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Unread 2017-02-08, 07:16 AM   #101
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Has anyone switched to Fi lately or are still using it? I am curious how the reception is now and if its worth considering as a switch from a grandfathered ATT unlimited data plan?
Fi Subscriber here - Your question is loaded, how much data do you use? Do yu use WiFi connections when you can?

Fi is different, it will use WiFi when it can, and when it can't you pay for the data on the cellular network(s) your using.

Before Fi I averaged about 7-10GB/Month - After Fi (My use patterns did not change) I'm using 2.5-3.5 GB/Month of Cellular data, and another 4-6GB/Month on the WiFi connections.
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Unread 2017-02-08, 10:35 AM   #102
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I'm using 2-4gb usually and one high month of 6. So far I'm saving about $30/mo over my old sprint plan
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Unread 2017-02-08, 10:59 AM   #103
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I switched from FI (~$50-60/mo) to ATT (now paying $115/mo).

I switched because I use my phone for work, and when it stopped working (warranty claim, not using insurance and not my fault it broke) Google said they couldn't get me a replacement for 5 days. I can't go 5 days without a phone, and because you can only put like 4 phones on that network, I couldn't use an old phone. I can't go a full fucking week without a cellphone, that's totally unacceptable. Having a brick and mortar building to go to for services is so much quicker and easier in cases like this.

Besides that though, the service with ATT isn't really much better. I feel like I didn't have a choice because of the above, but removing that from the equation, I am paying twice as much for negligibly better service (though I also worry much less about data usage now, which is very nice) and a much bigger selection of phone options. Again, not considering the above scenario, I do think FI is worth it.
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Unread 2017-02-08, 11:13 PM   #104
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Originally Posted by NachO_SRT View Post
Fi Subscriber here - Your question is loaded, how much data do you use? Do yu use WiFi connections when you can?

Fi is different, it will use WiFi when it can, and when it can't you pay for the data on the cellular network(s) your using.

Before Fi I averaged about 7-10GB/Month - After Fi (My use patterns did not change) I'm using 2.5-3.5 GB/Month of Cellular data, and another 4-6GB/Month on the WiFi connections.
I average around the 7-12gb per month range. I try to use WiFi as much as possible but most of the time its only at home or a few certain friends' or family houses. Otherwise I am on cellular data. My usage will be going down some now because of stricter work rules on cell phones so I am hoping to fall into the 5-7gb range if not less maybe.

The other side of this is a possible switch from iphone to android but I will save that for later.
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Unread 2017-02-08, 11:21 PM   #105
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Originally Posted by SlowTA View Post
I average around the 7-12gb per month range. I try to use WiFi as much as possible but most of the time its only at home or a few certain friends' or family houses. Otherwise I am on cellular data. My usage will be going down some now because of stricter work rules on cell phones so I am hoping to fall into the 5-7gb range if not less maybe.

The other side of this is a possible switch from iphone to android but I will save that for later.
At 5-7gb, you would be at 70-90$/mo

I got my first iPhone with att this year. The battery life isAMAZING compared to any google phone I've had. I prefer android in every single other way though. Android is a great os
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Unread 2017-02-21, 12:37 PM   #106
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Google’s Project Fi starts testing Voice over LTE support

Google’s wireless service called Project Fi has rolled out Voice over LTE service for a subset of its users, the company confirmed this week via an announcement in Google’s product forums. Users will be able to tell that they’ve been added to this lucky group of testers because their signal indicator will continue to display LTE when they’re making or receiving a call, instead of falling to H [for HSPA], Google explains.
The company also confirmed that the test had been underway for a few weeks, as some Project Fi customers had noticed.
Project Fi, by way of background, is an MVNO (mobile virtual network operator), which sees Google working with network partners T-Mobile, Sprint and U.S. Cellular. This is one of the things that makes Google’s service different from other MVNO’s – it doesn’t rely on a single network, but can switch to the best network available at any given time. However, the service is limited to select Google Android phones, including the Pixel, Nexus 6P and Nexus 5X.
According to the Project Fi community manager’s announcement, Voice over LTE (VoLTE) has a number of advantages, including higher quality calls that don’t count toward your data allocation, faster data browsing while on a call, and faster call setup.
This translates into real-world benefits like fewer dropped calls, or being able to navigate in Google Maps while also on the phone without losing your connection.
One caveat: the VoLTE service on Project Fi will only work when users are connected to T-Mobile’s network, as the other network partners have not officially introduced VoLTE support.
VoLTE is one of several additions to Project Fi since its launch. The service has also added features like group plans that can be used with friends and high-speed data while traveling internationally, for example.
Google did not announce a time frame for when VoLTE would roll out to all Project Fi users, but said it would update as the testing progressed.
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Unread 2017-06-20, 01:52 PM   #107
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Slowly but surely, Google is building Project Fi to become a reliable and viable carrier option in a world of carriers looking to take more out of your pocket. The carrier has already introduced its group plan options, but now Google is making it even easier for you to pay for your portion of the bill.

Group Repay is a new feature which will hopefully take the headache out of getting money from others on the plan. The premise is simple – every month, Google will take care of the calculations and then will send a bill reminder to each user, allowing the user to pay for their portion, a fixed amount, or for additional data used over their budget.
The owner of the account can also now set up customizable reminders based on the cost for each person’s plan, and integrates with Google Wallet to send money when its time. Finally, this group repay option will give the plan owner a breakdown of how much each line costs, while also showing when other users have paid or still owe on the plan.
This feature is available now and you can access it via the account billing section within the Settings. Let us know what you think about group repay and if you would like to see more options come to Project Fi.
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Unread 2017-06-30, 09:15 PM   #108
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Project Fi is a pretty good carrier if don't use much cellular data, as it only charges $20/month for the base service and $10 per GB used. But only Google's own devices can be activated on the network, and now that the age of Nexus is over, the only choice is a $650+ phone. To fill the network's mid-range gap, Project Fi announced yesterday that a new device "from a partner" would arrive later this year.
VentureBeat now believes that the mystery phone will be the Moto X4, which is expected to be released in Q4 2017. While the Moto X was previously Motorola's flagship line, the X4 is expected to sit between the Moto G5 and the Moto Z. According to a leaked presentation, it will have a Snapdragon 660 chipset, 4GB of RAM, 64 GB of storage, dual cameras, and a 3,800mAh battery.
As a Project Fi customer, I'm glad to see that the carrier is listening to customers and promises to offer more devices, but I still don't think it's enough. The Nexus 5X was just $199 on Project Fi, and the X4 is expected to be somewhere around $400. There needs to be one more device in the $200-300 price range - something like the Moto G5 Plus.
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Unread 2017-10-03, 10:57 PM   #109
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Project Fi experiments with opt-in data throttling, accidentally deactivates customers' SIMs in the process



Data throttling has been standard practice by carriers for years. At first it mostly applied to customers going over their data limits, but recently carriers have begun throttling certain content (like streaming services) for everyone by default, especially in the face of a less strict FCC. Project Fi has been experimenting with an opt-in (not default) throttling feature, which ended up disabling the SIM cards of some customers.
Earlier today, some Project Fi users began to see alerts that they were being throttled, such as in the tweets below. Naturally, most were confused, considering Fi doesn't throttle users at all.
Hey @projectfi, what's going on? I thought there was no throttling just pay per gb? pic.twitter.com/RGTyIcv49M
— Ty ✌️ (@tsmith) October 3, 2017
Uh, @projectfi would you mind explaining why 2.5GB of data is enough to qualify me for throttling? pic.twitter.com/5XsghRONXf
— Eric Ravenscraft (@LordRavenscraft) October 3, 2017

Others had it even worse, with some customers reporting that their SIM cards were being deactivated, as seen below. The deactivation seemed to only affect T-Mobile connections (Fi uses T-Mobile, Sprint, and US Cellular), but it's still a major problem. Not only do Fi SIM cards use T-Mobile by default, the data SIMs can only connect to T-Mobile.
Comment from discussion Tea_EarlGreyHot's comment from discussion "Incorrect notification on data management".
Comment from discussion sarkomoth's comment from discussion "Incorrect notification on data management".
After all this, a community manager from Project Fi made a post on the /r/ProjectFi subreddit, announcing that the throttling notifications and SIM deactivations were related to an opt-in data throttling feature that is in development. This is the explanation:
Some of you may have received a notification earlier this afternoon regarding data management. Rest assured that this was a mistake, and your service will return to normal shortly.
We’re experimenting with options for users to opt in to throttle their data in certain situations. We’ve heard from many of you that it would be helpful to have greater control over data costs, so we’re looking into adding more options to do this. You can continue to use your data as planned, and as always we’ll give you choice and transparency in your plan.
In the meantime, Fi support is asking affected users to force their phones to use Sprint's network by using a custom dialer code (* # * # 34777 # * # *). You can also install Signal Spy, which makes switching between networks on Fi easier.
Hopefully Project Fi will offer service credits for customers experiencing this problem, because it leaves many without a reliable connection. Let us know in the comments if you're on Fi and having problems - my Fi Pixel seems to be working for the moment.
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Unread 2017-10-04, 10:17 PM   #110
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Google Pixel 2 doesn't need a SIM card, as long as you use Project Fi



The Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL are the first phones to come equipped with eSIM technology, but only subscribers of Project Fi will be able to take advantage of it.
Google's Pixel 2 event was full of announcements, and although we had a pretty good idea of what to expect going into the event, Google still managed to sneak in a few surprises here and there – one of which being eSIM support.

The Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL support the traditional nanoSIM technology that we've seen on smartphones for years, but in addition to this, they'll also come equipped with a new technology called eSIM. Rather than using a traditional card, eSIM allows you to connect to your carrier's network and service right out of the box without any physical card required. This technology has previously been available on gadgets like smartwatches and tablets, but this is the first time it's appeared on a smartphone.
Until other carriers adopt the new tech, only Project Fi subscribers can use the Pixel 2's eSIM tech.
This new tech is undoubtedly cool, but only a small group of people will be able to use it at first. For the time being, the Pixel 2/Pixel 2 XL's eSIM functionality will be limited to subscribers on Project Fi. There's nothing Google can really do about this until other carriers adopt eSIM tech for their own networks, but either way, it's insanely cool that we're one step closer towards a future where physical SIM cards are a thing of the past.
Assuming you're on Project Fi and preordered your Pixel 2, setup should be dead simple when you finally receive your new phone. There will be an option to use the Pixel 2 SIM-free during the setup process, and as long as you're connected to a Wi-Fi network, it shouldn't take long at all to get your service working.
For those of us that aren't on Fi, we'll have to resort to using the Pixel 2's nanoSIM tray (for now). That may well change in the future:
For now, we're piloting eSIM on the newest Pixel devices with Project Fi. We look forward to sharing what we learn and working together with industry partners to encourage more widespread adoption.
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Unread 2018-01-17, 01:08 PM   #111
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Google's Project Fi offers a sort of unlimited plan

"Bill protection" will help heavy data users cap what they spend.












Google's Project Fi wants to help you cap your bill.
Google Google's cell phone service, called Project Fi, is changing how its billing works. Previously offering a simple model of paying for whatever data you use, the plan now caps how high your bill can go if you tend to use a lot of data. This new "bill protection" comes with a catch: Google will cap your speeds if you cross a certain data threshold.
The plan scales based on the number of people you have signed up, but basically, you'll still pay $10 per Gigabyte of data as normal for the first few GBs you use a month. If you're on a single person plan, your monthly bill won't go higher than $80, even if you use more than 6 GB ($10 per GB plus the $20 flat fee for calls and texts).
This feature is called "bill protection" and it's Google's version of the unlimited plans now offered by other major carriers. It's not truly unlimited. If you use more than 15 GB, Google will start capping your speeds, though the company will let you opt out of slower speeds and pay for extra GBs above 15 at the normal rate.
While a speed cap doesn't sound great, the plan actually looks like a good deal for heavy data users without upping the price if you don't use data. You're basically getting GBs seven through fifteen free of charge. The price and GB cap change depending on
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Unread 2018-01-25, 10:40 AM   #112
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Project Fi gets smart replies via the Android Messages app


.adslot_ap2_above_post_body { margin: 10px -10px; } @media (min-width: 540px) { .adslot_ap2_above_post_body { margin: 10px -20px; } } @media (min-width: 768px) { .adslot_ap2_above_post_body { margin: 10px -15px; } } @media (min-width: 960px) { .adslot_ap2_above_post_body { margin: 10px -20px; } } @media (min-width: 1160px) { .adslot_ap2_above_post_body { margin: 10px -30px; } }

Google's smart replies have shown up in a few apps including Inbox (the original), Gmail, and Allo. Now, this handy feature has arrived in the Android Messages app. However, it's not for everyone. This is a feature for Project Fi subscribers only.

Those among you who use Fi might be thinking you've already seen this. Maybe you've even had it for several months. Indeed, some of you have. This is an example of Google's extended unannounced testing—classic Google.
Now, smart replies in Android Messages is an official feature. You need to use the Google app to get the smart replies, but it should be automatic. It'd be nice to get this on other carriers via the Messages app as well. Fingers crossed.
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Unread 2018-01-26, 05:09 AM   #113
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$14.86 this month - I've mastered Wi-Fi Whoring....


Love this carrier.


Signal Spy = Switch between the 3 carriers without issues -just dial a code -
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Unread 2018-05-30, 12:51 PM   #114
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Project Fi doubling phone support with addition of Moto G6, LG G7 ThinQ, and V35 ThinQ



Project Fi may have many fans—after all, it gives you service across three US carriers plus international roaming at an affordable pay-as-you-go rate—but one thing subscribers don't enjoy is the lack of selection when it comes to phones. Fi hears that, and to make up for it, it's adding the Moto G6, LG G7 ThinQ, and LG V35 ThinQ to its lineup. The affordable G6 is even available to pre-order today.

The two LG phones won't be arriving at Fi until "next month," though you can sign up to be notified for each at the listings on Project Fi's site.

For more information on details like specs, you can check out our prior coverage for the Moto G6, LG G7 ThinQ, and LG V35 ThinQ. The V35 was only just announced today, but if you're familiar with past LG V30 phones, you'll get the gist.

Pricing for each covers the low and high-end, with the G6 priced at $199 on Project Fi, while the G7 is $749, and the V35 is a whopping $899. Fi might be bringing more choices, but the price-points may leave something to be desired.
New subscribers can also take advantage of occasional discounts for Fi (like our $20 referral credit), so if the new pricing stuns you a bit, odds are discounts will be coming.
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Unread 2018-06-05, 02:09 PM   #115
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Project Fi group plans now support Family Link-managed child accounts



Google's Project Fi has just announced that its group plans are now family-optimized, with additional support for Family Link-associated children's accounts. In essence, Google is still pushing the same group plans it had before, at the same $5 per person discount, but as of today you can add children under 13 to your Fi group plan and continue to manage their device use via Family Link.

View image on Twitter


Project Fi
@projectfi





Starting now, you can bring the whole family to your plan, no matter their age. https://goo.gl/8QEqWk
11:18 AM - Jun 5, 2018


Over the last year or so, Google's been quite aggressive at expanding the reach and utility of Family Link, and Project Fi appears to be the latest to get its attention.

So far as we can tell, the only real change associated with today's announcement is that children's Google accounts managed via Family Link can now be added to Project Fi group plans. Most of the other functionality Google describes was previously present via the existing management tools for group plans in Project Fi and the Family Link app, which already allows you to manage and monitor use of your children's phones.
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Unread 2018-06-26, 02:52 PM   #116
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Why doesn't Project Fi support RCS yet, Google?




Back in April, Google announced that it was pausing work on its Allo chat client to focus more on its RCS-enabled texting app, Android Messages. News of an upcoming web client for Messages was released alongside the announcement (something we’d known about for months), making it seem like Google was all-in on its SMS and RCS platform going forward. Now, that web client has arrived, and RCS continues its rollout around the world. The one, slight wrinkle? Google’s branded carrier, Project Fi, doesn’t even support RCS. And there’s still no timeline as to when it will.

RCS (Rich Communication Services) has been hailed as the ‘iMessage for Android,’ meant to finally bridge the feature gap between Apple’s closed communication platform and the ancient SMS standard. RCS chat won’t actually work with iMessage, of course - Apple doesn’t want it to (which is to say, you’ll be stuck with regular SMS when chatting with iPhone users for the foreseeable future). But if Google’s vision is to be believed, RCS will eventually become just as ubiquitous and universal as SMS, without all of the annoying limitations of a technology that is rapidly approaching its 30th birthday.

RCS supports features like typing status indicators, rich media content (read: no more awful MMS quality videos), inline links, no practical character limit, and a host of other improvements meant to make it a modern, robust chat platform.

While those of you outside the US (and some inside) are likely saying “who cares about an SMS replacement?” there remains substantial demand for such a thing in America. SMS became highly popular in the US because carriers here priced text messaging fairly competitively in the dumbphone days, and by the time most modern smartphones rolled around, pretty much every US carrier offered unlimited texting for a reasonable fee - and pretty much everyone was using it. The iPhone even relied solely on SMS for a while, as the first iteration of iMessage didn’t launch until iOS 5 in 2011.

But all these years later, it’s iMessage, ironically, that has kept SMS around. The immense popularity of Apple’s smartphone in this country made iMessage an overnight success, but Apple understood that its customers still needed to communicate with people on feature phones or competing smartphone platforms. The solution? Bake SMS directly into iMessage. This made SMS the most convenient way to communicate with someone with an iPhone if you didn’t have an iPhone yourself, and vice versa. Outside America, the iPhone’s growth was slower and competing platforms like Android were more successful. And, more importantly, SMS was and often still is expensive in many countries, which led to the rise of free, web-based chat services like WhatsApp, Telegram, LINE, WeChat, and others (like Google Hangouts or Facebook Messenger). In the US, though, cheap, abundant, and interoperable SMS was king.



The launch of the web interface for Android Messages would have been a perfect time for Project Fi's RCS unveil. Image via The Verge.

SMS, though, has reigned only by virtue of an absent heir-apparent. SMS is slow, unreliable, extremely feature-poor, and relies on a phone number - something that is highly identifiable and easily discoverable - making it subject to abuse. RCS is meant to address much of this, and Google has been at the forefront of pushing the standard ahead. Why, then, does its own wireless provider quite conspicuously lack the feature?


Signs that Google is testing RCS among Fi users have occasionally been spotted, but Google itself has never commented on when Project Fi will support RCS (when asked, Google was willing to confirm to us RCS is coming to Fi, but no timeline was provided). Speculation on this issue has generally centered in on a logical conclusion: because Project Fi is spread across several networks, many believe all the networks Fi operates on must support RCS before it is enabled.

Google was so eager to launch RCS last year that it presented a model where carriers could utilize a Google-operated “hub” to send messages from their subscribers to carriers on others, easing the process of adoption. Nobody got on board, which makes Google’s story about carrier enthusiasm for the standard a little hard to swallow.
Still, you’d have to think a standard as modern and internet-based as RCS wouldn’t have to worry about something as silly as network-level adoption, right? Isn’t this all just easily virtualized bits and bytes that can be run on the virtual Project Fi network (Project Fi is an MVNO - Mobile Virtual Network Operator). The short answer is: we don’t know. But given how keen Google has been to push RCS and even go out of its way to promote the standard by announcing the effective death of its own proprietary chat platform, you’d have to be nuts to think Google wouldn’t want to make Project Fi a showcase for that standard. And yet, here we are.

Hopefully, we won't be "here" much longer.
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