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Unread 2013-09-12, 11:04 PM   #26
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SoftBank Taps 19 Banks for $20 Billion Loan to Pay for Sprint Deal


To fund its recent acquisition of Sprint Communications (NYSE: S ) , as well as consolidate other debt, Japanese-based telecom giant SoftBank (NasdaqOTH: SFTBF) will contract with 19 banks to secure a total of $20 billion in loans, Softbank announced today.
The $20 billion will consist of two facilities. The first (A) will total approximately $11 billion, and the second (B) $9 billion. Facility A will mature Sept. 13, 2018, and facility B will come due Sept. 14, 2020.
Softbank also said it intends to draw an estimated $18.6 billion on Sept. 27, 2013, with the balance of the loans utilized "between the end of September 2013 and the end of December 2013."
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Unread 2013-11-08, 02:10 PM   #27
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Never got out of my plan (fee free that is). The conversation where I was promised several times I would not get charged an early termination fee was conveniently not recorded. Their legal team called me and said they just changed the verbiage of the ToS and that would excuse me from the contract, despite the fact that when I canceled, they made me change me mailing address to Kansas to ensure that I qualified to get out of my contract for free due to the ToS change. Now I'm stuck with a $188 bill that I'm refusing to pay. I'll wait a bit then give them a stupid cheap offer to settle.

I've had StraightTalk for a few months now with a jailbroken Iphone 4s that was given to me. I've never been happier.
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Unread 2013-12-03, 03:05 PM   #28
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Sprint denies report of possible headquarters move


In what may become a recurring rumor, a blog reporter says Sprint Corp. will move its headquarters to somewhere in California.



| File photo by DAVID EULITT | The Kansas City Star The Sprint world headquarters in Overland Park.



The Overland Park-based company denied the report that was based on unidentified sources.
Sprint’s vice president of corporate communications Doug Duvall said the headquarters will stay here even as he acknowledged its current operations in the Golden State.
“We have a presence in Silicon Valley now and that could increase over time, but again Sprint has no plans on moving its headquarters from Overland Park,” Duvall said.
It’s the logic of the situation that makes the report potentially evergreen.
Sprint is now 80 percent owned by Tokyo-based SoftBank Corp., thanks to a $21.6 billion transaction last summer.
And it hardly makes sense for the Japan-based executives and experts to fly over Silicon Valley on their way to flyover country to meet with Sprint executives and experts.
Most of the time, they don’t.
“We’re talking to SoftBank on a daily basis in some part of our company,” Duvall said.
Some meetings take place in Overland Park, others in California or even Japan. Many sessions consist of conference calls between distant groups, taking advantage of the technologies that both companies sell.
But there is plenty of fodder for rumors.
Duvall said SoftBank has increased its own footprint in California since the deal with Sprint. He said the company has purchased an office building in Silicon Valley.
“That could be complemented by some Sprint personnel, but again we’re not moving our headquarters,” Duvall said.
Still, Sprint’s headquarters has moved before.
It shifted to Reston, Va., with the 2005 merger between Sprint and Nextel, which was based in Reston. Overland Park was designated the operations headquarters.
Sprint chief executive Dan Hesse brought Sprint’s headquarters back to Overland Park in February 2008, months after being named to the top post.
He had raised concerns at the time about a possible disconnect from having senior strategists on the East Coast and operational teams in Kansas.
Sprint’s deal with SoftBank wasn’t a merger. Sprint remains a separate, publicly traded U.S. company though its shares are owned mostly by SoftBank.
SoftBank, however, also wrote the checks that allowed Sprint to boost its network upgrade work, buy its long-time network partner Clearwire Corp. and become a potential bidder in billion-dollar government auctions of wireless spectrum that carries mobile customers’ video downloads, apps and other data.
And by the companies’ own accounts, SoftBank is a source of expertise as Sprint puts in place some of the same technologies that SoftBank uses in Japan.
As Sprint and SoftBank marched toward their deal earlier this year, they said Sprint’s headquarters would stay put. They’re still saying that.
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Unread 2013-12-05, 11:03 AM   #29
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All that financial backing and Sprint's LTE network is absolute GARBAGE.
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Unread 2013-12-05, 11:14 AM   #30
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All that financial backing and Sprint's LTE network is absolute GARBAGE.
more so the 3g network....holy hell its horrible....I get a rather decent LTE experience when its available....
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Unread 2013-12-06, 12:08 AM   #31
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more so the 3g network....holy hell its horrible....I get a rather decent LTE experience when its available....
Sprint's LTE is horrible pretty much everywhere I go across the U.S. This test was performed with a full-strength LTE signal while tethered to my laptop.

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Unread 2013-12-06, 12:25 AM   #32
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All that financial backing and Sprint's LTE network is absolute GARBAGE.
yea, because tower upgrades happen overnight.
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Unread 2013-12-06, 06:53 AM   #33
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yea, because tower upgrades happen overnight.
That and they really haven't received much in the way of money from Softbank yet, anyway.
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Unread 2013-12-06, 08:50 AM   #34
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That and they really haven't received much in the way of money from Softbank yet, anyway.
They need to start begging for some cash so they can fix their BS network. Its truly pathetic that their 4G LTE service in most of the markets I've been in is slower than their 3G... which is crappy as well. I was in the KC area last weekend having lunch at a restaurant right up the street from their headquarters... less than 2 miles away and I could NOT connect to the web. As soon as my contract is up in a few months, I'm jumping ship if no improvements have been made.
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Unread 2013-12-13, 05:14 PM   #35
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WSJ: Sprint working on possible bid for T-Mobile
Roger Yu, USA TODAY 4:54 p.m. EST December 13, 2013
Published report says telecom giant is working on offer to merge with its rival in $20B deal.

T-Mobile US shares surged in late trading Friday after The Wall Street Journal reported that Sprint is preparing a big for its wireless network rival.

A Sprint acquisition of T-Mobile would leave the U.S. wireless market dominated by three companies, AT&T, Verizon and Sprint. However, a merger of Sprint and T-Mobile would test federal regulators' willingness to allow such concentration, the Journal said.

Sprint is studying regulatory concerns and could launch a bid in the first half of next year, the newspaper added, citing unnamed sources familiar with the matter.

T-Mobile US shares gained more than 8% to $27.50 after the report. Sprint shares also climbed on the news.

Sprint's bid could be launched in the first half of 2014, the Journal's story said. Sprint is said to be looking at possible regulatory issues.
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Unread 2013-12-13, 05:36 PM   #36
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WSJ: Sprint working on possible bid for T-Mobile
Roger Yu, USA TODAY 4:54 p.m. EST December 13, 2013
Published report says telecom giant is working on offer to merge with its rival in $20B deal.

T-Mobile US shares surged in late trading Friday after The Wall Street Journal reported that Sprint is preparing a big for its wireless network rival.

A Sprint acquisition of T-Mobile would leave the U.S. wireless market dominated by three companies, AT&T, Verizon and Sprint. However, a merger of Sprint and T-Mobile would test federal regulators' willingness to allow such concentration, the Journal said.

Sprint is studying regulatory concerns and could launch a bid in the first half of next year, the newspaper added, citing unnamed sources familiar with the matter.

T-Mobile US shares gained more than 8% to $27.50 after the report. Sprint shares also climbed on the news.

Sprint's bid could be launched in the first half of 2014, the Journal's story said. Sprint is said to be looking at possible regulatory issues.
if they would switch to gsm this could be great but if the try the same crap as the nextel merger it will be a joke
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Unread 2013-12-13, 06:29 PM   #37
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if they would switch to gsm this could be great but if the try the same crap as the nextel merger it will be a joke
lol - you dont just "switch" to GSM
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Unread 2013-12-14, 10:57 PM   #38
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6 Reasons Sprint Shouldn't Buy T-Mobile




I thought I wasn't going to write this column today, but a vibrant conversation on Twitter convinced me to. The Wall Street Journal today floated an inflammatory story that Sprint is looking to buy T-Mobile. There's no formal bid yet, and there may never be. There shouldn't be. This merger would be a disaster for American consumers, which I also said back in 2011 when this rumor first popped up. Here are six simple reasons why.
Merger Malaise. For Sprint and T-Mobile to survive, they need to compete aggressively. Companies in the midst of major mergers tend to burn a lot of time and energy on figuring out how to merge their businesses. Employees and customers flee. Marketing gets confused. Innovation becomes impossible because all of the operating units are figuring out how to synch existing systems rather than pushing new ideas forward. Sprint's troubled merger with Nextel set the company back by at least a year because of all of this, and T-Mobile's failed merger with AT&T led to a staff exodus and a lost year as well. U.S. consumers can't afford Sprint and T-Mobile navel-gazing for 18 months.
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Technology Nightmares. Sprint and T-Mobile have incompatible technologies and frequency bands. Sprint works with CDMA, some FD-LTE and increasingly TD-LTE. T-Mobile works with GSM, HSPA+ and FD-LTE. Sprint is trying to aggregate the 800, 1900, and 2600 bands; T-Mobile has some 1900, but does a lot of its work on 1700. This merger would result in a horrible technology alphabet soup; there's very little compatible here, which means lots of time and energy will have to be wasted aligning these networks somehow. That means a combined Sprint/T-Mobile will fall even farther behind AT&T and Verizon.
The End of Uncarrier. If Sprint and T-Mobile merge, who would be in charge? Softbank. T-Mobile is currently the most aggressive, radical player in the U.S. mobile market, but Sprint is the larger partner in this merger, and Masayoshi Son's Softbank is even larger. Son will probably try to get T-Mobile to sync up with his own global strategy, which means the end of T-Mobile CEO John Legere and his maverick moves. Sprint and T-Mobile are taking different approaches to providing value; fewer carriers means fewer chances for disruptive, breakout ideas.
Three Carriers Isn't Competitive. Fortunately, we don't have to look far for a lab test of this postulate. Just over the border, Canada has three major carriers which own 90 percent of the market. While they've been very good at building and sharing networks, they charge high fees in lockstep, and for many years had such restrictive contract terms that the government finally had to crack down on them. The Canadian government is now frantically trying to cobble together a fourth competitor from odds and ends of spectrum to put some price pressure on the Big Three, but the project isn't going too well. The smaller, newer carriers, short of spectrum and network buildout money, are struggling. We do not want to wake up and find ourselves in this situation.
Government Roadblocks. During the failed AT&T/T-Mobile merger, the Department of Justice said that because "each of the Big Four nationwide carriers is especially well-positioned to drive competition ... customers of mobile wireless telecommunications services likely will face higher prices, less product variety and innovation, and poorer quality services due to reduced incentives to invest than would exist absent the merger." The DOJ's report, especially, repeats over and over again that eliminating one of the "four national competitors" would result in a "significant loss of competition." While a Sprint/T-Mobile merger wouldn't concentrate things as purely as AT&T or Verizon buying one of the other two carriers, many of the DOJ's arguments still hold. So the companies would burn a lot of time and energy and probably get shot down in the end, anyway.
The Reports of T-Mobile's Death Were Exaggerated. We haven't heard the companies' rationale for merging yet, but it'll probably be that they can't survive on their own. Except T-Mobile isn't just surviving on its own - it's thriving. Thanks to excellent management and a radical new approach, T-Mobile is grabbing new customers not from Sprint, but from AT&T. Sprint is currently in the middle of a network re-engineering and will see major investment from Softbank in 2014. Each of them have more customers than the entire population of a mid-sized European country. Neither company's story is anywhere near over.
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Unread 2013-12-16, 04:19 PM   #39
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Why regulators are likely to reject a Sprint/T-Mobile deal

Reports have surfaced that Sprint is interested in acquiring T-Mobile, but T-Mobile's recent success with its "Uncarrier" strategy is likely to sway regulators to block any deal that takes T-Mobile out of the game.



The Sprint innovation center in Burlingame, Calif.
(Credit: Lynn La/CNET)

The Wall Street Journal reported over the weekend that Sprint is looking to buy T-Mobile in an acquisition that would reduce the total number of national wireless operators from four to three. But regulators in Washington, DC, have already signaled that they're likely to put the kibosh on such a tie-up.
The Journal reported late Friday that Sprint is readying a bid for early next year that could be worth more than $20 billion. Citing sources close to Sprint, the newspaper said that SoftBank Chief Executive Masayoshi Son is driving the acquisition talks. Son led Softbank's acquisition of Sprint earlier this year. The Japanese telecom operator fought off a competing bid from satellite TV provider Dish Network to ultimately win 80 percent of Sprint.
For years there has been talk of Sprint and T-Mobile, the third and fourth largest nationwide wireless operators in the US, teaming up to take on Verizon Wireless and AT&T, the No. 1 and No. 2 nationwide mobile operators. And there was a time, when such a deal made sense and might have won support from regulators. Even combined, Sprint and T-Mobile would not match either Verizon or AT&T in terms of total number of customers. And a combined Sprint/T-Mobile would still not cover as much footprint nor have as deep and wide a spectrum position as either AT&T or Verizon.
But today just two years after AT&T withdrew its $39 billion bid for T-Mobile, due to strong disapproval from regulators, it seems highly unlikely that those same regulatory agencies would feel much different about a Sprint/T-Mobile tie-up.


"Despite being a more palatable merger than AT&T/T-Mobile on pure antitrust grounds, we believe a Sprint/T-Mobile tie-up probably would face the same fate -- a challenge by DOJ and the FCC," Paul Gallant, an equities analyst Guggenheim Securities, said in a research note Monday. "We believe regulators are very pleased with T-Mobile's resurgence and its aggressive, innovative moves and would not want to see it disappear via acquisition."
Regulators see four as the magic number
One of the reasons that the Department of Justice and the Federal Communications Commission rejected the 2011 merger between AT&T and T-Mobile was because the regulators saw T-Mobile as a "maverick" in the industry that put pressure on its competitors with innovative service plans and pricing.

Indeed, T-Mobile has cemented that reputation this past year and has become the poster child for regulators hawkish about preserving competition. Since its failed merger with AT&T a couple of years ago, the company has doubled down on being the "maverick" of the industry launching its "Uncarrier" strategy, which in its first phase eliminated contracts. The company has continued to add other customer-friendly services, such as free international roaming and an early upgrade program. As a result the company has gone from losing hundreds of thousands of customers a quarter, to gaining customers.
"This time last year, I don't think anyone anticipated what was coming," Jim Alling, T-Mobile chief operating officer, said at an investor conference last week. "The biggest story is our customer turnaround. We went from losing 2 million customers last year to gaining customers again."
The strategy seems to be working. In the third quarter of this year, the company added a total of 1 million new customers to its network. About 648,000 of these customers were highly valuable, so-called postpaid customers, who tend to have stronger credit history and are willing to pay more each month. In total T-Mobile ended the quarter with 45 million customers.
T-Mobile has also made significant strides in building its 4G LTE wireless network using spectrum it acquired from AT&T as part of the consolation following the break-up of the proposed merger and using repurposed spectrum the company already owned. The company has also been putting to use spectrum it acquired from its acquisition of prepaid operator MetroPCS. As a result, T-Mobile now covers more than 203 million people in 254 markets throughout the US with 4G LTE service.
T-Mobile CEO John Legere.
(Credit: Lori Grunin/CNET)

What's more, competitors have begun to answer T-Mobile with changes in their own policies. After T-Mobile announced an early upgrade plan, AT&T and Verizon Wireless followed with their own plans. And AT&T just a couple of weeks ago altered its pricing plan and now offers its wireless customers a discount on its monthly service if they bring their own phone to the AT&T network. This is the same idea behind T-Mobile's original "Uncarrier" service plans announced earlier in the year.
Regulators have taken notice of T-Mobile's success and the effect it has had on its competitors, and they have not been shy about patting themselves on the back when it comes to their role preserving T-Mobile as a competitor. In November, William Baer, the head of the antitrust division for the Department of Justice, told The New York Times in an article profiling T-Mobile's CEO John Legere that wireless consumers are benefiting from T-Mobile's aggressive new strategy.
"When you have feisty rivals whose survival depends on innovating and differentiating, they can gain market share and loosen the oligopoly," he told the newspaper. "That's exactly what T-Mobile has done."
The new chairman of the FCC, Tom Wheeler, has also signaled that his agency would likely not accept a merger among the top four nationwide wireless operators. During a question-and-answer session at Ohio State University earlier this month, Wheeler said in the context of the upcoming wireless spectrum auctions that he would like to keep four major wireless competitors in the market.
"The mobile business is today with four carriers a competitive business." he said. "And it's important it stay that way."
Analyst Paul Gallant said in his note that he feels these comments paint a clear picture of how regulators are likely to view a proposed merger between Sprint and T-Mobile.
"Some may have overlooked Mr. Wheeler's comment at the time because it was made in context of discussing the spectrum auction," he said. "But we view it as a clear signal that he (like Mr. Baer) would be disinclined to approve a Sprint/T-Mobile merger."
Comments from these top regulators aside, there are other more tangible reasons to believe that the FCC and DOJ would likely reject the deal. In the FCC's most recent Wireless Competition Report, the agency found that the wireless market is already "highly concentrated" by antitrust standards. So based on its own analysis and using a commonly accepted measure of market concentration called the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index, or HHI, a merger between Sprint and T-Mobile would only further concentrate the market.
In his research note, Gallant said that the HHI score itself may not sink the merger. But he said that it shifts the burden of the companies to explain why the government should allow further market concentration. It's likely that Sprint and T-Mobile could argue that together the companies could more effectively compete against AT&T and Verizon. Gallant concedes that regulators would likely give this argument serious consideration.
Is T-Mobile even interested in merging with Sprint?
But a bigger question to ask might be whether T-Mobile would even be willing to be gobbled up by Sprint. While the company's executives have publicly stated their willingness to examine future deals, the company is on a positive trajectory not only with the "Uncarrier" strategy, but also with its network build, which is nearly complete. The company is also preparing and positioning itself for the upcoming incentive wireless auction in 2015, which will put more low-frequency broadcast TV spectrum in the market.

It seems unlikely that T-Mobile, which suffered serious customer losses during the time its merger with AT&T was being considered, would be willing to risk its gains to team up with Sprint.
The Wall Street Journal noted in its story that Sprint has not made up its mind whether it will move forward with its bid. That makes sense given Sprint's acquisition track record and the fact the company is already struggling to keep customers satisfied.
Sprint is the weakest among the national carriers at the moment. The company has had a long history of missteps with acquisitions. In fact, it is today finally integrating wireless spectrum it bought in 2005 from Nextel. The shift to shut down Nextel's network, and the company's technological flip- flop from 4G WiMax to 4G LTE has resulted in massive customer losses.
Sprint's woes were exacerbated this year as the company also transitioned its network to a new infrastructure. It has been ripping out old gear and replacing it with a new more flexible network. But in the meantime, service has suffered and customers have not been happy. Throw on top of that the Softbank acquisition and a deal to bring Clearwire's assets back into Sprint, and it's been a very difficult time for Sprint.
Sprint's CEO Dan Hesse said at an investor conference last week that the company is going through some short-term pain that will eventually have long-term benefits. But it's not difficult to see why customers and consumer advocates would likely look at a merger between Sprint and T-Mobile as a loss for consumers.
Dish Network is the real wild card.
Still, this doesn't mean that the wireless industry is done consolidating. In fact, it's very likely that there will be more mergers in 2014. Most of these deals could be small, similar in size and scope to T-Mobile's deal with MetroPCS and AT&T's acquisition of another regional prepaid brand, Leap Wireless. The big question in terms of mergers and acquisitions in the wireless market is what will happen to satellite TV provider Dish Network.

The company already owns a big chunk of terrestrial wireless spectrum, which it could use to build a mobile network. It is also the only company bidding on a national license of the upcoming H block wireless spectrum. Dish tried to acquire Sprint and Clearwire earlier this year. And the company's founder has also been pursuing wireless assets from the bankrupt startup LightSquared. There is a chance that Dish may swoop in at some point to make a play in the market either by acquisition or by building its own network. One thing is clear, 2014 could be another interesting year of wheeling and dealing in wireless.
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Unread 2014-01-17, 03:42 PM   #40
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Sprint might be getting serious about their bid for T-Mobile. A new report from The Wall Street Journal suggests that Sprint is pursuing financial backing from banks to acquire the resurgent carrier. Though banks are showing interest, and a deal is far from over, we may now have a better idea of why Sprint is in a hurry.

The deal is said to have a “total enterprise value” of about $50 billion, which includes a $30 billion bid for T-Mobile and about $20 billion for outstanding debt T-Mobile has. T-Mobile’s current market value is about $26 billion, but their stock continues to rise, and Sprint will likely be forced to pay a premium. Paying off the debt is a crucial part of the deal, as if Sprint were to proceed without having that base covered, debt holders could cash in their bonds against the new Sprint/T-Mobile venture.
With financial backing, Sprint is said to be insistent on getting this deal done quickly. Part of that is that aside from two carriers, you have parent companies in Softbank and Deutsche Telekom that have to come to terms. There is also a looming spectrum auction in 2015 that Sprint seems interested in. They can’t compete with the likes of AT&T and Verizon as a smaller player, but a Sprint/T-Mobile power play might do the trick. Though the duo wouldn’t be able to outsize either AT&T or Verizon, they do make for a more compelling argument in spectrum auctions.

Regulatory bodies are notoriously suspect, though. In AT&T’s failed bid for T-Mobile, the FCC made it quite clear they prefer to have four major carriers in the US. That commentary could have been due to AT&T scope, especially in taking over T-Mobile. Two smaller companies make for a less polarizing situation.
If you’re wondering who would prevail in the merger, it’s up for grabs. Deutsche Telekom has been known to shop T-Mobile around, but could retain some interest in the newly formed company. Softbank is keen on scaling quickly to compete in the US, but T-Mobile’s CEO John Legere has input on who should run the show. When asked who should prevail in the proposed venture, he said “the T-Mobile Uncarrier business, the people, the brand the attitude is here to stay. … I think what we’re doing in any scenario we will prevail.” Sorry Dan Hesse, but we hope he’s right.Sprint might be getting serious about their bid for T-Mobile. A new report from The Wall Street Journal suggests that Sprint is pursuing financial backing from banks to acquire the resurgent carrier. Though banks are showing interest, and a deal is far from over, we may now have a better idea of why Sprint is in a hurry.

The deal is said to have a “total enterprise value” of about $50 billion, which includes a $30 billion bid for T-Mobile and about $20 billion for outstanding debt T-Mobile has. T-Mobile’s current market value is about $26 billion, but their stock continues to rise, and Sprint will likely be forced to pay a premium. Paying off the debt is a crucial part of the deal, as if Sprint were to proceed without having that base covered, debt holders could cash in their bonds against the new Sprint/T-Mobile venture.
With financial backing, Sprint is said to be insistent on getting this deal done quickly. Part of that is that aside from two carriers, you have parent companies in Softbank and Deutsche Telekom that have to come to terms. There is also a looming spectrum auction in 2015 that Sprint seems interested in. They can’t compete with the likes of AT&T and Verizon as a smaller player, but a Sprint/T-Mobile power play might do the trick. Though the duo wouldn’t be able to outsize either AT&T or Verizon, they do make for a more compelling argument in spectrum auctions.

Regulatory bodies are notoriously suspect, though. In AT&T’s failed bid for T-Mobile, the FCC made it quite clear they prefer to have four major carriers in the US. That commentary could have been due to AT&T scope, especially in taking over T-Mobile. Two smaller companies make for a less polarizing situation.
If you’re wondering who would prevail in the merger, it’s up for grabs. Deutsche Telekom has been known to shop T-Mobile around, but could retain some interest in the newly formed company. Softbank is keen on scaling quickly to compete in the US, but T-Mobile’s CEO John Legere has input on who should run the show. When asked who should prevail in the proposed venture, he said “the T-Mobile Uncarrier business, the people, the brand the attitude is here to stay. … I think what we’re doing in any scenario we will prevail.” Sorry Dan Hesse, but we hope he’s right.
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Unread 2014-01-28, 11:37 AM   #41
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T-Mobile CEO changes tune, says Sprint merger would help fight AT&T-Verizon duopoly







When T-Mobile CEO John Legere first addressed rumors that Sprint and parent company SoftBank might make a play to acquire T-Mobile USA, he openly bashed Sprint and its network. But in a sign that such a deal may in fact be in the works, the outspoken CEO has softened his stance in recent days and stated on several occasions that a potential Sprint-T-Mobile merger has several upsides.
In a recent interview with NPR, Legere said that a takeover by Sprint could be a good thing as long as he and his executive team are called upon to run the combined entity. Now, in a more recent chat with Bloomberg West picked up by FierceWireless, Legere not only sounded more open to the idea of a merger, but went even further to state that it might actually be a good thing.
“If the government wants us to have a competitive environment, you are going to make sure that the duopoly doesn’t use their prowess to crush the little guys and have this sub-1 GHz spectrum be moved all to them,” Legere said during the interview.
He continued, ”We’re all going to need better scale and capability. The question starts to be: How do you take the maverick and supercharge it? We either need more spectrum and capability, a lot more investment, or we need consolidation.”
Subscribers thus far have not seemed to share Legere’s new opinion, as many are worried that a Sprint takeover would ultimately put an end to many of T-Mobile’s appealing Uncarrier offerings. Regulators may see things similarly — an analyst with Medley Global Advisors said that regulators may block a potential T-Mobile-Sprint merger in order to ensure that T-Mobile’s affordable prices are maintained.
A recent Cowen and Company study found that at $120 per month on average, T-Mobile customers enjoy the least expensive wireless service in the country among the four major nationwide carriers.
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Unread 2014-01-28, 11:49 AM   #42
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They need to start begging for some cash so they can fix their BS network. Its truly pathetic that their 4G LTE service in most of the markets I've been in is slower than their 3G... which is crappy as well. I was in the KC area last weekend having lunch at a restaurant right up the street from their headquarters... less than 2 miles away and I could NOT connect to the web. As soon as my contract is up in a few months, I'm jumping ship if no improvements have been made.
It takes a VERY long time to upgrade a network. Over the next year or two, the Sprint network will become MUCH better. Don't expect anything to happen over night, though.

If you want the best service RIGHT NOW, get Verizon. You'll pay more than you will with any other provider, and their devices suck, but their network is the best.
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Unread 2014-01-28, 02:00 PM   #43
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Just got a text from Sprint saying that a new network will be largely completed in my area in the next month. Yay?
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Unread 2014-01-28, 02:30 PM   #44
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Just got a text from Sprint saying that a new network will be largely completed in my area in the next month. Yay?
first phase of several.
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Unread 2014-01-28, 02:52 PM   #45
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Its almost like you work for Sprint or something
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Unread 2014-01-28, 03:31 PM   #46
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Actually, I don't work for Sprint. I work on the Sprint network, though.
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Unread 2014-01-28, 03:39 PM   #47
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Actually, I don't work for Sprint. I work on the Sprint network, though.
Same here. Ericsson I assume?
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Unread 2014-01-28, 08:41 PM   #48
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Department of Justice expresses concerns over Sprint/T-Mobile merger in meeting with Sprint



When rumors of a Softbank takeover of T-Mobile first emerged, there were – as expected – mixed responses. T-Mobile is in its strongest position for years, and there are obviously concerns that the progress Magenta has made over the past 12 months could be negated by a takeover. On the other hand, Sprint is a “pile of spectrum” waiting to be used – according to Legere – and could prove useful to expanding the T-Mobile brand and philosophy further. Whatever the advantages or disadvantages there ar, there’s an ever-present stumbling block: Regulatory bodies.
Since the first day of rumors, we’ve all known that the U.S. government, FCC and whoever is involved could potentially stand in the way of any deal. It happened when AT&T tried to buy Deutsche Telekom’s controlling stake in Tmo back in 2011. It ended up costing the company a pile of cash and spectrum. The same could happen with Softbank’s attempt.
According to a recent report from WSJ (subscription required), Sprint and Softbank CEOs, Dan Hesse and Masayoshi Son, recently met with the Department of Justice to discuss their plans.
The conversation, which occurred in January, signals the seriousness of Mr. Son’s interest in a deal, but also underscores his highest hurdle. U.S. antitrust authorities believe the current lineup of four national carriers is important to maintaining a competitive market, and department officials indicated at the meeting that a deal combining Sprint and T-Mobile could face regulatory difficulties, the people said
According to the report, Sprint/Softbank has lined up around $31 billion in potential cash to fund the deal, and is very keen on making it a reality. But as already mentioned, regulatory bodies are not sure it’s the best way forward, not for the US market.
With the lack of any clear denial of a deal from T-Mobile’s execs, and the steady stream of reports regarding the ins and outs of a deal, it’s clearly moved past the stage of “no smoke without fire”. There is clear and real interest from Softbank to buy DT’s 67% share, and it’s doing all it can to ensure it’s in the position to do so. But, if the government is going to stand in its way, all the cash in the world won’t make the deal happen.
Stay tuned, this rodeo’s not over yet.
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Unread 2014-01-29, 12:50 PM   #49
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Same here. Ericsson I assume?
do either of you work in 6550?
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I think it would suck to be a dickhead... Seriously in the dark all day, it can get kinda funky and when you do come out a fucking hand tries to choke you or your shoved into a fucking sarlacc.
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Unread 2014-01-29, 12:51 PM   #50
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do either of you work in 6550?
I work on the road for one of Sprint's non-Ericsson vendors.
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