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Unread 2019-03-20, 05:04 PM   #1
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Default Google unveils Stadia cloud gaming service, launches in 2019

Stream games to your PC, tablet, TV, or phone



Google is launching its Stadia cloud gaming service at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco today. Google CEO Sundar Pichai, who says he plays FIFA 19 “quite a bit,” introduced the Stadia service during a special keynote at GDC this morning. Describing it as a platform for everyone, Pichai talked up Google’s ambitions to stream games to all types of devices. Stadia will stream games from the cloud to the Chrome browser, Chromecast, and Pixel devices, and it will launch at some point in 2019 in the US, Canada, UK, and Europe.
Phil Harrison, a former Sony and Microsoft executive, joined Pichai onstage to fully unveil Stadia in his role at Google. Harrison says Google will amplify this game streaming service by using YouTube and the many creators that already create game clips on the service. Google previously tested this service as Project Stream in recent months, allowing Chrome users to stream games in their browser. Assassin’s Creed Odyssey was the first and only game to be tested publicly using Google’s service, and the public tests finished in January.
Of course, Google won’t limit Stadia to just one game. Google demonstrated a new feature in YouTube that lets you view a game clip from a creator and then hit “play now” to instantly stream the title. “Stadia offers instant access to play,” says Harrison, without the need to download or install any games. At launch, games will be streamable across laptops, desktops, TVs, tablets, and phones.
Google will leverage YouTube for Stadia
Google demonstrated moving gameplay seamlessly from a phone to a tablet and then to a TV, all using Google-powered devices. While existing USB controllers will work on a laptop or PC, Google is also launching a new Stadia Controller that will power the game streaming service. It looks like a cross between an Xbox and PS4 controller, and it will work with the Stadia service by connecting directly through Wi-Fi to link it to a game session in the cloud. This will presumably help with latency and moving a game from one device to another. You can also use a button to capture and share clips straight to YouTube, or use another button to access the Google Assistant.
To power all of this cloud streaming, Google is leveraging its global infrastructure of data centers to ensure servers are as close to players around the world as possible. That’s a key part of Stadia, as lower latency is a necessity to stream games effectively across the internet. Google says it expects to support up to 4K at 60 fps at launch over an internet connection with around 30Mbps of bandwidth, and it’s planning to support up to 8K resolutions and 120 fps in the future.
Stadia has more teraflops of power than an Xbox One X
Google is partnering with AMD to build a custom GPU for its datacenters. It’s a chip that Google claims will deliver 10.7 teraflops of power, which is more than the 4.2 teraflops of the PS4 Pro and the 6 teraflops of power on the Xbox One X. Each Stadia instance will also be powered by a custom 2.7GHz x86 processor with 16GB of RAM.
One of the first games to launch on Google’s Stadia service will be Doom Eternal, which will support 4K resolution, HDR, and 60 fps game play. Doom Eternal doesn’t have a firm launch date just yet, but it will also be available on PC, Nintendo Switch, PS4, and Xbox One. Stadia will also embrace full cross-platform play, so developers can enable cross-platform multiplayer and game saves and progression.
Focusing on developers, Google also unveiled an impressive way for game developers to apply their own design style to titles on Stadia. It’s a machine learning-based style transfer tool that developers can use to simply drop an image into the video frames of games and have it mimic the style throughout. Google is also using something called State Share to let players easily share moments, so you can even share an exact link to a part of a game, changing the way games are typically shared. Q-Games founder Dylan Cuthbert is even building an entire game all around this new State Share feature.
YouTube is a giant part of Stadia, and Google appears to be relying on it to push gamers to its cloud service. More than 50 billion hours of gaming content was watched on YouTube during 2018, so Google is letting Stadia users highlight, capture, and share straight to YouTube or even let viewers play alongside creators. A Crowd Play feature of Stadia is designed to facilitate this, and it includes a lobby system to let you match up with YouTube content creators.
Google launches its own game dev studio
Google is even creating its own game studio for Stadia-exclusive titles, Stadia Games and Entertainment. Jade Raymond, who recently joined Google as a VP is leading Google’s push for its own games. Raymond is an industry veteran who has previously worked at Sony, Electronic Arts, and Ubisoft. Google says more than 100 studios already have dev kits for Stadia, and more than 1,000 creatives and engineers are already working on titles that will work on the service.
While Google unveiled Stadia today, it had no details on exactly when the service will be available other than 2019. Google didn’t reveal pricing or even how many games the service will have at launch, but is promising more details in the summer.
Google will naturally face competition from a number of rivals that you’d typically associate with games and gaming services. Microsoft is planning its own xCloud game streaming service, which it demonstrated recently, with public trials set to start later this year. Amazon also appears to be readying a similar service, and both Nvidia and Sony are already streaming games over the internet. Even Valve is expanding its Steam Link game-streaming feature to allow you to stream your Steam games from a PC to anywhere through the Steam Link hardware or the Steam Link app.
Correction, March 20 at 3:16 PM ET: Google has clarified that Stadia will require an internet connection with about 30Mbps download speeds to achieve 4K at 60fps, up from the 25Mbps connection it recommended for 1080p resolution during its earlier public test of Project Stream. At launch, a 1080p resolution stream should require less than 25Mbps thanks to improvements. Previously, Google had said 4K would require “approximately” 25Mbps.
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Unread 2019-08-20, 02:18 PM   #2
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Hands-on: Stadia might be the perfect console replacement for casual gamers



Stadia is still about two months out, but Google isn’t shy about drumming up an appetite for the service. At Gamescom earlier this week, the company announced a slew of new games for the platform, including CD Project Red’s Cyberpunk 2077, Stadia exclusive Orcs Must Die 3, and many more. We had the chance to go hands-on with the streaming service during the event. Despite a few flaws, it’s shaping up to be a viable alternative to high-end gaming PCs and consoles for a vast majority of casual gamers – if Stadia can maintain perfect latency on wireless connections.



Due to the busy nature of any trade fair, Google was forced to use ethernet for the demo. Instead of connecting the Stadia controller to a router via Wi-Fi, the gamepad was hard-wired to a corresponding Pixelbook or Pixel 3 XL, linked to Stadia servers. Potentially, connecting the controller to the router directly should lead to even less latency since commands don’t have to travel through yet another node before reaching Google’s servers. This is Google's preferred setup for usage at home, so it's a bummer we couldn't test it today.




The Stadia controller, in contrast to PlayStation’s and Xbox’s solution, looks considerably Google-y, lacking a better word. Just like the Pixel phones, its dual sticks are accompanied by unintrusive orange and yellow accent colors, and the white plastic matches the Pixel 3a and Home devices. You could criticize it for looking rather toyish, but this is a game controller after all.


The button layout is similar to the competiton. The clickable dual sticks are joined by two pairs of shoulder buttons, a d-pad, and four action buttons. In the middle, you get another set of options for invoking Google Assistant, screen recording (both not working yet), opening the Stadia menu, or pausing the game. Holding the controller in my hands, it doesn’t feel as sturdy as the PS4 counterpart, and while buttons have a distinct click, they still feel mushy before you completely press down. Overall, the controller is decent enough and if Google would've priced it just a bit more competitive, it would be well worth its money – especially for a first-gen product.
In Gamescom’s hands-on area, Stadia was available on a Pixel 3 XL and a Pixelbook, both in conjunction with the controller. The Pixelbook was connected to an external 1080p screen, and the Pixel phone didn’t offer Stadia’s maximum 4K resolution, either.




Google’s choice of demo games shows that it’s confident in Stadia’s low latency. I could test Doom Eternal and Mortal Combat 11, both examples of genres that require fast reactions where milliseconds can make or break your winning streak. When I played, I didn't notice any perceivable lag at all (though note I’m a casual gamer at most). I did see blurriness around letters, with artifacts increasing or decreasing depending on how heavy the rendered scene is..


It's understandable – even though Stadia requires a 20 MBit/s connection to go 1080p, live footage still has to be heavily compressed. Generally this wasn’t a nuisance by any means, but still noticeable. I also had two instances of frozen frames that remained static for about a jarring second, but I’d be careful calling out Google for it at this point in time – there was a multitude of devices streaming from Stadia at the same location, which probably won't happen in real-world usage.


Google employees told me that the servers used during the demos are stationed in Frankfurt, located about 100 miles away from Gamescom. They wouldn’t tell me how fast their connection at the trade fair was, though – the only thing they would reveal is that it wasn’t extraordinarily fast and that you could reasonably expect a similar connection at home.


Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

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With all this in mind, I still fear that Wi-Fi could be Stadia’s Achilles heel. So far, we’ve only ever got to use Stadia in an environment completely controlled by Google, either wired or at least shielded from other networks. The reality is that Wi-Fi networks interfere with each other. Stadia might drop more frames once it reaches your home with its potentially less-than-ideal networking infrastructure. Still, the Gamescom demo is promising to say the least and has me excited for the November launch.
I spoke to some of the other trade visitors who were equally impressed with the capabilities of the game streaming service. They all agreed that there wasn’t visible lag, though they also admitted that they weren’t the heaviest gamers and none of them played Doom Eternal or Mortal Combat before.


If you’re a competitive gamer or even just very advanced, Stadia probably isn’t for you. But that’s the beauty of open markets. There’s a good service for everyone, and people heavily invested in gaming can still heavily invest in hardware. For others, purchasing a game with no additional hardware required might be the better deal, even if that means they’ll see some artifacts, some lag, and som
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Unread 2019-10-10, 05:53 PM   #3
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Google Says Stadia Will Outperform Consoles and PCs By Predicting Gamers' Moves



Can Stadia really beat PS5, Xbox Scarlett and gaming PCs?

Well, this is some kind of mindbending magic trick that I can’t wait to see in action: Google wants to predict player moves in order to speed up Stadia — its streaming video game platform. In fact, Google believes that it will beat any local gaming platform.


Talking to Edge magazine, the VP of engineering for Google Stadia Madj Bakar said that Google Stadia will outperform any current or future game console or PC thanks to artificial intelligence.


“Ultimately, we think in a year or two we'll have games that are running faster and feel more responsive in the cloud than they do locally, regardless of how powerful the local machine is.”


It’s a bold claim which may not be far from the truth. Google Stadia has impressed critics so far. Their demonstrations have proved that a good fiber connection will give you the same experience as a local PC or console at least at 1080p, with impressive resolution and the same latency. But in modern gaming you will need to go to 4K and eventually 8K in order to be competitive.
Negative latency

Google believes Stadia can beat the PS5, Xbox Project Scarlett and any gaming PC or gaming laptop by using artificial intelligence. One of the tricks that Bakar described is “negative latency”.



Before we get into what this means, let’s explain the two things that affect our perception of video games playability. One is input lag — the time that it takes from the moment a user clicks a button or moves a joystick to the moment the video game character responds to that action in the screen. That could be classified as controller latency. But more important here will be the network latency: in services like Google Stadia your actions will have to travel up to the cloud and back to your console. That’s a long path which can easily break down and, with it, destroy playability.


In general, latency is measured in milliseconds. Anything from 20 to 100ms will give you an acceptable gaming experience. However, high-end gaming requires a lot less latency than that.



To avoid this and enable 4K and 8K resolutions without any lag, Google wants to use AI that predicts what a user will click next. That way, a server in the cloud will basically be able to pre-render ahead of your actual action, delivering these frames in advance so, when you actually click, you will get the right frame.



If you click another button, then you will of course take whatever path you have chosen. But, statistically, this method will accelerate gaming and provide this negative latency in which everything feels immediate because it has already been pre-calculated before you made the decision.
I know. Mind blown. Eventually, I guess they will be able to calculate a number of possibilities and deliver them ahead. Or, you know, you can just sit on your sofa and see your potential self play without even touching a button. Just watch while you dig into that bowl of Cheetos with your two fists, my friends.
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Unread 2019-10-10, 05:55 PM   #4
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All Google Stadia launch titles available in 4K with streams locked at 60fps



Google's cloud gaming platform, Stadia, will be able to deliver up to 4K HDR content at 60fps. But will all of those games — some of them having come out long ago — be able to put up as much as the servers are willing to put out? Will they be 4K60, too? The short answer is yes.

The long answer comes courtesy of a tweet from Phil Harrison, a vice president and general manager leading Stadia efforts at Google, in response to a question about this very topic.


Quote:
Sir Trza of OVRCRK @16_Blocks

· Oct 8, 2019


@MrPhilHarrison will all games on @GoogleStadia run at 4K60? Be good to get some clarity.



Phil Harrison @MrPhilHarrison


Yes, all games at launch support 4K. We designed Stadia to enable 4K/60 (with appropriate TV and bandwidth). We want all games to play 4K/60 but sometimes for artistic reasons a game is 4K/30 so Stadia always streams at 4K/60 via 2x encode.

35

8:13 PM - Oct 8, 2019

Pretty much all of the older titles that have been announced for the Stadia's launch have had 4K remasters at some point, so it's not really a question of if the content is there.


Rather, the bigger questions, it seems, is about frame rate: Harrison says that Stadia will always stream at 60fps when the bandwidth is available to do so. That will mean 30fps content will be double-encoded and that other framerates that aren't a factor of 60 (you never know if and when game devs will start experimenting with that stuff) will probably look off.
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Unread 2019-10-16, 08:16 PM   #5
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Google’s Stadia wireless controller won’t be very wireless at launch





Seems the full Stadia experience is a little ways out




You’ll probably be plugging in Google’s wireless Stadia controller when the cloud gaming service launches on November 19th. While it’ll work wirelessly while playing Stadia on a Chromecast Ultra, you’ll have to plug in a USB-C cable to use it with computers or phones at launch, Google tells The Verge.

When Google first showed off the controller in March, the company touted how you could seamlessly switch from gaming on your TV to a laptop or phone while using the same exact controller, without having to pair it to each device — because the controller would stay directly connected to Stadia’s servers over its own Wi-Fi.
But as 9to5Google spotted earlier today, Google recently added a disclaimer in a new Stadia explainer video that wireless play will only be available on Chromecast Ultra at launch, and a Google community manager on Reddit later confirmed that meant you’ll need to break out the USB-C cables for other devices — perhaps because Bluetooth also won’t be an option by launch.


Google tells us it’s focusing on getting wireless play right on TV first, because it wants that big screen experience to be as good as possible. That makes sense to me — if Google wants to compete in gaming, it needs to make playing Stadia games on a TV as easy as kicking back on the couch with a PlayStation or Xbox controller.


And purely from a logistical viewpoint, Google is probably banking on the fact that it’s already much more common to plug things into our laptops, desktops, or phones, since they are usually just a few feet away from us anyway.
But right now, it seems we’ll have to wait to fulfill the ultimate dream of playing triple-A console-quality games on a phone with a wireless controller and seamlessly swapping them back and forth to a TV. To be fair, Stadia is only launching for buyers of its $130 Founder’s Edition package this November; it’ll be more broadly available in 2020.
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Unread 2019-10-20, 06:43 PM   #6
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Google Says Stadia Controller Wireless Play Will Expand "Soon"



Today Google has reportedly confirmed that wireless play on the Stadia controller would expand soon. This is after it confirmed earlier this week that it will only work with Chromecast Ultra initially.
This was a limiting factor that may have a lot to do with ensuring a smooth launch. It's also somewhat reassuring that Google seems to be actively working on getting wireless play supported on more devices.
The details were posted to the official Stadia subreddit, and spotted by 9To5Google.
Stadia controller wireless play may not expand to all endpoints at once

Right now there is only one endpoint that wireless play supports. That's the Chromecast Ultra. This does limit which screen you can play on to some degree. But soon enough that won't be an issue.
Just because Google is working to expand the feature though doesn't mean you should expect all endpoints to be supported at once. It's very possible that Google will roll out these expansions slowly.
In fact that sort of makes more sense. It's very possible that wireless play for phones will get support before PCs. It might be just as possible that it happens the other way around.
The good thing is that Google says it's working to bring this feature to users soon. That being said Google doesn't mention how soon. It merely says "soon after launch." This could mean before the end of the year or it could be further out, in 2020.
Google will regularly communicate when new features are added

Google says it will work diligently to inform gamers. Specifically about when new things come to Stadia.
In the reddit post, u/GraceFromGoogle points out that the team will communicate to gamers often about when new features are on the way. This means when wireless play is being added to other devices, it will let gamers know.
The communication doesn't stop at wireless play expansion though. Google is referring to all new features. When Stadia can do something new, gamers will find out about it from Google in one way or another.
Details might be posted on a subreddit post. They might be shared in a Stadia Connect. But regardless of where the information comes from, it will be coming. At least that's the message Google is trying to convey.
Aside from only supporting wireless play on Chromecast Ultra at launch, Stadia controllers will also come without Bluetooth audio support in the beginning. So you'll either need to connect a wired headset, or use the audio from whatever device you're playing on.
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Unread 2019-11-11, 07:10 PM   #7
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Google Stadia will only have 12 games at launch



Most recent game platforms have shipped with a decent amount of games available on day one. The PlayStation 4 and Xbox One both had 23 titles at release, but if you were hoping for as much variety from Stadia, you'll have to wait a few months.


In a blog post today, Google revealed the list of games that will be available on Stadia's release date of November 19th. Only 12 titles have made the cut, though some of them (like Red Dead Redemption II) are long enough games that most players probably won't mind.


  • Assassin's Creed Odyssey
  • Destiny 2: The Collection
  • GYLT
  • Just Dance 2020
  • Kine
  • Mortal Kombat 11
  • Red Dead Redemption 2
  • Thumper
  • Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition
  • Rise of the Tomb Raider
  • Shadow of the Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition
  • Samurai Shodown
The good news is that Stadia subscribers won't have to wait long for the catalog to expand. There are only two months left in 2019, but Borderlands 3, Farming Simulator 19, Final Fantasy XV, Football Manager 2020, GRID, Metro Exodus, RAGE 2, and others will arrive on Stadia before the year's end.
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Unread 2019-11-13, 07:58 PM   #8
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Google Confirms All the Stadia Features That Will Be Missing at Launch

Google Stadia is releasing next week, and it seems like nobody is talking about it. And maybe that's by design, because what Google will be offering at launch is pretty underwhelming. When Google Stadia releases on November 19, it will come with one game: Destiny 2. Meanwhile, owners will only have the option of buying another 11, three of which are Tomb Raider games (full launch lineup can be found here). That said, a measly launch lineup isn't the only blemish on Stadia's launch. It will be missing a lot of its features that won't be available until next year.




In fact, a lot of the features Google talked up around the Stadia's reveal won't even be present at launch, which makes you wonder: why is Google rushing this to the market? During a recent Reddit AMA, Google confirmed the following slab of features won't be available at launch next week:
  • Stream Connect -- not arriving until next year.
  • State Share -- not arriving until next year.
  • Crowd Play -- not arriving until next year.
  • Family Sharing -- "high priority," but not coming until early next year.
  • Buddy Pass -- Founders Editions of Stadia come with a Buddy Pass that allows you to give someone a three month subscription to Stadia. These won't be rolled out until two weeks after launch.
  • Achievement System -- coming "shortly after launch."
  • The controller -- Some controllers will be available at launch, others may take a few days to arrive. Maybe more.
There's more, but these are the most notable exclusions. And you get the point: the Stadia, a feature-light gaming platform will be missing some of its biggest features right at launch. And on top of this, it will only have 12 games to play, and only one of them is new and exclusive to Stadia. The rest you've probably already played.


It's not a good start for the new gaming platform, but it seems Google has big plans for 2020. That said, I still don't get why this is releasing next week, with missing features and such a tiny offering of games, all of which you have to buy, minus Destiny 2.


For more news, media, and information on the Stadia, be sure to peep our past and recent coverage of the gaming platform by clicking right here.
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Unread 2019-11-14, 04:03 PM   #9
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Google reveals The Claw, a phone mount for the Stadia controller



Earlier today, two Google Stadia team members hosted an AMA on Reddit to answer people's questions about the upcoming Stadia game streaming service. Although the Q&A session dampened some of our enthusiasm for Stadia by revealing a bunch of missing day-one features, the AMA contained a pleasant surprise: Google made a phone mount for the Stadia controller, and it is called "The Claw."

The Claw's existence was let out of the proverbial bag by Andrey Doronichev, Director of Product for Stadia at Google. Details were light, but enough information was shared in the thread to get some people excited for it. After testing several off-the-shelf clips and finding them to be lacking in balance, the team decided they wanted a phone mount that is centered and "floating" over the controller. After building a trial prototype with a metal wire coat hanger and following it up with a 3D-printed design, they teamed up with a Made for Google partner called Power Support for the final creation.



This is what "The Claw" will presumably look like.
The Claw has been designed with Pixel phones in mind, although Andrey didn't specify the models in detail. The price is currently unknown, and it will be available for purchase at the Google Store in the coming weeks. To see it in action, check out the video below.


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