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Unread 2012-09-13, 05:13 AM   #51
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So what happens when the wind blows? Does your phone start dialing random numbers?
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Unread 2012-09-13, 06:32 AM   #52
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So what happens when the wind blows? Does your phone start dialing random numbers?

Are you really this stupid or do you just enjoy acting like a idiot

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Unread 2012-09-16, 08:29 AM   #53
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Are you really this stupid or do you just enjoy acting like a idiot
It's a serious question. How does the google glass interpret wind noise or signal interference/drops? Will it start doing all sorts of random stuff? The last thing you want to do is accidently dial 911 from the exhaust noise at a street race.
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Unread 2012-09-16, 11:23 AM   #54
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It's a serious question. How does the google glass interpret wind noise or signal interference/drops? Will it start doing all sorts of random stuff? The last thing you want to do is accidently dial 911 from the exhaust noise at a street race.
Google has some of the most advanced voice recognition stuff I have ever seen, I have a newer android phone and flat out it understands me better then my wife does. I have no issues with it acidently calling dialing ect as you suggest.
Not to mention I am sure the people who made this shit for my phone can do even better in a state of the art beta product they have invested limitless resources into.
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Unread 2012-09-19, 05:31 PM   #55
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Google has some of the most advanced voice recognition stuff I have ever seen, I have a newer android phone and flat out it understands me better then my wife does. I have no issues with it acidently calling dialing ect as you suggest.
Not to mention I am sure the people who made this shit for my phone can do even better in a state of the art beta product they have invested limitless resources into.
There's a big difference between an android phone that only uses voice commands for a few select things, and a device that requires voice commands for everything.
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Unread 2012-09-19, 06:03 PM   #56
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No shit.

Also, not all homes are made of wood.

What a dumb ass. I hope he's trolling.
ok what else are they made out of?


and i don't like this google glasses shit at all. i feel like i am oversaturated with technology as-is. i feel like i'm breathing fresh air for the first time from deleting facebook and leaving my phone at home when i'm at work. i don't need some 24/7 shit in my face to put me even further out of touch with humanity.
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Unread 2012-09-26, 04:07 PM   #57
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Sergey Brin's live demonstration of Google Glass at the Google I/O Conference in June clearly showed that wearable, always-on, Web-connected computing technology is here now—and that it works. While such augmented-reality (AR) eyewear is in its early stages of development, future versions of the technology, whether Google's or some other company's, could lead to dramatic changes in the way we work, play, travel, and communicate.

The best killer applications for wearable AR tech involve situations where it's important that users have free use of their hands or be able to walk while using the app. The coolest apps also display data and images in a way that interacts with the real-world imagery that users see. For example a basic AR app might place information bubbles over real-world landmarks within in the frame of the glasses (it might display the name of a movie theater along with the names of movies that are starting within the next hour).

Here are some of the more exciting applications that may be coming.

Hands-free gaming
The coolest games for wearable AR apps will probably involve glasses that cover the whole eye, or a contact-lens-style display that covers one or both eyes. But Google Glass might provide a view that augments a multiplayer “reality game” played on the street or in a forest.

For example, in a team-based game in which players operate at different locations within a given area, the glasses could provide a view from above, showing the exact locations of all team members. The lens could also display an I-see-what-you-see view, allowing one team member—the team leader, perhaps—to see through the eyes of another team member.



he wearable aspect of the glasses would be especially useful in a game where the players have to have their hands free to shoot or tag.
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Unread 2012-09-26, 04:07 PM   #58
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Seeing your friends
You go to an amusement park with a group of friends. People are everywhere. You and your friends decide to split up and go your separate ways, but you all want to meet up again later.

If your friends voluntarily share their locations, AR glasses could use assisted GPS, Wi-Fi, and cellular networks to track everyone's location and display each one in the glasses. Those locations could appear on a “view from above” map, or as silhouettes at ground level (if they are separated from the viewer by one or more walls). The glasses could also identify your friends in a crowd.



Another possibility is that you may wonder what your friends are doing as the afternoon progresses, on the chance that they've found something more fun to do than what you're doing. In that case, you could look through the camera view of any of your friends' glasses. If you liked the look of what they were doing, you could head in that direction, guided by directions on a map displayed on the glasses.

Translation
Last year I visited Paris for the first time. My chief anxiety about going there was the language barrier. For me, part of the fun of visiting new places is to get a taste of what the people there are like. But not being able to speak French prevented me from getting that. I had a translation app on my smartphone; but of course, consulting my phone every second during a live conversation was a nonstarter.

The microphone on the glasses would be able to hear what is being said to you, and then translate it into English on the lens. It could even speak it as English into the glasses' earpiece. Responding with the right words is a little more difficult. You would have to speak your response into the microphone on the glasses, and then let the servers display the words in French on the display, at which point you'd speak the words in French.



This would introduce some gaps in the conversation, but it might not tank the conversation altogether. Of course, the person you were talking to might be fully aware of the role of the glasses in the conversation. But the translation apps of the future might recognize the content of Jean-Marc's speech, and suggest some common responses.
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Unread 2012-09-26, 04:07 PM   #59
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Medical emergencies
Most of us have taken CPR training at some point in the past, but how many of us could actually perform the duty if someone collapsed right next to us? Chances are we would be terrified and would have a hard time remembering our training. But the situation might be different if we could call up a program to walk us through the process of saving the distressed person's life.

Such an app would display simple instructions on the screen and voice it in the earpiece of the glasses. The program might use the camera to help the wearer zero in on the right place to position the heel of the hand on the victim's chest before starting compressions. The app would watch the user's actions and advise the wearer when to switch from giving breath to doing chest compressions.



Very advanced apps might even be able to watch the reaction of the victim and advise the person performing CPR of when to adjust the next steps or when to quit performing CPR. If connected to the 911 emergency communications system, the application could perhaps downlink a teleconference line to an ER doctor, who could see see through your glasses and walk you through the steps needed to keep the patient alive until help arrived.

Just knowing that such powerful information was within reach might give us the confidence to perform CPR more effectively. The information displayed in the glasses, when delivered in real-time and adapted to the minute-by-minute needs of patients, could very well save lives.

Travel information
Travel is data-intensive. You're constantly accessing information from print sources or electronically to help get you to the right place at the right time to catch a vehicle to take you to the next stage of the trip. And you're usually trying to access that data in the midst of your travels—while you're waiting for a taxi or walking through the airport concourse toward your gate. Your hands are holding luggage and other things, so using wearable technology to access your travel data seems like just the ticket.

With Google Glass you could use voice commands to pull up travel information on the lens. The content could be anything from ground transportation data to flight numbers to rooms available in hotels at your destination.



During travel, you may be moving through places that are completely foreign to you. Navigating through large airports or subway systems (try Tokyo's!) can be daunting, especially when the signage is in a foreign language. The glasses could translate all the signs and give you step-by-step directions, with routes and landmarks overlaid on your field of vision. With everything decoded, the unfamiliar environment would seem more welcoming, and your stress level would go down.

Wi-Fi detection and measurement
A Wi-Fi signal locator and speed measurement app would place a Wi-Fi icon next to the base stations within the wearer's field of vision, and the icon would grow larger or smaller depending on the strength of the signal being transmitted.

In another mode, the glasses might cast a green hue over areas where one or more Wi-Fi signals are strong, and cast a red hue over weak Wi-Fi environments. They could provide similar graphic representations of cellular signal strength.



Another app might poll crowdsourced databases to find out where free Wi-Fi is available, and might even provide quick directions on how to get there.

Speeches and presentations
Using the lens of the glasses as a miniature teleprompter over your eye could change speech and presentation making forever. The lines of your speech could scroll down the screen at a pace that you chose (or that the voice recognition software detected that you were going), and only you could see it. To the audience, you would appear to be looking straight out, even while reading from the display. Of course, the glasses themselves would give you away—but someday those glasses might become a contact lens.

Another problem with presentations is that you can't see your own slides, which are usually projected behind you on the wall while you're speaking. Sure, you could stay glued to the podium, where you could see the slides on your laptop, but most presenters want to move around freely when addressing an audience. The glasses could overlay a transparent view of your slides, along with any presentation notes you might need.



The glasses could be extremely useful—albeit in a different way—during the Q&A session after your presentation. If a tough question arises in connection with a past event or statistic, say, your support team could send you relevant information via the glasses lens. Knowing the the right thing to say is valuable at any time, but in a public affairs context, it can be priceless.

History of places
Content can become a hundred times more meaningful when presented over the real-world thing it relates to. One of my favorite sites, oldsf.org, maintains a collection of old pictures of San Francisco organized over a Google map on the basis of the part of the city visible in the photograph. You can also move a slider up and down a timeline to see photos from specific time periods.

If such content were retrofitted to display on the glasses, it might truly come alive. As you walked around the city wearing the glasses, historical pictures of specific places you were seeing through the lens could appear. You could fix your eye on the steps of City Hall, and then use the slider to go back in time to superimpose older and older pictures of the scene, watching the ghosts of the past come into view and depart again.


Social mapping and navigation
Wearable AR might make services like Google Street View go social. Today these services have to pay fleets of cars to drive around and snap millions of still photos of streets and surrounding environs. The fleets must return to the streets periodically to keep the street views up to date and accurate.

Now, imagine that Street View used imagery (even video) captured through the lenses of thousands of Google Glass users and recorded to the server. Street Views would be more accurate because many many more views would have contributed to them. User images would come from many places (such as inside malls, on beaches, or in forests) where the Google camera cars can't go.



The map makers would have to develop the technology for piecing together the best of the millions of user views of a particular place. The process would involve continually replacing older or inferior images with newer or better ones.

Nutrition and shopping
When you were at the grocery store, you'd be able fix a certain product in your lens, and then see an overlay of all the nutrition information about that product. Food companies would begin touting their ability to make this nutrition information easily accessible via the augmented reality app.

You could port the nutrition information to a dieting site (like Weightwatchers) and/or an exercise site. You'd then immediately know how much of the food you could eat while adhering to the rules of your diet, and how much exercise you'd have to do to work off one serving of the food. Knowing the nutrition, dieting, and fitness aspects of the food you were looking at would help you make better-informed decisions about what and how much to buy.

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Unread 2012-10-16, 01:39 PM   #60
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Why knowing your dominant eye will be important for Project Glass


We all know that people are born either right handed or left handed, with some lucky individuals earning the title of ambidextrous, but did you know that right and left eye dominance varies from person to person, as well? As is the case with handedness, nature tends to favor the right, but a good one-third of the population is left eye dominant. But don’t just assume your visual preference will match that of your hands, as right-handed individuals are not always born leaning on the same half of their visual field.



So you might be wondering where I’m going with all of this talk of ocular dominance. Well, consider a recent patent filing by Google. While many have been going about their lives completely ignorant of which eye takes the lead, Google has been developing a mirrored version of Project Glass for folks that favor vision on the left. The current build is designed for those that have stronger vision in their right eye, and it isn’t clear if any production-level left-oriented prototypes exist (or if they will be available when the limited run of Project Glass launches for those that registered at Google I/O).
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Unread 2012-10-16, 04:09 PM   #61
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I can not wait for this to be mainstream and more cost friendly. I will totally get one for overseas trips, supplement navi, and documenting my upcomign family (someday.)
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Unread 2012-10-16, 04:23 PM   #62
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It's a serious question. How does the google glass interpret wind noise or signal interference/drops? Will it start doing all sorts of random stuff? The last thing you want to do is accidently dial 911 from the exhaust noise at a street race.
there are 2 microphones for a reason. One is purely for noise cancelling (read: wind noise mic) and the other is for voice. The first one eliminates both the sound through the earpiece and to the other end, while the other mic is able to decipher voice and eliminate the wind noise.

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Unread 2012-11-25, 04:37 PM   #63
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Microsoft Patents… Google Project Glass?



The patent wars never cease to push forward into realms previously thought too ignorant to explore. While tech companies blindly register for thousands of patents ranging from painfully general to weird and obscure, the US Patent and Trademark Office seems to approve said patents at an equally alarming rate. The most recent? A patent filed 2 days ago by Microsoft, in an apparent attempt to secure exclusive rights to a product Google already has in development: Project Glass.

Quoted directly from the patent filing:
A system and method to present a user wearing a head mounted display with supplemental information when viewing a live event. A user wearing an at least partially see-through, head mounted display views the live event while simultaneously receiving information on objects, including people, within the user’s field of view, while wearing the head mounted display. The information is presented in a position in the head mounted display which does not interfere with the user’s enjoyment of the live event.
I’m not quite sure how such a claim would even be patentable. Someone could accomplish the above by taping their phone to their head. It would be a pretty terrible product, but the point is the general concept is nothing original. Especially considering Google has already locked up a bunch of patents directly related to Project Glass.
WAIT. Microsoft received their patent on November 22nd, 2012 whereas Google’s patent was issued on May 22nd, 2012 but Microsoft actually FILED their patent request earlier. Microsoft’s submission for their “EVENT AUGMENTATION WITH REAL-TIME INFORMATION” came in May 2011, a full 5 months before Google’s “Wearable display device section”.
This could get sticky, and if eventually litigated (which we’ve come to expect), chances are these patents will come down to the utility and design more than the concept alone.
A couple interesting notes, though, are Microsoft’s examples of how the product may be used, mostly in conjunction with live sporting events and concerts. Take for example this picture of how Microsoft’s Google Glasses (note: sarcasm) would work at a baseball game:

Several problems here. First of all, the Yankees don’t lose to the A’s. Second of all, Willie Randolph is at bat, a ball player who hasn’t played in the Major Leagues in 2 decades. Perhaps that’s part of the strategy… you know, maybe they’ll think we drew this picture twenty years ago and grant us the patent.
Here’s another example from Microsoft used at a football game:
[0001] Fans of live sporting and artistic events have enjoyed various types of information which is provided on different displays to supplement the live event. This supplemental information is provided both when the user is in attendance at the event and when the user views the event on broadcast media. One example of this is the augmentation of football games to display a first down marker superimposed on a playing field in a broadcast television event, and the broadcast of replays both on broadcast television and large displays at the venue of the event.
Interesting indeed, but telling us how a developer might leverage the product to create an app for Project Glass doesn’t make it patentable. Especially considering that whole yellow first down line thing is already patented.
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Unread 2013-01-07, 06:41 PM   #64
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Tobii eyesight controlled computer to be Google Glass partner?



Tobii (tobii.com) isn’t a new company – they’ve been around for over a decade – but what they’re showing this year at CES is nothing short of outrageously innovative. You look at your computer monitor, it tracks your eye movement, and you use only your eyes to scroll, click, and perform actions. While we’ve heard of this idea in practice there is a difference with Tobii: it’s working and I tried it successfully for myself.


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The Tobii Rex, which will first be available to developers for $995, plugs in through any USB port and works instamagically. But as you can see from the above video, only (at least for the moment) works with Windows 8 devices. So why are we covering it on Phandroid? You’ll likely see Tobii technology built into Google Glass when it launches.
Below is a picture of an existing Tobii product… look familiar? As I mentioned, Tobii has been around for 10+ years, only not in the consumer technology space. Tobii is mostly focused on in the B2B space as a research company. For example, take 100 consumers, ask them to wear the Tobii glasses, put them in a grocery store aisle, and see exactly where there eyes wander. The resulting information offers invaluable information to marketers about product placement, packaging, and other critical information that helps companies make decisions and sales.

Privacy concerns aside, Google is the type of company that loves analytics, collecting information about consumers, and crowd sourcing that data to create valuable resources for others.
I want to make something very clear: I’m only speculating that Tobii will be a Google Glass Partner. When asked directly, VP of the Silicon Valley Tobii location said explicitly that he could not disclose any partnerships with Google or Google Glass. But it doesn’t take a genius to connect the dots. Just browsing around their website lends itself some interesting ideas on how they might leverage their “Gaze Interaction” and “Eye Tracking Research” down the road.
Tobii’s technology is truly fascinating, partly because of the innovative concept, but even moreso because it actually works. If you couldn’t understand how Google Glass might create opportunities for new interactive experiences, I highly suggest you watch the video above and discuss in the comments below. And even then, watching someone control the Tobii made it seem like a tech demo that somehow cheated its way to seeming cool. Controlling it yourself? Blown away.
Watch for Tobii in 2013 and beyond, whether it’s with the Tobii Rex and Windows 8, Google Glass, or other platforms and opportunities. They specifically mentioned the potential opportunities in the gaming sector… think about THAT! How about a gun-slinging first person shooter where you use only two things: your eyesight and the trigger button.
Tobii is definitely a company to keep your eye on and we’ll make sure to keep you up to date with the latest developments.
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Unread 2013-01-17, 05:54 PM   #65
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Could Google Glass one day be controlled by laser-projected virtual keypad?



Google Project Glass is a pretty awesome, albeit uber-nerdy, concept that may or may not revolutionize mobile computing. But how, exactly, does one interact with the Android-based headgear? The most logical methods include voice control, gestures, or perhaps pairing with a smartphone, but a new patent application shows an intriguing method that Google could implement.

Yes, a laser projected virtual keyboard. As if wearing Google Glass couldn’t get any dorkier, the device might eventually beam forth an intangible keypad that can be interacted with on multiple levels. Aside from basic typing, Google proposes that the keyboard could perform different functions based on the way it is projected on a human hand, providing easy gestures for quick (quasi) hands-free input.
The specific technology needed to accomplish such a task isn’t new, but as Google presents it the current generation of laser-projected keyboards would need some major refinements. For this reason we doubt we will see the feature in the first iteration of Google Glass, but it very well could make future releases. Google, after all, is no stranger to releasing half-baked concepts to the public. I can see it now: Google Glass with Laser Keypad (beta).

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Unread 2013-01-25, 03:19 PM   #66
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Google holding Project Glass Developer Conference attendees to strict NDA




If Google pulls any big surprises at next weeks Project Glass Developer Conference, we won’t be hearing about them. Google is holding all attendees to the strictest of non-discolure agreements, asking that anything learned as part of events occurring in New York and San Francisco not be made known to the general public.
To accomplish this, Google is requiring all registered developers to use special Google+ accounts to test the features of the Android-powered glasses, lest they post anything to their personal profiles. Any photos or video captured at the event become the property of Google, as the agreement states that those in attendance “waive any moral rights you have and agree not to exercise them.”
But it does sound like developers will be able to take home their Glass preview units based on certain language in the agreement. A disclaimer warns of the dangers of using Glass during real world activities such as driving or playing sports.
Phandroid registered several member of our staff, including our lead developer, for the Glass Explorer program. We have contacted Google for further clarification on the NDA in relation to media coverage of future Glass events.
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Unread 2013-01-25, 06:40 PM   #67
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Google Glass audio to be delivered through “headphoneless” headphones?



Google’s Project Glass has been an interesting thing to follow. We first heard about the wearable technology back at Google I/O last year, and while the company’s initial vision was little more than a concept at the time, it has come a long way. We haven’t seen a huge influx of actual use cases outside of taking photos/video and sharing them to Google+ just yet, but perhaps all of that will change once Google holds its private developers’ event (though, considering those attending will be under strict NDA we might not hear about anything that will be discussed at the workshop).
Since then, many different patents have been uncovered to give us an idea of what kind of features Google might look to add between now and whenever these things are ready for retail. One such patent was a laser-projected keyboard that might allow someone to type or dial a phone number by manipulating a virtual keyboard on their hand. It sounds crazy, but projected keyboard technology already exists and it’s not outside the realm of possibility.

Another very interesting patent has been uncovered as of late in regards to Google Glass — “headphoneless” headphones. This patent, filed in October 2011, describes a system where a built-in vibration transducer will be used to create an indirect bone conduction speaker. In English, this means that a vibration motor within the frames of the glasses resting on a bone just in front of your ear could be used to send audio signals straight to your inner-ear.
This sort of tech would solve the issue of audio for the purposes of, say, a phone call or listening to turn-by-turn walking directions without having to wear actual earphones or make use of a privacy-killing external speaker. The easy way out would be to use frame-mounted ear buds, but it sounds like Google really wants this tech to be the 9th wonder of the world. Whether or not something like this ends up making it into Google Glass is still up for debate, but the existence of such a patent lets us know that Google’s at least thinking about it, and that’s all that we need to get excited.
We’re expecting Google to give us an update on the project at Google I/O in May — which we’ll be on hand for, of course — and we’re still trying to see if we can deliver any updates to you guys from the developer workshop taking place next month. Either way, Google’s looking to drop quite the bombshell in 2013 and you can bet we’ll be smack-dab in the center of the blast radius to absorb all the exciting bits we can.
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Unread 2013-01-25, 08:13 PM   #68
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I love my Apple products and yet... the mentality of giving people what they don't even know they want is the past. People have wanted a 4.8-5" phone and Apple gave us the 5 which offers little more than a better widescreen viewing option. Apple is also offering limited innovative products the hybrid memory system is pretty amazing though pricey, but beyond that rehashing older products. Further they have taken soooooo long to develop a television set that they have really missed the boat... all high end tv's are wifi connected with apps and now even recognizing hand gestures.

Apple needs to step up their game in a big way this year, if they don't have a better phone option by the time my upgrade hits this summer I may have a really hard time ignoring the Galaxy S4.

These glasses are true innovation with some "amazing" functions. This is going to be a big deal, and will go beyond glasses to windshields I would guess as well.
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Unread 2013-01-31, 05:54 PM   #69
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Google Glass sitting at the FCC



With Google’s Glass Foundry events taking place lately — one went down in San Francisco this past week, and a New York City event will commence tomorrow — you had to guess that the device is approved to be used and consumed in the United States, or at least close to that point. Sure enough, listings for the HUD-enabled glasses have been spotted inside the digital file drawers of the FCC.

The publication of these documents don’t tell us anything that we haven’t already known or assumed. We do know that WiFi 802.11b/g will be on board and Bluetooth 4.0 will be an alternate wireless data option, but that’s about it right now. The bone-conduction technology we heard about in a recent patent filing does seem to be on board, as well. We’re glad to see that this wasn’t just a concept Google was dreaming up.
It seems the paperwork was filed a couple of months ago, so it’s obvious Google requested a temporary hold to make sure one of us know what it was up to. Once this device makes its way through all of the necessary steps for approval Google will be able to legally distribute the devices in the United States. Of course, the only folks getting their hands on these glasses anytime soon are the developers who pre-ordered the early preview units at last year’s Google I/O.
Phandroid plopped cash down for three of those if you don’t remember, though we’re still in the dark in regards to the arrival date. We’ll be waiting patiently for those details to roll in, but in the meantime we’re just happy to know that the device does look to be on track to be in the public’s hands — in one way or another — at some point this year.
[FCC via Gizmodo]
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Unread 2013-02-01, 11:53 AM   #70
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Google Glass Explorer Edition arrives at the FCC



Folks, the rather dour line drawing that you can see in the image above is the very first glimpse of Google's wearable computing project as it swings through the FCC's underground facility. The Google Glass Explorer Edition hardware, promised to arrive this year, is carrying a Broadcom 2.4GHz 802.11 b/g WiFi radio that's been paired with a Bluetooth 4.0 + LE module. We've seen a reference to an "integral vibrating element that provides audio to the user via contact with the user's head," which we presume relates to the bone conduction patent we saw earlier this month. The filing also reveals that the testing laboratory involved used the conduction technology to view video with audio. As the commission is now making the paperwork public, it can only mean that it's judged the unit, with the product code "XEB," to be safe for human consumption -- which means customers 782 and 788 might be expecting something special in the mail very shortly.
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Unread 2013-02-02, 02:50 PM   #71
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An Engineer’s Takeaway From Using Google Glass



Google Glass or “Project Glass” is one of the search giant’s most anticipated and innovative projects to date. The plan for these augmented reality spectacles is to give you a wearable Android smartphone experience, using voice commands to control the majority of the operations. So far all we’ve seen of the glasses in action was last year’s awesome Google I/O demonstration which included skydivers, mountain bikers, and repellers all participating in a Google Hangout, as well as appearance on California Lieutenant Governor’s “The Gavin Newsom Show”. But now it appears that these glasses are seeing the light of day to outsiders, albeit a very limited group.
It seems as though recently Google hosted a “Tech Talk” at Stanford and one engineer, Souma Mohan, a self described “Engineer in Pursuit”, wrote about his experience on quora. In an answer to the question “Google Glass: what do users actually see?” Mohan writes that “a small screen was visible on the top right corner”, upon turning on the device.
On the screen was a list menu with a black background and white lettering showcasing options such as, “click a picture”, “shoot a video”, and “voice call”. Obviously with such a small screen Mohan tells us that there are only four or five options visible at a time and these were able to be cycled through by motion. “Moving my head up and down also caused the list to scroll in a vertical fashion.” Additionally there was also a touch pad by the right ear which would also appear to be a way of scrolling.
Last but not least he describes the voice commands which can be used to do all of the above functions. “I clicked a picture using the voice command. The screen automatically showed me the clicked picture just after I instructed the device to click it.”
Obviously we are still in the very early stages and these are still just prototypes but they are slowly but surely inching closer to an eventual launch. Let’s not forget that Google will be conducting a set of “hackathons” which will be comprised of developers who signed up for “Glass Explorer Program” and paid $1,500 for the opportunity to pre-order a pair, so maybe we’ll be getting more Google Glass info in the near future.
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Unread 2013-02-03, 05:30 PM   #72
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Google Glass bone conduction technology referenced in FCC filing




As if Google Glass wasn’t already cool enough, today we’re finding out that it feature bone conduction technology. The glasses recently made an appearance at the FCC, and the filing for the project mentions “integral vibrating element that provides audio to the user via contact with the user’s head.” Of course, Google recently filed a patent for glasses that feature the tech, so it seems that bone conduction will definitely be a part of Project Glass.


Some of you will already know what bone conduction is, since it isn’t exactly a new technology. Essentially, the glasses will send vibrations through bones near the ear. This means that users can hear audio with the glasses on, without the need for headphones. The added benefit here is that users will be able to hear the audio Google Glass is putting out while still hearing whats going on in their surroundings – something that’s a lot more difficult or even impossible when you’re wearing headphones.
Having bone conduction tech along for the ride should do something to allay the concerns of those who think Google Glass could potentially be unsafe. After all, having a little screen in front of your eye could prove to be quite the distraction. At least with bone conduction technology, users would still be able to hear what’s happening around them.
Bone conduction technology isn’t new, but it isn’t very popular either, so perhaps we’ll see it popping up more in other devices after being included in Google Glass. Google recently held developer hackathon events for Google Glass, but don’t expect to hear any news from them. Hopefully we’ll be finding out more about Google Glass soon, so stay tuned.
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Unread 2013-02-20, 06:18 PM   #73
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Google expands Glass Explorer program, invites regular folk to try on a pair




After a successful developer event that saw the first non-Google employees getting their hands on Project Glass, the Android-powered eyewear is inching closer and closer to a final design every day. Now the tech giant is inviting regular folk like you and me to try our hand at scoring a pair of Google glasses.
Today Google is expanding the Glass Explorer program to a group of lucky individuals to be selected by way of an online contest/application process utilizing Google+ or Twitter. To put your name in that hat, simply start a post with hashtag #ifihadglass and describe how you would use the futuristic headpiece in 50 words or less. Entrants can also include photos or a short video.
Google hasn’t begun shipping a pair of Project Glass glasses to all members of their Explorer program just yet, but it sure sounds like they are ready to make a big push to start creating some hype. Check out the original post on Google+ or the Glass homepage for more info.
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Unread 2013-02-20, 06:19 PM   #74
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Google offers glimpse of Project Glass UI

Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1uyQZNg2vE


We’ve seen plenty of Project Glass and have a pretty good idea of how it will look when you spot someone strolling down the street in a pair, but what we haven’t seen is what the world will look like through the eyes of the user. Google is finally lifting the veil by way of a new video showcasing life through the lens of Glass.
The clip, which takes its cues from recent Google ads for the Nexus line and features like Google Now, also gives us an idea of how we will be able to use our voice as the main means of controlling the experience. It all looks quite intuitive. If it works as well as Google portrays it here, the company might really be on to something.
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Unread 2013-02-23, 01:23 AM   #75
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Report: Google Glass to get general consumer release by end of this year (and one user’s take on it from personal experience)

It’s been a good month for Google Glass, it seems. Following seemingly successful rounds of developer workshops (the results of which are being protected under strict non-disclosure agreements), Google confirmed it would be expanding the Glass Explorer program to give lucky (and rich) users a chance to get the device in its early stages for $1,500. While most of us probably won’t be crazy enough to spend that much on it, new information suggests we’ll all have a crack at the device for a cheaper price much sooner.
CNet has heard it from a source that Google would carry out a consumer launch of Google Glass by the end of 2013. The original timeline was early-mid 2014 so this is even better than we expected. The device will apparently come to us for less than $1,500, though price has yet to be pinpointed just yet. We’re just keeping our fingers crossed that it won’t be in the range of thousands of dollars.

Other information gleaned from the source suggests Google Glass will be able to interface with both Android devices and iPhone devices, and will do so via Bluetooth. The device won’t have its own cellular radios so it’ll leverage the WiFi connection or cellular data from whichever phone or tablet it’s connected to. This makes a lot of sense, and to be quite honest we never expected Google Glass to be made with the idea that it could be used 100% independent of other devices.
In other news, The Verge’s Joshua Topolsky has had a go with the smart glasses for himself. As far as we know, this is the first user account of Google Glass out there, and it gives us a good idea of what to expect from a consumer standpoint before they officially hit store shelves.
Topolsky discusses design, potential, and his thoughts on whether or not Google Glass has what it takes to be the next big innovation in computing — long story short, he says it’s a matter of “when,” not “if.” Find that delicious story here, and let us know if you’re going to be in line for a pair of these if they do, in fact, drop by the end of this year.
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