Mirror Finish Polishing ~ 1-816-529-6089 ~ sales@mirrorfinishpolishing.com ~ mirrorfinishpolishing.com For the best rate on home, auto, life or business/commercial insurance call me at 888-959-0955, cell 636-734-1310 or bricehazelwood@weiss-ins.com. Never Done Garage - donewhenimdead.com Peerless Automotive Reconditioning - 1155 W. Dennis Ave, Olathe Ks, 66061 - 913-893-1201 Mark H. Epstein ~ The Epstein Law Firm, LLC ~ 913-396-5123 Wilkes Automotive ~ wilkesautomotive.com ~ 246 Marion St, Olathe, KS 66061 ~ 913-254-7171 Skandalous Inc ~ www.skandalousinc.com DIY Auto Repair Inc ~ www.diyautorepairkc.com ~ 11509 Strangline Rd, Olathe KS 66062 ~ 913-226-3806 Your advertisement here! The Law Offices of Jeremiah Johnson, LLC ~ 104 E. Poplar, Olathe, KS 66061 ~ (913)764-5010 ~ www.kcatty.com - www.johnsoncountydui.com ~ jeremiah@kcatty.com Santa Fe Body, Inc ~ 8717 Lenexa Drive, Overland Park, KS 66214 ~ (913) 894-6090 House of Boost LLC Nude? HouseofHID.com - The #1 source for HID The Print Shop KC 816.200.6694 or Ryan@RMD-Photography.com the art of tyleR ~ http://tyleR.bigcartel.com ~ TYLERcoey.com ~ MUTTtoy.com ~ MUTTtoy@gmail.com W-K Chevrolet Buick Pontiac Cadillac GMC ~ 3310 W. Broadway, Sedalia, MO 65301 ~ 800-382-5088 ~ Cell 660-553-8928 ~ dustin@wkchevy.com ~ www.wkchevy.com

Go Back   KCSR - THE Kansas City Forum > General Forums > Politics, Religion, Current Events

Reply
Thread Tools
Unread 2018-09-19, 11:32 AM   #151
Oblique
Buckwheat 2.0
 
Oblique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wherever I May Roam
Posts: 7,736
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 46
Thanks (Received): 140
Likes (Given): 191
Likes (Received): 778
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 26
Default

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/18/u...er=rss&emc=rss

Quote:
U.S. Loses Track of Another 1,500 Migrant Children, Investigators Find

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration is unable to account for the whereabouts of nearly 1,500 migrant children who illegally entered the United States alone this year and were placed with sponsors after leaving federal shelters, according to congressional findings released on Tuesday.

The revelation echoes an admission in April by the Department of Health and Human Services that the government had similarly lost track of an additional 1,475 migrant children it had moved out of shelters last year.

In findings that lawmakers described as troubling, Senate investigators said the department could not determine with certainty the whereabouts of 1,488 out of 11,254 children the agency had placed with sponsors in 2018, based on follow-up calls from April 1 to June 30.

The inability to track the whereabouts of migrant children after they have been released to sponsors has raised concerns that they could end up with human traffickers or be used as laborers by people posing as relatives.

Since 2016, officials at the Department of Health and Human Services have called sponsors to check on children 30 days after they were placed there. But the department has also said it was not legally responsible for children after they were released from the custody of its office of refugee resettlement.

Caitlin Oakley, a spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Human Services, offered a response to the findings on Tuesday night. “As communicated to members of Congress multiple times,” she said, “these children are not ‘lost.’ Their sponsors — who are usually parents or family members and in all cases have been vetted for criminality and ability to provide for them — simply did not respond or could not be reached when this voluntary call was made.”

The findings were accompanied by legislation introduced on Tuesday by Republican and Democrat senators to clarify the department’s responsibility for ensuring the safety of migrant children, even when they were no longer in its custody.

The legislation would require officials at the Department of Health and Human Services to run background checks before placing children with sponsors. It also would compel the department to make sure that sponsors provide proper care for the children in their custody, including making sure they appear at their immigration court hearings.

Additionally, the legislation would require department officials to notify state governments before migrant children are placed with sponsors in those states. And it would increase the number of immigration court judges to help the Justice Department process cases more efficiently.

Senator Rob Portman, Republican of Ohio and the chairman of a Senate Homeland Security subcommittee on investigations, said the bill “will ensure that we keep track of unaccompanied minors in our country, which will both help protect them from trafficking and abuse as well as help ensure they appear for their immigration court proceedings.”

Senator Richard Blumenthal Democrat of Connecticut, who also sponsored the legislation, said, “Children who risk their lives to make a dangerous journey in pursuit of asylum shouldn’t then have to worry about falling victim to human trafficking or being handed over to abusive or neglectful adults in the United States.”

In a report two years ago, the Senate subcommittee detailed how department officials mistakenly placed eight children with human traffickers who forced them to work on an egg farm in Marion, Ohio.

The report found that department officials had failed to establish procedures — including sufficient background checks and following up with sponsors — to protect the children who were traveling alone. As a result, the children were turned over to the traffickers who contracted them out to the egg farm.

Since October 2014, the Department of Health and Human Services has placed more than 135,000 unaccompanied immigrant children with adult sponsors in the United States as they wait for their cases to be heard by an immigration judge.
This is a child sex traffickers wet dream.
Oblique is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-09-19, 01:09 PM   #152
DIYAutoRepair
**Sponsor**
 
DIYAutoRepair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,643
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 25
Thanks (Received): 198
Likes (Given): 73
Likes (Received): 1357
Dislikes (Given): 1
Dislikes (Received): 27
Default

That is the intent of the laws created many admins ago.

People complain that they are held in child care centers, now we let them go and they are taken by who knows who.

Should just put them back on a plane to where they came from so they can rejoin their parents.

You do realize this is the parents fault for sending them here alone knowing full well they will be raped during the journey and potentially sold to traffickers.

While being sold to traffickers is possible, most likely they are being taken by liberal groups and hidden from the government so they won't be returned to where they came from.
__________________
DIY Auto Repair
Fully equipped service bay rental by the hour
We also offer full service automotive repairs along with paint and bodywork
Visit us at http://diyautorepairkc.com/
or call (913) 226-3806

Favorite car from the past (73 Pinto)
DIYAutoRepair is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 05:22 AM   #153
Oblique
Buckwheat 2.0
 
Oblique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wherever I May Roam
Posts: 7,736
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 46
Thanks (Received): 140
Likes (Given): 191
Likes (Received): 778
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 26
Default

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...ustody-of-kids

Quote:
‘They Want to Steal My Daughter’: Deported Parents May Lose Kids to Adoption, AP Finds

As the deportees were led off the plane onto the steamy San Salvador tarmac, an anguished Araceli Ramos Bonilla burst into tears, her face contorted with pain: "They want to steal my daughter!"

It had been 10 weeks since Ramos had last held her 2-year-old, Alexa. Ten weeks since she was arrested crossing the border into Texas and U.S. immigration authorities seized her daughter and told her she would never see the girl again.

What followed — one foster family's initially successful attempt to win full custody of Alexa — reveals what could happen to some of the infants, children and teens taken from their families at the border under a Trump administration policy earlier this year. The "zero-tolerance" crackdown ended in June, but hundreds of children remain in detention, shelters or foster care and U.S. officials say more than 200 are not eligible for reunification or release.

Federal officials insist they are reuniting families and will continue to do so. But an Associated Press investigation drawing on hundreds of court documents, immigration records and interviews in the U.S. and Central America identified holes in the system that allow state court judges to grant custody of migrant children to American families — without notifying their parents.

And today, with hundreds of those mothers and fathers deported thousands of miles away, the risk has grown exponentially.

States usually seal child custody cases, and the federal agencies overseeing the migrant children don't track how often state court judges allow these kids to be given up for adoption. But by providing a child's name and birthdate to the specific district, probate or circuit court involved, the AP found that it's sometimes possible to track these children.

Alexa's case began in November 2015 under the Obama administration, years before Trump's family-separation policy rolled out. Her 15-month separation from her mother exposes the fragile legal standing of children under the care of the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement and a flawed, piecemeal system that can change the course of a child's life.

It took 28 minutes for a judge in a rural courthouse near Lake Michigan to grant Alexa's foster parents, Sherri and Kory Barr, temporary guardianship. Alexa's mother and the little girl's immigration attorney were not even notified about the proceedings.

Based on their experiences with Alexa, the Barrs had become convinced that Alexa's mom was a bad mother and that the little girl would be abused if she were reunited with her.

"My wife and I are sick over this," Kory Barr told the judge, who wished him good luck as he granted the foster parents' request two days after Christmas.

The federal system that had custody of Alexa says the state courts never should have allowed foster parents to get that far, no matter how good their intentions. But each state court system, from New York to California, runs wardship and adoption proceedings differently — and sometimes there are even variations between counties.

In Missouri, an American couple managed to permanently adopt a baby whose Guatemalan mother had been picked up in an immigration raid. That seven-year legal battle terminating the mother's parental rights ended in 2014. In Nebraska, another Guatemalan mother prevailed and got her kids back, but it took five years and over $1 million in donated legal work.

The Office of Refugee Resettlement and Bethany Christian Services, the agency that placed Alexa in foster care, would not comment on her case. But Bethany said foster parents are informed they're not allowed to adopt migrant children.

Since the 1980s, however, Bethany acknowledged that nine of the 500 migrant children assigned to its foster program have been adopted by American families. The children, ages 3 to 18, were adopted after it was determined it wouldn't be safe or possible for them to go back to their families; at least one asked to be adopted by his foster parents, and another was a trafficking victim, Bethany said.

"We never want families to be separated," Bethany CEO Chris Palusky said. "That's what we're about, is bringing families together."

John Sandweg, who headed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement under the Obama administration, said he worries that many more migrant children recently taken from their families may never see them again.

"We have the kids in the U.S. and the parents down in Central America, and now they'll bring all these child welfare agencies into play," Sandweg said. "It's just a recipe for disaster."

In Ramos' darkest days, she would lay on her bed, stare at the ceiling and sob, her hand on her stomach.

"This girl, she was here, in my womb," she said. "We are meant to be together. Always."

---

Alexa's mother was born in the middle of a bloody civil war in El Salvador that gave way to violent street crime. She was pregnant at 13; that daughter was raised by grandparents.

Starting at age 19, Ramos had four sons with another man over the course of a decade, followed by the arrival of Alexa in

2013. She and her daughter looked alike — both bright-eyed, with dark hair framing their smooth skin.

It was after the children's father found another woman that the abuse began, Ramos said.

"The worst time was when he kicked me so hard it left a bruise and it never went away," she later told an asylum officer. Without makeup, a dent in the center of her forehead is apparent.

Ramos went to a shelter, but said she became increasingly convinced that her former partner would track her down and kill her. She applied for a U.S. visa, she said, but got nowhere.

During a custody battle in their home city of San Miguel, Ramos said her children's father filed false police reports, including one alleging that she encouraged a 17-year-old girl to have sex with an adult. With the help of his own mother, who told authorities her son had made up the accusations, she successfully cleared her name and the cases were dropped.

Yet it was that information — later deemed "outdated and unsubstantiated" by the U.S. Justice Department — that was used in a Michigan court as support for the argument that Alexa should be permanently separated from her mother.

Ramos scraped together $6,000 to pay a smuggler who could help her escape from the man she said warned her she'd "never be at peace." On the monthlong, 1,500-mile pilgrimage, she carried Alexa, a change of clothes, diapers, cookies, juice and water.

The toddler was exhausted by the journey. She slumped for days in a backpack carrier when they walked, and dozed and fidgeted when they traveled by car. When she was sleepy and agitated, she insisted on being cradled in her mother's arms.

After crossing the Rio Grande near Roma, Texas, Ramos and her 2-year-old were arrested by U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Their ordeal appeared nearly over, since domestic violence was then considered grounds for asylum.

In El Salvador, Ramos might earn $5 a day selling clothes or waitressing. In the U.S., she could earn more than that in an hour. Ramos yearned for a new beginning.

It took less than an hour for her hopes to shatter. The border agent screening her records spotted a red flag: She was a criminal, he said, charged in El Salvador. Alexa, crying, was pulled from her mother's arms.

"They told me I would never see her again," Ramos recalled.

Ramos said she begged agents to send Alexa to friends in Texas, but said they gave up when two calls went unanswered.

The departments of Homeland Security and Health and Human Services have not disputed that events could unfold that way in the federal system. DHS spokeswoman Katie Waldman said Tuesday that the agency had not yet been able to investigate Ramos' claims, but "takes seriously our responsibility for those in our custody."

Three days after Ramos' separation from her daughter, court records show, the U.S. government labeled Alexa an "unaccompanied minor," which meant she entered the bureaucracy for migrant youth, typically teens, who arrive in the U.S. alone. The toddler was issued a notice to appear on "a date to be set, at a time to be set, to show why you should not be removed from the United States."

At 28 months, Alexa was intelligent and engaging, but her vocabulary was limited to Spanish words for colors, some numbers and her favorite foods.

She initially was placed with a Spanish-speaking foster family in San Antonio, Texas, who would call Ramos in the detention center and put Alexa on the phone. "Each time they called, I could not stop crying," Ramos said. "Crying and crying, because I wanted to be with her."

More than two weeks after their separation, ICE agents moved Ramos seven hours away to a rural Louisiana facility surrounded by high fences topped with coiled razor wire. While Alexa and her foster family decorated a Christmas tree, Ramos slept in a pod of bunkbeds.

Two months after her arrival there, Ramos used a translator to speak on the phone with an asylum officer who asked about her family, why she left El Salvador and what her children's father might do if she went back. Alexa was safe, Ramos told the officer, but "I think he will kill me."

The next day, Ramos got word that she had "demonstrated a credible fear of persecution or torture," according to the asylum supervisor at the DHS.

Her case was assigned to Oakdale Immigration Court in Louisiana, where the three judges had denied 95 percent of all asylum requests that year, compared to the national average of about 50 percent. She said she called the list of pro bono lawyers she was provided, to no avail.

Without a lawyer, her chance at asylum slipped away. Like everyone else around her, she was being deported.

The federal government offers all deported parents the chance to take their children with them, but Ramos said she was ordered to sign a waiver to leave Alexa behind. "The agent put his hand on mine, he held my hand, he forced me to sign," she said.

Immigration agents then handcuffed Ramos and put her on a plane south, soaring over the volcanos and jungles of Central America.


At the time, it was unusual for parents to be deported while their children remained behind in federal foster care, but that occurred again and again this summer. More than 300 parents were deported to Central America without their children this summer, many of whom allege they were coerced into signing paperwork they didn't understand, affecting their rights to reunify with their children. Some parents also contended that U.S. officials told them their children would be given up for adoption.

"And the reality is that for every parent who is not located, there will be a permanent orphaned child, and that is 100 percent the responsibility of the administration," U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw said in August while overseeing a lawsuit to stop family separations.

The AP asked the State Department, as well as embassy officials in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, whether they were working with deported parents to find their children in the U.S.

The State Department deferred to the DHS, which said in a statement: "DHS is not aware of anyone contacting embassy or consulate in a foreign country to be reunified with a child. This is unsurprising given the fact that these parents made a knowing decision to leave their child in a foreign country."

___

By April 2016, Alexa was transferred to the care of Bethany Christian Services, one of the nation's largest adoption agencies. As thousands more Central American children crossed the border alone during President Barack Obama's second term, the nonprofit agency's work providing temporary and long-term foster care to unaccompanied children had begun to grow.

Over the years, the Michigan-based agency has received support from local donors that include Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and her family members, who have contributed more than $3.1 million. One DeVos relative worked for Bethany, and another served on its board.

As the agency started receiving more Central American children, several former Bethany social workers said they were encouraged to recruit new foster families at the agency's traditional base, the Christian Reformed Church, and other local churches.

"All of a sudden when we had these younger kids to place, everyone was really excited about that," said Sarah Zuidema, a former Bethany supervisor who grew up within the denomination. "They just felt that if these kids could know Jesus, everything would be OK."

Among the families who stepped up to help were the Barrs — Kory, a physical therapist at a nearby rehabilitation hospital, and his wife, Sherri, who ran a home-organization business. The Barrs had three daughters who were raised in a devout home and already had fostered two Salvadoran sisters in 2013.

Bethany's outreach to local families was part of a rising Christian movement to mobilize support to address what Bethany has called the "global refugee crisis." The movement emphasizes that fostering is aligned with spiritual beliefs, and urges families to approach the role with open hearts.

When Bethany placed Alexa in the Barrs' home, the couple signed a form promising they would not try to seek custody because the Office of Refugee Resettlement was legally responsible for the child. But eight months later, fearing for the girl's safety, that is exactly what they did.

On June 5, 2016, Alexa celebrated her third birthday 3,000 miles away from her mother. The next month, a social worker sent Ramos Facebook photos showing Alexa wearing an American flag tank dress, drawing outside in the Michigan sunlight. In another shot, the girl appears at the Barrs' front door clad in a hot pink ensemble, next to a little red wagon and the family dog.

Around this time, Alexa began meeting with a play therapist and, based on their observations of the girl, the Barrs became deeply suspicious that she had been exposed to abuse before she reached their home. Ramos said they then began limiting her phone contact with her daughter.

The foster program notified the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, which opened an investigation but decided the complaint lacked sufficient evidence.

Ramos had cried when social workers approached her about the abuse allegations and insisted that Alexa had always been safe in her care. Because Alexa had spent nearly a third of her life away from her mother, she then grew distressed at the thought that her daughter might have been harmed during their separation.

In August, the Young Center for Immigrant Children's Rights, which has a federal contract to advocate for the best interests of immigrant children navigating the legal system, began investigating whether Alexa could safely be returned to her mother. An evaluator repeatedly visited Ramos and interviewed her family, neighbors and employer.

Meanwhile, Salvadoran diplomatic officials began making periodic visits to Grand Rapids to check on Alexa and advocate for her release.

"The foster family started putting up barrier after barrier to delay her departure," said Patricia Maza-Pittsford, El Salvador's consul general in Chicago.

Finally, the girl's immigration attorney, the Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. immigration courts all reached agreement: It was past time for Alexa to be back with her mother.

Just days before Christmas 2016, a federal immigration judge ordered her deported. The Barrs were told to pack up Alexa's things and have her ready to go at a moment's notice.

Alexa had learned to speak English, bonded with her foster sisters and captured their hearts. The Barrs were certain she had been abused and remain so to this day. So they hired a lawyer and went to court.

"The Office of Refugee Resettlement is planning to put Alexa on a plane back to her abuser," the couple said in a handwritten application seeking guardianship. Alexa's mother, they wrote, "has not owned her crimes, not been rehabilitated."

During an emergency hearing, Kory Barr pounded on the judge's bench as he begged him to help them keep the girl in Michigan and insisted that child-welfare experts needed more time to investigate.

"Every day they are telling us this could happen very fast," he said. "We have her bags packed."

Judge Mark Feyen confessed he wasn't familiar with the federal agencies involved, saying, "This is kind of hard to pin down exactly who the interested parties are."

Responding to their concerns that Alexa's life could be in danger, Feyen granted the Barrs temporary custody after their attorney, Joshua Mikrut, asserted he had a "loose understanding" that a prior order had been issued suspending Ramos' parental rights, though he didn't know where. The judge asked him to return with proof, and also scheduled a full guardianship hearing for a few weeks later.

"Every time I get one of these, I learn a little more," the judge said.

Within days, a federal immigration judge granted an emergency motion to stay Alexa's departure.
__________________
There's battle lines being drawn, Nobody's right if everybody's wrong
Oblique is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 05:22 AM   #154
Oblique
Buckwheat 2.0
 
Oblique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wherever I May Roam
Posts: 7,736
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 46
Thanks (Received): 140
Likes (Given): 191
Likes (Received): 778
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 26
Default

Quote:
When state courts gain control of a child being detained by the federal government, that child can become invisible in the system. Alexa and her mother were held in federal custody. But states — not the federal government — typically run child-welfare systems.

Alexa's mom didn't know where to turn, and she didn't have the money to hire an attorney. But she did have Facebook.

In El Salvador, in the days surrounding the Michigan guardianship hearing, she posted a series of increasingly desperate videos — which went viral in Central America and in one case attracted 2.5 million views — speaking directly to the Barrs, to her daughter, to anyone who might help her get Alexa back.

"I'm the girl's mother. You aren't anything to her — you just met her because I traveled with her," she sobbed in one video, her voice breaking as she addressed the Barrs. "Look inside your hearts. . I had her in my belly for nine months. I'm the mother and I'm waiting for her."

In another video, she cried as she displayed dolls modeled on the Disney movie "Frozen" that she bought to give Alexa for Christmas.

Outraged and sympathetic comments poured in and word reached Salvadoran government officials in El Salvador and the Chicago consul's office. Pressure mounted.

A month after the Barrs were granted guardianship of Alexa, the Justice Department weighed in sharply.

"The Barrs obtained their temporary guardianship order in violation of federal law," U.S. prosecutors argued. The Barrs' attorney and the Michigan judge also violated federal law by seeking and granting guardianship, and failed to inform Ramos or Alexa's lawyers about the proceedings, they wrote.

More than a month after they had petitioned to keep Alexa, Sherri and Kory Barr despairingly gave up. The federal government, they wrote the judge, "seems to have us painted into a corner with no way out."

While Mikrut acknowledges the Barrs sometimes were blinded by their passion, he said the federal system should allow challenges to its decisions about the welfare of children in its care.

A few days later, the Barrs sent Alexa home with a huge bag of toys and clothes and a letter from "Papa Foster," as Kory Barr called himself.

"Mi querida Alexa," he began, or "my dear Alexa." He wrote about how she loved her first snow, how they pretended to hold wrestling matches, how he cried at the thought of life without the "baby" of their family.

"I hope this is not the last time we see you, but if it is, I want you to know that I will keep you in my heart forever," he wrote.

___

Alexa was stunned when she landed in El Salvador in February 2017. Her mother sobbed and clung to her, but the girl barely recognized this woman who called herself Mama. When could she go home to "Mama Foster, Papa Foster" and her three blonde, blue-eyed sisters? And what was this woman saying?

Alexa had lost all her Spanish and spoke English to her mother, using words like "water" and "chicken." Ramos, who spoke almost no English herself, had to point to pictures or call friends to translate.

The Ramos' small brick home, shared with two of Alexa's brothers, is on a quiet dirt street a few blocks from the main drag, a colorful and chaotic mix of shops and services.

Alexa pined for her house in suburban Grand Rapids, its green lawn, her pink room. She rarely giggled and didn't want to play or eat.

Children traumatically separated from their parents are more likely to suffer from emotional problems throughout their lives, according to decades of scientific research. And some more recent studies have found that separation can damage a child's memory.

Ramos showed Alexa baby pictures to help her relearn their relationship.

"I am your mother. I love you so very much," she told her in Spanish, over and over.

Slowly, over time, Alexa began to smile and understand her native tongue. She bonded again with her mother and brothers. Bright and energetic, she now often winds her small arms around her mother's waist and neck. When she wants attention, she whispers in her mother's ear.

Ramos still struggles with the pain of the separation, and to support her family on the few dollars a day she earns at a pizzeria. She often posts Facebook photos and videos of herself with her daughter, a visual assertion of their bond.

She fears for parents who were separated from their children under the zero-tolerance policy and has taken to Facebook to urge them to fight to get their kids back.

"If they give our children up for adoption without our permission, that isn't justice," she said during a recent interview in a park. "They are our children, not theirs."

For months after she came home, Alexa asked if she could talk to the Barrs but Ramos wasn't ready. She had a change of heart when she learned Sherri Barr was ill and now lets them talk every so often.

"I do not feel resentment for them because they also love her and because the family is going through a bad time," Ramos said. "We all deserve an opportunity."

The Barrs worry about Alexa's safety in El Salvador, but say they also worry about Ramos' well-being. They now consider their relationship with mother and daughter part of God's plan.

"No one wins in this one," Sherri Barr said.
They're selling these kids into sex slavery.
__________________
There's battle lines being drawn, Nobody's right if everybody's wrong
Oblique is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 07:27 AM   #155
DIYAutoRepair
**Sponsor**
 
DIYAutoRepair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,643
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 25
Thanks (Received): 198
Likes (Given): 73
Likes (Received): 1357
Dislikes (Given): 1
Dislikes (Received): 27
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oblique View Post
They're selling these kids into sex slavery.
That's why they are trafficking the kids here without their parents. They say they are a family so they can stay here, then they sell off the kids when they are of no more use.

This illegal immigration needs to stop and Trump is doing his best to stop it but the liberal courts are blocking him.

Build the wall!!!
__________________
DIY Auto Repair
Fully equipped service bay rental by the hour
We also offer full service automotive repairs along with paint and bodywork
Visit us at http://diyautorepairkc.com/
or call (913) 226-3806

Favorite car from the past (73 Pinto)
DIYAutoRepair is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 08:30 AM   #156
Oblique
Buckwheat 2.0
 
Oblique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wherever I May Roam
Posts: 7,736
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 46
Thanks (Received): 140
Likes (Given): 191
Likes (Received): 778
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 26
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DIYAutoRepair View Post
That's why they are trafficking the kids here without their parents. They say they are a family so they can stay here, then they sell off the kids when they are of no more use.

This illegal immigration needs to stop and Trump is doing his best to stop it but the liberal courts are blocking him.

Build the wall!!!
So they're selling them to the government then, since they're the ones who take them. Pretty genius argument you have there if you think that it makes Trump look innocent in all of this.
__________________
There's battle lines being drawn, Nobody's right if everybody's wrong
Oblique is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 08:37 AM   #157
DIYAutoRepair
**Sponsor**
 
DIYAutoRepair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,643
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 25
Thanks (Received): 198
Likes (Given): 73
Likes (Received): 1357
Dislikes (Given): 1
Dislikes (Received): 27
Default

No, Those that slip by the government sell the kids to whoever. The ones the government gets a hold of, they try to locate the parents, if they can't find them, they put them in the system where they could get adopted by legal citizens just like any other adoption.
__________________
DIY Auto Repair
Fully equipped service bay rental by the hour
We also offer full service automotive repairs along with paint and bodywork
Visit us at http://diyautorepairkc.com/
or call (913) 226-3806

Favorite car from the past (73 Pinto)
DIYAutoRepair is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 12:10 PM   #158
torqueburner
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: 39.11*N, 94.54*W, elavation 971 ft
Posts: 4,836
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 112
Thanks (Received): 18
Likes (Given): 418
Likes (Received): 237
Dislikes (Given): 17
Dislikes (Received): 4
Default

The bad thing about adoption is that it can take years to complete the process, all the while they're being bounced around from home to home, not to mention it's not cheap either (I know first hand).
__________________
Dear Karma,
Here's a list of people you missed.....


Street & Racing Technology
torqueburner is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 12:19 PM   #159
Oblique
Buckwheat 2.0
 
Oblique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wherever I May Roam
Posts: 7,736
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 46
Thanks (Received): 140
Likes (Given): 191
Likes (Received): 778
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 26
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DIYAutoRepair View Post
No, Those that slip by the government sell the kids to whoever. The ones the government gets a hold of, they try to locate the parents, if they can't find them, they put them in the system where they could get adopted by legal citizens just like any other adoption.
And then they lose 1500 of them...
__________________
There's battle lines being drawn, Nobody's right if everybody's wrong
Oblique is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 12:30 PM   #160
phreakdna
 
phreakdna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Leawood
Posts: 6,920
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 163
Thanks (Received): 118
Likes (Given): 409
Likes (Received): 637
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 36
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by torqueburner View Post
The bad thing about adoption is that it can take years to complete the process, all the while they're being bounced around from home to home, not to mention it's not cheap either (I know first hand).
its also bad if we separated families at the border and then separate them for life because we refuse to do basic recordkeeping.

its kind of a fucked up way to look at it but this is basically an inventory problem... we should be assigning ID numbers to people that come in and then we simply associate ID A (adult) with ID B (minor). when we move either human being we track their ID and literally check them in and out at the various holding facilities (whether they are moved together or, separately because we're monsters) we move them around. then whenever we want to find the other (for phone calls, release, repatriation, etc) we simply check the database and find that human B is associated with human A and we can find out where human B is (checking them out of their holding facility to close that loop) and reconnect them with human A.

this is basic shit of running an organization and its telling the the Trump Admin gives so little fucks about immigrants and basic human decency that they refuse to set this system up. fucking redbox has this worked out and yet DHS can't figure it out after months and hundreds of thousands of people separated? bullshit.
__________________
Our progress in degeneracy appears to me to be pretty rapid. As a nation, we began by declaring that ”all men are created equal.” We now practically read it “all men are created equal, except negroes” When the Know-Nothings get control, it will read “all men are created equal, except negroes, and foreigners, and Catholics.” When it comes to this I should prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretence of loving liberty -- to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be taken pure, and without the base alloy of hypocricy. - Lincoln

Last edited by phreakdna; 2018-10-10 at 12:33 PM..
phreakdna is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 01:18 PM   #161
DIYAutoRepair
**Sponsor**
 
DIYAutoRepair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,643
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 25
Thanks (Received): 198
Likes (Given): 73
Likes (Received): 1357
Dislikes (Given): 1
Dislikes (Received): 27
Default

^^ You don't even understand the problem yet you comment like you know what's going on.

A lot of the children arriving here, especially under the previous admin, came here without parents or family members. What do we do with them?

When they say they lost 1500, what they mean is that when they called the phone number of the guardian with whom they were placed, that person did not answer the phone.

A lot of the children were placed with other illegal guardians. I believe this is where the sex trafficking occurs.

This admin is trying to fix the problems that have been created by previous admins, and the courts are not allowing those fixes to be implemented.

If you actually care about the children, they should be prevented from entering this country in the first place. By allowing them to enter, parents are sending them here alone to be victimized all along the way by predators.

But the Libs don't really care about the children, they are just interested in making political points no matter how many children are victimized.
__________________
DIY Auto Repair
Fully equipped service bay rental by the hour
We also offer full service automotive repairs along with paint and bodywork
Visit us at http://diyautorepairkc.com/
or call (913) 226-3806

Favorite car from the past (73 Pinto)
DIYAutoRepair is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 01:29 PM   #162
so.DOPE
 
so.DOPE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: From a 70 mph roll, 2 red tail lights radically morph to one...
Posts: 3,670
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 55
Thanks (Received): 73
Likes (Given): 177
Likes (Received): 605
Dislikes (Given): 43
Dislikes (Received): 45
Default

Don't bring migrant kids here then without said kid's legally migrant biological parent. Problem solved.
__________________


Spencer Davis Group - Blues in F
so.DOPE is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 01:31 PM   #163
jwdb1fish
 
jwdb1fish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Sharpening my harpoon.
Posts: 12,706
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 34
Thanks (Received): 479
Likes (Given): 53
Likes (Received): 4088
Dislikes (Given): 7
Dislikes (Received): 124
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by so.DOPE View Post
Don't bring migrant kids here then without said kid's legally migrant biological parent. Problem solved.

Woah.
jwdb1fish is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 02:09 PM   #164
DIYAutoRepair
**Sponsor**
 
DIYAutoRepair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,643
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 25
Thanks (Received): 198
Likes (Given): 73
Likes (Received): 1357
Dislikes (Given): 1
Dislikes (Received): 27
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by so.DOPE View Post
Don't bring migrant kids here then without said kid's legally migrant biological parent. Problem solved.
Racist, you don't like brown people do you.
__________________
DIY Auto Repair
Fully equipped service bay rental by the hour
We also offer full service automotive repairs along with paint and bodywork
Visit us at http://diyautorepairkc.com/
or call (913) 226-3806

Favorite car from the past (73 Pinto)
Post Thanks / Like - 0 Thanks, 1 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Likes so.DOPE liked this post
DIYAutoRepair is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 04:28 PM   #165
Oblique
Buckwheat 2.0
 
Oblique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wherever I May Roam
Posts: 7,736
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 46
Thanks (Received): 140
Likes (Given): 191
Likes (Received): 778
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 26
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by so.DOPE View Post
Don't bring migrant kids here then without said kid's legally migrant biological parent. Problem solved.
Yep. So that means they're completely fair game right? Fuck em. Stupid dipshit parents. Those kids deserve to get abused.

What in the ever living fuck is wrong with you people?
__________________
There's battle lines being drawn, Nobody's right if everybody's wrong
Oblique is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-10, 04:32 PM   #166
Oblique
Buckwheat 2.0
 
Oblique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wherever I May Roam
Posts: 7,736
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 46
Thanks (Received): 140
Likes (Given): 191
Likes (Received): 778
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 26
Default

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...ce/1521128002/

Quote:
As feds focused on detaining kids, border drug prosecutions plummeted

WASHINGTON – Federal drug-trafficking prosecutions along the southwestern border plunged to their lowest level in nearly two decades this summer as the Trump administration launched a “zero tolerance” crackdown on illegal immigration that separated thousands of children from their parents.

The decision to prosecute everyone caught entering the USA illegally flooded federal courts with thousands of cases, most of them involving minor immigration violations that resulted in no jail time and a $10 fee. As prosecutors and border agents raced to bring those immigrants to court, the number of people they charged under drug-trafficking laws dropped by 30 percent along the border – and in some places far more steeply than that, a USA TODAY review of court dockets and Justice Department records found.

In June and July, federal prosecutors charged fewer people with drug-trafficking violations than in any month since at least 2001, when the United States began a border security buildup. The numbers rebounded in August but remained lower than the previous summer.

The administration cited keeping drug smugglers and other criminals out of the USA as a central reason for tighter restrictions along the Mexican border. It’s part of President Donald Trump’s justification for a border wall and dates to the first moments of his campaign.

Announcing his plans to deal with a growing toll of opioid deaths, Trump said in March that “drug traffickers kill so many thousands of our citizens every year. And that’s why my Department of Justice will be seeking so many much tougher penalties than we’ve ever had.”

Two months later, in May, Attorney General Jeff Sessions instructed prosecutors in the five federal judicial districts spanning parts of four states along the Mexican border to seek criminal charges against everyone caught attempting to enter the USA illegally, even if it meant setting aside other priorities.

A spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney’s office in New Mexico, Elizabeth Martinez, said the drop in drug cases there “is completely unrelated to the office’s immigration enforcement efforts.”

Others were just as certain the shift in focus played a role.

“There’s no doubt in my mind that serious federal felony offenses are being declined because of the additional resources being spent on people crossing the southwest border,” said John Sandweg, a former acting chief of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. “You’d think the emphasis would be on drug traffickers.”

Days after the zero-tolerance crackdown began, a Justice Department supervisor in San Diego warned of the likely consequences. In an email to border authorities, Fred Sheppard, who ran the major crimes unit of the U.S. attorney’s office there, said prosecutors would be “diverting staff, both support and attorneys.” He said prosecutors would put tighter deadlines on smuggling investigations bound for federal court, making it more difficult for agents to bring cases.

Soon, already busy courts along the border found themselves inundated with often largely symbolic cases – most of them misdemeanor charges against people caught crossing into the USA for the first time. Border agents brought adult immigrants into federal courtrooms to plead guilty by the dozens, then returned many of them to immigration detention centers, where they found their children were gone.

An examination by USA TODAY in June found that a majority of people charged with misdemeanor immigration violations pleaded guilty the same day and were sentenced to no jail time or fine. Case management records show attorneys who previously handled some drug-trafficking cases were assigned to prosecute the hundreds of thoseborder crossing misdemeanors.

Justice Department lawyers filed so many immigration charges that the total number of criminal cases in the federal courts in Laredo and McAllen, Texas, more than doubled from March to August, court records show. The caseloads in Corpus Christi and Brownsville, Texas, and El Centro, California, more than tripled.

The glut of new cases ignited an international backlash because they were the legal mechanism for separating more than 2,600 children from their parents. At the end of September, government lawyers said 136 children remained in custody without their parents.

Few of the cases involved drugs. Court dockets show that only 262 of the more than 14,000 criminal cases filed along the border in July involved people indicted on drug-trafficking charges.

In McAllen, the Justice Department brought half as many felony drug-trafficking cases in July as it did earlier in the year, court dockets show. Federal prosecutors in Southern California indicted 54 people in felony drug-trafficking cases that month, down from 152 in March.

As the number of federal drug-smuggling cases in Southern California fell, more started appearing in local courts, even though drug violations typically are punished far less harshly in state courts than in federal ones. For example, cocaine trafficking can lead to a prison sentence as short as two years in California state court while some federal trafficking charges carry a 10-year mandatory minimum.

In late June, ICE agents turned a man caught with more than 20 kilograms of cocaine at a Southern California border crossing over to state authorities instead of bringing him to federal court. A judge sentenced him to eight years in prison, though under the state's sentencing laws, he could get out in half that time.

The district attorney’s office in San Diego County, which covers the length of the southern border in California, said in June that the number of drug cases it received from Homeland Security agents who monitor border checkpoints doubled since the start of zero tolerance; three-quarters of them involved more than a kilogram of narcotics. A spokesman for the office declined to provide updated statistics.

The Justice Department started hiring prosecutors and bringing in military lawyers to help.

“There’s no question that zero tolerance created a need for more prosecutors because you’re just squeezing all the cases through a small number of inputs,” said Kenneth Magidson, a former U.S. attorney in southern Texas.

Sandweg said prosecuting some immigrants has merit. He and other immigration officials pressed during President Barack Obama’s administration to bring more border crossers into federal court because they found that even token charges against immigrants from northern Mexico seemed to prevent them from trying again. The Justice Department rejected the idea.

“They said we’re already at capacity and we’d have to drain away resources from some other priority prosecution area,” he said.

Among those priorities are drug-smuggling cases. The drug cases that make it to federal court along the border are seldom small. In July, the Justice Department brought trafficking charges against a woman caught crossing the border in California with 76 pounds of methamphetamine, 15 pounds of cocaine and 3 pounds of heroin stashed in the spare tire and gas tank of her car. Federal prosecutors charged another woman with smuggling 37 pounds of methamphetamine in her gas tank.

Martinez said the decline in drug prosecutions in New Mexico is the result of less smuggling, not less attention from prosecutors and agents. For years, she said, border agents have caught fewer and fewer people trying to carry backpacks loaded with marijuana across the border. That number, she said, hit a new low this year.

Nonetheless the drug trade along the border remains vast. U.S. Customs and Border Protection estimated in March that agents seize almost 3 tons of narcotics on a typical day. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen told Trump at a Cabinet meeting in August that agents “interdict more and more drugs at the border each month.”
Well at least all these kids have the feds distracted so I can keep getting my drugs.
__________________
There's battle lines being drawn, Nobody's right if everybody's wrong
Oblique is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-11, 02:10 AM   #167
phreakdna
 
phreakdna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Leawood
Posts: 6,920
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 163
Thanks (Received): 118
Likes (Given): 409
Likes (Received): 637
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 36
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DIYAutoRepair View Post
^^ You don't even understand the problem yet you comment like you know what's going on.

A lot of the children arriving here, especially under the previous admin, came here without parents or family members. What do we do with them?

When they say they lost 1500, what they mean is that when they called the phone number of the guardian with whom they were placed, that person did not answer the phone.

A lot of the children were placed with other illegal guardians. I believe this is where the sex trafficking occurs.

This admin is trying to fix the problems that have been created by previous admins, and the courts are not allowing those fixes to be implemented.

If you actually care about the children, they should be prevented from entering this country in the first place. By allowing them to enter, parents are sending them here alone to be victimized all along the way by predators.

But the Libs don't really care about the children, they are just interested in making political points no matter how many children are victimized.
for the 497th time... you really shouldn't challenge me on the "does he have his facts straight, even if I think he's interpreting them wrong?" game... you will lose like you do basically every damn time. you may not like my interpretations of the facts or the conclusions I draw but no matter how much msn.com you try to read, its unlikely that you can legitimately call me out for not understanding the problem or commenting without having my basic facts straight. plus I've never felt the need to hide behind the "mommy's skirt" of calling facts I don't like "fake news"... when you get made up nonsense from the various tabloid/conservative sites you frequent, I will call you out on it with legitimate facts but I won't ever hide from shit I don't like that's real, particularly just because it makes "my guy" look bad.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/30/polit...ted/index.html
Quote:
...The court filing from the Justice Department and the American Civil Liberties Union case describes a slow and laborious process to try to connect the families that have been separated.

It remains unclear exactly how many parents were deported without their children, though it's in the hundreds. By the government's latest count, there are 322 deported parents who have children still in custody.
...
so just to be clear, we have separated parents from their children at the border, and then we deported the parents without reuniting them with their children and have been unable to reconnect them by the hundreds. that's not liberal spin, that's the Trump Department of Justice saying that in a court filing.

we literally separated kids from their parents, processed the parents, and then deported them without their children. so either our gov't is intentionally in the business of stealing children so that we can create a welfare state of migrant kids that will just exist for no particular reason or the gov't has what boils down to an inventory problem that they refuse to solve presumably because the DOJ is run by heartless monsters of human beings.
__________________
Our progress in degeneracy appears to me to be pretty rapid. As a nation, we began by declaring that ”all men are created equal.” We now practically read it “all men are created equal, except negroes” When the Know-Nothings get control, it will read “all men are created equal, except negroes, and foreigners, and Catholics.” When it comes to this I should prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretence of loving liberty -- to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be taken pure, and without the base alloy of hypocricy. - Lincoln
phreakdna is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-11, 02:49 AM   #168
Oblique
Buckwheat 2.0
 
Oblique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wherever I May Roam
Posts: 7,736
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 46
Thanks (Received): 140
Likes (Given): 191
Likes (Received): 778
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 26
Default

Like I've said before, they're being trafficked. It makes too much sense for it not to be true. Think about it. I've heard about this "Trump is taking down the pedos" since he won the election. I thought it was really weird since I never heard a word about this so I figured it must be on so pro Trump conspiracy sites or something. Well then comes Q a year later and thats the main thing he talks about too. The Q cultists biggest thing was talking about Trump taking down pedo rings and then Pizza gate and all that nonsense. The entire thing is projection to avert your attention away from them and make anyone who talks about this kind of things look like a crazy Trump supporter. And they'll never think Trump's administration is involved in it because of how convinced they've been that Hillary is personally running her own ring out of the basement of a fucking pizza shop. Just look at DIY. You all think I'm crazy? His brain can't even acknowledge reality if it conflicts with Trump. I'm just connecting dots that you guys don't think are related, I'm not straight up denying facts and reality. You guys will see over the next couple of months. The DOW just dropped over 800pts on the day I said something would happen. You all can keep saying I'm crazy while I keep telling you whats going to happen as it happens. It will come to light, whats been going on with these kids at the border and those of you who made excuses and dismissed it, I hope you can live with yourself.
__________________
There's battle lines being drawn, Nobody's right if everybody's wrong
Oblique is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-11, 07:58 AM   #169
DIYAutoRepair
**Sponsor**
 
DIYAutoRepair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,643
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 25
Thanks (Received): 198
Likes (Given): 73
Likes (Received): 1357
Dislikes (Given): 1
Dislikes (Received): 27
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oblique View Post
It makes too much sense for it not to be true. Think about it.
From what you have been positing the past month, this carries a of weight.
__________________
DIY Auto Repair
Fully equipped service bay rental by the hour
We also offer full service automotive repairs along with paint and bodywork
Visit us at http://diyautorepairkc.com/
or call (913) 226-3806

Favorite car from the past (73 Pinto)
DIYAutoRepair is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-11, 08:31 AM   #170
so.DOPE
 
so.DOPE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: From a 70 mph roll, 2 red tail lights radically morph to one...
Posts: 3,670
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 55
Thanks (Received): 73
Likes (Given): 177
Likes (Received): 605
Dislikes (Given): 43
Dislikes (Received): 45
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oblique View Post
Yep. So that means they're completely fair game right? Fuck em. Stupid dipshit parents. Those kids deserve to get abused.

What in the ever living fuck is wrong with you people?
You're an idiot.

If you don't smoke crack...you won't get addicted to crack. Do you agree with this?

Even with your limited sanity I'm going to give you enough credit here and assume you are capable of staying with.

So...

If you don't bring Pablo who would otherwise cross the boarder completely illegally...who wouldn't have a guardian to protect him from Franco and his tribe of rebels...it's safe to say that because Pablo never entered the U.S.A. in the first place...Pablo nor the U.S.A. would have to deal with the problem discussed above in the first place.

Still with me lil' fella? Mind. Blown.
__________________


Spencer Davis Group - Blues in F
so.DOPE is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-11, 09:17 AM   #171
Oblique
Buckwheat 2.0
 
Oblique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wherever I May Roam
Posts: 7,736
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 46
Thanks (Received): 140
Likes (Given): 191
Likes (Received): 778
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 26
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by so.DOPE View Post
You're an idiot.

If you don't smoke crack...you won't get addicted to crack. Do you agree with this?

Even with your limited sanity I'm going to give you enough credit here and assume you are capable of staying with.

So...

If you don't bring Pablo who would otherwise cross the boarder completely illegally...who wouldn't have a guardian to protect him from Franco and his tribe of rebels...it's safe to say that because Pablo never entered the U.S.A. in the first place...Pablo nor the U.S.A. would have to deal with the problem discussed above in the first place.

Still with me lil' fella? Mind. Blown.
Mind blown indeed. At how absolutely fucking moronic you are.

See if you can follow this line of reason. Imagine you're a child, which shouldn't be too much of stretch for you, you're told what to do and to come here. You get here and go into a "shelter" where you get forcibly drugged, abused and then sold into some foster family where you continue to be abused.

You still with me? I know this is a long post, keep at it though.

Then imagine you complain about your treatment to some authority figure, and they tell you that your parents brought you here so blame them. Because apparently that gives anyone carte blanch to do whatever they want to you. You're no longer a human, you're property with no rights to decent human treatment.
__________________
There's battle lines being drawn, Nobody's right if everybody's wrong
Oblique is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-11, 10:18 AM   #172
so.DOPE
 
so.DOPE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: From a 70 mph roll, 2 red tail lights radically morph to one...
Posts: 3,670
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 55
Thanks (Received): 73
Likes (Given): 177
Likes (Received): 605
Dislikes (Given): 43
Dislikes (Received): 45
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oblique View Post
Mind blown indeed. At how absolutely fucking moronic you are.

See if you can follow this line of reason. Imagine you're a child, which shouldn't be too much of stretch for you, you're told what to do and to come here. You get here and go into a "shelter" where you get forcibly drugged, abused and then sold into some foster family where you continue to be abused.

You still with me? I know this is a long post, keep at it though.

Then imagine you complain about your treatment to some authority figure, and they tell you that your parents brought you here so blame them. Because apparently that gives anyone carte blanch to do whatever they want to you. You're no longer a human, you're property with no rights to decent human treatment.
Said kid is illegal. Said kid is a burden to me, my family, and our country as a whole. Kick said kid back to wherever said kid came from.

There are legally registered unemployed veterans, starving homeless and legally registered struggling drug addicts that get my sympathy well before little Pablo.

I don't care about illegal Pablo.
__________________


Spencer Davis Group - Blues in F
so.DOPE is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-11, 10:34 AM   #173
Oblique
Buckwheat 2.0
 
Oblique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wherever I May Roam
Posts: 7,736
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 46
Thanks (Received): 140
Likes (Given): 191
Likes (Received): 778
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 26
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by so.DOPE View Post
Said kid is illegal. Said kid is a burden to me, my family, and our country as a whole. Kick said kid back to wherever said kid came from.

There are legally registered unemployed veterans, starving homeless and legally registered struggling drug addicts that get my sympathy well before little Pablo.

I don't care about illegal Pablo.
^^^This is the moral compass of your average Trump supporter.

You're argument ignores key facts while also deflecting and exposing just how dark your point of view is.
__________________
There's battle lines being drawn, Nobody's right if everybody's wrong
Oblique is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-11, 11:15 AM   #174
Oblique
Buckwheat 2.0
 
Oblique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Wherever I May Roam
Posts: 7,736
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 46
Thanks (Received): 140
Likes (Given): 191
Likes (Received): 778
Dislikes (Given): 8
Dislikes (Received): 26
Default

https://theintercept.com/2018/10/11/...n-immigration/

Quote:
THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION CARRIED OUT THOUSANDS MORE FAMILY SEPARATIONS THAN PREVIOUSLY ACKNOWLEDGED

MORE THAN A year after the Trump administration quietly began a program of separating migrant children from their families along the U.S.-Mexico border, the full number of people impacted remains unclear. According to a new report, however, the government’s own data indicates that the campaign was far more expansive — and far more destructive — than previously acknowledged.

Figures provided by U.S. Customs and Border Protection detail the separation of 6,022 “family units” from April 19, 2018 to August 15, 2018, according to a report published by Amnesty International on Thursday. Noting that the term “family unit” has varying applications in the U.S. immigration enforcement world — sometimes referring to individuals in a family, and other times referring to family groups containing multiple people — Amnesty observes that even on the low end, the figure reflects the largest total ever disclosed by the border enforcement agency in the context of the family separation crisis.

Using available statistics from the last two years, Amnesty further reports that in 2017 and 2018, the Trump administration appears to have separated approximately 8,000 “family units” along the border. Even if half of the people referred to in that figure were parents, the remaining 4,000 children would dwarf the total number of kids commonly reported to have been impacted by the “zero tolerance” campaign — that total tends to hover between 2,500 to 3,000.

The numbers are admittedly murky, said Brian Griffey, the author of the Amnesty report. But that’s because the agency that provided them — CBP — refused to provide any clarification as to what, exactly, they reflected. Conversations with the border enforcement agency continued into last week, Griffey told The Intercept in an interview on Tuesday. The closest Amnesty could get to a clarification on the “family unit” question, Griffey said, was a claim from CBP that the 6,022 figure “appeared” to refer to individuals. According to the Department of Homeland Security, which includes CBP, “family unit” apprehensions refer to the individual count of each family member.

“They have to come clean,” Griffey said. “It requires a congressional inquiry, that’s our view.”

CBP did not respond to The Intercept’s request for comment. Katie Waldman, a DHS spokesperson, mischaracterized Amnesty’s findings in her emails to The Intercept and, despite repeated follow-ups, did not explain the disparity between the numbers provided by CBP and those previously acknowledged by authorities, including in response to the Ms L v. ICE class-action lawsuit. Instead, Waldman issued the following statement: “This is a deeply flawed, inaccurate report authored by an open-borders activist group. In fact, many of its so-called ‘findings’ contradict data provided in federal court by the government, the ACLU, and Judge [Dana] Sabraw. It is not even remotely credible and should not be treated as such. Individuals looking for an accurate accounting of the Administration’s Zero Tolerance efforts should examine the Ms L court filings which identified 103 children between the ages of 0 and 4 who are potential class members and 2,551 children between the ages of 5 and 17 who are potential class members.” Asked for clarification on what specific parts of the report were inaccurate and misleading, given that Amnesty based much of its findings on data provided by CBP, she simply resent her agency’s original statement with no additional information.

The Office of Refugee Resettlement, which takes custody of minors once they are separated from their families, did not answer The Intercept’s questions besides providing generic links to its website.

As Amnesty’s report makes clear, family separation numbers are but the most well-known piece of a much larger story, one in which the Trump administration has waged a systematic, multi-pronged, and frequently illegal attack on some of the world’s most vulnerable immigrants and the systems designed to protect them. Asylum-seekers, the report finds, have borne the brunt of this assault, being illegally turned away from lawful ports of entry — with the cooperation, in some cases, of Mexican authorities — and held in indefinite detention. The report also details the cases of asylum-seekers who had their children taken from them, experiencing what Amnesty says amounts to torture.

Even as family separations have receded from the headlines after the full-blown scandal of this summer, the Amnesty report underlines what’s still unknown about the true impact and timeline of the policy. As Amnesty documents, the president and his closest advisers have routinely relied on dehumanizing rhetoric in reference to immigrants, particularly asylum-seekers, and devised strategies clearly designed to terrify them away from coming to the United States. At the same time, the administration has provided little guidance to DHS agencies in implementing these orders. The result, frequently, has been chaos. Griffey attributes it to what he calls a “confluence of malice and incompetence.”

“You never know if it’s one or the other or just both,” he said.

Manipulated Figures and Deliberate Obscurity

The number of families, children, and adults that U.S. authorities have separated during, as well as before and possibly after, the Trump administration’s so-called zero tolerance policy have remained the subject of confusion, contradicting statements, and differing definitions by the various agencies in charge. But the Amnesty report makes clear that, even with the most conservative interpretation of the data officials have made public, the total number of separations is a lot higher than previously reported.

Last September, after disavowing earlier figures, CBP told Amnesty that it had separated 6,022 “family units” between April 19 and August 15, 2018. CBP did not offer Amnesty further clarification about that data, and it did not specify how many — if any — separations occurred after Donald Trump signed an executive order supposedly putting an end to the practice on June 20. A month later, Griffey says, CBP suggested, though it did not confirm, that the “family unit” figure it had provided to the human rights organization appeared to refer to individuals who had arrived as part of a family. As the Amnesty report notes, the ambiguity appears to be motivated, at least in part, by politics. “The use of ‘family units’ to mean individual people who arrive with families, rather than their whole family groups, conflicts with the definition of the term under DHS policies, and may be intended to inflate the apparent number of families seeking to cross the U.S.-Mexico border, for political purposes,” the report notes. As The Intercept has reported, CBP is known to have manipulated statistics in the past, in order to score political points.

“They didn’t even know what that stats mean that they’re giving us,” said Griffey. “It’s ambiguous. And it’s frustrating.”

After repeatedly asking for clarification, Griffey said that CBP told him that the information would take a few weeks. “I don’t have the luxury of that. No one does. These are human beings we’re talking about,” Griffey told The Intercept. “They should be able to break that down by the month, by the number of kids, by the number of adults, etc., and then by the grounds for which they were separated. They seem very casual about the whole thing.”

The new figure provided to Amnesty conflicts with earlier numbers given by the administration, which were also incomplete and often confusing. With no clarity coming from authorities, and agencies like CBP and ORR — which took custody of separated children — offering different numbers and definitions, reporters and rights groups have been left scrambling to cobble together the total number of children impacted by the policy.

For instance, CBP said in June that 2,342 children had been separated between May 5 and June 9, while other officials said 1,995 children were separated between April and May. Combining administration statements with other figures from the government about children who were separated in the months before “zero tolerance” became official, The Intercept tallied in June that 3,700 children had been separated up to that point. But when Trump signed his executive order in June ending the policy, the official number that circulated was 2,600.

Of the unknown number of total children impacted by the policy, 2,654, including 103 under the age of 5, have qualified for the Ms L lawsuit, one of several around the issue of family separations. Of those children, 136 children, including three under the age of 5, remained in ORR custody as of late September, along with 219 children, including 12 under the age of 5, whose parents do not qualify for that class status.

To complicate the matter further, CBP is now saying that the statistics it has provided do not include what it considers “fraudulent” cases — by which it means not those lying about their status as relatives, but relatives other than parents, like grandparents or parents who do not have documentation to prove their relation to their children or whose documentation CBP was unable to verify. In fact, while the Trump administration has often referred to the trafficking of children across the border to justify its policy, DHS’s own figures suggest that traffickers account for only 0.1 percent of asylum-seekers.

Pushing the Problem to Mexico

The Amnesty report describes an orchestrated campaign by the administration to seek “the full dismantling of the U.S. asylum system”: discouraging asylum-seekers with the threat of family separation, detaining asylum-seekers while their claims are heard in substandard conditions where they are incentivized to give up and agree to leave – and seeking to rewrite longstanding policy to make it harder for people to request asylum directly at the border.

“These are not isolated aberrations. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has implemented these interrelated policies in unison,” the report says. “The Trump administration is waging a deliberate campaign of human rights violations against asylum-seekers, in order to broadcast globally that the United States no longer welcomes refugees.”

The report also provides new firsthand accounts of how U.S. border officials have prevented asylum-seekers from crossing legally at ports of entry in order to make their claims, forcing them back into dangerous cities in Mexico. Mexican immigration officials described how the U.S. has enlisted Mexican authorities in that effort — encouraging them to check the status, detain, and possibly deport asylum-seekers that the Border Patrol had turned away from U.S. ports of entry.

This practice has been reported since Trump took office, but Amnesty argues that since April 2018, when “zero tolerance” began, “U.S. authorities have more systematically conducted mass illegal pushbacks of asylum-seekers along the entire U.S.-Mexico border.” Their finding comes after a DHS inspector general report last week, which also concluded that U.S. border officials had prevented asylum-seekers from presenting themselves lawfully at ports of entry, and in doing so, had pushed people to cross illegally.

In a practice they call “metering,” border officials block asylum-seekers from physically reaching U.S. soil, saying that border stations are at capacity and that the migrants seeking protection will have to wait in line or come back later. Amnesty, however, points out that overall border crossings by people without status in the U.S. have been consistent over the past five years, and that CBP had previously been able to handle large numbers of asylum-seekers. The agency has refused to provide statistics on the actual number of people supposedly flooding their gates.

The long queues and encampments on the Mexican side of the border leave asylum-seekers from Central America, Africa, and elsewhere vulnerable not just to crime and punishing heat, but also to being deported from Mexico. And according to Mexican immigration authorities quoted in the Amnesty report, CBP has implicitly encouraged them to do just that.

In June, for instance, a senior Mexican immigration official in Sonora said that “U.S. officials had requested INM [Instituto Nacional de Migración, Mexico’s immigration agency] to detain and check the papers of the asylum-seekers whom CBP was pushing back to the Mexican side.” The official said he understood that to mean that Mexico should deport people who did not have status in Mexico. Three INM officials told a lawyer in Texas that they were screening asylum-seekers at the request of CBP, and detaining non-Mexicans without visas. “Yes, it’s a collaborative program that we’re doing with the Americans,” one official said.

An INM delegate in Baja California said that CBP had asked his agency to remove an encampment on the Mexican side of the border. The official saw the request as asking Mexico to do the U.S.’s dirty work and deport the asylum-seekers.

“Everybody knows their [transit visas] are about to expire. If I go out there right now and do an immigration sweep on the plaza,” probably 40 percent of the asylum-seekers would not have legal status, the official said.

The contentious collaboration between Mexico and U.S. immigration authorities points to another goal of the Trump administration’s attempt to remake asylum policy: getting Mexico to take on the responsibility for the Central American and other refugees presenting at the southern border. The administration has announced plans to give $20 million to Mexico to pay for the deportation of some 17,000 people, and has been been pursuing a “safe third-country agreement” that would define Mexico as a safe destination for all asylum-seekers — allowing the U.S. to turn away all but Mexican asylum-seekers and force them to seek refuge in Mexico first. Rights groups are uniformly opposed to the idea, pointing out that Mexico’s asylum system is underfunded and backlogged, wrongful deportations are common, and migrants in Mexico are at risk of discrimination, exploitation by criminal groups and corrupt government officials, sexual assault, and other abuses. Nonetheless, the U.S. has pushed to negotiate the agreement, though Mexico’s newly elected president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, appears little inclined to support it.

“The U.S. government’s abrogation of its obligations under human rights and refugee law is undermining the international framework for refugee protection,” the report concludes, “grossly violating the right to seek asylum, and is inviting a race to the bottom by other countries.”

As it has embarked on the policies and practices detailed by Amnesty, the administration has continued to publicly maintain that asylum-seekers who present themselves legally at ports of entry will not be prosecuted and will not have their families separated. As DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said in June, “They have not committed a crime by coming to the port of entry.” But at the same time, Nielsen has also said that the right to ask for asylum at ports of entry amounts to “a huge gaping loophole that we need to fix because it is so abused.” Today’s report adds to a growing mound of evidence that the administration has undertaken to fix that alleged loophole by illegal means.
Well that was quicker than I thought. Lets get this process going.
__________________
There's battle lines being drawn, Nobody's right if everybody's wrong

Last edited by Oblique; 2018-10-11 at 11:18 AM..
Oblique is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-11, 11:35 AM   #175
so.DOPE
 
so.DOPE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: From a 70 mph roll, 2 red tail lights radically morph to one...
Posts: 3,670
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 55
Thanks (Received): 73
Likes (Given): 177
Likes (Received): 605
Dislikes (Given): 43
Dislikes (Received): 45
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oblique View Post
^^^This is the moral compass of your average Trump supporter.
That's your opinion which has no bearing on me or what is legal.
__________________


Spencer Davis Group - Blues in F
so.DOPE is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

 

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:49 AM.


Design By: Miner Skinz.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.13.37
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright (c) 1993-2012, KCSR.org