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Unread 2014-01-29, 03:11 PM   #51
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Motorola patent shows their ‘connected car’ ambitions




With the sea change for the ‘Internet of Things’ comes innovation. Though we’re still finding our way with the connected home, Motorola is taking their mindshare elsewhere. In a recently filed patent, we see that their 'Assist' app isn’t the only way Motorola wants to be involved in your commute.

The patent, filed two months after Google completed their acquisition of Motorola, takes something old and livens it up. In what seems to be the CB radio of today, Motorola’s patent will identify pics of road hazards, take photos of them, and relay the info to motorists behind you. It’s a lot like truckers with CB radios, who warn trailing drivers of traffic jams or other road conditions.
It also signifies that Motorola — by proxy of Google, we’re sure — plans on being ingrained in the car. With the scope of what’s being described, there is no way a smartphone could handle it all. From the patent:
An inter-vehicle alert system controls the camera to initiate capturing video data which includes the video data. A method of operation modulates a radar signal to include at least a portion of the video data captured in response to detecting an obstruction, and transmits the radar signal to a second vehicle via an antenna array oriented at the moving vehicle’s rear.
Rear antennae arrays, inter-vehicle alert systems — sounds like a ful-on connected car to us. Google’s current method of identifying hazards and other road conditions exist with crowd-sourced info, but that almost asks that you use your smartphone while driving, which is always dangerous and often illegal. With a system like this, the info is still crowd sourced, it just doesn’t require your interaction.
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Unread 2014-01-29, 04:27 PM   #52
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Lenovo To Buy Motorola Mobility From Google For About $3B

TechCrunch has confirmed reports that state Lenovo is buying Motorola Mobility from Google. This is the division within Google that the company purchased in 2011 for $12.5 billion.
The terms of the deal have yet to be revealed but we’re hearing the price was near $3B.
According to a separate report published by Reuters, Lenovo is being advised by Credit Suisse Group while Lazard Ltd advised Google on the transaction.
According to our source, Google had to hold off selling the division for tax reasons.
Motorola Mobility’s performance has yet to live up to its purchase price. Since Motorola split and its consumer division went to Google, it has been a constant source of red ink. Motorola lost quite a lot of money: $248 million in the quarter in the last quarter alone. Google sums this well, noting that the loss was “-21% of Motorola Mobile segment revenues.” Motorola lost $192 million in the year-ago quarter, so the trend here isn’t positive.
This comes just weeks after Google purchased the hot hardware startup Nest. Since then it has been widely speculated about Nest’s role in the budding conglomerate that Google is turning into. Well, now with Motorola gone, Nest’s superstar team that includes many former Apple engineers seemingly have a clean slate.
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Unread 2014-01-29, 05:23 PM   #53
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Motorola is now a Lenovo company, sold for $2.91 billion




It’s official: Motorola is now a Lenovo company. The purchase is worth $2.91 billion, and includes $1.41 billion to be paid at closing. The rest will be in the form of a three year promissory note.

Of the $1.41 billion to be paid at the time of closing, $660 million will be cash, with the remaining portion ($750 million) being Lenovo common shares. This comes on the heels of Lenovo purchasing IBM’s server business a few days ago. For Google-Motorola fans, this closes the chapter indefinitely. The transaction is still subject to regulatory clearances, closing conditions, and any other approvals needed.
Since being acquired by Google for $12.5 billion, Motorola has seen a rapid uptick in both attention and activity. Their recent lineup, including the Moto X and Moto G, are among the better Android devices around. Yang Yuanqing, Chairman and CEO of Lenovo, had the following to offer about the transaction:
The acquisition of such an iconic brand, innovative product portfolio and incredibly talented global team will immediately make Lenovo a strong global competitor in smartphones. We will immediately have the opportunity to become a strong global player in the fast-growing mobile space. We are confident that we can bring together the best of both companies to deliver products customers will love and a strong, growing business. Lenovo has a proven track record of successfully embracing and strengthening great brands – as we did with IBM’s Think brand – and smoothly and efficiently integrating companies around-the-world. I am confident we will be successful with this process, and that our companies will not only maintain our current momentum in the market, but also build a strong foundation for the future.
In the interest of rounding out the commentary, Gogole CEO Larry Page said “Lenovo has the expertise and track record to scale Motorola Mobility into a major player within the Android ecosystem. This move will enable Google to devote our energy to driving innovation across the Android ecosystem, for the benefit of smartphone users everywhere”. Dennis Woodside, CEO of Motorola, noted that for his company, this changes nothing. They’ll still be focussed on innovation and reaching “the next 100 million”.
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Unread 2014-01-29, 07:06 PM   #54
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Motorola CEO Comments on Lenovo’s $2.91 Billion Buyout




Earlier today, we received the news that Lenovo will be purchasing Motorola Mobility from Google for the rather large sum of $2.91 billion. Make no mistake, this is a massive news story, as Google only recently purchased Motorola Mobility back in 2012 for a whopping $12.5 billion. The deal seems to be a win-win for all parties involved, however, and now CEO Dennis Woodside has taken to the Motorola Blog to give his own comment on the somewhat surprising acquisition.
While Google offered the backing Motorola needed to release phones like the Moto X and the Moto G, which helped “re-establish the Motorola brand around the world,” the company will be working with Lenovo toward an entirely different goal. Motorola wants to see mobile internet in the hands of another 100 million people and views Lenovo as the perfect partner to have in undertaking such a task. “Combined, our two challenger brands will become a true force in mobility,” Woodside said.
Once the deal is complete, Google remain in control of the “vast majority” of Motorola Mobility’s patents, so at least some portion of that portfolio will be going to Lenovo. A big reason Google purchased Motorola is so it could get its hand on that massive patent portfolio, so the terms of this takeover means that Google will still be benefiting from its 2012 purchase. Of course, Lenovo will get a license to use the patents that Google will continue to own, so there will be a lot of benefits for each company involved. Woodside says Lenovo stands to gain “over 2,000 patent assets, as well as the Motorola Mobility brand and trademark portfolio.”
So, once the deal is all said and done, don’t expect Lenovo and Google to go off and do their own thing. With a license to use Google’s patents, we expect these two companies will be working together closely in the future. This could be an especially good deal for Lenovo, considering Motorola is an established smartphone manufacturer here in the US. That brand identity will allow Lenovo to break into the US smartphone scene, something it’s held off on doing thus far. Stay tuned, because things are certainly going to be interesting from here on out.
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Unread 2014-01-29, 10:15 PM   #55
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Interesting, seems like Google very rarely sells off companies or divisions.
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Unread 2014-01-29, 11:13 PM   #56
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So they bought the company last year to get a bunch of patents basically? Was it worth $9 billion?
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Unread 2014-01-29, 11:17 PM   #57
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So they bought the company last year to get a bunch of patents basically? Was it worth $9 billion?
Certainly could be. Patents aren't exactly up for sale, and who knows what kind of mobile technology Motorola had cooked up prior to the Google acquisition. Patent law is a clusterfuck.
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Unread 2014-01-29, 11:43 PM   #58
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So they bought the company last year to get a bunch of patents basically? Was it worth $9 billion?
I think they also sold Motorola's set top box division for over 2 billion as well.
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Unread 2014-01-29, 11:47 PM   #59
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I think they also sold Motorola's set top box division for over 2 billion as well.
and kept their skunk works division
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Unread 2014-01-30, 03:19 PM   #60
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Google-Motorola-Lenovo deal

The iPhone maker will now face a more focused Google, as well as a stronger Lenovo. Both could cause problems for Apple down the line.


Lenovo executives show off several of the company's new smartphones during an event in June in India.
(Credit: Getty Images)
Things are about to get tougher for Apple. Google late Wednesday made an unexpected announcement that it's selling Motorola Mobility to Chinese PC giant Lenovo for $2.91 billion, or less than a quarter of what it paid for the handset vendor just a couple of years ago. During the years Google owned it, Motorola lost money and market share, and the relationship caused tension between Google and the other Android vendors, particularly Samsung. It also led those other phone makers to develop their own software and services, rather than push those from Google. That amplified Android's fragmentation in the market.
Overall, Google's purchase of Motorola turned out much better for iPhone maker Apple than for Google. That's now going to change.



Google, sans Motorola, can go back to focusing on what it does best -- making a really great operating system and apps. It can mend its relationship with Android leader Samsung and the other vendors. And it can concentrate on unifying and streamlining the Android experience, rather than worry about bolstering its own hardware operations. All of those factors mean that Apple may not be able to win over customers as easily as it has in the past. "Getting rid of Motorola helps Google, and anything that Google can do to create a more cohesive user experience across vendors is competitive to Apple," Current Analysis analyst Avi Greengart said.
But Google isn't all Apple should be worried about. Up to this point, only Samsung has posed a real threat to Apple in smartphones. A combined Lenovo and Motorola, however, has the potential to take a large chunk of the market. It won't be easy or quick, but Lenovo has a strong track record for dominating markets it enters. Less than a decade after buying IBM's PC operations, Lenovo became the world's biggest PC maker.
Already, Lenovo is one of the fastest-growing smartphone makers in China, a market that's also getting a lot of attention from Apple. Last year, Lenovo was the second largest smartphone vendor in mainland China by volume, up from eighth place in 2011, according to Strategy Analytics. That boosted its position in the global market in 2013 to fifth place behind Samsung, Apple, Huawei, and LG.
At the same time Lenovo's market share has risen in China, Apple's has fallen. In 2011, Apple was the third largest smartphone vendor in the country. By last year, it had dropped to sixth place, according to Strategy Analytics.
"Apple's lack of presence in the lower end of the smartphone market has cost it sizable volumes in China in recent years," said Neil Mawston, executive director of Strategy Analytics.
Apple, predictably, has offered no public reaction to the Lenovo-Motorola news. We've contacted the company for comment and will update the report when we have more information.



The iPhone maker doesn't have device pricing that touches the lower end of the market. So far, it hasn't needed or wanted to, but that will need to change if it doesn't want to be relegated to niche status. Already, the low end of the smartphone market is growing much faster than the high end. Strategy Analytics expects Apple's deal with China Mobile to boost it to fifth place in the Chinese market this year, but that's nowhere near the position of Samsung or Lenovo. And Apple's less expensive, more colorful iPhone 5C has failed to catch on with users. Apple positioned the device as more of a mainstream product, but it's still too pricey for developing countries. And it turns out that most people are buying the higher-end iPhone 5S that includes a fingerprint sensor, Apple CEO Tim Cook acknowledged during the company's earnings conference call earlier this week.
Apple won't just face Lenovo in China. The company also will use Motorola to break into the US market. Lenovo gains not only a well-known brand with Motorola but also closer relationships with US carriers and retailers. The company wants to become the world's biggest seller of smart devices -- which includes PCs, tablets, smartphones, and smart TVs -- and it won't be able to do that without addressing the US market.
Lenovo won't become Apple's biggest threat overnight. It will take awhile for the Chinese company to figure out its strategy with Motorola, and Lenovo also will have to invest heavily to get Motorola back on its feet. In the meantime, Apple and Samsung won't be slowing down in their efforts to dominate the market. But a few years down the line, it may be Samsung and Lenovo jockeying for the top mobile spot, not Samsung and Apple.
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Unread 2014-01-30, 05:47 PM   #61
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So they bought the company last year to get a bunch of patents basically? Was it worth $9 billion?
It think Google knows what is going on...so, maybe, and maybe not. I am sure they have made some business mistakes, but they have also hit some major home-runs.
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Unread 2014-01-31, 10:35 AM   #62
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Now armed with a floundering phone company, Lenovo says it wants to crush Apple and Samsung




Motorola launched two Moto-branded phones last year that each received critical acclaim. The Moto G was a remarkably affordable entry-level smartphone with a design and performance that surprised reviewers. The Moto X was a customizable beauty, built to order right here in the United States. But as we learned on Thursday afternoon when Google reported its fourth-quarter earnings, Motorola still couldn’t find a way to stem the bleeding as the phone maker recorded yet another quarterly loss.
So now, Motorola is someone else’s problem.
Just ahead of its earnings report, Google announced that it is selling Motorola Mobility to Lenovo for $2.91 billion. It originally paid $12.5 billion for the smartphone maker, but Google didn’t lose as much as you think in the deal.
And where some might see a problem, Lenovo sees opportunity. The new question, though, is whether Lenovo is opportunistic or delusional.
In an interview with Fortune, Lenovo CEO Yuanqing Yang said that he wants to use Motorola to replicate the success his company has had with the ThinkPad — Lenovo is currently the top PC vendor in the world by shipment volume — but in the mobile market. He also said that with the Motorola acquisition, Lenovo’s mission is to ultimately surpass both Samsung and Apple in the smartphone market.
This is the same man who said in a separate interview on Thursday that Lenovo doesn’t yet have an “effective plan” to fix Motorola.
The company certainly has a steep climb ahead if it’s looking to catch up with Apple and Samsung, but the first step in Lenovo’s mission is clear: Figure out how to actually make money selling Motorola phones.
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Unread 2014-01-31, 11:52 AM   #63
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Motorola has Plans in Place Up To 2015, New Moto X and 6-inch Phablet Reportedly in the Works





With the news that Motorola is now part of Lenovo, it’s not surprising that discussions surrounding their next line of products are happening. In fact, it seems that Motorola has plans in place up tot 2015, including some interesting products that might help diversify their line even further. According to industry insiders, Motorola’s 2014 lineup is already finalized, with 2015 looking to be fairly complete, too. With this comes word that Lenovo is unlikely to change anything, at least not for the foreseeable future. When it comes to big industry acquisitions like these, it takes time for things to be fully complete, and there’s no telling how it might take for Lenovo to finally take the reigns of Motorola fully.
Among the rumored products to be already in the pipeline is not only the successor to the Moto X, but a 6-inch phablet device. Of course, there’s also the rumored smartwatch still in the works as well, but that’s hardly surprising at this point, as it seems like everyone is looking to sell a smartwatch. With Lenovo looking to “surpass Apple”, we’re surprised to hear that Lenovo won’t be changing too many things. Of course, everything needs to settle down and a transition to take place before anything big can happen. However, with Motorola posting operating loss, after operating loss we’d have thought that Lenovo would be far more hands-on with their new division.
One of the main areas in which Motorola will need to improve upon under Lenovo is in marketing. It’s no secret that Samsung have been catapulted to the top of the ladder thanks to brilliant marketing, which has cost them hundreds of millions of dollars. Lenovo will need to put their money where their mouth is if they hope to create a successful Motorola and marketing will likely be the key factor in turning their fortunes around. We’re pretty confident that Motorola can become not only profitable, but successful under Lenovo’s wing. What do you think? Will the acquisition take longer than we think to take effect or will it mean business as usual at Motorola for the unforeseeable future?
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Unread 2014-01-31, 11:53 AM   #64
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VentureBeat Interviews Lenovo’s President about Why Motorola is Better Off with the Chinese OEM



So this week, the big news was Lenovo buying Motorola from Google. And we’re still hearing a lot more about this acquisition. Lenovo agreed to buy Motorola Mobility from Google for a mere $2.91 billion, partially because Google is keeping many of their patents.
VentureBeat’s Devindra Hardawar, sat down with Lenovo’s President of North America, Jay Parker and asked a few questions about the Motorola acquisition. We’re not going to cover the entire interview here, just the good stuff, you can head over to VentureBeat to read the full interview.
How do you see Motorola fitting inside of Lenovo right now?
“It definitely accelerates our timeline to bring smartphones to mature markets, like Western Europe, and the US. Motorola has a very strong presence here in the US, and important brand, a historical brand. They’re number three in smartphones here. They have a great relationship with Google, which is something we’ll bring over and which will strengthen our relationship with Google.
We have this concept of PC Plus, we’re expanding our business into adjacent technology areas, and now in a very short time we’ve done that in both servers and smartphones”
Does this change Lenovo’s relationship with Google?
“Google’s an extremely important player in our ecosystem obviously… we had a very strong relationship prior to this deal. I see this doing nothing but strengthening what we have going forward and our ability to plan and develop products together.”
When will we see the first new devices from Motorola under Lenovo?
“Our plan is to bring over the brand, the trademarks, and the products that they have under development right now, including the Moto X and Moto G as well as the DROID. Exactly when that happens, and what goes beyond that depends on how successful we are and how fast we are collectively when we close this deal.”
Will anything change for the existing customers for the Moto X? Will Lenovo be providing any services to them?
“Maybe in the long-term. Right now our job is to integrate that business once the deal closes, to turn it around to profitability and ultimately once we go through that process we’ll learn what makes sense in terms of bringing Lenovo capabilities to Motorola’s side. We’re also very excited to have the technical experise, sales, marketing and distribution expertise for smartphones. We’re looking forward to bringing that in Lenovo.”
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Unread 2014-01-31, 12:01 PM   #65
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lol, that's pretty funny re: Lenovo wanting crush apple/samsung. Let them have it - more cool phones for the consumers. The mobile market is thriving and still very volatile. I see Lenovo as a business is doing fantastic lately and considers themselves a mobile company now. One way to screw that up is to release a bunch of shit phones and and have to high of hopes for them..*.cough*RIM*cough*
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Unread 2014-02-03, 02:23 PM   #66
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The hilarious story of how Lenovo came to own Motorola







Since Lenovo’s purchase of Motorola, interesting news has been trickling out. The latest is that the Chinese OEM tried to purchase Motorola bak in 2011, ahead of Google’s acquisition. Though it seems like a cut-and-dry case of simply being outbid by the search giant, Lenovo’s tale of a failed pick-up is much funnier.

It seems that after Motorola split itself into two divisions — Motorola Mobility and Motorola Solutions — Lenovo found it a prime opportunity to try and get the mobility half of Motorola. The CEO of Motorola Mobility at the time was Sanjay Jha, while Greg Brown headed up the “Solutions” side of things. Lenovo came to talk to Jha, but ended up with the wrong guy.
Not making themselves clear ahead of the meeting, Lenovo ended up talking with Brown’s staff, exchanging pleasantries before leaving the talks alone. Brown had absolutely nothing to do with Motorola Mobility, and couldn’t help Lenovo at all. Never told of a pending Google deal, Lenovo simply left red-faced to fight another day. That day would take years, but immediate actions after the Google acquisition left Lenovo as a frontrunner for Motorola all along.
After Google acquired Motorola, Lenovo CEO Yuanqing Yang invite Eric Schmidt to his home for dinner, and discussion of possibly dealing for Motorola with the Google Chairman. Yang showed what Lenovo could do with smartphones, and told Schmidt that if Google were ever interested in unloading Motorola, to contact him.
About two months ago, Schmidt emailed Yang. A follow-up phone call from Yang to Schmidt yielded the results Lenovo wanted all along. Schmidt asked “are you still interested in Motorola?”, and the rest is history. Though the deal still needs to see the blessing of regulatory officials, the foregone conclusion is that Motorola is a Lenovo company, and the backstory is one for the ages.
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Unread 2014-02-10, 03:25 PM   #67
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How Google Used Motorola To Smack Down Samsung -- Twice




Samsung is giant. It employs 427,000 staff, has an annual turnover in excess of $270bn and assets of $600bn spread across over 80 business units. And Google GOOG -0.5% just floored it twice using Motorola as a baseball bat.
Why?
On the surface having 81 per cent of Android marketshare would seem to make Google and Samsung best buddies. Samsung has been the driving force behind Android’s meteoric growth and put Google mobile devices in pole position.
The problem is Samsung wanted too much credit. It wasn’t enough for Samsung to make the most popular Android phones and tablets, it had to hide Android – and consequently Google’s role in its achievement. It did this using ‘TouchWiz’, the company’s proprietary skin which painted over all aspects of Android leaving it unrecognisable. To the casual consumer they were buying ‘a Samsung’, Google’s role was largely unrecognised.
Then things got worse. Samsung began degrading Android performance by switching out vast parts of the software – phone dialler, calendar, email client, contacts, notification center, music and video player, voice control and much more – for its own apps. Reviews were largely negative with TouchWiz and its bloatware slowing down Android, wasting storage space and the replacement apps were seen as inferior or, worse still, needless gimmicks.

Samsung then exploited this further. It put TouchWiz on its smart TVs, another market it dominates, and began building its own Android rival – Tizen – which, thanks to its TouchWiz interface, looks identical to the casual observer. The long term strategy was clear: switch over to Tizen and take the majority of the handset market with it. Google had to act.


How?
The ‘how’ was Motorola. On 15 August 2011 Google announced it had bought Motorola Mobility for $12.5bn in cash. With it Google acquired more than 20,000 mobile patents and publicly declared the purchase of the phone maker would not in any way compromise relationships with its handset partners… honestly, really, pinky swear.
Of course Google didn’t expect handset partners to fully believe this and platitudes issued from them in reaction to the deal confirmed it. Should Google use Motorola to ramp up its own major handset business the market would be theirs. The phones would have stock Android and no-one, not even Samsung, could afford to subsidise their cost as Google can leveraging its mammoth advertising revenue.
The bait was set: obliteration by Google stock Android handsets unless manufacturers (read: Samsung) stopped messing with Android. Google quietly showed it could walk the walk as well as it ramped up Nexus production and introduced the well-received Motorola X and Motorola G which stripped away almost all customisation from stock Android.
Samsung bit. On 27 January 2014 Google and Samsung signed a wide-ranging global patent deal which will last a decade. Buried within it was an agreement that Samsung would tone down TouchWiz, refocus on core Android apps over its own customisations and cancel more radical customisations such as its ‘Magazine UX’ interface. Two days later Google announced the sale of Motorola Mobility to Lenovo showing both agreements had been working in parallel.



The consequences
The smack down for Samsung is twofold.
Firstly, despite its size and dominance of the Android market, Samsung has been brought back into line. No longer will Samsung run roughshod over Android’s design, kick out its apps in favour of Samsung alternatives and hide Google’s hard work underneath. Indications of a low key Galaxy S5 launch suggest it will stand by its word.
Secondly, the jump off point for Samsung from Android to Tizen is no longer straightforward. With Android shining through more strongly in future Samsung handsets it won’t be a seamless switch from one to the other. If Samsung wants Tizen to succeed it will now have to be earned rather than snuck in under the radar.
All of which should be good news for Android users who will find it easier to move between handset makers when they upgrade while a stock Android experience (particularly with Android 4.4 KitKat’s optimisations) will make for faster, more responsive budget devices. Whether it gives smaller handset makers a greater chance to compete with the all-conquering Samsung, however, remains to be seen.
And what of Google’s supposed $10bn loss? It’s a misreported myth calculated by subtracting Motorola’s $2.91bn sale price from its $12.5bn purchase. What it misses are the $3.2bn Motorola had in cash, $2.4bn saved in deferred tax assets and two separate Motorola unit sales totalling $2.5bn in 2013. Factor in Lenovo’s purchase and Google has paid $1bn for what it retained: $5.5bn worth of Motorola patents and the company’s cutting edge research lab.
Well played Google. Well played.
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Unread 2014-02-12, 10:38 PM   #68
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Dennis Woodside Departs Motorola to Take Over as COO of Dropbox





According to the Wall Street Journal, Motorola CEO Dennis Woodside is departing the company to become the COO of Dropbox. I wouldn’t exactly say that you should be surprised that Woodside is departing the smartphone manufacturer after Google sent it packing to Lenovo, but the move to Dropbox is sort of. Then again, going from a mega-company like Google to somewhat of a start-up might be the hot new trend for executives.





While Woodside was unable to turn around the losses at Motorola during his short stint, I think it’s safe to say that his staff put out one heck of a product (the Moto X) that the tech world really got behind. The positive reviews and low prices may not have helped them sell millions of phones, but it certainly seemed like they were on to something.
Dropbox recently took in $350 million in funding and have a value at somewhere near $10 billion.
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Unread 2014-02-13, 03:45 PM   #69
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Lenovo CEO Looks to Turn Motorola Around in Mere Quarters After Deal Closes With Google





With Motorola CEO Dennis Woodside already speaking on his departure from the company, Lenovo’s CEO had words of his own, stating a few rather bold claims for Motorola and its future success in the mobile market. Yang Yuanqing, the CEO of Lenovo, states that the company can turn Motorola around financially after just a few quarters once the $2.91 billion deal with Google is finalized and in the books.
As indicated by Yuanqing, Lenovo’s goal is to ultimately introduce the well-known US manufacturer to Chinese and emerging markets. Not only will Motorola continue to produce premium devices, but the OEM will be a major competitor in the entry-level sector. As we have seen with the Moto G, Motorola claims this to be one its biggest successes, and will keep working to produce high-quality entry-level devices.
As reported by Bloomberg, about 3,500 Motorola employees will transfer to Lenovo, which will help Motorola’s financial bottom line – at least on paper. Lenovo is hoping to close all deals with regulatory approval within six to nine months.
We still have high expectations for Motorola, and we truly hope the company won’t plan on exiting the US market anytime soon, even with its entrance into Chinese and emerging markets.
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Unread 2014-03-31, 02:21 PM   #70
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Lenovo CEO talks “Motorola by Lenovo” branding






Lenovo CEO Richard Yang previously talked about how he felt they could turn Motorola around "in a few quarters." At the time the initial chatter seemed to be focused on two aspects; how Motorola could help Lenovo expand into other markets, and about what Lenovo could due for Motorola. Obviously those earlier comments from Yang were focused on the latter.

But looking towards more recent comments, Yang touched on how Motorola already has a good reputation in some markets, and how they will not be relying on the Lenovo name for overseas expansion. Basically, it doesn't appear as if Lenovo will be making many changes to Motorola in already established markets.
By established, we are talking the Motorola side -- notably in the US and parts of Europe. But on the flip side it would appear as if there will be a change in branding. There was mention of something along the lines of "Motorola by Lenovo." This obviously, would allow for a shared branding as they move, and make a deeper push into other markets.
While the possibility of seeing a "Motorola by Lenovo" branding could come in time, we do have to remember the acquisition has yet to officially wrap. We suspect there will be more changes, aside from a new tagline, once that happens. Not to mention, while Yang seems to have dropped some hints, we do have to remember he was very likely not revealing the full plan.
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Unread 2014-04-09, 02:37 PM   #71
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Rick Osterloh named President and COO of Motorola Mobility






Effective as of today, Rick Osterloh has been named President and COO of Motorola Mobility. Osterloh came to Motorola by way of the Good acquisition and has been with the company for nearly 7 years. For now he will be reporting to the Motorola Operating Board at Google. That is, until the Lenovo acquisition is complete.

Osterloh previously held the title of Senior Vice President of Product Management with responsibilities to include the "planning, strategy and delivery" of products at Motorola Mobility. Osterloh also spent some time with Skype, overseeing design and product, and before that -- he helped push Motorola towards Android.
"Rick first joined the company 7 years ago when Motorola acquired Good, and he started Motorola down the Android path while managing product and engineering teams."
Jonathan Rosenberg, who shared this news on the Motorola Blog, mentioned how he feels "Rick’s appointment provides the focused leadership and business continuity needed to steer the organization into the future." Rosenberg also touched on how he looks forward to continuing his role as a Google liaison and advisor as Motorola continues through this transition period.
Additional comments from Rosenberg touched on how Osterloh has played a "key role in the company’s reinvigoration" citing how he has been a "guiding visionary on the entire product front and a passionate advocate for our philosophy to focus everything we do on the consumer experience."
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Unread 2014-10-28, 06:22 PM   #72
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Hello Moto: Motorola Unfairly Compared With Apple




For a business that’s between owners, Motorola sure don’t know when to give up. Their recent devices – the 2014 Moto G, Moto X and today’s freshly announced Motorola Droid Turbo shows us that the manufacturer isn’t going to give up and wait for Lenovo’s inspiration. Far from it. The Moto G and Moto X are superb devices and the Droid Turbo looks so epic I’m surprised Hollywood haven’t already made the movie and a sequel.(insert Michael Bay joke here)Motorola President and Chief Operating Officer, Rick Osterloh, has been talking about Moto today and has drawn comparisons between Motorola and Apple from the late 1990s, when the company was clearing its financial difficulties. On the matter, Rick said, “Quite interestingly, what we’ve gone through in the last year and a half is what they went through many years ago.” However, where Rick believes that Motorola is different to Apple is in how the businesses are lining up their strategies. And whilst I don’t want to hate on Apple too much, the fruit company does not appear to have a viable strategy for dealing with what Google are calling “the next billion,” meaning the developing smartphone markets.
You see, Google has Android One, Motorola has the Moto E and Apple simply don’t have an inexpensive iPhone product for emerging economies that is capable of running the latest OS. For all their posturing about Android’s fragmentation, their interpretation of a cheaper iPhone (the 5c) was almost as expensive as the premium model. Rick says that Apple’s reluctance to approach the emerging (and cheaper) handset market creates a “huge vacuum” in emerging markets. “That’s an enormous opportunity,” he said. Samsung are also in the same boat as they, too, do not have a viable emerging markets strategy. Still, whilst Motorola’s cheaper devices are competing at Android One prices, they are not quite Android One devices. It remains to be seen if Motorola will continue to offer the E, or a similar device, after the Lenovo purchase is complete (expected in the next couple of months). But we do know that Motorola is capable of producing an inexpensive and good product.
This is important because in the developed smartphone market – the USA, UK and Continental Europe – we’ve reached the point whereby the majority of smartphone sales are to upgrading customers on their second or subsequent smartphone. We’ll see market share moving between the manufacturers (and platforms) but ultimately, there’s little long term sales growth. In the developed markets, smartphone penetration is still low such that most sales are individuals’ first smartphone. This is where we’re going to see strong growth in the coming years. Motorola have reemerged from the darkness. They’ve managed to be one of the most talked about Android Wear manufacturers thanks to their Moto 360. Rick calls the Moto X “a modest success,” but Moto Builder is being rolled out to other countries and today we’ve seen a 24-hour sale in the UK, mirroring what the business did in the USA. They’re making the right noises, doing the right things. Moto are back. Hello Moto.
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Unread 2014-10-28, 08:54 PM   #73
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That droid turbo looks pretty sweet. Trying to talk myself out of buying one.
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Unread 2014-10-30, 02:14 PM   #74
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Motorola and Lenovo are officially an item







Motorola and Lenovo today announced that they have completed a deal for the latter to acquire the former. Motorola is now a Lenovo company, and what that means for the future is still very unclear at this point. Much like when they were acquired by Google, Motorola has been working in an independent capacity and have carried on business as they always have. The acquisition didn’t change anything about Moto’s plan to seed the market with two of the most exciting smartphones in 2014 with the Moto X and DROID turbo.
Lenovo’s original statement on the acquisition is that they’re hoping to be able to leverage Motorola’s global market share and mind share to help them perform better outside Asian markets. Lenovo has been known to take global brands and succeed with them over time, such as the ThinkPad and IdeaPad business they bought from HP a while back. They continue to command a significant portion of the notebook PC market all this time later.
We’re not sure if we’re to see the same with Motorola. We’d imagine they’d want to keep Motorola’s iconic name attached to the wonderful products they’ve been launching as of late, though if the IBM transition is anything to go by then we wouldn’t necessarily be worried if they decided to scrub Motorola’s name off all their products, either. Lenovo executive Liu Jun commented on the acquisition:
“Motorola has already built solid momentum in the market, and their recent results show consumers are excited about their exceptional products that stand out for their design and simplicity,” said Liu Jun. “With the complementary strengths of our two companies, we expect to sell more than 100 million mobile devices this year – including smartphones and tablets – by leveraging the Lenovo brand’s leading market position in China, our shared momentum in emerging markets, and Motorola’s strong foothold in mature markets like the U.S.”
Of course, it’s much too early to be thinking about any of this considering the ink probably has yet to dry. Let’s hope to hear more about Lenovo’s plans for Motorola in the near future.
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Unread 2015-08-14, 08:53 AM   #75
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Motorola is getting a new CEO, 20% jobs cut and a whole new identity under Lenovo









Well, this isn’t good. It seems Lenovo has had a knee-jerk reaction to news that Motorola didn’t make as much money as they hoped they would. Motorola was blamed for a good chunk of losses in the company’s Q2 2015 performance, but Lenovo suggested they would look to consolidate their side of the mobile business and put all of their muscle into restoring the Chicago company to former glory.
Here’s how they laid it out in their financial report:
Restructuring the Mobile Business Group (MBG) to align smartphone development, production and manufacturing and better leverage the complementary strengths of Lenovo and Motorola. There will be a more-simple, streamlined product portfolio, with fewer, more clearly-differentiated models. A faster, leaner business model will better leverage Lenovo’s global sales force and accelerate the efficiency actions already underway in its global supply chain. MBG will continue to drive the overall mobile business, but will now rely on Motorola to design, develop and manufacture smartphone products.
But it seems that plan won’t come without heavy sacrifices. Sources close to the matter have revealed to Phandroid plans for Motorola to make a big shake up.
They’ll cut 20% of the current jobs Motorola has, for starters, and not all of those jobs are insignificant either: President and CEO Rick Osterloh, who was one of the men responsible for the lean new Motorola we have today, is apparently getting his walking papers. Taking over his position will be Lenovo’s former vice president of mobile devices, Liu Jun.
If you didn’t know, Liu Jun once served on the board for Motorola, but opted to step down from his position as mobile devices VP a couple of months ago for unknown reasons. He remained on Motorola’s board and with Lenovo as a consultant, and now we know what the real deal was: he was being groomed for this shakeup.

Furthermore, Lenovo is planning to close 3 major Motorola offices, and have a majority of the business taking place from Motorola’s current labs situated in Merchandise Mart, a downtown Chicagoan business park.
Other important cuts revealed to Phandroid are the software and services team, the folks who are largely responsible for all the Moto-bred features we love today. Moto Voice. Moto Display. Moto Assist. Etc — the people responsible for those are gone, and will be replaced by Lenovo engineers. It’s our hope that the new guys stay committed to Motorola’s vision of offering no-nonsense software.
There are also more important positions bound to be affected as the Chicago Tribune reports that a vast majority of the job cuts are in non-manufacturing positions. Motorola might cut more than 500 people by the end of it all, according to sources. People flying in from Lenovo’s headquarters in China will be filling a lot of those roles.
We would have never imagined that this is what Lenovo meant when they said they were consolidating their mobile business and putting their weight behind Motorola. Instead, it sounds like they’re consolidating the Motorola we once knew, and injecting their people into it.
For all intents and purposes, the Motorola we once knew and loved is no more. It’s going to be a shell of its former self, though whether that’ll result in good or bad things remains to be seen.
Lenovo doesn’t make bad phones and tablets. Their devices are actually pretty good. Their problem has always been that they could never get far outside of China, and their original purchase of Motorola has always been about changing that. We just hate it didn’t have to happen like this, and we hope things turn out for the better not just for the companies’ sake, but for every individual who was affected by today’s news.
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