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Unread 2018-03-29, 01:39 PM   #11126
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Image Source: Zach Epstein, BGR



Galaxy Note 9 may launch earlier than expected, but without the feature people are buzzing about




Stop me if you’ve heard this before, but Samsung’s hottest new smartphone is rumored to launch well ahead of its due date. We’re now talking about the Galaxy Note 9, which could launch as early as July. Samsung is apparently looking to beat Apple’s new iPhones to market, but also to make up for Galaxy S9 sales that have apparently fallen well short of expectations.
Early Galaxy S9 rumors also claimed that Samsung was eying a January 2018 launch to counter the then-popular iPhone X. As we approached January, those rumors died down, and Samsung stuck to its regular MWC announcement schedule for the Galaxy S series. To be fair, though, an early Note 9 launch is certainly possible. Samsung has in the recent past released flagship products ahead of schedule. The Galaxy Note 7 is one such example, but we all know how that turned out.




The new report comes out of Korea, where The Investor has learned that Samsung is said to already be mass-producing its OLED displays for the Galaxy Note 9. It’s not unusual for Samsung to start preparations for the mass-production of a new device well in advance of its actual launch. It’s how smartphone manufacturing works. But the report says Samsung Display will kick off production in April, which would be about two months earlier than the usual June kickoff for Note series phones.
Samsung is supposedly reacting to the “less than stellar” sales performance of the Galaxy S9, but also to the fact that Apple’s best 2018 iPhones are supposed to arrive on time this year. Last fall, the “boring” iPhone 8 series launched in September, just as expected, while the iPhone X didn’t hit stores until early November. Reports have claimed that Apple is already taking several steps to ensure there won’t be any delays this year caused by bottlenecks in the production of the Face ID camera system.
The Galaxy Note 8 was unveiled on August 23rd, hitting stores on September 15th. The Note 7, meanwhile, was released almost a month earlier in the summer of 2016, on August 16th, two weeks after its August 2nd unveiling.
The Investor also provides an interesting detail about the Galaxy Note 9’s screen. Apparently, the display won’t feature a built-in fingerprint sensor, which is the potential feature that has everyone buzzing. A few weeks ago, a report said Samsung ditched such plans, while a different rumor claimed that Samsung was still planning to include the feature.
Considering what Samsung did with the Galaxy S9 this year, we expect the Galaxy Note 9 to be very similar to its predecessor. The Investor only mentions the screen size of the handset, which measures 6.38 inches, or 0.06 inches bigger than the Note 8’s screen.



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Unread 2018-03-29, 01:41 PM   #11127
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Most new Android phones this year are iPhone X clones, but this app will de-notch them for free




Ahh, the notch. If there’s one trend that defines the current era of smartphone design, it’s Apple’s notch on the iPhone X. Apple wasn’t the first company to cut a chunk out of the top of a smartphone display, of course. But now that it has, Android phone makers around the world are tripping over themselves to copy Apple’s design. In fact, nearly every Android smartphone vendor out there is ripping off the iPhone X right now. Seriously, it’s insane. In fact, two of the only big-name smartphone brands that didn’t copy the iPhone X with their latest flagship phones are Samsung and Xiaomi, two of the most notorious Apple copycats in history!
Android fans really, really seem to hate the notch on Apple’s iPhone X, which is why it’s extra sad that all these Android companies are copying it so shamelessly. If you’re an Android users who isn’t terribly excited about having a notch on

Apple included a notch on the iPhone X for a very simple and sensible reason. The company wanted to maintain a uniform bezel around as much of the phone’s display as possible, yet it needed room for the iPhone X’s complex TrueDepth camera and sensors that enable Face ID. Neither of those things can be said of the Android clones that have stolen Apple’s iPhone X design. They still have big “chins” on the bottom because they don’t have the resources or the know-how to pull off Apple’s folded OLED display design, and none of them have complex 3D facial recognition systems above their displays. Long story short, they’re just trying to make their phones look like an iPhone.
Of course, the problem is that many people don’t want an iPhone. This is especially true for hardcore Android fans, who tend to immediately dislike anything that has to do with Apple. Since most new flagship Android phones look like the iPhone X though — including new and upcoming phones from popular brands like LG, Asus, Huawei, and OnePlus — these people might have precious few choices if they hope to avoid the notch.
Thankfully, there’s light at the end of the tunnel.
As noted in a post on the Xda-developers blog, a new app in the Google Play store is ready to address the issue. The appropriately named Nacho Notch — Notch Hider app does exactly what you might think: it hides the notch by making the background of the “ears” on either side of the notch black. Status information and notifications are still displayed, of course. And best of all, it’s completely free.

Here’s the full description from the Play store:
Maybe you have a phone with a notch, maybe you don’t. If you do, you might also be annoyed by having this black blob in the middle of a light-colored status bar most of the time.
If this description fits you, you probably want this app. Nacho Notch colors the status bar black while the device is in the portrait orientation, making it better fit with the notch (thereby “hiding” it).
Even if you don’t have a notch, but still want a black status bar, you can use the app too. It dynamically finds the height of your statusbar, so you won’t be dealing with too little or too much height, or finnicky manual sizing.
IMPORTANT:
There is no launcher icon nor activity! To enable, you simply need to add the Quick Tile to your notification center.

Idea by Mishaal Rahman of XDA Developers
GitHub: https://github.com/zacharee/NachoNotch


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Unread 2018-03-30, 09:44 AM   #11128
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Image Source: Zach Epstein, BGR



Hilarious: LG asked Reddit’s Android users what they think about the notch, then deleted the post



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The iPhone X notch cloning business is getting ridiculous, especially when Android makers pretend they’re not copying Apple. Companies like Asus and Huawei went ahead and launched notched devices while taking hits at the iPhone maker and bragging their notch designs are betters. Smaller Chinese companies also unveiled iPhone X clones without explaining their design decision.
Earlier this week, however, OnePlus thought it’d be best to try to get in front of the issue, and went out of its way to convince customers that Apple’s notch design is the only way to go. LG then followed with a borderline hilarious move. The company, which is already working on an LG G7 that supposedly packs a top notch like the iPhone X, went on Reddit to ask Android fans what they think about notches. Things went sour fast, and the post was deleted.




Spotted initially by Android Police, the Reddit post titled What are your thoughts on “the Notch”? was removed. Apparently, people really hate the notch, and LG wasn’t really happy with the answers it received. Here’s what the post read originally:
We’ve seen a LOT of comments around “The Notch” over the past few weeks, from people who love the quick access to the menu to those that hate the wasted screen space. We would love to gather some more feedback to share with our R&D team – and this is where you come in. So… what do you think? Love the Notch? Or is it Notch your thing?
Let’s take a second to appreciate how hilarious this post is. We’ve got a major smartphone maker asking Reddit users what they think about a phone feature that’s not officially confirm to hit LG devices, a design was made popular by Apple’s iPhone.
Moderators then locked the post, preventing others from replying. At this time, the post has 376 upvotes and 907 comments.
The account that started the tread is called LG_Support and was verified by Reddit’s moderators. While it’s always possible that someone tried to pose as LG execs, the more likely explanation is that LG hated all the backlash.

Does that mean LG won’t go forward with its notch plans? That’s hardly likely. The handset that was shown behind closed doors at MWC was months in the making, and it’s not like LG will just cancel it and replace it with something else just because the Reddit Android community hates notches.
What is interesting about LG’s G7, or whatever they’re going to call it, is that LG ordered a revision of the phone, according to reports that emerged in mid-January. Other rumors said that some employees were not happy that LG decided to copy Apple design.
The LG G7 should be launched at some point in summer.



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Unread 2018-03-30, 10:08 AM   #11129
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Android P feature spotlight: Here’s how to bring back System UI Tuner




Sometimes Google takes features away, but sometimes they're just hiding. Turns out, Android P still does have the System UI Tuner that we previously thought was removed. It's just not user-facing anymore. Interested parties can still access that hidden list of UI modifications, you just have to do it the long way, and we've got two methods here.

Turns out, that related activities for the System UI tuner are still present in the current developer preview for Android P, just nothing in the current developer preview is set to point at it. However, it can be accessed via manual means, such as ADB. To get there, just run the command below:


Quote:
adb shell am start com.android.systemui/com.android.systemui.DemoMode


Although that command uses the "DemoMode" intent, it actually takes you to the System UI Tuner page.
There are a few other less technical workarounds, though. For example, Nova Launcher provides a widget for accessing system activities. So fret not if you aren't cool mucking about in ADB, we've conveniently put together a short guide on how to set it up to give you a shortcut to the System UI Tuner activity in Nova Launcher, and each step is demonstrated in the gallery below.

PREVIOUS












The easiest way to get to it is via Nova Launcher, as discovered by one of our readers. Just create an "Activities" widget pointing at it. You can do that by long pressing the home screen in Nova Launcher, select Widgets -> Nova Launcher -> Activities, long-press and drag to your home screen. Then scroll down to System UI and select System UI demo mode at the bottom. Voila!
We'll have to wait and see if Google plans on actually bringing System UI Tuner back, or if it's going to remove these last vestiges of it sometime later. But in the meantime, it's still there, and you can access it.
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Unread 2018-04-02, 08:33 AM   #11130
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LG G7 CAD renders leak, revealing display notch and headphone jack



  • The rumor mill for LG's upcoming G7 has had an interesting ride, with reported name changes, scrapping of an existing design, and so on. Most recently, we saw a video leak of the "G7 (Neo),"which was later said by Evan Blass to simply be the standard G7. These latest CAD renderings, courtesy of OnLeaks, confirm what we'd previously seen.


    OnLeaks collaborated with Mr. Phone to unveil this set of renderings, as well as a 360-degree video. What we see is basically what we expected after seeing the G7 (Neo) leak, though these images are less pixelated and show off more angles of the G7. For instance, we didn't previously know that the phone would have a headphone jack.
Up front, the nearly bezel-less display is marred only by the notch that we knew was coming. The bottom reveals a headphone jack on the left, as well as a USB Type-C charging port in the middle and a speaker on the right. The frame is metal, which means that antenna lines are required.
The left side of the phone has one button, likely the power button. LG's been using the rear-mounted fingerprint sensor as the power button on its phones for many years, but it looks like that's about to change. The right side has three buttons; two of them are for volume controls, but we're not actually sure what the one on the bottom does. Perhaps LG is preparing a Bixby competitor?
Out back, we see a vertically-oriented dual camera setup with a fingerprint sensor directly below. As it is on the G6, the back is made of curved glass. There's not much to see on the top aside from two microphones.
The G7 has been rumored to be unveiled in June. If that's to be trusted, we can expect a new LG flagship in around two months. And based on the specs we've heard, which include a 6.0" OLED (or LCD?), Snapdragon 845, 4GB/6GB of RAM, dual 16MP sensors, the flagship competition may be getting a little more fierce.

Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDsQXjMq4P4

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Unread 2018-04-02, 09:19 AM   #11131
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Google is making a cheaper Pixel 3 model, but don’t call it a Nexus





Google will have three devices in its Pixel 3 lineup this year, a new report says, including an affordable model. But before you get too excited about Google bringing one of the best things about the Nexus line to the Pixel family, you should know this affordable Pixel handset is supposedly going to target India and similar markets. In other words, it might not even be sold in the United States or other top markets.
Also of note, the third new Pixel 3 phone will supposedly be a mid-range device, meaning that it won’t share some of the specs and features Google has cooked up for its Pixel 3 flagships.




Google has formalized its strategy for India, which includes the rollout of several types of products, including the mid-range Pixel 3 phone, according to four senior industry executives who talked to ET Tech. Google is also bringing its smart home products to the country, including Home and Nest devices, as well as the pricey Pixelbook laptop.
The company will supposedly expand its presence when it comes to distribution channels, focusing on neighborhood mobile phone stores which accounted for 36% of Pixel sales in India. Online sales, meanwhile are reportedly responsible for 38% of Pixel sales.
Specs for the mid-range Pixel 3 phone were not mentioned, but the report does note that the mid-range model could be launched in India as soon as July or August. The actual price of the cheaper handset hasn’t been divulged.
The flagship Pixel 3 models may hit the market around Diwali, which is the Hindu festival of lights that’s celebrated every autumn. Diwali 2018 starts on November 6th. Google usually unveils its new Pixel hardware in early October, with phones shipping by the middle of the month.



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Unread 2018-04-02, 12:23 PM   #11132
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Exclusive: Moto G6 Display, Camera, Software Features In Detail


The Moto G6 has been the subject of a number of leaks over the past few weeks, with one of the most recent being the surfacing of the phone on TENAA. Typical of this type of listing, images of the device, as well as some basic spec information was provided. AndroidHeadlines can now further confirm most of those spec details, as well as provide further background on them thanks to seen in-house Motorola documentation provided to us by a reliable source. To protect the identity of the source, AndroidHeadlines will not be publishing images of the documentation. All of the details listed below are taken directly from the documents.

Display and design
The Moto G6 will be marketed with the main selling points: display, cameras, and battery life. In line with previous leaks, the screen will be a “new” 5.7-inch display. It will be marketed as a “Max Vision” display and does adopt an 18:9 aspect ratio. Motorola specifically highlights the selling point as a ‘big screen within a small body’ thanks to its “compact” and edge-to-edge design which results in “virtually no bezel.” The Moto G6 is listed with a “Full HD” display, although due to the aspect ratio in use, it is presumed this will actually be Full HD+ (2,160 x 1,080). The display is protected by Gorilla Glass 3 and will once again support Attentive display – ensuring the screen remains on when the user is looking at it

Sticking with the design, the Moto G6 will include a “premium 3D glass back” which is designed to reflect light differently depending on the angle. Likewise, the body itself will be splash-resistant due to the inclusion of P2i nano-coating protection. This means the Moto G6 is protected against “moderate exposure” to water encounters – it is not waterproof but will be able to withstand light rain, spills, and splashes. The Moto G6 will also feature a microSD card slot for expanded storage – supporting cards up to 128GB.
Cameras
In line with previous leaks, the Moto G6 will indeed feature a dual rear camera setup. The seen documents do not specify the exact configuration, although previous leaks have suggested 12-megapixel and 5-megapixel cameras. Though AndroidHeadlines can confirm the single front-facing camera will be an 8-megapixel unit. Speaking of the front-facing camera, one of its main selling points is support for facial recognition — “Face unlock” — software allowing users to unlock their phone just by looking at it. In addition to also sporting an ultra wide-angle mode for those times when a group selfie is needed.
As for the dual rear camera setup, what is clear is the emphasis Motorola is placing on the camera software. First up, the Moto G6 will be able to blur image backgrounds (and foregrounds) through the use of “Selective focus.” The blurring is only one novelty aspect that can be applied to the background as users will also be able to swap backgrounds in images. This feature is described as a “Cutout” and the idea is that users can pull a background from any photo in their Google Photos account and apply that background to the new image. In theory, the user can take an image of someone and then change the background to suggest the subject is at the beach, in the office, or even in space. As well as changing backgrounds, users will also be able to — in real-time — apply “animated face filters.” The cameras on the Moto G6 will also be of the smarter variety. This is best summed up through the use of artificial intelligence (AI) to take advantage of landmark and object recognition. In principle, this sounds very much the same as Google Lens, although Motorola has not specifically mentioned Google Lens in the documentation. In either case, users will be able to aim the camera at a landmark or an object and the software will initiate a prompt asking whether the user would like to learn more about the landmark or object. Alternatively, by pointing the camera at a physical document, the user will be able to have the text scanned to a digital form which can then be quickly added to an email, a message, or anything else where a copy/paste function is available. At launch, this feature will only support text in English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.
Additional software features for the rear cameras include the ability to add color to black-and-white images or highlight a color in an existing image. For example, the user will be able to highlight a color in a subject’s face and turn everything other than the highlighted color to black and white. In addition, the Moto G6 will house the ability for the camera to take multiple images at once and for the user to choose the “best shot” based on recommendations by the software. Likewise, “Active photos” will take a short video each time an image is captured. A “Beautification mode” will be included for those who want to jazz up selfies while those looking for greater granular control over aspects such as focus, exposure compensation, ISO, shutter speed, and white balance, will be able to have it through the Moto G6’s manual mode.
Battery life, performance, security and software
The Moto G6 will be powered by a 3,000 mAh capacity battery. According to Motorola, the battery will be enough to last “a full day” and will support Motorola’s TurboPower technology – compatible TurboPower charger will be included in the box. Without providing specifics, Motorola states users can expect “hours of power” in minutes. AndroidHeadlines can also confirm the Moto G6 will employ the help of a Qualcomm Snapdragon 450 octa-core SoC (clocked at 1.8 GHz) along with an Adreno 506 GPU.
At the software level, and with this being a Moto-branded phone it should not be a surprise to learn the Moto G6 is now confirmed as coming with all the usual Moto-related features, including support for Moto Actions, Moto Display, Moto Voice and Moto Key. The latter of which debuted on the Moto X4 and allows the use of the fingerprint sensor to unlock more than just the phone. For example, apps, websites, and Windows-based laptops. Essentially, removing the need to use passwords and typical login credentials altogether. On the fingerprint sensor topic, not only can the upcoming Android phone utilize Moto Key for a password-free lifestyle, but it also supports gestures. This works in much the same way as it does on the Moto G5 line, with the user able to swipe left to go back, swipe right right to access recents, and tap once to go home. Omitting the need for on-screen navigation buttons. NFC support is also included, allowing the fingerprint reader to be used for mobile payment purposes. Lastly, additional audio features will be in play, including free access to FM radio and Dolby Audio support.
Summary
Cutting to the chase, the Moto G6 will feature a 5.7-inch “Max Vision” display along with an 18:9 aspect ratio and an FHD+ resolution. The Moto G6 will also feature a 3D glass back, a Qualcomm Snapdragon 450 octa-core SoC, a dual rear camera setup, an 8-megapixel front-facing camera, a splash-resistant level of elements protection, and a 3,000 mAh capacity TurboPower-supported battery. In addition to a ‘smarter’ camera experience, a wealth of Moto-related functionalities, and a feature-rich fingerprint sensor.
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Unread 2018-04-02, 12:24 PM   #11133
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Exclusive: Moto G6 Play Confirmed Features In Detail


Late last week, AndroidHeadlines provided comprehensive details on Motorola’s upcoming Moto G6 smartphone. Now, the same level of information is available for one of the sibling devices expected to launch with the standard Moto G6. This is the Moto G6 Play. Some of the specs on this device leaked over the weekend and AndroidHeadlines is able to confirm most of the information as being correct, as well as padding out those specs and features in more detail, including the phone’s processor of choice. As was the case with the previous Moto G6 post, the information detailed here has come from the same reliable source and is based on in-house Motorola documentation seen by AndroidHeadlines. To protect the identity of the source, the documents themselves will not be published.

Display and design
With the Moto G6 Play being a G6 variant, there is significant overlap between the two devices and this is most evident at the display and design level. To briefly recap on the common features between the two models, AndroidHeadlines can confirm the Moto G6 Play will feature an edge-to-edge 5.7-inch “Max Vision” display. Although compared to the standard model, the Play version will come with a downgraded resolution, HD+. The “+” and the seen documentation confirm the use of an 18:9 aspect ratio. The design of the Moto G6 Play is generally in line with the standard model including the same Gorilla Glass 3 protection, as well as the use of P2i nano-coating for a splash-resistant level of protection – neither Moto G6 model will be waterproof. For more detailed information on any of these aspects, as well as the standard Moto G6 model, see here.

Cameras
Cameras are one of the main areas of difference between the Moto G6 and G6 Play as unlike the standard model, the G6 Play does not feature a dual rear camera setup. Instead, AndroidHeadlines can confirm the Moto G6 Play employs a single 13-megapixel rear camera. In spite of this, Motorola is positioning the G6 Play as a camera-focused smartphone due to the software tweaks and enhancements on offer. Most of these features are again common to both G6 models and include “Quick Capture” to allow the user to very quickly launch the camera, “Best Shot” where the software is primed to take multiple images each time an image is taken with the goal of recommending the best shot to the user. As well as greater granular control of focus, exposure compensation, ISO, shutter speed, and white balance, through the software’s “Manual Mode.” In contrast, the front-facing camera is now confirmed as a 5-megapixel unit which features a “Beautification Mode” to improve the quality of selfies.
Performance, security, and software
Generally speaking, much of the performance software is exactly the same as the standard Moto G6 model, although there does seem to be one interesting difference. While the Moto G6 features a Qualcomm Snapdragon 450, AndroidHeadlines can confirm the Moto G6 Play will be powered by the Snapdragon 427 quad-core SoC (clocked at 1.4 GHz) along with an Adreno 308 GPU. Otherwise, users of either model can expect a very similar software experience, including access to the same suite of exclusive Moto-branded features, free FM radio access, Dolby Audio support, and the same fingerprint experience – including Moto Key support. Again, for more details on any of these points, see here.
Battery life
Overall, battery life is going to be the clear defining difference between the standard model and the Play version, and the aspect Motorola will likely mostly focus on when marketing the Play model. In terms of straight numbers, AndroidHeadlines can confirm the Moto G6 Play will arrive with a 4,000 mAh battery compared to the standard Moto G6’s 3,000 mAh battery. Motorola will state the battery capacity of the G6 Play will allow the phone to stay powered for “up to 36 hours.” The Moto G6 Play will also support the company’s TurboPower charging solution. When coupled with the included 10-watt charger, the Moto G6 Play will be able to receive “hours of power” in a matter of minutes.
Summary
To briefly recap in a more condensed manner, the Moto G6 Play will feature a 5.7-inch “Max Vision” display along with an 18:9 aspect ratio resulting in an HD+ resolution. The Moto G6 Play will come powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 427 quad-core SoC, a 13-megapixel rear camera, 5-megapixel front-facing camera, a splash-resistant level of protection (not waterproof), and a 4,000 mAh TurboPower-supported battery.
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Unread 2018-04-05, 11:31 AM   #11134
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Pixel 3 makes its debut on Google’s Android project site





Google’s Pixel smartphone lineup isn’t the best-selling smartphone line in the world. In fact, it’s nowhere close, with recent estimates suggesting that Google sold just 3.9 million Pixel phones globally in 2017. To put that in context, Apple sells more smartphones than that in a single day when new iPhone models first go on sale. But what the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL lack in sales, they make up for in adoration from hardcore Android fans. That makes sense, of course, since Google’s Pixel phones are the only handsets that offer a pure Android experience and receive new software updates as soon as they’re made available.
Since the current Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL are so widely adored by Android fans, it stands to reason that their successors are hotly anticipated. Early details surrounding the Pixel 3 series began to leak not long ago, and now we have another first to report in the long run up to Google’s Pixel 3 release.



Recent reports revealed a big surprise for Google’s unreleased Pixel 3 phones: there will be three of them. In addition to the Pixel 3 and the Pixel 3 XL everyone is expecting, Google is also said to be working on a third new Pixel 3 phone that comes with some good news and some bad news. The good news is that this third new Pixel phone will apparently be an affordable Android Go phone, likely filling the void left by Google’s dead Nexus smartphone line. The bad news is that it’s reportedly only intended for a few emerging markets, and it likely won’t be available in the United States.
If you’re a Google phone fan who’s anxious to see how Google’s acqui-hire of HTC’s smartphone engineering team pans out this year, we’ve got a tiny bit of news for you on Thursday. For the first time, Google’s Pixel 3 has been mentioned on the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) website’s issue tracker. As fans will know, AOSP mentions are always an important point in the leak cycle, and more details surrounding Google’s unreleased phones typically follow soon after..
This time around, the Pixel 3 was spotted by a blogger from xda-developers in a commit titled “Cherrypick ‘Add device config to decide which Auto Selection Network UI to use.'” Here’s the text from the commit:
This change added the config because the HAL V_1_2 only supports Pixel 3, and the new Auto Selection Network UI is based on HAL V_1_2. So we set the flag to decide which Auto Selection Network UI should be used based in the device type.
It’s not terribly exciting, though xda-developers explains that it does make mention of a previously unknown networking feature in Android P. Of course, we’re not sure anyone really cares that Google is updating its “scan networks” feature in Android P. Plenty of people care about the Pixel 3 though, and we can expect to see more new details trickle out in the coming weeks and months.




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Unread 2018-04-05, 11:32 AM   #11135
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Google unveiled its Pixel and Pixel XL handsets during a big press conference in October 2016, and it was immediately clear that the company meant business. The company had previously launched Nexus-branded smartphones that were built and marketed in partnership with various Android vendors, but these new handsets were all Google, from top to bottom. Released alongside new Nexus phones, they might have made Google a player at both the high end of the market and in the mid-range market. Instead, Google chose to abandon its Nexus program after the final two Nexus phone models were released in 2015.
But as it turns out, Google may have had a plan brewing all along that would eventually see its Nexus phones reborn as something new. And if recent reports pan out, the Nexus line’s rebirth is slated to take place this year.



Android fans absolutely adored Google’s Nexus phone lineup for a number of reasons. These sleek phones really did check every important box. They offered a “pure” Android experience in an era when vendors’ Android skins had gotten completely out of control. Nexus phones also featured impressive designs and specs while still managing to cost significantly less than comparable phone models released by companies like Samsung, LG, and HTC. The Nexus program was a fantastic initiative by Google, and it seemed like the sky was the limit.
Then, in 2016, Google completely abandoned the program. Rather than continue to build affordable pure Android phones in conjunction with various vendor partners, Google launched the Pixel phone line. The Pixel and Pixel XL were both premium phones with premium price tags, leaving Android users no remaining options when it came to an affordable pure Android experience on a smartphone.
The phone’s successors, the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL, were more of the same: premium phones with hefty price tags. But in 2018, it appears as though Google is changing its strategy.
A report from earlier this week suggested that this year, Google will release not two, but three different Pixel smartphone models. The Pixel 3 will succeed the current-generation Pixel 2, while the Pixel 3 XL will step into the shoes currently filled by the Pixel 2 XL phablet. But the report said that Google also plans to launch a third new model with one key feature no other Pixel phone has ever had: An affordable price tag.
Today, a new report offers additional information about this mysterious third Pixel 3 phone Google is rumored to be cooking up. According to a leak on a Chinese tech blog called Qooah, the new entry-level Pixel 3 phone Google plans to release this year is codenamed “Desire.” That’s interesting, of course, because Google recently acqui-hired a huge portion of HTC’s smartphone engineering team, and HTC’s mid-range smartphone line is called Desire.
But far more interesting than that tidbit is another piece of the rumor shared by Qooah. A leaked screenshot appears to reveal that Google’s upcoming third Pixel 3 phone will run Android One.

As you’ll recall, Android Go is a stripped down version of Android that is optimized to run on entry-level hardware. The goal here is to provide an Android user experience on low-cost phones that is as fast and smooth as the Android user experience on high-end phones. Android Go isn’t quite on par with premium phones just yet, but it comes closer than one might expect, considering how well it performs on low-end phones.
Now, for the bad news. The report from earlier this week suggested that this entry-level version of Google’s Pixel 3 likely isn’t being prepped for a wide release. Instead, it’ll be targeted only to certain markets such as India, where low-cost handsets dominate smartphone sales.





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Unread 2018-04-05, 11:58 AM   #11136
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Android P initial impressions: Two weeks daily driving Google's latest OS



Android P is the latest iteration of Google’s mobile operating system, and it’s been available to test as a Developer Preview on the company’s Pixel phones for about a month now. I flashed the preview on my Pixel 2 XL a few weeks ago and have been using the phone as my daily driver since.
Overall, this is easily the most polished day-one build Google has released. I’m not having any battery drain issues, annoying app crashes, or random reboots. The P preview is, dare I say, very usable.
Still, flashing an early preview to your personal phone generally isn’t advisable. They’re buggy, unstable, and often break third-party apps. And, it’s true: the first P preview has its problems. Some apps, like Lyft, just don’t work for me (requesting a ride just displays a loading interface indefinitely). Bluetooth, as it has been on every Android developer preview I’ve ever used, is exceptionally buggy at times. And there are occasional graphical glitches that I’ve never had using release-grade software on my Pixel 2 XL. None of these issues render my phone unusable, but they’re annoying enough that I still don’t recommend most people run the preview software. I have a drawer full of phones I can fall back on should I encounter a truly experience-breaking bug - most people don’t have that luxury.
So, for the curious but not-quite-ready-to-flash, or just for those without a Google device to try Android P on, I thought I’d give an overview of my thoughts on the new OS so far.
Cosmetics: Moving toward a responsive interface

As with essentially every major Android release, Google has restyled much of Android’s interface. Many people don’t like this, and simply for the fact that it can feel like change for change’s sake.
Settings is looking rather... colorful these days.
The most divisive aspect of P’s new aesthetic is the heavy usage of white in areas like the settings app, which also now sports some rather colorful icon accents. Google has attempted to introduce a more responsive interface, though, continuing its efforts to provide basic dark and light theming depending on the device’s current wallpaper. A light wallpaper will color elements like the quick settings toggles, app drawer, and volume interface in white and light-gray shades. A dark one will cause the system to switch those elements for very dark grays.
In theory, Android's light and dark theming is great...
In theory, this is a good idea. In practice, we run into the issue of things like notification cards, the Google Feed pane, and settings app all heavily utilizing white and light gray. This produces intense visual clashing. As much as I’d like to use the darker interface - especially at night - the searing white contrast of the the white notification cards against the dark quick settings area is something I find difficult to put up with in practice.
... in practice, it's often clash central.
I have a feeling Google understands this is a problem. Given that Android has slowly inched toward having something resembling a theming framework over the years, I think we are finally seeing Google attempt to develop a cosmetically responsive operating system. As to a user-facing theme engine, I think I can safely tell you to keep dreaming - I really doubt that’s happening in Android P, or probably ever.
I don’t think we’ll see Google’s ideas around responsive system theming really fleshed out until the third-generation Pixel phones launch later this year, though. That’s because for whatever work the Android team is doing around responsive theming, it’s the Pixel software team that will have to dig in to all of the various core applications and services on those new phones to produce a more system-wide feel to it. Ideally, this would also involve working with various Google product teams - Gmail, Maps, Search, Photos, Play Store, and others - to develop dark themes for their applications.
Hopefully dark notification cards, a dark settings app, and a dark version of the feed are things we’ll see in upcoming previews
Whether such an initiative could be substantially completed by the time the Pixel 3 launches, I don’t know. Google’s product teams are notorious for their wildly varying lag time in terms of adopting new features and supporting new hardware. But I think the writing is on the wall: Android P expands responsive theming, and it seems a given that this effort will eventually expand beyond OS elements and into other device applications. Maybe, one day, even to third party apps.
Hopefully dark notification cards, a dark settings app, and a dark version of the feed are things we’ll see in upcoming previews. Because as is, the lack of consistency is a bit of an eyesore. It is a preview, though - it is by definition unfinished. So, for everyone moaning about the excessive use of white, maybe wait until the preview is over to pass judgment. Google is clearly working on responding to the demand for a dark interface. Hopefully much of that work is completed in this Android release, not the next one.
Features: There’s stuff you’ll actually appreciate here

Even as Android matures, Google hasn’t slowed iteration of new features and APIs in the OS. That’s one of the things I truly love about Android, and keeps me coming back to Google’s interpretation of the platform every year (as opposed to a skinned experienced, like TouchWiz). I want the newest features, and Android P already has a handful I’d consider indispensable. (For a full list, check out our post here.)
Smart auto-rotate takes the pain out of auto-rotate.
Smart auto-rotate is hands-down one of my favorite changes. When auto-rotate is turned off in Android P, if you rotate the phone from portrait to landscape, a small icon appears in the navigation bar to rotate the phone into landscape manually, should you want to do that. Given that auto-rotation occurs, in my completely unscientific experience, about half the time by accident, I’d far rather explicitly tell my phone when I want it to rotate, on-demand. No more accidentally rotating the news article I’m reading in bed!
A native screenshot editor should have been a thing years ago.
There’s a native screenshot editor - long overdue, frankly - that makes marking up and cropping your screenshots a snap (quite handy for our work here at AP). Notifications are getting even more control with the addition of a recent senders menu in the notification settings, allowing you to see which app sent a notification and when. Android will also now offer to hide notifications from apps that you frequently dismiss, though I could see this behavior getting tweaked in the future - there are plenty of apps for which I regularly dismiss notifications but still want them, and that red dot is rather ugly. Notifications themselves are becoming more powerful, too, with smart replies that can be associated with text, emoji, and graphics to make responding to your messages easier still. Notifications remain a core part of the phone experience, and one where Android unabashedly shines compared to iOS. They’re a huge part of my preference for the Android platform overall. Google has consistently made improving them a focus in recent years - as with notification channels in Oreo - and I think it’s still somewhere they’re miles ahead of the competition.
There are quite a few changes documented with Android P, and our continuously-updated list is the best place to find the most notable ones. I’ve not even commented on all the changes I’m liking so far - the new volume control interface, the power-menu screenshot button, and alarm quick settings toggle are smaller tweaks that I’m starting to like having around.
At I/O, we’ll see the next wave of announcements for the platform and, probably of more interest, for Google’s various products like Assistant, Search, and Home. Often, these products leverage new APIs and capabilities inside Android to enable new functions and features, so it’s possible we really haven’t even seen some of the cooler things Google has planned for Android P just yet (such as, perhaps, the mysterious Slices API).
So, should I flash it?

At this point, the next developer preview for Android P will be out around the time of Google I/O in early May. That release will be the first “beta” candidate, which should mean improved stability and fewer bugs. If you’re wanting to play it real safe, previews four and five will be “release candidates” for official testing, at which point the number of bugs should be pretty minimal, and serious bugs essentially squashed.
Don’t get me wrong: this first preview is the most polished alpha build of Android Google’s ever publicly released, at least in my subjective experience. I continue to use it without major issues every day. My battery life is just as good as it was on Oreo, and perhaps slightly better under heavy usage. Serious Bluetooth bugs seem to have settled out in the last week or so, though I’m hesitant to make any assurances there - they could come back at any moment.
Using P won’t completely change the way you feel about your phone, mind you. The new features that are already exposed are nice, but basically none of the new APIs are being leveraged by third-party apps. And most won’t be until Google finalizes those APIs and releases the official SDK in June. The uptake on some Android features is also pretty slow; Oreo’s notification channels, for example, are still far from ubiquitously supported. But I would say things in even this regard are far better than they were in years past. Google is becoming much more effective in communicating with developers about the need to target the newest version of the platform, and is now actively discouraging developers who avoid updating their applications to do so (I’m looking at you, Snapchat).
So, no, I wouldn’t say you’re missing out by not flashing the P preview, at least at this point. The alpha builds are more a glimpse into the future of Android, and things in the preview still may change. Plus, there’s a real chance that you might use an app on your phone that won’t be compatible with P at this point, and then you’ll have to flash back to Oreo. That’s a real pain.
Even for adventurous testers, I’d advise at least waiting for the beta. This alpha release is good, but I won’t even try an in-place upgrade to the beta when it comes out next month - I’ll just wipe clean to avoid any possible issues a factory reset could avoid. Basically, if you’re not comfortable factory resetting your phone on a regular basis (i.e., it takes you many hours to get yourself set back up), alpha builds probably aren’t for you. Even the beta could still have significant third-party application compatibility issues. And until developers have those final APIs and SDK, there’s not a lot of incentive for them to fix bugs with an upcoming release when things could just change again.
My overall assessment of Android P is a positive one, though. Android continues to mature as a platform and add meaningful new features - and I don’t think it’s getting replaced any time soon.
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Unread 2018-04-08, 09:45 PM   #11137
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Photo supports rumor that follow-up to LG G6 is the LG G7 ThinQ







  • Two photos, allegedly of the LG G7 ThinQ, give us our first look at what the upcoming flagship might look like.
  • The two most notable features of the LG G7 ThinQ are a notched display and a dedicated hardware button. Its function is unknown.
  • The alleged LG G7 ThinQ specs are good, but nothing that will blow you away.


Last week we reported on a rumor from VentureBeat writer Evan Blass that the upcoming follow-up to the LG G6 would be called the LG G7 ThinQ. Now, via some images posted at TechRadar, it’s all but confirmed that that will likely be the real name.

A month ago, LG revealed the awkwardly named LG V30S ThinQ and the LG V30S Plus ThinQ. The “ThinQ” moniker refers to the ability of the devices to detect objects in photos using artificial intelligence. Although the two devices are definitely high-powered superphones, they were both only minor upgrades from the original LG V30.

Editor's Pick

LG G7: All the rumors in one place (Updated April 3)





But with this new LG G7 ThinQ as revealed in the leaked images below, it looks like LG will be upgrading a few features of last year’s LG G6. The two most significant changes are a notched display and a new hardware button on the side, which could be a dedicated AI button, like the Bixby button on Samsung phones. From the photos, we can also likely confirm that the G7 ThinQ will come with a Snapdragon 845, 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of internal storage.





While those specs are certainly current for a flagship device, they aren’t exactly revolutionary. In fact, the upcoming OnePlus 6 will have more RAM, more storage, the same processor, and likely sell for cheaper than the G7 ThinQ.

This new device comes after a shake-up at LG where the development team scrapped its then-current design to start over fresh. It seems that the new AI button is the only thing especially noteworthy about this new phone, so it’s kind of a let down that this is the result of those scrapped plans. Unless, of course, the button does something incredibly cool that we’re not expecting.

Editor's Pick

LG wants to know how much you hate the notch (Update: Changed its mind)





It’s also interesting that the LG G7 ThinQ will almost certainly have a notch, as LG tried to get folks on Reddit to talk about notches last week. Spoiler alert: Redditors hate notches as much as you do.

It’s assumed that LG will bring the G7 ThinQ to market in May, so we could see an official announcement of the device sometime this month. Are you excited to find out what this new button does, or do the phone’s specs underwhelm you? Let us know in the comments!
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Unread 2018-04-08, 09:45 PM   #11138
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First Google Pixel 3 notice gets spotted in AOSP commit









  • A mention of the Pixel 3 was spotted this week in a commit for the ASOP (Android Open Source Project).
  • This is the first real indication of Google’s plans to launch a new Pixel phone generation.
  • The next Pixel phones, with Android P installed, are expected to launch later this fall.


It’s not exactly a major surprise, but it looks like Google is indeed making some plans to launch Pixel 3 phones sometime in the future. A commit mentioning Pixel 3 was found this week as part of the (Android Open Source Project).

The Pixel 3 notice was first reported by XDA-Developers, and was mentioned in this context:
Cherrypick “Add device config to decide which Auto Selection Network UI to use.”
This change added the config because the HAL V_1_2 only supports Pixel 3, and the new Auto Selection Network UI is based on HAL V_1_2. So we set the flag to decide which Auto Selection Network UI should be used based in the device type.
So what does all this mean? XDA believes it has something to do with mobile network settings. However, it’s really anyone’s guess at this point as it is way too early to speculate on what all of this code really means.

Editor's Pick

Android P: the top features you need to know





The mention of the Pixel 3 in ASOP is the first real indication that Google will be making future smartphones with that branding. It’s also almost certain that the Pixel 3 will have the final version of Android P installed out of the box.

The actual release of the next generation of Pixel phones won’t likely happen until sometime in the fall of of 2018. Those phones will also likely be the first ones that will be designed and made by a number of former HTC team members, which Google acquired several months ago in a $1.1 billion deal.
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Unread 2018-04-10, 09:13 AM   #11139
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Exclusive: Official LG G7 ThinQ Render, All Available Colors Confirmed


This is the LG G7, LG’s upcoming flagship smartphone for 2018. There’s been a number of leaked images and renders that have come through over the past few weeks and months, although AndroidHeadlines can confirm this is an official press render for LG’s new smartphone. The image was provided to AndroidHeadlines by a reliable source, along with further information which corroborates the authenticity of the render.

As the image depicts, the LG G7 — or more accurately, the LG G7 ThinQ — will be available in a variety of color options. AndroidHeadlines can confirm there will be five colors in total, as well as the names of those colors. With the LG G7 ThinQ set to arrive in “Aurora Black,” “Platinum Grey,” “Moroccan Blue,” “Moroccan Blue (Matte),” and “Raspberry Rose.” The Aurora Black will be the ‘default’ color option, with the others launching as alternatives for those seeking a more customized look. As is usually the case with color variation, the availability of these models will vary by region and carrier.
The image does also reconfirm a ‘notch’ will be included on this year’s major LG smartphone, along with an edge-to-edge design with a view to offering as much display on the front panel as possible. In spite of the seemingly small surface area of the notch, this is where the front-facing camera and the earpiece speaker will be located. The LG G7 ThinQ will follow on from last year’s model by adopting a dual rear camera setup. Though unlike the previous G-series model, the G6, the cameras will be vertically aligned instead of horizontally. The fingerprint reader will retain its position on the rear of the device — below the camera module — albeit in a lower position due to the change in alignment of the camera module. Besides the volume up, down, and power button, the image also shows a fourth button which seems likely to allow for instant activation of an AI assistant. One last design point worth noting is on the branding front as the render seems to show the LG G7 ThinQ without the typical G-series numerical branding on its rear plate. In other words, there is the suggestion the rear panel will not display the “G7” branding and will instead only highlight “LG.” If a correct assumption, this is something that has not been seen on G-series phones since the LG G3 and would add further confirmation that LG has now basically stripped the G smartphone lineup of its visible G-series branding.
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Unread 2018-04-10, 02:21 PM   #11140
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Image Source: Apple Inc.



This upcoming Android phone didn’t just beat the iPhone X’s benchmark scores, it crushed them



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Apple’s iPhone lineup has a long history of confusing Android fans. By that, we mean that new iPhone specs don’t typically appear all too impressive on paper. They always have processors with fewer cores and lower clock speeds than the latest Android flagships, and they typically have less RAM as well. Despite the edge Android phones have always had on paper, iPhones have absolutely crushed every Android-powered rival in real-life speed tests and in benchmark tests. In fact, previous-generation iPhone models typically beat brand new Android phones in these tests, that’s how far ahead of the competition Apple’s iPhones have always been… until now.
Android phone makers and key component suppliers like Qualcomm have made huge strides over the past year. Couple that with RAM management problems and other performance issues in iOS 11, and a changing of the guard has taken place that continues to surprise us all.



Apple’s latest iPhones continue to have the edge in some key areas. For example, no Android phone on the planet comes anywhere close to touching the iPhone 8 or iPhone X where single-core processor performance is concerned. But multiple Android flagships have managed to top Apple’s iPhone in some important benchmark tests like AnTuTu. What’s more, several recent Android phones have managed to outperform the iPhone 8 and iPhone X in real-world speed tests, which is something we never thought we would see happen.
Moving back to the AnTuTu benchmark test, a score achieved by an upcoming Android phone has absolutely obliterated Apple’s latest iPhones. The iPhone 8 and iPhone X were among the first phones in the world to ever score more than 200,000 on AnTuTu’s popular test, and we’ve seen their scores climb as high as nearly 230,000. That’s impressive, of course, but it’s nothing compared to the upcoming Huawei Mate 20.
A new leak from Chinese tech news blog CNMO supposedly reveals AnTuTu benchmark scores for the Mate 20, which is powered by Huawei’s own Kirin 980 chipset. How did the phone do? Well, see for yourself:

According to the report, the phone managed to rack up a score of 356,918, which is completely unprecedented. Prior to the Huawei Mate 20, the highest AnTuTu scores we had ever seen were from the Samsung Galaxy S9+, which came in just north of 260,000. Now for the bad news: Huawei’s Mate 20 isn’t expected to launch until sometime in the late summer or early fall, and when it does it likely won’t be offered by any US wireless carriers or electronics retailers.



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Unread 2018-04-10, 03:03 PM   #11141
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maaaan, fuck all these notches. WTF?!
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Unread 2018-04-11, 07:46 AM   #11142
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maaaan, fuck all these notches. WTF?!
Agreed. Still rocking my original Pixel and I'm hoping Google doesn't hop on the notch train with the Pixel 3.
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Unread 2018-04-11, 12:41 PM   #11143
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Pixel and Pixel XL No Longer Available From Google Store




The original Google Pixel and Pixel XL, following a $100 price reductionwith the introduction of the Pixel 2 last year, have been pulled from the Google Store and are no longer available for sale. RIP, friends.
If you need one, you can still buy one from Verizon, plus they are likely to pop up here and there at daily sale sites, on eBay, or even on Amazon. The Google Store does still have some Pixel and XL accessories.
It was a good run, original Pixel, but it’s probably time to go, especially if a new mid-range Pixel is one the way.
Also, you still have software support for some time, Pixel owners.
// Google Store


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Unread 2018-04-12, 12:59 PM   #11144
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Google or Android TV ?



The FCC can be a great tipster for predicting the future of electronic devices and they just gave us a solid glimpse at what appears to be a brand new… something from Google. It looks like a Chromecast on steroids, has an Android TV styled remote (with Google Assistant button), and is adorned with a giant “G” Google logo in several places.

You can even download the user manual (PDF link) which shows a nice graphic of the remote:


And full specs:

But wait: no USB Type-C? Hmmm… That’s odd.

There’s plenty to gush at here, but it’s worth noting that this submission is not by Google. Instead it was submitted by “Shenzhen SEI Robotics Co., Ltd.” and they’re calling it a ‘4K ATV Stick’. Google has outsourced production of their Chromecast/ATV devices in the past, so a difference in the submission company name doesn’t nix the possibility, but the charging cable, and power brick look cheaply made; this is less likely coming directly from Google and more likely a budget manufacturer leveraging Google partner branding.
If you need further evidence, read through their “literature” to find some tidbits sure to give grammar nazis convulsions (powerful or power full?).
But then why the big G everywhere? Great question. Probably a partner breaking Google branding rules, but perhaps – just maybe – something more.
Google TV or Android TV?

Google initially launched Google TV in October 2010 but it has since been discontinued. It was eventually replaced with Google Chromecast (2013) and Android TV (2014) – two products that help fill the space – but the Google TV branding has been long gone. Could it return?
It’s quite possible considering Apple and Google tend to navigate their strategy in parallel. Years ago Apple moved away from having iThings and began to rebrand a lot of their products as Apple “Fill in the blank” (including Apple TV). Google followed suit- take a look through Google’s apps in the Play Store and you’ll see what I mean. In a home where consumers own Google Home and Google WiFi, two of Google’s newest products, we wouldn’t be surprised to see Google circle back, bundle hardware features/services (maybe even YouTube TV), and return to using the Google TV name.
Now that the Nexus Player has sunk into the abandoned device abyss, we have to think Google has something big planned for the biggest screen in everyone’s house.
What’s your TV running?

What type of TV do you have and what set top boxes or dongles do you have connected? Own an Android TV? Fire TV? Chromecast? Something else? Nothing at all? Let us know why you love or hate your TV setup and what it would take to switch to a newly released “Google TV” solution.
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Unread 2018-04-13, 10:44 AM   #11145
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Motorola’s Moto G6 Lineup Leaks In High-Resolution Renders


Motorola’s entire Moto G6 lineup leaked in a series of new product renders shared by one Ishan Agarwal earlier this week. The images that can be seen in the gallery below largely correspond with previous sightings of the three Android smartphones and numerous reports on the upcoming mid-range lineup, including those provided by AndroidHeadlines. The Moto G6 Play is hence once again alleged to be the only member of the new product family that will lack a dual-camera setup on its rear plate as the handset apparently ships with a single-lens system, albeit one that’s still supported by a dual-LED (dual-tone) flash unit. The Moto G6 Play will at the very least be available in Gold and Indigo color options, according to the new leak. Unlike the other two models, the Moto G6 Play doesn’t have a physical Home button which could double as a fingerprint reader and is instead presumed to have such a sensor embedded into the company’s signature batwing logo found on its back panel.

The regular Moto G6 was sighted in the broadest range of colors out of the three, having been depicted in Black, Silver, Rose Gold, and Indigo variants. The Moto G6 Plus is also meant to be offered in Black but will also have an exclusive Gold variant, according to the same source. As is usually the case with the Lenovo-owned company’s product variants, not all of the newly leaked colors are expected to be available on a global level and some may only hit select markets.

Exclusive: Official LG G7 ThinQ Render, All Available Colors Confirmed, Click Here to read more.

All three devices feature edge-to-edge screens utilizing an elongated 18:9 (2:1) aspect ratio while being sandwiched between bezels that aren’t the smallest in the industry but are still noticeably slimmer than those found on last year’s Moto G5 lineup. The three smartphones are likely to be announced by the end of the month, with Motorola previously confirming its first 2018 products will be launched in April and the Moto G6 series being by far the most leaked handset line from the company in recent weeks.

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Unread 2018-04-23, 03:13 AM   #11146
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Samsung Leak Reveals New Galaxy Is Massive









Last month it was confirmed Samsung will introduce a significantly upgraded version of the Galaxy S9. And now we know one big feature everyone got wrong…
Once again Ice Universe has the scoop. The mysterious leaker, who exposed the Galaxy Note 8 design, posted the first real-world photos of the Galaxy S8 and nailed every specification of the Galaxy S9, has revealed Samsung’s upgraded Galaxy S9 will have a much larger display than expected.
SamMobile
Samsung SM-G8850 is much larger than expected



He tweeted: “Staff's mistakes, all parameters regarding it are wrong, it is 6.3 inches.”



This has a significant impact on the phone, currently only known as the ‘SM-G8850’ - and in my opinion not a good one.
The great thing about the SM-G8850 was it took the Galaxy S9 chassis and fixed its biggest flaw: the singular rear camera is upgraded to a dual 12MP shooter like the larger Galaxy S9 Plus. The SM-G8850 also has a flat display, ditching the polarising curves of the original Galaxy S9, as well as an overclocked 2.8GHz Exynos 9810 chipset for even more iPhone X-beating performance.

In short: the SM-G8850 was the phone people wanted the Galaxy S9 to be.
But now we know the SM-G8850 has a 6.3-inch screen it is no-one near as radical. In fact, it’s just a flat-screened version of the dual camera Galaxy S9 Plus with a flat display and slightly faster chipset. Yes, the tweaks are worth having but this is not the compact smartphone revolution the SM-G8850 appeared to be.
Samsung
Galaxy S9 (left) misses out on the Galaxy S9 Plus dual camera (right)



Consequently, it’s impossible to escape the feeling that smartphone makers simply don’t care about phones with displays under 6-inches anymore.
The Galaxy S9 saw Samsung leave the top features to the 6.3-inch Galaxy S9 Plus for the first time, and Google’s 6-inch Pixel 2XL design is far superior to the 5.1-inch Pixel 2. Meanwhile Apple’s 5.8-inch iPhone X was the company’s flagship in 2017, but it will soon be usurped by a supersized 6.5-inch iPhone X Plus.
Hopefully Samsung’s attempts to supercharge the Galaxy Note 9 will pay-off. Though it must be remembered: Apple is now fighting a price war on two fronts.
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Unread 2018-04-23, 05:48 AM   #11147
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What do you think Android P will be called?

It’s never too early to start speculating about what Google’s going to name the next version of Android. And with Google I/O just a few weeks away, we figured it was a good enough time to check in on what everyone’s thinking.
After we posted our first look at Android P’s developer beta last month, we got a ton of comments from people speculating on the new name. Popular guesses included:
  • Pancake
  • Peppermint
  • Pie
  • Pineapple
  • Pistachio
  • Pizza
  • Popcorn
  • Popsicle
  • Potato
  • Pudding
  • Pumpkin
There were also some one-offs, including Pop Rocks, Pringles, Pop-Tart, and Pez.
Ever since Android C was given the name Cupcake in 2009, Google has named each new release of its operating system after some kind of sweet or dessert, moving on to the next letter of the alphabet. The current version of Android is Oreo, so the next is Android P.
It’s pretty safe to assume that a lot of those guesses — Potato, Pizza — are jokes and definitely won’t be happening. But pretty much everything else is fair game. Pie is a nice option; it even allows for some alliteration (Pumpkin Pie, Pecan Pie), though I’m guessing Google won’t want to go with “PP” for the new version’s initials.
Popsicle is also a solid guess, but it’s actually a brand name, not a generic term. Google has used brand names in the past, but I don’t know that Popsicle is iconic enough to be worth the effort.
Personally, I kind of like Pop-Tart, assuming it’s allowed to be used as a generic. I know plenty of coffee shops and bakeries sell their own pop-tarts, but it’s definitely better known as a brand name. My dad also texted me to guess “panna cotta,” which I like, and also to say that he had no idea what we were guessing.
Android P is already available in beta to developers, and chances are, we’ll learn about more consumer-facing features at Google’s I/O conference on May 8th. That’s around the time we’re likely to start seeing public betas come out, too. Google doesn’t usually announce a name for its operating system until its final public release is ready — recently in the fall — but it has started to tease options earlier in the past.
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Unread Yesterday, 07:38 AM   #11148
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Android Easter Eggs from Gingerbread to Oreo: A History Lesson



Android is fun. Its versions are named after desserts, and Google often sprinkles little Easter eggs throughout. None are more popular than the Easter egg associated with each Android version, however, so here’s a bit of history.
What Are These Easter Eggs and How Do You Find Them?

Starting with Gingerbread, Google put a hidden piece of art in the About Phone section. Since then, every version of Android has had its own little Easter egg—some related to the version, and others not so much.
To find the Easter egg on your phone, go to Settings > About Phone (or Settings > System > About Phone on some devices) and tap the Android version number a handful of times. Poof—a hidden screen shows up with a nifty little something-or-other there. On some versions, it’s just a picture. On others, it may be a game. Regardless of what’s there, it’s just fun.
Here’s a look at what Google has offered over the various versions of past years.
Android 2.3, Gingerbread: Zombies and a Zombie Cookie


This piece of art is puzzling, terrifying, and absolutely wonderful. Featuring a handful of zombies and a zombie gingerbread man next to a happy little Bugdroid leaves us all feeling utterly satisfied and completely confused at the same time. This is the best way to introduce a new feature.


Android 3.0, Honeycomb: Bzzzzz


Honeycomb’s logo is still, to this day, my favorite of all the Android logos. The bee form factor (are bees considered a form factor?) works so well for the Bugdroid, and the colorscheme is very becoming as well. This is a great Easter egg. Just look at him glow.
Android 4.0, Ice Cream Sandwich: Nyan Ice Cream Sandwich


The Ice Cream Sandwich logo is a Bugdroid dressed like an ice cream sandwich. The Easter egg here appears to be nothing more than that—but this Easter egg in fact hides its own Easter egg. Long-pressing it makes the Bugdroid bigger and when he reaches full capacity, the screen fills with flying Ice Cream Sandwich Bugdroids, appearing to pay tribute to Nyan Cat. Good times.

This long-press feature turned out to be the start of many more Easter eggs hidden within Easter eggs.
Android 4.1-4.3, Jelly Bean: Beans, Beans, Everywhere, but Not a Bite to Eat


Entering Jelly Bean’s Easter egg exposes a huge, red bean. Boring, right? Tap that little guy. Suddenly it gets a face and antenna! But wait, there’s more: long-press it. A little Jelly Bean-based “game” appears, where you can fling beans all over the screen for no real reason. Cool.

Android 4.4, KitKat: Break Me Off A Piece Of That


Android KitKat marked the first time Google paired up with an actual confection manufacturer—in this case, Nestlé—to promote a version of Android. It was a pretty big deal at the time, and to date the biggest reveal Google has ever done when releasing a new version of Android. Everyone fully believed it would be called Key Lime Pie, so the misdirection was incredible.

The Easter egg itself, however, isn’t much—it starts with a simple “K” that spins when you tap it. A long-press reveals the “Android” in a KitKat-style logo, and a tribute to versions past when you long-press that logo. It’s like an Easter egg inside of an Easter egg inside of an Easter egg.
Android 5.x, Lollipop: Flappy Droid


The Lollipop Easter egg starts off with, well, a circle. Tapping it transforms it into a lollipop (it even says as much right there in the middle of it). But long-pressing this seemingly innocent little lollipop reveals a much darker game housed beneath.

You guys remember Flappy Bird? You know, the game that had people breaking their phones out of pure frustration, before the developer pulled it forever. Well, it’s that, but with a Bugdroid flying through lollipops instead. How “fun.”
Android 6.x, Marshmallow: Flappy Droid, Redux


Flappy Bird was really popular, so Google figured why not use it again? And that’s exactly what happened with Marshmallow. Only with marshmallows instead of lollipops. Oh, but this time it had multiplayer—tapping the + at the top allowed you to add up to six people. Sounds like absolute chaos.

Much like older versions of Android, you had to jump through a couple of hoops to get to this little game—first press the M logo, and then long-press the Marshmallow when it shows up.
Android 7.x, Nougat: Erm, Cats?


You know what goes hand-in-hand with nougat? Cats. At least that’s what Google thought, so Nougat’s Easter egg is arguably the strangest of all—it’s basically a cat collection.
RELATED: How to Enable Android Nougat’s Cat-Collecting Easter Egg
The Easter egg is initially just an N; tap it and it flashes. Long-press it, and it displays a cat emoji at the bottom of the screen.

This basically made a new Quick Settings tile available that lets you place treats to attract cats. Then you can collect those cats. No clue why really, but when this version first dropped I was addicted to collecting those stupid cats. And I don’t even like cats.

Android 8.x, Oreo: Cookies and an Octopus


Oreo’s Easter egg is very interesting, because it makes about as much sense as, well, cats in Nougat. It starts off as just an Oreo cookie—the Oreo logo—but long-pressing it reveals…an octopus? He just floats around the screen looking all weird (though he does remind me of an Oreo), but you can grab him by the head and sling him all over the place. He stretches when you do that, which may be the weirdest thing about this Easter egg.

Android ?.?, P: ??

Since Android P is still in its developer build stages (and Google holds version numbers/code names close to its chest), we have no idea what this one will be. For now, it’s just a colorful P, which is arguably the best kind of P.

There’s no question that the Easter eggs have gotten more fun (and more interesting) over the years, and the one for Android P should hopefully keep the pace. Can’t wait to see what that it turns out to be.
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