of the past. Anyone who travels outside of their home country should realize how huge that is. I learned the hard way many years ago about just how painful roaming charges are when crossing the border; I came home with a $400 phone bill. Now, when I travel to the U.S. (from Canada), I get a roaming card that costs me $4-per-day. But what about other countries? EU countries? Asia?

Flickr: Robert Scoble
In time, those could be covered for cheap or no costs as well. According to The Telegraph, Google is in talks with Hong Kong's Hutchison Whampoa, owner of the mobile operator Three. Ultimately, Google would like to create a network where its customers wouldn't have to even think of roaming. It'd become a matter of Google and its partners scratching each other's backs.
This all sounds good, but the unfortunate thing is that Google is being really modest about its ambitions here. It's as if it doesn't want to put too much emphasis on things just in case it decides to pull out and decide against being its own carrier. Given what Google's capable of, though, I hope that this begins out small but turns into something massive.
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Unread 2015-04-14, 04:43 PM   #34
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Google’s wireless service could charge you for only the exact amount of data you use





While it’s been confirmed that Google is looking into offering wireless service through some new network aggregation technologies in conjunction with Sprint and T-Mobile, we haven’t gotten many details on what, exactly, they were looking to do differently. A new leak may have shone a whole beacon of light on some of the details, though.
According to details uncovered by Android Police thanks to a leaked app that will be used to support the service, Google’s wireless network — referred to as Nova in many previous rumors, but also now known as Project Fi — could charge you only for the exact amount of data you use. That is to say, there won’t be any unlimited data (as much as we would all hope from an internet-strong company like Google), but instead a “pay-as-you-go” approach.
The thinking is that there will be a set per-gigabyte price and you buy however much you need by the gigabyte, but if you don’t use up your full gigabyte Google will credit you for the remainder. We’d hope such a plan would come with some very low rates instead of the outrageous per-gigabyte prices set forth by the country’s four major carriers. As for talk and text, you’ll have a flat rate and allowance for those much like any carrier offers these days.
Other interesting aspects of the service include a way to seamlessly switch your service to a different phone using an app, the ability to share buckets of data across however many lines you want, data-only plans for tablets, and even a way to opt out of sharing your cellular usage data with Google (yes, folks, your current carrier keeps an alarming amount of information about the calls you make).
Google would be a very new player in this arena, though if their approach to entering the broadband internet game is anything to judge by they could help shake up the wireless industry in a big way.
Take Google Fiber, for instance — it might not be as widespread as we would like just yet, but Google’s ability to offer gigabit speeds for the cost of typical internet service in the United States has already sparked major competition. Cable companies left and right rush to upgrade speeds and lower prices whenever Google’s pipes roll into town, and it helps bring a breath of fresh air into the industry that only genuine competition is able to provide.
We all know the wireless industry desperately needs much of the same (kudos to T-Mobile for getting the ball rolling) and Google’s arrival could be the turning point we’ve all been waiting for.
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Unread 2015-04-22, 04:44 PM   #35
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Google officially unveils Project Fi, a refreshing new wireless service [VIDEO]





Looks like the rumors were true, folks — this is Project Fi, Google’s wireless carrier. The Mountain View company laid all the details out on a brand new landing page today.
A lot of the details brought to surface by recent leaks seem to have been spot on. Here’s what to expect from each facet of Google’s new wireless service:






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Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faacIELjUeI
The Network

  • Automatically identify and connect to the fastest and most reliable network, whether that’s a public or private WiFi hotspot, or a network of a carrier partner (Sprint or T-Mobile)
  • All transmissions over WiFi networks are automatically and fully encrypted
The Plan

  • Start with a basic plan of $20 per month that includes unlimited domestic talk and text, unlimited international texts, low-cost international calls and WiFi tethering.
  • Add data by the gigabyte at a rate of $10 per 1GB.
  • Don’t use all the data you added in a billing period? $1 per 100 unused megabytes is refunded to you.
  • International data costs the same at home as it does in 120 other international destinations (though you may be limited to 2G and 3G when abroad).
The Experience

  • Calls and texts can be made over WiFi in case you don’t have cellular coverage.
  • Calls can be routed from WiFi to cellular networks and vice versa without interruption if you happen to drift away from a signal
  • You can also make calls and send texts using your phone number with any device that has Hangouts, including your tablet, a different phone or your computer.
Sound like something you want to be part of? You can head right here to request an invite to check it out ahead of its full launch.
There are a couple of caveats to note before you jump in head first. The first is that you’ll need to buy a Nexus 6 as it’s the only smartphone that supports the new technology Google is using to make this possible. The Nexus 6 you may already own from Motorola, Google Play or your carrier counts, or you can buy one when signing up for Fi service (Google will have an installment plan available if you can’t chalk up the full retail price at once).
You’ll also need to make sure Google’s carriers partners have sufficient service in your area, though this is no tall order as they’ll ask for your zip code before whisking you through the setup process. Google says you’ll hear from them within 30 days and that invites will be sent out in waves every week, so if you want in on Project Fi then that shouldn’t be an issue.
Those who ultimately decide to take the plunge will be able to port their existing phone number over if they so choose, though do note that this may come with a hefty early termination fee that Google is unsurprisingly unwilling to help you pay for.
So there’s only one question remaining — are you in? It all sounds very interesting, and if done right this move by Google could do a while lot to change the wireless industry as we know it. Let us know how you feel about Project Fi and whether you plan to give it a go by dropping a comment below!
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Unread 2015-04-23, 03:40 PM   #36
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Strongly considering switching to this..
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Unread 2015-04-27, 09:33 AM   #37
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Sounds intriguing to me. I have a year left on my plan and don't see myself paying the cancellation fees to switch.
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Unread 2015-04-27, 09:38 AM   #38
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After watching Nexus 6 vs Moto X videos I think I'd miss my X too much. It's the little things that I got used to on this phone that I don't think I can give up.
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Unread 2015-04-27, 10:35 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Karlen View Post
Strongly considering switching to this..
I looked at it, it does have some appeal. Would have more if they had AT&T up in there too for rural coverage.

Killer is the data tiers though. Right now, if I do the math, Im still better off with Straight Talk or Cricket.
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Unread 2015-04-30, 02:28 PM   #40
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Google’s Project Fi companion app hits Google Play





Project Fi, Google’s carrier effort in conjunction with Sprint and T-Mobile, has only been official for about a week, but Google is already preparing to let the flood gates open for anyone who requested an invite. The company has released an official companion app in Google Play for the service. It allows you to do a number of things:
  • Activate your Project Fi service
  • Manage your account and settings
  • Check your data usage
  • See your monthly statements
  • Get in touch with support 24/7
But, of course, you’ll need a Nexus 6 to even download it, and you’ll need Project Fi for it to be remotely useful. As such it’s little more than a dormant app right now, but you’ll want to bookmark the link if you’re anticipating being a Project Fi customer in the near future.
Project Fi app on Google Play
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Unread 2015-05-06, 10:18 AM   #41
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Check your inboxes: Project Fi invites are starting to roll out





If you signed up to be notified about Project Fi’s availability and wanted to sign up as soon as the service was ready, you’ll want to check your inbox — Google is starting to send out the first batch of invites.
If you aren’t aware, Project Fi is the company’s new wireless service built on the backs of Sprint and T-Mobile’s networks. It features a simplified and sensible data plan, a flat rate for talk and text, and cellular technology that’ll automatically and seamlessly make sure you’re on the best available network. You can find out more in our original post about the official launch right here.

So what’s it like to be whisked into this new program? Things are as Google announced for the most part — they ask you how much data you want (after reminding you that any unused data will be refunded to you) and ask you if you want to buy a Nexus 6 or use an existing one. You sign up with all your relevant details and once you receive your phone and / or SIM card you’ll be good to go.
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Unread 2015-06-24, 11:22 AM   #42
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Check your status: Google Project Fi invites continue rolling out




If you were one of the many techies eager to try out Project Fi and jumped at the opportunity to sign up for an early invite, you’ll probably want to check your status. The sign up page is now showing an updated time frame for many Phandroid readers including myself- it appears my invite should arrive in 3 to 4 weeks.


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Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faacIELjUeI


An even luckier lot of lads received their invites last week, including our own Chris Chavez, who was happy to see an invite land in his inbox outlining the Project Fi details.
You’re invited to join Project Fi
We’re excited to invite you to Project Fi. Earlier on, you requested an invite, and now we’re ready to bring you onboard. Just click the button below to sign up or head to fi.google.com/signup. If you have questions along the way, give us a call at 1-844-TALK-2-FI to get help from a Fi Expert.
5 things to know about Project Fi
Say hello to fast speeds, easy communication and simple pricing.
  1. Tap into a network of networks
    Project Fi uses new technology to give you better coverage by intelligently connecting you to the fastest network at your location whether it’s Wi-Fi or our two LTE network partners.
  2. Secure connections to fast, reliable Wi-Fi networks
    We automatically connect you to over a million Wi-Fi networks we’ve verified as fast and reliable. When we connect you to an open network, we secure your data through encryption.
  3. Wi-Fi enabled calls provide even more coverage
    When you’re on the move, calls seamlessly transition between Wi-Fi and cellular, so you can keep your conversation going.
  4. One simple plan
    Our plan starts with the Fi Basics for $20 per month, which includes: unlimited domestic talk and text, unlimited international texts, Wi-Fi tethering, and access to coverage in 120+ countries. Then it’s $10 per GB for data. $10 for 1GB, $20 for 2GB $30 for 3GB, and so on. That’s it. With no annual contract required.
  5. Never pay for unused data
    Our plan is designed to save you money. Let’s say you go with 3 GB for $30 and only use 1.4 GB one month. You’ll get $16 back — you only pay for what you use.
If you’re eager for the opportunity but haven’t yet received an update, don’t worry- Google has already stated that all Project Fi requests should be fulfilled by mid summer.
This concludes your friendly PSA from Phandroid… now go check your Project Fi status, let us know when your invite will arrive in the comments, and then head over to the Project Fi Forums for even more!
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Unread 2015-06-29, 09:28 AM   #43
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You might be able to use Project Fi on a Nexus 5 (and other devices) with one simple trick









Want to try Project Fi (more invites are rolling out!) but don’t want to shell out for the Nexus 6 required to use it? One user on XDA reportedly found a way to get Project Fi activated for use on their Nexus 5.
The skinny of the story is that they simply used a Nexus 6 to activate Project Fi service, and made use of a nanosim-to-microsim adapter to use the SIM card inside of a Nexus 5. Service was said to be perfectly functional for incoming and outgoing calls, as well as full LTE data, but the user was unable to verify whether Google’s hand-off technology (to automatically switch between Sprint, T-Mobile and WiFi) was working.
There’s also the issue that there haven’t been many other reports of success. Most people who have tried (and failed) to activate Fi for use on a Nexus 5 tried to activate service on the Nexus 5 itself, but to our knowledge this is the first and only report of someone using a Nexus 6 to give the initial activation a go.
There are a couple of issues to note for anyone whose ears suddenly perked up at the thought of not having to own a Nexus 6 to use Project Fi:
  • It’s unlikely Google’s network hand-off technology will be supported, as Google originally confirmed there’s a mixture of software and hardware components needed to facilitate it.
  • Your device could be limited to use on T-Mobile’s network only as Sprint’s network requires an MEID number that’s been approved for service.
So, all of that is to say that using Project Fi on anything other than a Nexus 6 would be akin to using a smartphone on any standard MVNO carrier. Unless you’re a huge fan of how Google runs the administrative side of the service — such as pricing (which isn’t even the best value you can find) and plan features — then there’s really no real current benefit in using Fi on other devices.
But if all of that is OK with you then, by all means, be sure to give it a go if you can borrow a friend’s Nexus 6 for activation. Information is still being gathered so there are still a lot of questions as to the specifics of how Fi service would work on different devices. If you happen to try this approach be sure to report back with your results — whether that’s here or over at the original XDA thread — to help contribute whatever information you can
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Unread 2015-08-05, 02:30 PM   #44
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My Experience Using Project Fi for One Month


I just received my second statement for Project Fi since signing up on July 2. The total? Only $20.21. Thanks to Project Fi’s Unused Data Credit, the unused portion of the $50 I paid at the start of service for 3GB of data is refunded onto my next month’s bill, saving me quite a substantial amount. At signup, I opted for the lowest tier they offer to start, which is 3GB, but found through the Project Fi app that I wasn’t using all that much, so I dropped my monthly allotment to just 2GB. With Project Fi, you pay for what you use, and if you happen to go over, Google won’t pull your teeth out — simply up your allotment and pay for it at the end of the month.
I am fortunate to have a job where I sit next to a WiFi hotspot all day long, so I am not the best example of a person who goes through a ton of data each month. However, with how simple Project Fi is to understand in terms of billing, anyone can master it within 5 minutes. After a month of regular usage on the network, I have a pretty good understanding of what to expect from Google’s Project Fi, so allow me the time to share my story with you.
Setup

After waiting a few weeks and finally getting my invite to Project Fi, I went ahead and had them send over a Welcome Kit. The kit includes your Project Fi SIM card, a set of headphones, portable battery bank, and Nexus 6 case. I already had a Nexus 6 on hand, so I didn’t have to shell out for one at the start of usage. Getting set up was insanely easy and straightforward. To start, everyone pays the base $20 for unlimited talk and texts. Then, a flat rate of $10 per GB is added on top. For example, if you want 3GB of data, your monthly bill will be $50. If you don’t use all of your data, you receive an Unused Data Credit on your next statement. When activating service, you will choose your number on Project Fi (if you opt for that), how much data you will want each month, and then you enter in a credit card to be billed each month. Through the dedicated app, all of this editable, except for your phone number. That stays the same. Once activation is all said and done, you are ready to use your phone.
Pricing

When compared to other carriers’ pricing, Project Fi is highly competitive. Let’s break it down quickly. $20 a month is your base price (aka line fee), no matter what. That nets you unlimited talk and text. Each 1GB of data you consume costs $10. No matter how much or how little you use, it will always be $10 for a GB. Need 10GB a month? That’s $100. Need 3GB? That’s $30. Compare this to Verizon or AT&T. We recently wrote a post, detailing how much your monthly bill is on a single line with 3GB of data. Included in those prices usually are device loan programs or insurance, so for the sake of clarity, let’s just assume you own your device outright and are not making monthly payments for it. On Verizon, a 3GB plan is priced at $50, with a line access fee of $25. That’s $75 a month. AT&T is not much better. Your 3GB will cost $40, with a line access fee of $25, equalling $65. On Project Fi, for 3GB of data, your price will $50, plus a couple dollars for taxes and fees. Sprint and T-Mobile are the only two carriers coming close to this, with T-Mobile pricing 3GB of data at $60 with no “line access fee,” but technically unlimited throttled data after your 3GB is used up. Sprint is a tad different, as it implemented the All-In plan, which is $80 a month for unlimited everything. The All-In plan also factors in the lease price of your phone, all under one price. As I stated, Project Fi simplifies this process to the barebones, which to me, is very much welcomed. When you near your data usage limit, Fi will notify you through the application, asking whether you would like to add more data. There is no fee for this or any type of funny business.
Service

Google asks that you keep your WiFi on whenever using your Nexus 6, as the service will automatically connect you to any open WiFi hotspot it can find. Although, Google notes that they test each connection to be fast, and pass all information through a VPN for data security. When not in range of WiFi, your phone will fall onto a cell tower; either T-Mobile or Sprint. Through the duration of a month, I ran speed tests here and there, and then checked the details to see if I could pinpoint which network I was running on. From my findings, I mostly ran on T-Mobile towers and had great speeds. There was one time I went to the Oregon Coast, which had me at crawling speeds, but that’s just part of the coastal experience.
To be honest, I was half expecting my experience with data speeds to be rather poor, given where I live. I have ran T-Mobile phones and Sprint phones before, never coming away impressed with connection. But on Project Fi, speeds were solid as long as I was not inside an elevator or walking my dogs through the woodland parks. On average, I was seeing about 20Mbps download and 5Mbps upload. For most people, that should be more than fine. The thing everyone needs to keep in mind is, my experience will likely differ greatly from yours, as where you live and your connections are not the same as mine. I can only attest for my experience with the service, and for me, it was solid. On the Project Fi website, a coverage map can be viewed to see if you live in an area where Fi will be a viable option for you. And be sure to check spots where you travel to frequently as well. Usually, I enjoy the security of having a carrier with nationwide coverage, as I do a bit of traveling. But since Google utilizes T-Mobile and Sprint, I can rest assured that I am either going to have WiFi, or can find a bit of service. There were no times when I was completely out of signal, left stranded on the side of the street, cursing Google’s name.
As for the transition from cellular data to a public WiFi hotspot, then back onto cellular, my experience was limited. When I was paying attention, this only happened one time when I ventured into a Target. I saw my Nexus 6 automatically connect to the network, and that was it. I was able to check Instagram and Twitter with no trouble. When I left Target, I was back on Fi cellular data. That is how seamless it should be, but I was surprised I did not see this happen more often. For example, when I go into a Starbucks or place I know there is WiFi, I expect to be automatically connected, but I was not. Connecting myself is no big deal, but this was supposed to be one of the big draws to the service. This feature could see improvement in the future, but who knows. Maybe Fi was not connecting me because they did not think it was secure or “open.”
Below you can view my speeds from tests I ran around the Portland, OR area.
Support

Inside the Project Fi application, getting answers to your questions is one call away. Sure, you can call your current carrier anytime you want, too, but something about it being Google makes me a bit more confident in the support I will receive. Before you call or email, you get an estimated wait time, allowing you to choose if it’s a good time to seek support or not. Over the course of a month, I never saw the wait time surpass 1 minute, so that’s a good sign. Of course, we don’t know exactly how many people are using Project Fi currently, but since the service is still relatively new, support should continue to be excellent.
There is also an official Google+ community for Fi users, currently serving a little under 5,000 members. Here, you can get answers from fellow Fi users, or even post feature requests for the future. There is a dedicated FAQ section, containing answers to all of your basic questions that don’t require one of Google’s reps to help you.
Devices

The only issue I have with Project Fi is not with the service itself, but with the phone I am required to carry in order to use it. Right now, Project Fi is exclusive to the Nexus 6, and if you don’t care much for a 6″ device, then you may not enjoy yourself. Personally, the Nexus 6 is not my choice of phone, and I wish other phones were compatible, but my guess is that Google will bring support for Project Fi to any upcoming Nexus devices released later this year. If you don’t want to use a Nexus 6, stay off of Fi, but don’t be afraid to request an invite if the service interests you. Your invite won’t expire. Once we have more phones that are compatible, I could see this service really catching on.
Conclusion

After a month, my conclusion is, I don’t want to use the Nexus 6 anymore. Project Fi has treated me well, and I do enjoy using it, but my hope is that Google will allow for new Nexus devices to run on the network. My bet is that they will. However, until that time, the Nexus 6 does not fit into my lifestyle.
As for Project Fi itself, the service could not be more easy to use and consumer friendly. There are no surprises each month, and you pay for what you use. There’s no rollover data crap or insane overage charges. It just works. One could argue Google tends to oversimplify services, but in an industry filled with small text and hidden fees, Google is a welcomed competitor in the space.
If you currently own a Nexus 6, there is no harm in trying a month out. But again, if the Nexus 6 is not a device you want to be toting around, just wait until more devices hit the market that are compatible.
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Unread 2015-08-05, 03:19 PM   #45
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sounds awesome!
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Unread 2015-08-19, 02:02 PM   #46
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Has anyone else tried Google Fi? I just found out my brother has been on it since release, and he actually loves it.
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Unread 2015-08-19, 02:08 PM   #47
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Unless it opens up to the Moto X Pure Edition, I won't be trying it. Nexus 6 has no appeal to me.
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Unread 2015-08-19, 02:17 PM   #48
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Any android phone with 5.1 can use project Fi now. So, it appears the MotoX Pure Edition will be eligible.
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Unread 2015-08-19, 02:44 PM   #49
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No, just the ability to manage it is available on any 5.1 phone. Still only phones that support both networks and the auto-switching will. Im sure the new Nexii will, and maybe some partner phones like Motorola.
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Unread 2015-08-19, 02:47 PM   #50
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I think Straight Talk is a better deal for the data amount I'd use.
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