Mirror Finish Polishing ~ 1-816-529-6089 ~ sales@mirrorfinishpolishing.com ~ mirrorfinishpolishing.com For the best rate on home, auto, life or business/commercial insurance call me at 888-959-0955, cell 636-734-1310 or bricehazelwood@weiss-ins.com. Never Done Garage - donewhenimdead.com Peerless Automotive Reconditioning - 1155 W. Dennis Ave, Olathe Ks, 66061 - 913-893-1201 Mark H. Epstein ~ The Epstein Law Firm, LLC ~ 913-396-5123 Wilkes Automotive ~ wilkesautomotive.com ~ 246 Marion St, Olathe, KS 66061 ~ 913-254-7171 Skandalous Inc ~ www.skandalousinc.com DIY Auto Repair Inc ~ www.diyautorepairkc.com ~ 11509 Strangline Rd, Olathe KS 66062 ~ 913-226-3806 Your advertisement here! The Law Offices of Jeremiah Johnson, LLC ~ 104 E. Poplar, Olathe, KS 66061 ~ (913)764-5010 ~ www.kcatty.com - www.johnsoncountydui.com ~ jeremiah@kcatty.com Santa Fe Body, Inc ~ 8717 Lenexa Drive, Overland Park, KS 66214 ~ (913) 894-6090 House of Boost LLC Nude? HouseofHID.com - The #1 source for HID The Print Shop KC 816.200.6694 or Ryan@RMD-Photography.com the art of tyleR ~ http://tyleR.bigcartel.com ~ TYLERcoey.com ~ MUTTtoy.com ~ MUTTtoy@gmail.com W-K Chevrolet Buick Pontiac Cadillac GMC ~ 3310 W. Broadway, Sedalia, MO 65301 ~ 800-382-5088 ~ Cell 660-553-8928 ~ dustin@wkchevy.com ~ www.wkchevy.com

Go Back   KCSR - THE Kansas City Forum > General Forums > Movies, Music, TV, Books

Reply
Thread Tools
Unread 2018-06-19, 04:13 PM   #26
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

The Girl in the Spider's Web: Claire Foy Interview







Lisbeth Salander is returning to the big screen this year in The Girl in the Spider's Web, and this time The Crown star Claire Foy is taking on the role of "the girl who hurts men who hurt women." The Girl in the Spider's Web marks the first adaptation of one of the Millennium books since David Fincher's The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and is the first ever adaptation of this particular novel, which was written by David Lagercrantz. Fede Alvarez (Don't Breathe) co-wrote and directed the film, which was shot at Babelsburg Studio outside Berlin, and Screen Rant paid a visit to the set earlier this year, where we had a chance to speak to the cast and creative talent.

During our visit, Foy was filming the scene that kicks off the recent trailer for The Girl in the Spider's Web. Lisbeth tracks down a powerful, wealthy man who has been abusive to his wife and other women, and hangs him from the ceiling by his feet. As a measure of both disguise and intimidation, she has a splash of white facepaint over her eyes, has hair in a mohawk, and is wearing black leather tactical gear. It makes for quite an impressive sight, and during a break in filming we sat down with Foy to find out more about this latest incarnation of Lisbeth Salander.



First and foremost, you're obviously so transformed, and this look is amazing. I wanted to ask about a) what it feels like to live in that skin, and b) the makeup. It looks a little... superhero-y. Is that what it's evoking?

Claire Foy: No, she's not a superhero. I think the most amazing thing about Lisbeth Salander is that she doesn't have any special powers. She's sort of an underdog, she has been an underdog her entire life. And the only power that she really has is that she'll never give up, and she'll fight to the bitter, bitter end. She's sort of the most human person I've ever played, really, for that reason. This makeup is very specific, it's not what I have the whole movie or anything like that, it's partially practical to kind of disguise her face, but it's also what Lisbeth does a lot, which is to try and scare people away so that they don't underestimate her, I suppose.

As regards to living in her skin, she's a huge contradiction and she's incredibly strong and intelligent and sort of powerful in her own right, but at the same time she's so vulnerable and she has been so, so damaged by what's happened in her life. And she doesn't necessarily work from an entirely conscious level, you know what I mean? Because of all the things that have happened in her past, she lives her life in a kind of... she's very, very closed off, and very, very- got her defenses up the majority of the time, and I suppose this sort of film is about her growing up a bit.

Does she do a lot of vigilante work?

CF: Do you mean to sort of suggest that she's against the establishment? Or to mean she's against government? She has no respect for authority whatsoever, because when have they ever helped her? Why would she have respect for them, really? They let her down at every single opportunity in her life. So, I don't think she's a vigilante.

And I don't think that Lisbeth, in my head, when it comes to this story, as the story of the end of the three books, which was the fact that she was free of her identity that had been created for her. That she was a ward of the state and that she was in some way not like everybody else, that she was a menace to society. That she didn't have the intellect that other people had, that she was somehow lesser than everybody else. And she doesn't have that around her anymore, that's been got rid of for her, in a way.

And then she's got to find her own identity and what she is, and I think you see her at the very beginning of the film doing what she can't help, which is that she can't help but get drawn into the injustice of the way women are treated, or the way powerful men take advantage. I think that's what she's just like, "I have to right that wrong." She's moved to do it, she's not just like, "What cause can I fight now..." It's very specific, what she finds galling, and she wants to right that wrong.

Her look is very extreme and I could see some people stepping into an outfit like this and the face paint and just feeling really out of sorts. How do you command her look?

CF: Well, for me it was very, very important that it's me playing the part, I can't just put the costume on and go, "This is the character." Because that's a lie. We've always, all of us together, have questioned and gone, "Did this feel right? Does it look right, is it too much of a cliché, does this actually fit with who she is?"

I always, from the very, very beginning of any character, start with nothing, start with the basics. I never like to put stuff on because it's what people expect or anything like that. I always think less is more, so I always start with the bare bones, and then as time goes on you sort of think, "does that feel right or not?" So yeah, it's been a process that we've all sort of done together. But I love the Lisbeth that we've created in the sense that she's really, really composed and in complete possession of herself at some points, but at other points she's like a 12-year-old girl who has been a victim and treated like a victim her entire life, and she's like, "I'm not. I'm not a victim, I'm not, I'm not, that's not who I am."

Something that - when I was reading the books - that I really, really understood and made a lot of sense for the character for me was that from the outside, people, especially with victims of sexual assault, they find the victim, they find the person. It's that the predator finds the victim, as opposed to someone just walking around being a victim, they find the person that they want. And Lisbeth, to me, is that. From the outside she's so easy to underestimate and say, "She's vulnerable, I could take her." But then if you try she'd cut your balls off.


This Lisbeth is way different from the one in the previous movies. Is the whole purpose to do something different here?

CF: No, I think this character and this story has been told before. I think our version of this film is obviously the fourth book, so you sort of have a little bit more leeway in the fact that it is a different story. You're not telling the story which was, especially the first book, the story of the murder and the thriller element of it, which was trying to find out and the investigation and those things. We're not retelling that story, obviously, because everyone's seen it and they'd go, "We know the ending!"

But I think by virtue of someone else playing a part, it's always different, as story is always different. I don't think we have attempted or tried to make it different, because I think if you try and do that then the audience will just see straight through the fact that you're like, "Look, guys, we're trying something crazy here." I don't think you can- you have to accept the world that you're living in and I think people do that with this character. They are immediately drawn to her and her circumstance and what she's going through as opposed to anything outside of her.

No, is the answer. I don't know. I think the Swedish versions were incredible, I think the David Fincher version was amazing, and I think Rooney and Noomi are amazing, it's just I'm doing it this time, which is weird for me, but so many things about it haven't felt weird, which I find encouraging. I think that Fede is incredible, I think he is genius. I think Pedro, the DP, is genius, and I think it's exciting for that reason, it's a really exciting combo.

This falls within a certain period in the entertainment industry, with #MeToo. How do you feel about this coming out in November and this presenting a very strong female, action-led drama. And in the midst of that, Lisbeth, who is specifically a vigilante for women who have been victims of abuse.

FOY: Well, I think to say that, you can't underestimate the fact that... this story's been around for well over a decade... I've done period drama where I've been asked that question. "What's relevant about this story today?" And the point about stories and the point about dramas is it always is, because there's people in it, and we're all people.

To say that Lisbeth is around and that the story is around because it's popular or it's part of the zeitgeist, is slightly wrong. Because this character has always been around, essentially. I just think it's the fact that it's about people want to see women in the central roles, and she just happens to be a woman who has experienced what a lot of women experience. But she's able to right the wrongs, I suppose, and it's about seeing that fulfilled. But this film hasn't come out yet, so I don't know what the reaction's going to be, and I don't know where it's gonna sit, this conversation. You know, 6 months ago we wouldn't have been having this conversation, so, you know, I live and hope that in 6 months time it will be an even bigger, wider conversation as well. So who knows, really.



What are Lisbeth's feeling towards her sister, Camilla (Sylvia Hoeks)? Is there a desire to reconnect there, or has she left her sister behind?

CF: I think Lisbeth has left herself behind, in the sense that as soon as she left the children's hospital, that was it. Whatever happened pre- that date didn't exist anymore, because it was too painful and too awful and how can someone live with that and think about it, actively think about it? And so I think that she genuinely has cut everything out of her mind and her life that would make her feel pain or make her feel anything, really... That's why I think that the film really works, because you do see that crack and that, hopefully, letting in of the light a bit into the heart.

I think the relationship that anyone has with a sibling or a family member is always going to be something that your subconscious is in charge of and not you. I think she thinks, "No, I can- whatever, I don't care, ugh." But, deep down, you know, it's always there... yeah, broke her heart a bit.

You talked about it in your early process stripping it down to the basics. What were the keys that helped you understand Lisbeth?

CF: I think it's always really, really luck when you've got some books. Because you have an insight. But there were things about her that I really found incredible, I really admire about her. I admire her lack of judgment, I don't think she judges anyone. I think she finds people sort of interesting and bit weird, and there's a lot of detail in the book about how when she's hacking into people's computers, she finds all sorts of things. Whatever people's sexuality is, what they're sexually- what gets them going, she's just like, "Huh. That's interesting." She's not judgemental, and that's why I think people like the books. It's because she doesn't really give a shit. She doesn't live within the realms of what society tells you- you should be married, you should have kids, you should be doing this. She's just like, "Should I? Don't want to."

She doesn't have to fit within that idea, and therefore she can work outside of that. She's sort of on the fringes and she can observe society for what it is, really. I love that about her, I love that she's bisexual and she just loves sex and has absolutely no qualms about enjoying it with whoever she enjoys it with. And Fede was very about this as well, she's just not comfortable in her own skin. Although she puts up a defense and although she seems like she knows what she's doing, she's very easy to find her buttons, I think. She's very easy to find what would make her feel uncomfortable and vulnerable and she has a purpose, really. It's like people, places, and things. She has avoided being in situations with those people at those- you know, that's what she does, she avoids them.

The look is a defense, it's not like, "I'm super cool and I'm amazing and I belong to this group of people." It's not that. It's a porcupine, it's like, "Don't come anywhere near me. Don't even think about touching me." That's what it is, it's not a statement. If someone said she was cool, she'd be like, "Huh?" She just wouldn't get it.

There's an interesting moment in the book where she's just hacked into the NSA and left a message for Ed Needham (Lakeith Stanfield). And in the moment, she feels really self-righteous and then afterwards she feels kind of empty. Do you think she's kind of a character who needs to constantly be doing something?

CF: Yeah. Well, that's what I mean about the fact that I think at the beginning she's a bit bored. She has survived for so long fighting that when she has money, she's like, "What's next? Hang on. Oh, it's me. I'm next, dear God, no! I don't wanna think about myself!" And that's why I think she then goes into that whole situation and why playing always helps her get a new job or whatever. I think the interesting thing with Lisbeth is what happens when she doesn't have a task. And I think what I found really great about the second book was that after she solved that whole story and she's fallen in love with Mikael a bit and she's had her heart broken, she just goes to Granada and reads about mathematical theorems. She has to engage her brain in something to distract from what she's really, achingly needing to figure out, which is herself. She sort of goes into all these things, and that's the thing with life, unfortunately, or fortunately, whatever way you look at it, that it catches up with you. .


You said that Fede is a genius, can you elaborate a little bit more?

CF: He just is. He just is, and I sort of knew from the moment I met him, really. He sort of is like a concert-trained pianist, he's incredible, he just has an understanding of film and story and audience that I think very few people do. It is studied in a way, but it's not studied. He loves film and he is able to see, to go, "It needs to be ..." He sees the rhythm of it. "It needs to be this, this, this. And then that. And then it needs to be this, this, this. And then that!"
He creates a beautiful image with [cinematographer Pedro Luque], they're just an incredible team, they just have such beautiful eye. And it's always slightly different to what you would think it would be. I haven't done a single shot in this which has been like, "Well now we have to cross you and we have to get you all close..." That hasn't been the case at all. It's never felt like a formulaic way of making anything. I think he's full of heart as a person, and really cares about this movie, which is very, very rare. It's not a vehicle for him, he's in it, and that's lovely.

Can you just quickly talk about how her relationship with Blomkvist has evolved, and being ex-lovers and the tension and the intimacy in working together, how is that playing out?

CF: Well, I think it's that thing that she- from the outside as a spectator you sort of are like, "Go on! Get together! Be happy!" If that was the normal, common garden story. But it sort of diminishes how interesting they both are as characters... We have a deep connection and a deep understanding of one another, but it's like, in what world would these two people ever make it work? And it's not just the fact that she's a vigilante sort of person, but it's more the fact that... how do you even begin to cross that bridge of differences between them?

But I think in this one they have a shorthand, they've gone past that point. I think it's at the end of the third book where he sort of, he's at her front door and he's like "Alright, can I come in?" I think Steig says something about letting her back in, she let him back into her life. And I think we haven't don't that in this one, what we've said is the fact that they haven't seen each other for three years. And where have they gone? He's missed her and she's got over him, you know what I mean?

So that's the interesting thing, where you find that she's like, "No, no, no! I don't care about you at all, I don't care!" And he's like, "Come on!" And whether she goes for that or not is the thing. They're certainly not gonna walk down the aisle, yeah. That's never gonna happen.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-06-22, 09:58 AM   #27
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

An Important Girl In The Spider's Web Character The Movie Refused To Change

The following story contains some spoilers for the book (and upcoming movie) The Girl in the Spider's Web. Read on with caution if you are unfamiliar with the story, and want to stay unscathed.

When adapting a best-selling novel, it's important to maintain as much about the story that attracted readers, while also figuring out ways to possibly make a narrative more cinematic, or possibly make space for a riveting talent. Fede Alvarez opened up about both aspects when talking about his approach to the upcoming The Girl in the Spider's Web on his movie's set in Berlin. The director was very open to the changes that co-star Lakeith Stanfield is making to NSA tracker Alona Casales, but they sound fresh and exciting. However, when it came to the important character of August, Alvarez knew that he had to hold true, explaining:

That's one of the things I think we have been more faithful to, because [August's relationship with Lisbeth] starts in a place where, as a premise for her story -- as you know from the book -- she's stuck in a situation where she has to suddenly be responsible and taking care of this kid. And she's not really good, with kids. [Laughs] She doesn't want to be. And he's special in his own way, so seeing them together -- last week, we were shooting some of their scenes together, and it was fun because both of them are very awkward. They are trying to connect somehow, but it's very difficult.

Actually, you get to see a lot more here than you get to see in the book. Because, in the book, you only get to see it through a flashback, or someone saw them together, running from here to there. But here, you really get to spend more time with them, and their intimacy, and how they are trying to connect. And how she's trying to not be terrible with him. But she's terrible... which is fun to watch. Being really, really bad with kids. But then eventually, they will find things that they have in common. They have a lot more than what they think. If I say more, I will spoil it. But it's really faithful to the book in a way, but you actually get to see more.

Lisbeth Salander (Claire Foy) definitely doesn't strike us as someone who's about to launch a successful babysitting service. So yes, placing a young autistic boy in her care creates a dramatic wrinkle that Fede Alvarez was happy to protect. In the story, August (Christopher Convery) is a young autistic boy who's at the center of a web of deceit that pulls both Lisbeth (Foy) and Mikael Blomkvist (Sverrir Gudnason) into a conflict with cyber criminals and corrupt government officials. But over the course of our interview, Fede Alvarez confirmed an important aspect of August's character -- his drawings -- also will be maintained. He said:

Yes, there are different kinds of drawings than what's in the book. But he is some sort of an artist here. I think you will like what we did with it. He's, again... I hate to spoil it, but he does do drawings.

From all that we learned on the set of The Girl in the Spider's Web, Fede Alvarez and his cast and crew are doing what they can to bring David Lagercrantz's novel -- the fourth in the Millennium series -- to the big screen in a faithful form. Fans will be able to see for themselves when the movie opens in theaters on November 9.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-06-22, 02:13 PM   #28
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

The Girl in the Spider's Web: Lakeith Stanfield Interview





Lakeith Stanfield's star has quickly been rising over the past few years, thanks to roles in Get Out, Atlanta, and indie satire Sorry To Bother You. This year he will also star in Fede Alvarez's The Girl in the Spider's Web - a new movie about the girl with the dragon tattoo, Lisbeth Salander.
The Girl in the Spider's Web is the fourth book in the Millennium series created by Stieg Larsson, and the first in the series written by David Lagercrantz, who took over the story after Larsson passed away in 2004. Stanfield plays Ed Needham, an NSA agent who is horrified when an upstart hacker (guess who) breaks into the NSA's files and steals some extremely compromising information. Determined to track down the hacker, Needham leaves his comfy office chair behind and goes on a manhunt in Stockholm to try and find the culprit - while Lisbeth herself deals with a deadly conspiracy and the return of her estranged sister, Camilla.

Screen Rant paid a visit to the set of The Girl in the Spider's Web earlier this year, where we spoke to Stanfield and his co-stars Sylvia Hoeks (who plays Camilla) and Sverrir Gudnason (who plays Mikael Blomkvist) about this revamped take on Lisbeth Salander's world.


Lakeith Stanfield: They told me that I have to say only good things about this film.

But what's your real take?

LS: You'll never know.

Can you just talk about what that dynamic between Ed and Lisbeth? I mean, you're hunting her down.

LS: Yeah. My character just wants to find her to secure some very precious cargo that she's stolen, that could potentially hold in the balance the future of the world. And so really his motivation is to stop it from getting into the wrong hands, and he assumes that it might have been in the wrong hands, having been taken by... who he finds out is Lisbeth. So he just spends his time knocking down trees, jumping over fire pits, rolling around in the snow, trying to find this woman. His relationship with her... it changes throughout the story and becomes one of like - first of all, who is this unknown entity? And then he finds out who it is, and then they develop a little partnership.


Does he have an admiration for her, as a fellow computer nerd?

LS: Who doesn't? Yeah, I think so. I think he's every in awe of what she's able to pull off, the things she's able to accomplish. He's like, "How does one person do all of this?" So I think there's a little admiration, although I don't think he might admit it.



In the book Ed is quite an abrasive character. He's not very popular in the workplace because he's a bit of an asshole. Is that the same in the movie, or is he a little bit more mellow?

LS: I don't view him as an asshole. I think he just doesn't take time and engage in small talk too much, just really not with the shits, just getting straight to the point. I think he has to be to do the kind of work he does. Of course he deals with information and a lot of sensitive, high-security type thing. So you could maybe get a cold disposition from him, he could maybe be perceived that way because he doesn't spill his guts out and talk about things, and he would probably need to be a less emotional person to do the work that he does. So maybe one might view him that way, but I view him as actually just a person who takes his time and moves fast, if that makes sense...

I couldn't play an asshole, I think he's just a part of me that, like I said, takes its time and moves fast. You got to get shit done but you have to wait for power move, which gives him this coolness.

Is Fede quite a hands-off director, like he casts you and lets you do what you want, or...?

LS: He's been getting on my nerve since we started this thing. [Laughter]. No, it's a great collaboration, really, and one that I really cherish. You don't always realize how much you will appreciate a director and their discussions with the character about you until it happens... he's just so intelligent and aware of the story and all its many details in a way that I think a director should be. And it's nice, I haven't worked with a director quite like him. And his visual style is so good. I think he's a good actor's director because he sees things visually before they happen, and that's important, so I'm not always having to run back to the monitor to make sure I'm still within the vision, he kind of already has that there. And that's nice, it's a nice gift...
And he's really open and malleable too, like there were certain parts of the story that I thought initially didn't make very much sense, or certain things that Needham might do or situations he might be in that I didn't really feel went with the character. And I would voice them, and we would change the fabric of scenes, and whole things were able to change just based on some notes I was giving. So not only did he have a vision, but he was listening and able to dance with us, and that's equally important because you don't want to feel like you're running into a brick wall.


We know a little something about the technology at the center of the movie... Why is it we keep building Skynet?

LS: [Laughs] I don't know, man, transhumanism, man, it's a real thing. I don't know, but the world is scared. You know, sometimes movies like this provide a little insight as to where we might be going when it comes to certain things, and technology in particular... I remember reading a part of the script and being like, "I could see that being a real thing. It's crazy, but I could see it." I wish I could tell you guys what it is, but you shall see. But yeah, I could definitely see that in the next five to ten years, being real - if it's not already real. They could have some military insight that I don't know about.

We've seen two versions of Lisbeth Salander already. Can you guys talk a bit about what Claire brings to the performance and how her iteration is unique?

LS: I think Claire, for me, what's been valuable to see in her is the way she acts off-screen, her countenance, and how she's always in a very balanced mood, as far as I've seen. And it's been quite nice. A lot of times the tone is set by the lead and sort of created for the rest of us, and they're going through the heaviest workload, so if they're able to show up and have a good time sometimes your insecurities as an actor, which - I don't know about anybody else but I'm full of them sometimes! - are sort of done away with by being surrounded by someone who just does it so effortlessly but also still is able to, when they call cut, just be fine. You know, it's a really big story, a really big project, so it's easy to get nervous about a lot of things, but with her and Fede together it's like you just feel cool...

I kind of get the sense that, just in the little bit of things I've seen - most of my stuff is just trying to find her [laughter] - but in the little bit of things I've seen I get the sense that there's some kind of real connection to Lisbeth's ambitions and sort of her view of the world and sort of her righteousness, she has a certain righteousness, and wanting to help the less fortunate... You kind of get a sense that there's a little bit of that in Claire. I could be wrong but I see that. And I think that's important, you have to feel what your character feels and sort of believe that, but I think it's cool. Like, they don't call cut and she's like, "Alright, let's go murder babies!" [laughter]. So yeah, it's nice.

Always a good quality in a co-star.

LS: Yeah. But you'd be surprised how rare it might be.


What was it for you guys when you picked up the script that got you interested in the project and the roles that you have? What connected with you?

LS: Yeah, also there's times where - going back to Fede, and not to stroke his ego any more - but if there's a scene where you have a lot of people doing a lot of different things and sometimes you need to get your shot, and so the guy with the camera he has to make sure he's doing it right, he's just like, "Would you mind moving that over to here?" and I'm like, "Aah..." And Fede's like, "Does it feel natural for it to be over there?" And I'm like, "Ehhh." And he's like, "Do the natural thing." The natural thing always takes precedence over everything else, and that's really great for me as an actor. My style is typically a little bit more of a natural approach, so it's nice to just be like, "Just do what you think is right... just go and roll with the scene." Sometimes directors might sacrifice certain things - one thing he won't sacrifice is the rawness.

Would you say that this film is being made with a sequel in mind, or with a mind to continue the story afterwards?

LS: I hope they get a sequel, for me! I just want to come back.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-08-10, 09:51 AM   #29
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Why The Girl In The Spider's Web Director Recast Lisbeth Salander




Claire Foy becomes the third actress to play Lisbeth Salander in Sony's upcoming The Girl in the Spider's Web, but that almost wasn't the case, according to director Fede Alvarez (Evil Dead). Foy follows in the footsteps of Noomi Rapace, who played Salander in the original Swedish movie trilogy based on Steig Larsson's Millennium trilogy of novels, and Rooney Mara, who earned an Oscar nomination for her portrayal of Lisbeth Salander in director David Fincher's 2011 adaptation. Given the critical acclaim and Mara's Oscar nomination, it's not terribly surprising that the studio was considering bringing her back, but Alvarez ultimately convinced the studio to let him cast his own version of the iconic character

Sony's 2011 adaptation of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo was supposed to kick off an American adaptation of Larsson's trilogy, starring Mara as the hacker Salander and Daniel Craig as journalist Mikael Blomkvist (originally portrayed by Michael Nyqvist). While the film was received well by critics, it wasn't exactly a runaway hit at the box office. The adaptation earned $232.6 million worldwide from a $90 million budget. While there were no shortage of rumors about the franchise's future over the years, Sony finally announced last year that they were skipping the last two books of the Millennium trilogy and, instead, adapting The Girl in the Spider's Web, the first novel in the new series written by David Lagercrantz, following Larsson's death.

Related: The Girl In the Spider's Web Interview: Claire Foy
Since Lagercrantz's book does feature Salander and Blomkvist, many wondered if Mara and Craig would still return to reprise their roles, but the decision was ultimately made to cast Foy and Sverrir Gudnason as the hacker and journalist, respectively. Alvarez revealed in a new interview with EW that there was "a lot of debate" on the studio side as to whether or not they should keep the existing stars or recast. There was no debate for Alvarez, though, who told the studio that he "preferred" to have his own cast. Here's what the director had to say on the matter:

"As a director, I just didn’t like the idea of taking someone else’s cast. As much as I admired Fincher as a filmmaker, I think Rooney Mara is Fincher’s Lisbeth, right? And I wanted to find my own.”


While there were others such as Scarlett Johansson once being considered to play Salander, Alvarez eventually landed on Foy to play Salander and Gudnason to replace Craig as Blomkvist. Of course, the rest of the director's cast - which includes Sylvia Hoeks as Camilla Salander and Lakeith Stanfield as Alona Casales, along with Vicky Kreips and Stephen Merchant - have taken on roles that didn't need to be recast since their characters weren't in the last movie.

What remains to be seen is how fans will react to this new casting, the third incarnation of Salander to surface in less than a decade. If this movie is a success, Sony could continue on and adapt Lagercrantz's second novel in the series, 2017's The Girl Who Takes an Eye For an Eye, but that likely won't be set in stone until the studio sees how this adaptation fares at the box office. If The Girl in the Spider's Web fails to impress fans and critics alike, though, it may be the last audiences see of Salander and Blomkvist for quite some time.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-09-17, 09:07 AM   #30
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

The Girl in the Spider's Web Trailer #2: Lisbeth Can't Escape Her Past





Lisbeth Salander uncovers a new conspiracy even as her past catches up to her in the latest trailer for The Girl in the Spider's Web. Both a partial continuation and quasi-reboot of the English-language Millennium property, Girl in the Spider's Web swaps out The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011)'s Rooney Mara for Claire Foy as the vigilante/hacker Lisbeth. Evil Dead remake and Don't Breathe helmsman Fede Alvarez likewise replaced Dragon Tattoo director David Fincher behind the camera for the latest chapter in the Swedish mystery-thriller series.

Girl in the Spider's Web itself is based on the David Lagercrantz novel, which was the first Lisbeth Salander book published after series creator Stieg Larsson's death in 2004. While there were once plans for Fincher to adapt the remainder of Larsson's original Millennium trilogy following Dragon Tattoo, that ultimately didn't happen for reasons that remain somewhat nebulous, even now. Regardless, the end result was that Sony elected to relaunch the franchise with a new cast/crew and fresh source material that has never been adapted to film before - unlike all three of Larsson's books.
Related: Why The Girl in the Spider's Web Director Recast Lisbeth Salander
Alvarez's Girl in the Spider's Web picks up some time after the events of Dragon Tattoo and follows Lisbeth as she uncovers a dangerous cyber-conspiracy with far-reaching implications. Along the way, the Swedish sleuth crosses paths with her old journalist buddy Mikael Blomkvist (Sverrir Gudnason, replacing Daniel Craig), as well as an NSA agent named Ed Needham (Lakeith Stanfield), a mysterious and ruthless assassin (Claes Bang) and Camilla (Sylvia Hoeks), a person who knows all too much about Lisbeth's troubled history. For more on that, watch the film's new trailer in the space below.

Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jEINTQ2AP9k

Whereas the first trailer for Girl in the Spider's Web was a combination extended clip and teaser, this new preview has more of a typical trailer structure and dives deeper into the film's story. Judging by the footage released thus far, Girl in the Spider's Web places a heavier emphasis on the thriller aspects of the Millennium franchise, as opposed to the crime investigation elements emphasized in Fincher's Dragon Tattoo. That's to be expected though; whereas Fincher is a storyteller who tends to spotlight the minutiae of police and crime procedurals with his work (see Netflix's Mindhunter for case in point), Alvarez has made tersely violent thrillers his bread and butter, as a director.

While The Girl in the Spider's Web will probably fall short of the creative heights reached by Fincher's Oscar-winning Dragon Tattoo for related reasons, it also comes off as less of a feel-bad thrill ride in and may be all the more commercially viable for it. Admittedly, it's been a hot minute since the Millennium books peaked in popularity, but now feels like a fitting time for Lisbeth (and her unending quest to punish the bad men of the world for their crimes) to make her big return. We'll find out if general audiences agree in a couple of months.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-09-17, 11:07 AM   #31
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbxXldXG2CE
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-09-26, 01:25 PM   #32
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Girl in the Spider's Web: Bringing Intensity To Lisbeth Salander





The Girl in the Spider's Web is the sequel to 2011’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. The crime thriller is directed by Fede Álvarez and follows Lisbeth Salander as she rescues battered women and takes revenge on their behalf. Claire Foy plays Salander in Spider’s Web, while Rooney Mara played the character in the first film. The Girl in the Spider's Web hits U.S. theaters on November 9, 2018.

FROM NOVEL TO FILM

At a recent press conference, director Fede Álvarez talked about adapting the novel:

“I was a big fan of the Swedish movies and the Fincher movie. And I was like, ‘I would love to play in that playground.’ For me at least that’s what it’s all about. Which is, there’s a playground I want to spend a lot of time in and that’s why I was interested in.

“And they allowed me to be a writer on it. Which allowed me to take this, whatever it is, the story, the book, the material, take it to a little bit more the themes and things that are more personal to me, that I care about. Like the books have many, many things and when you condense it to two hours you have to pick the ones that are relevant for you, mostly.”

FINDING A PARTNER




Said Alvarez:

“And the challenge was obviously to find someone that would agree, the things we were interested in. Which was one of the first conversations we had with Claire. There would be no movie without her. So, we met in New York and we sat down, and we didn’t talk about the script or the movie or the other movies, nothing like that. We talked about family and how we relate to each other and why it’s so interesting and complex and painful. And that the movie was basically, going to talk about that. And that’s how we started. When Claire said, ‘Sounds cool.’ We decided to make this movie.”


PLAYING LISBETH


At the same press conference, Claire Foy was asked about preparing to play the intense character of Lisbeth Salander.

“I was never really worried about the intensity bit. Or the kind of…the inherent energy of the character and how she is. The fight that she has, the kind of aggression or rage that she appears to have. That never really… bothered me. Because [LAUGHS] I’m a very rage-ful and vengeful person [LAUGHS]. No, but I don’t know why, but I guess that was something that I got, about her. I understood what she was fighting against, both inside herself and outside. That was the thing that I inherently understood about the character, that made me want to play it. And made me want to have my own go at portraying that.”

REAL INTENSITY


Said Foy:

“But for me it was…making a film like this, which was so…required me to do things as an actor that I had never been asked to do before. No one had said, ‘Don’t think, just go. Jump, don’t think.’ My instinct was to go, ‘But don’t you think, um… maybe--.’ ‘No go, just go.’ ‘No, really…’. That’s what I could do forever. I’m so used to dialogue. Really taking things apart and trying to get to the root of things. And so much of this film was go on instinct. Just go and feel it. Be there, and be exhausted, and run up that hill, and punch that person in the face. And yes, there’s a flamethrower above your head. Get in the bath [LAUGHS]. That was the intense side of it.”
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-24, 05:02 PM   #33
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

‘The Girl in the Spider’s Web’ Early Buzz: A Mixed Response, But Claire Foy is a Great Lisbeth Salander




The girl with the dragon tattoo is back. Director Fede Alvarez, who captivated audiences with the suspenseful thriller Don’t Breath a couple years ago, is behind The Girl in the Spider’s Web, a sequel to David Fincher’s 2011 Dragon Tattoo remake. This time, The Crown star Claire Foy plays hacker Lisbeth Salander, and she’s earning much of the praise from critics in the first batch of reviews.
Find out what they’re saying about the film in our early buzz round-up below.
The Girl in the Spider’s Web Reviews

When I saw nearly 30 minutes of early footage from this movie, I noted that The Girl in the Spider’s Web bore a striking resemblance to a James Bond movie. Apparently that holds through in the final version, because CinemaBlend’s Sean O’Connell noticed the same thing:
There are only three full reviews online at the time of this writing, so let’s go through them one by one.
First up, Kate Erbland at Indiewire singles out Foy’s performance as the best aspect of the movie:
It’s Foy, however, that drives the entire film. The actress has already turned in one revelatory film performance this year, thanks to Damien Chazelle’s “First Man,” but her turn as Lisbeth is further proof that the full spectrum of her talents have yet to be tapped. Her Lisbeth is more human than she has been in any previous incarnation, though Foy doesn’t add emotion to the mix at the cost of dialing down her character’s more opaque attributes. Lisbeth is never going to be cuddly or sunny, but that doesn’t mean she has to be robotic or impossible to read. That’s something that Foy and Alvarez clearly understand, and the result is a heroine not only worth cheering for, but one worth loving and even understanding.
For once, it’s Lisbeth who traps the audience in her own web.
But unfortunately, she also says the story is “laden with undercooked revelations” and “loses much of its momentum” during a saggy middle section.
Deborah Young at The Hollywood Reporter also seemed to appreciate Foy’s interpretation of the character – to a point:
Perfunctory in its psychological realism and flagrantly lacking any other kind, the screenplay by Alvarez, Jay Basu and Steven Knight is certainly not the most satisfying version of Lisbeth. But it is edgy and action-packed and Alvarez’ direction keeps the tension high through a slew of ever-more-improbable threats to Lisbeth and her allies. In the end, her character is so invincible she feels unreal as a human personality. For one thing, she has lost the traumatic background of abuse that made her credible as an angry feminist revenger in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. It’s also perplexing to discover she has a sister (Sylvia Hoeks) whom she left behind when she escaped from their father, a Russian crime lord.
Jay Weissberg at Variety is the harshest of the three, saying that while Alvarez “delivers some big bang thrills,” “this entry feels like a betrayal” to the Lisbeth Salander fans out there because it “reduc[es] Salander to a quirky Batgirl-like figure, soft-pedaling her feminism, practically eliminating her queerness, and tossing in an American so the U.S. can save the world.” And that’s not all:
Alvarez soups it all up with action sequences that occasionally give a rise, accompanied by a nearly omnipresent music soundtrack as predictable as it is unnecessary. In keeping with a particular vision of Scandi noir, Sweden is seen as a country of black and gray — even Fincher leavened it with sharp blues, playing on contrasts of light and dark that’s totally absent here. Presumably this is the way the remaining films of the franchise will play out, with Salander just another superhero with a stuck-on psychological profile rather than a three-dimensional young woman dealing with severe trauma, trying to seek justice in a world stacked against her. How sadly ironic that in the midst of the #MeToo moment, one of recent fiction’s most iconic characters in the fight against sexual abuse gets turned into just another male fantasy action figure.
I came away from the early footage interested to see this new take on the character, but it sounds like it’s sort of a mixed bag. We’ll be able to find out for ourselves when The Girl in the Spider’s Web hits theaters on November 9, 2018.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-10-26, 01:32 PM   #34
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Even though the end of the year brings plenty of awards season titles to the table, that doesn’t mean everything else goes into hiding. There are still plenty of movies coming over the next couple months bringing chills, thrills, excitement and laughs. The release of Sony’s The Girl in the Spider’s Web, a reboot of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo franchise, might be a little light on the latter when it hits theaters in a couple weeks. But a new clip shows it will have plenty of suspense and action. Plus, who knows, maybe there’s a chance Claire Foy could land an Oscar nomi
In the clip, Lisbeth Salander (Claire Foy) stirs up some trouble at an airport and uses herself as a distraction in order to free Lakeieth Stanfield (Get Out) from custody. We’re not sure what he’s being held for or why Lisbeth Salander is breaking him out at putting herself at risk to do so, but Stanfield’s line of, “You don’t understand what this is, do you?” indicates that there’s something much bigger in play here that Salander maybe doesn’t fully understand.
Some of the early buzz that hit the web (pun intended) this week compared the action thriller to the recent James Bond offerings, and this clip very much aligns with those sentiments. It also feels a little like a Jason Bourne movie due to the visual aesthetic, albeit with significantly less shaky camera work.
Fede Alvarez, director of the Evil Dead remake and Don’t Breathe, is at the helm of The Girl in the Spider’s Web, and the rest of the cast features Sverrir Gudnason, Sylvia Hoeks, Stephen Merchant, Claes Bang, Christopher Convery, Synnøve Macody Lund, and Vicky Krieps.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-11-06, 03:26 PM   #35
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

The great surprise of The Girl in the Spider’s Web: A New Dragon Tattoo Story (aside from that mouthful of a title) is that director Fede Alvarez wasn’t hired to direct the new James Bond movie. Though Spider’s Web couldn’t be confused with the high-quality entertainment largely evinced by the Daniel Craig era of 007 films, it’s mounted in extremely stylish fashion and lead character Lisbeth Salander is presented as a hybrid of 21st-century Bond and the villains he combats. Spider’s Web is essentially high-toned trash, a slick piece of cinema that’s the filmic equivalent of the novel you read on a cross-country flight and forget about the day after.
Though Spider’s Web is technically a sequel, none of the cast of David Fincher’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo returns. (Fincher is credited as an executive producer.) This time around, Claire Foy dons the spiky, cropped hair and dour demeanor as Lisbeth; years after the events of Dragon Tattoo, she’s still a dangerous, hyper-intelligent hacker who works as an angel of revenge to attack men who beat and otherwise demonize women. When Lisbeth is hired to help steal a powerful missile-control software by the man who created it (Stephen Merchant), she finds herself ensnared in a massive conspiracy that leads her back to journalist Mikael Blomkvist (Sverrir Gudnason).
There are flashes of a truly entertaining film in Spider’s Web; when they peek through, it’s enough to keep you going from scene to scene. Of course, most of the flashes belong to Lakeith Stanfield, as an NSA agent who travels to Sweden to figure out who stole the missile-control software from his agency. His character is rote (and appears to not have a boss, because his trip to Sweden is entirely his own choice), but Stanfield gives each line reading a quirky enough take that each time he’s onscreen, the film improves. Foy, taking over for Rooney Mara, does a good enough job; it’s less her performance than what the script gives her to work with that’s eye-rolling. The pre-credits scene, depicting young Lisbeth’s escape from her cruel criminal father, sets up the notion that every time Lisbeth sees a parent embrace their young child, she’ll have a case of The Sads; Foy’s a fine actress, but you can only make that work so many times before it becomes goofy.
But then, Lisbeth is almost exhaustingly goofy in how she is apparently omniscient if a scene requires her to be. To wit: in one setpiece, she’s attempting to help Stanfield’s character escape Swedish police custody and begins by breaking him out of an airport jail cell, then remotely gifting him a phone and a blackjack. A few minutes later, the American and Swede come face to face, at the exact time that a Swedish cop has Lisbeth at gunpoint. And look what the American has: a blackjack with which to knock out the cop! It’s almost as if…Lisbeth knew this is why he would need a blackjack, which suggests a comical amount of pre-planning. This is the heroic inversion of all those Marvel bad guys (as well as The Joker in The Dark Knight) planning to get caught simply so they can break out by somehow knowing exactly how their captors will act.
This trope also cropped up in Skyfall, the best modern Bond film that also feels like a very deliberate touchstone for the final third of Spider’s Web. In both films, our hero is drawn back to their old stomping grounds, both for a face-off with the bad guy and to think back to their fractured family past. Though this film doesn’t go for a Straw Dogs-influenced climax, its slick filmmaking feels like a hollow remix of what Sam Mendes brought to the Bond franchise. Spider’s Weblooks fancy enough, but the Bondian elements only serve to make this feel like a weird, failed superhero reboot.
Aside from Foy, the other actors who have replaced the leads of Dragon Tattoo (including, what a coincidence, Daniel Craig) do their jobs well enough without managing to feel like second-run actors taking over the parts of a major Broadway production. Gudnason tries as much as possible, even though Blomkvist is much more of a supporting character now than he was in the 2011 film, but the notion that the journalist is dependent on Salander emotionally as well as for great journalism is barely explored. This time around, Blomkvist’s editor is played by Vicky Krieps, which I mention primarily because it’s depressing to see one of the leads of last year’s remarkable Phantom Thread in such a slight role. Do better by Vicky Krieps, Hollywood.
The Girl in the Spider’s Web: A New Dragon Tattoo Story is, quite simply, a few years too late. Maybe if Fincher, Craig, and Mara could have been brought together to tell this story, or some Lisbeth Salander saga, it might have been more enjoyable. Fede Alvarez isn’t trying to copy Fincher here — the opening credits are more James Bond-like than the striking and grim opening to Dragon Tattoo — but all the style in the world can’t paper over what’s largely a very goofy and nonsensical story that tries and fails to elevate Lisbeth Salander to almost god-like status.
/Film Rating: 4 out of 10
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-11-06, 08:01 PM   #36
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Fede Alvarez Interview: The Girl In The Spider's Web

Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXZMahhVWPU

Fede Alvarez doesn't do things as you expect. His debut feature, Evil Dead, was the rare reboot of a 1980s horror franchise that fans of the original have embraced, then his follow-up, Don't Breathe, flipped the home-invasion thriller on its head with an unsettling turkey baster. And now he's taken on Lisbeth Salander: his third feature film is The Girl in the Spider's Web, the reboot of the Millennium series that sees Claire Foy taking on the role of the girl with many talents. Fitting of Alvarez, it's a very interesting thriller; a movie that is grounded and cold, yet also high stakes and fast-paced.


For the release of The Girl in the Spider's Web, Screen Rant sat down with Alvarez ahead of the film's Rome Film Festival premiere to discuss working in the shadow of Bond, the source books (both Steig Larrson's original trilogy of Millennium books and the David Lagercrantz follow-up on which this is based), and the previous David Fincher adaptation.


What you do with this film is really interesting in terms of the whole series because I think it makes it a lot more like Bond - in terms of how you create this adventure, this different tone to what we've seen before, and make it very personal but enable it to be something where Lisbeth Salander can run forever in all different permutations. Was that your intention - and how did you go about that?
Well, yes. I guess it was intentional. It happens in the books - the books evolve in such a way. You start with this very small, you know, family mystery and then they went a bit crazier. And I love that and I love getting the chance to jump ahead a little bit and go to a world where Lisbeth has become an icon - a little bit of a local celebrity almost - in her town. No one knows who she is but everybody knows what she does. So it was definitely the Bond aspect I think, just because I'm a fan of those movies. I think... when stories are very personal for the main character but the stakes are bigger than life, it just takes you there. That character-driven action thriller.
And you mention the books. This deviates in several key places from the book on which it's based. And, without going into spoilers, what was the motivation to make those changes and adjust how characters were presented?
We started with a draft from Stephen Knight, a brilliant writer. And he kind of did a selection what were the aspects of the book we were going to take and what were the aspects we were going to dismiss. My job in it, and Jay Basu - we wrote together, our draft for the movie - was to make it more personal. To really, not just tell a more personal story, but talk about the themes that I care about. My movies are always about secrets and shame and always about guilt and family, and I think because that's one of the most powerful subjects you can talk about.
<img class=" lazyloaded">


And one specific thing there is Lisbeth and her relationship with her father. In the books, famously, there's fire involved and burning, which your presentation of the events seems to avoid. Is that a conscious retcon or is that something you didn't want to allude to?
Well, it does happen. It's supposed to happen after that. I mean, the way... we're totally in canon in this movie, everything that happens here, it doesn't override anything that has happened, or doesn't override anything that has happened in the books. We did add things and we were able to approach certain ideas from a different point of view, but still the same things [happened]. The father will be burned a few days after that scene when the movie opens.
And speaking of honoring what's come before, you do keep certain stylistic elements that featured in David Fincher's film. The opening titles, and just the way that it's lit and shot, the way you present Sweden really. What did you choose to take explicitly and what did you choose not to take.
Well, I learned things... you don't really take anything. You just... there's no many ways you can do certain things. There's not many ways you can light Stockholm or present some of those places, so they end up feeling like common ground. Then yes, with the title sequence, there was something fantastic about that original title sequence, but the pace is different in ours. It just tells you right away, this is more personal, a bit more romantic even. But it was really intentional... it's not one of those things where you have to seen the other movie to enjoy this. So, whatever connection there is, is more my personal enjoyment of connecting them on some level. But the reality is that it was made in a way that if you haven't seen anything else, you can definitely enjoy the movie and everything you need to know the world, that is relevant for the story, is told in the first fifteen minutes. So that was why, this book, I love that. If we'd have made the second, third book, you would necessarily have to see the first movie to understand it.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-11-06, 09:39 PM   #37
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

The Girl in the Spider's Web Review: A Very Cool New Dragon Tattoo

It's been seven years since David Fincher delivered his gritty, American take on The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. Unfortunately, a sequel never materialized, despite the fact that Sony has been dead set on turning the popular book series into a franchise. Now, they've completed their brand new attempt in the form of The Girl in the Spider's Web which brings in a new director, writer, cast and a decidedly different take on the material than what came before. The result, though unlike what preceded it, still winds up being a thrilling and arguably more crowd-pleasing effort.

The Girl in the Spider's Web, which is based on author David Lagercrantz' fourth novel in the series, centers on a man who was recently fired from a high-ranking position within the National Security Agency. He then recruits world-class hacker and all around troubled badass Lisbeth Salander to steal his program, FireWall. The program has the ability to access codes for nuclear weapons across the globe, making it very dangerous, if put into the wrong hands. Lisbeth's theft draws the attention of an NSA agent who traces the activity to Sweden. Things get extra complicated when mysterious Russian criminals take Lisbeth's laptop with FireWall on it, while also kidnapping the man who can make the program work. Now, Lisbeth, with the help of someone from her past, must try and recover the program before it falls into the wrong hands.

Director Fede Alvarez, whose previous work includes the Evil Dead remake and the horror hit Don't Breathe, found himself in an unenviable position creatively with this project. Does one pick up where Fincher left off? Just remake the same movie again and hope to more successfully launch the Dragon Tattoo trilogy? Instead, Alvarez took an entirely different approach, putting the character of Lisbeth Salander in the driver's seat, no longer playing second fiddle to journalist Mikael Blomkvist, in what is equal parts action and thriller, as opposed to much more of the latter. It's a decision that ultimately pays off and makes for a movie that seems much more commercial in nature. Not commercial in the cash-grabby sense, but more as a result of what feels like genuine artistic direction.
I should also clarify that I haven't read the novels, nor have I seen the Swedish trilogy of movies. I'm basing this strictly on the merits of the movie itself, in contrast to what David Fincher did, which was, unquestionably, a much darker, gritty and subverted take. That's not to say things don't get dark in The Girl in the Spider's Web. They absolutely do. But this movie is more flashy, action-heavy and spectacle-laced. As such, it doesn't feel like such a demanding exercise.


What's interesting is that this feels more akin to the modern Mission: Impossible movies, or certain entries in the James Bond franchise, than it does the previous adaptation of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. It also makes a strong case against ever making James Bond a female, as movies like this effectively prove that Hollywood should be focused on creating new franchises centered on strong female characters. And there's certainly an irony to the fact that this feels heavily Bond influenced when the last movie did actually star the current 007, Daniel Craig.
One of the best things about Fincher's movie was Rooney Mara's performance as Lisbeth. Claire Foy (The Crown), who is having herself a moment, steps in as the mysterious hacker who seeks justice for wronged women in the world. If The Girl in the Spider's Web has an ace up its sleeve, it's Foy. She's magnetic, full of energy and steals every scene. Lakeith Stanfield, Stephen Merchant and Sylvia Hoeks do a great job filling out the supporting cast, but this is Foy's movie. And hopefully, Foy's franchise. No disrespect to Sverrir Gudnason, but he's a clear downgrade when compared to Daniel Craig in the role of Mikael Blomkvist.
This winds up being a movie that plays very well into the sensibilities of Fede Alvarez, while also serving as something one might not have expected, based on his previous work. The Girl in the Spider's Web is a very potent spy thriller with a thoroughly compelling female lead and serves as a total reinvention of this franchise. It may not be the sequel that many wanted to see, but it's certainly something I sense a lot of moviegoers are going to enjoy. Sony made the right movie with this one.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-11-07, 08:36 PM   #38
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Sylvia Hoeks Interview: The Girl In The Spider's Web



Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=38Hz2sY9XU8

If you're making a Fall thriller and need an imposing yet affecting villain, look no further than Sylvia Hoeks. The Dutch actress broke big in 2017 as evil android Luv in Blade Runner 2049, and this year she's back on the silver screen as Camilla Salander, sister of hacker Lisbeth in The Girl in the Spider's Web. Head of a legacy crime syndicate, the red-coated Camilla is a very dangerous presence in the movie, and that's before you get to the tortured childhood with her twin.
All of that context proved to be the topics of our conversation when Screen Rant sat down with Hoeks to discuss The Girl in the Spider's Web. You can watch the interview above or check out the transcript below.
The interesting thing about Camilla as a character in this movie is that so much of her presence is hidden. When she turns up, there's already so much implied history. So when she meets Lisbeth, it's quite a powerful moment but the relationship is powerful because of the absence. How did you guys work on getting that chemistry right, because that's quite a tough relationship to do - and the moment you start interacting, you're going to influence it.
Yeah, and that's why Fede [Alvarez, director] didn't want us to hang out. So we did everything separately, going to costume fittings, makeup fittings, everything. We didn't see each other, and he really wanted to keep that distance between us. And he was right because I really like her and we would have had a much harder time giggling in-between the takes, being stupid as you do in-between takes, because you are stupid because it makes it fun. But yeah, I think he did a great job of keeping us apart.
So when you talk about the makeup and the costuming, did Claire not see you in that big red impressive getup until on the set?
Yeah... I think so. I don't think... maybe she did. Maybe she saw photos or something, but I think, yeah, for us to see each other for the first time, opposite... I mean, it was not... we didn't shoot it very chronologically.
Have you read the book, The Girl in the Spider's Web?
Yes.
I wanted to talk about some of the changes made to the character because she's quite different in the book. Much more straight-up sadistic, whereas she's much more sympathetic here. I think both characters work in their respective stories, but I wondered if you could talk about how you feel about those changes and how you think it affects Camilla as a character - and how audiences are going to react to her.
Well, that was the most important thing for me taking Camilla on as a character - to find the vulnerabilities and to find openings for the audience to be able to identify with her, to explain "I'm here because that happened to me." Not only to show her as a victim, to show her as a powerful woman as well, [and] to show that vulnerability in a sense that, you know, "why didn't you come for me, why did you help everybody else?" And you get a reaction from Lisbeth, a reaction that, as an audience, it does something to you. When I read the script, the girl that overcomes everything can't look at her past, she can't look at it, she has to outrun it.


One of the most striking scenes in the film is when you've got the plastic wrapping around Lisbeth, and you're watching. How was it, doing those scenes? That is a highly emotional scene, and to do it with that coldness, how was that scene shot and how did it impact you as an actor?
It's interesting what happens when you take on a role, I think. What happens to me - without sounding too spiritual or too hippy I guess - what happens most of the time you do a lot of research and you get into the character, and at a certain moment it's like the character takes over. It's like you're on set and you're in the moment, and all of sudden she's there, she's like "Hey. I'm here, let's do this." So a lot of the times I'm in the moment and I let it lead me, I guess, in a certain direction. Instead of anticipating what is going to happen.
And I'd be remiss not talking about Blade Runner 2049, which was one of my favorite films of last year, which you also played a warped mirror of the main character. Taking on this role, did you notice those parallels and did you do anything to make sure Luv and Camilla were maintained as these very different people?
Hence the look. The look was very important for me. When I read the script, I loved Camilla, that was the most important thing for me. To show her vulnerability, but really be different from Luv. I saw... that's true, she mirrors again someone's pain and someone's longing, right? And for me, Luv was such a different creature. A very muscular, perfect almost android, where Camilla has the scars on her face. And that's why I wanted to show that pain and the damage already in the beginning. Because I don't have a lot of time to explain it to the audience, so I wanted, from the moment she steps in, I wanted that paleness, the look and the scars to see I've had a difficult time. This is me.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-11-08, 12:49 PM   #39
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Sverrir Gudnason Interview: The Girl In The Spider's Web


Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwaMrb5Wjwk
Sverrir Gudnason isn't Michael Nyqvist or Daniel Craig. The new Mikael Blomkvist, seen in The Girl in the Spider's Web, takes over the role from two celebrated actors, although his take is a little different. This is a Mikael who's been through the events of Stieg Larsson's trilogy and is reuniting with Lisbeth Salander for a very forward-thinking adventure.
Screen Rant recently caught up with Gudnason at The Girl in the Spider's Webjunket to discuss his role as Blomkvist and being a part of the Millennium universe.


You live in Sweden and you're welcoming a lot of people into that environment. How was that bringing in people from literally an international cast?
It was fun. It was fun to be a part of making a Swedish story internationally. And bringing the cast and the team to Sweden, they were all really excited to see Sweden.
Did you look to the earlier versions of the character, the previous two movie versions, or did you try and keep yourself clean of that?
I've seen all the movies and read the books, but at the same time you have to create your own character, you have to find your own Blomkvist. Also, when you have a different actor portraying a role, it's always going to be... because you put so much of yourself into a character, so it's always going to be different.
I think what's so interesting about your iteration is that you're quite young compared to the others. You're younger than either actor was when they played the role, but also you have gone through so much more with Lisbeth. How did you try and bring a youthful side to the character?
Well, I really thought more about making him like a normal human being. Because he's kind of one of the only ones in the story that's a regular person. Because, the other ones, they all have these skills and kind of superpowers, so I tried to make him as a contrast to Lisbeth. They want the same thing, they want justice, and they seek the truth, but they're very different characters.
There's so much history to this character when we meet him in Spider's Web, with Millennium and also with Lisbeth. Did you and Claire work on building that up and ensuring you had this emotional shorthand?
Well, we knew we had to find the feeling that when they meet, they haven't met for a couple of years, so it's a big thing for them to meet again because she just disappeared. And to get the feeling that they are super important to each other and feed off each other.
They meet in a really cool location, across from two buildings. How did you shoot that moment? Because there's such a great emotional yearning with that distance. Did you shoot it on the same set or was that entirely greenscreened.
No no, they built two facades of two houses that actually exist in Stockholm, only they don't have those elevators. So we shot it with that kind of distance and that helped the scene, I think, because meeting somebody after a couple of years, you have a distance.

What isn't in the film much, at least compared to the book, is the whole Millennium storyline, it's referenced there are new owners but it's not really resolved. Was there more of that shot, did you do much more with that that didn't make it to the final cut?
We did some stuff, not a lot. Because this film focuses more on Lisbeth's journey. But, in the beginning, we have some of it.
And that's another question. Obviously, Blomkvist in this movie is much more of a supporting player, he is the connection to the outside world. Is there anything you'd like to have been able to do with the character in this movie that you didn't get to do because of being a smaller role?
No, not really. I think it's very interesting they are these opposites and work together.
There's obviously another book in the series. Would you be interested in coming back for that and exploring the character again?
Yeah, definitely. Yeah.
Do you have any ideas of where you'd want to take him, any aspect of him - go deeper into that Lisbeth relationship?
We'll see about that, if it happens.
And one final question, this is the fifth movie, it's the fourth book. What makes these characters so iconic and so beloved, in your mind?
I think it's that they have a strong feeling of seeking justice and seeking the truth and they want to make things right. And they're both courageous in their own ways.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-11-09, 01:44 PM   #40
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

The Girl in the Spider's Web Review: A Lackluster Franchise Reboot



=
THE GIRL IN THE SPIDER'S WEB IS A GENERIC FRANCHISE REVIVAL HAMSTRUNG BY AN UNINSPIRED STORY AND POOR CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT.


The Girl in the Spider's Web represents Sony's second attempt to launch a film franchise based on the Millennium novels, after David Fincher's 2011 adaptation of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Fincher's movie, while well-received critically, did not perform up to the studio's expectations at the box office. As such, a followup lingered in development hell for a number of years before Sony recruited Don't Breathe's Fede Alvarez to helm a soft reboot starring an all-new cast. Obviously, the hope here is for this iteration of Lisbeth Salander to headline multiple installments, but the fresh start isn't all that exciting. The Girl in the Spider's Web is a generic franchise revival hamstrung by an uninspired story and poor character development.

Spider's Web picks up as Lisbeth (Claire Foy) is tasked by terminated NSA employee Frans Balder (Stephen Merchant) to find his highly dangerous program, Firewall. It gives its user access to all of the world's nuclear codes, and Balder is worried about that power falling into the wrong hands. Lisbeth downloads Firewall by hacking into the NSA's servers and plans on giving it back to Balder, so he can destroy it.

The job seems easy at first, but Lisbeth's actions quickly draw the attention of not only NSA security agent Edwin Neeham (Lakeith Stanfield), but also notorious criminal organization The Spiders, who want Firewall for their own devious purposes. As Neeham travels to Sweden to conduct an investigation into Lisbeth, Salander calls upon her old friend Mikael Blomkvist (Sverrir Gudnason) to help her track down The Spiders and prevent a global catastrophe from occurring.

Fincher's Dragon Tattoo wholly embraced the unsettling and disturbing nature of its source material, and Spider's Web takes a slightly different approach. While the film has a fittingly dark tone and makes some truly upsetting revelations about the characters, it rarely goes deeper than surface level. In a way, it feels like Sony's trying to water down the Millennium brand and make it more accessible to the mainstream by stripping away much of its hard edge. Spider's Web plays less like a grim modern noir and more like a standard espionage thriller, with Salander coming across as a female James Bond or Jason Bourne. While it's understandable the studio would want to mix things up after Dragon Tattoo underperformed, fans of the books (and the previous films) will likely be disappointed with the current direction.


The script, credited to the trio of Alvarez, Steven Knight, and Jay Basu, likewise doesn't do the film any favors. Its main narrative is woefully by-the-numbers, revolving around the tired trope of a doomsday device and is hardly engaging. To be fair, there are a couple of fascinating ideas presented throughout (including the dynamic between Lisbeth and Sylvia Hoeks' villainous Camilla), but they aren't given enough development to be fully formed. Spider's Web frustratingly prioritizes its basic genre elements over everything else, leading to some unearned payoffs that may have been more rewarding if certain aspects were given more time. There sadly isn't much in Spider's Web to differentiate it from similar titles.

Foy, coming off strong performances in Unsane and First Man earlier this year, is typically reliable as Lisbeth. Her interpretation may not be as captivating as other versions, but she nevertheless commits herself to the role, handling the emotional and physical sides of the character with skill. Foy's turn is essentially the saving grace of the ensemble, as many of the supporting actors are wasted in thankless roles. Key figures like Blomkvist, Balder, and Neeham are basically walking plot devices to help move the story along, rather than three-dimensional individuals and don't have much to do. Hoeks makes for an eerie presence as Camilla, but she's ultimately a generic antagonist undercut by the shortcomings in the script. To her credit, Hoeks tries to make the most of what she has to work with (particularly towards the end), but by then it's too little, too late. It should be noted that nobody in the cast is bad, though few will leave an impression on the audience.


In his short time directing features, Alvarez has demonstrated a keen eye for filmmaking, and that continues here. With an assist by cinematographer Pedro Luque, Spider's Web's visuals look great on the big screen and do an effective job of conveying Millennium's trademark cold aesthetic. The style may be indebted to the previous versions, but Alvarez is able to honor them without being completely derivative. Coming in at just under two hours, Spider's Web mercifully doesn't overstay its welcome and is never dragged down by over-extended set pieces. More of an emotional investment in the characters' arcs would have made the action sequences and story trajectory compelling, but everything as presented is sound from a technical perspective.

It remains to be seen if Sony has a new franchise on their hands, but in the event sequels are made, the creative team has some work to do to ensure any followups are of better quality. Unfortunately, The Girl in the Spider's Web eschews much of what makes Millennium unique, diminishing a complex character like Lisbeth and the fascinating relationships she has with those around her. Unless one is a die-hard fan of the property or any of the principal players involved, there's little incentive to rush out and see this one in theaters - especially with several other high-profile titles on the way for the holiday season.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-11-09, 07:44 PM   #41
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Claire Foy Interview: The Girl In The Spider's Web



Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcWhzYo5Ed0


Claire Foy will forever be remembered as the first iteration of Queen Elizabeth in The Crown seasons 1 & 2, but standing right alongside her Majesty may just be Lisbeth Salander. The British actress is the third person to take on the Swedish hacker - after Noomi Rapace and Rooney Mara - in this week's The Girl in the Spider's Web, and takes Lisbeth in a more wounded and action-focused direction.
Screen Rant caught up with Foy for the release of Spider's Web, where we discussed preparation for the project, the character's history, and what may come next.
This is your third movie this year, third big release after Unsane and First Man. They're all really interesting ideas with deceptively layered characters. What's been your decision process in taking a project after The Crown? Is it to be different, is it to go for what jumps out of the script?
Yeah, pretty much. There doesn't seem to be any rhyme or reason really to why [laughs] apart from, I know when I can't say no to something, I suppose. And, yeah, it's just... it's the writer, it's the director, it's the character, it's the other cast. It's every... that's what every decision's based on, and been very, very, very, very, very lucky.
And so what specific aspect of Lisbeth in this story was what spoke to you?
I think it was the way Fede [Alvarez] wanted to shoot it. I think putting her at the heart of the story and focusing on the relationship that she has with her sister, which I found really fascinating. And Fede is a very intelligent person. He wanted to deal with the psychology of Lisbeth in a sense that she was running from something that she couldn't outrun, I suppose in that way, and that was her past and her subconscious telling... driving her towards an ultimate end that she couldn't avoid. But yeah, it was Fede's idea for it really that was, I kind of went, "yeah, that's brilliant."
You mention the relationship with the sister. That is the core of the movie, and it's simmering underneath - she's physically and emotionally wounded. How did you work with the other actors in making sure that relationship came across as genuine, even when it's something mostly suggested?
Well, Fede originally wanted me and Sylvia [Hoeks] to keep very separate. But we're the kind of actors, I think, we knew that in order for us to do that, we had to have a relationship that was so clear, I suppose. So me and Sylvia spent time together and talked about our characters and had wine, and just got to know one another, really. And I think that ultimately lends itself to the story because you get a backstory and you get information, and you feel that pull and that draw of those two people who love each other but can't, are so polarized they can't be near each other.




And in terms of prep for the actual role, Lisbeth is a pretty iconic character now. Did you go back to the original books, or either of the earlier film version - or did you want to distance yourself from that?
The books were my bible, so I just kept them with me all the time. They're so... one, just amazing to re-read them, but just amazing having little information, being inside her head just next to me all the time was amazing. I'd already seen the films, all of the Swedish one and the American version, which I'd watch when they came out. And I think when anything is that good, it stays with you, so I didn't need to rewatch it. And also, I think rewatching would probably have been quite hard on myself, to rewatch those films before shooting. It wouldn't have been a good idea.
One of the big questions, because this does come in the style of the Fincher film, is how it's related. What would you best describe the relationship between the two films?
Well, I think this is very different. This isn't... we aren't remaking any of the movies that have been made before, this is the D reincarnation of these books and this story. So it does explore different things. Lisbeth is at the center of this drama which hasn't necessarily seen before. But it's not a remake of any of the movies that have gone before it.
And obviously, there's one more book that hasn't been made into a film. The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye. Would you be interested in coming back for that?
Lisbeth is, sort of, infinite. There is no end to what you can learn about her as character, and I think all the other actors who've played her will attest to that. There's definitely more to know and learn about here, but I think it's important to just focus on this film at this point.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2018-11-12, 07:15 PM   #42
JDLM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 169,891
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Girl In The Spider's Web Tried To Turn Lisbeth Salander Into James Bond (And Failed)



Warning: SPOILERS Below for The Girl in the Spider's Web!


-

The Girl in the Spider's Web tried to turn Lisbeth Salander into James Bond - but it didn't work. Set after the events of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (but neither the Swedish language original or David Fincher version explicitly) the espionage thriller directed by Fede Álvarez skips over the next two books in series creator Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy and instead adapts the fourth novel by David Lagercrantz. Álvarez ramped up the action and set Lisbeth on an adventure to stop a shadowy criminal organization called the Spiders from causing global nuclear armageddon. Suddenly, the girl with the dragon tattoo, now played by Golden Globe-winner Claire Foy, is literally saving the world. And it's an odd fit, at best, for Lisbeth Salander.

When The Girl in the Spider's Web begins, Lisbeth is already a vigilante in Stockholm, Sweden. Known as "the woman who hurts men who hurt women", she applies her unmatched skills at hacking and surveillance to brutalize men who emotionally and sexually abuse women. This feels like a natural evolution of her character in the three years since she and her ex-lover, journalist Mikael Blomkvist (Sverrir Gudnason), cracked the cold case of Harriet Vanger's disappearance and brought her uncle Martin, the killer of numerous women, to justice. However, Spider's Web kept changing Lisbeth and makes a hard pivot away from the dense character work and detailed investigation of previous films. Lisbeth is soon thrust into multiple fight scenes and chase sequences, and by the time Camilla Salander (Sylvia Hoeks) is revealed as the mastermind behind the Spiders' plot, the Salander sisters are settling old family scores while literally holding the entire world's nuclear arsenal in their hands.



The Girl in the Spider's Web received brutal reviews and bombed with an opening weekend gross of only $8 million, so audiences clearly weren't won over by the rebooted Lisbeth Salander. For fans who remember the character from any of the four previous films or from the best-selling novels, The Girl in the Spider's Web transforming the goth hacker into a 007-like action heroine felt like a very forced miscalculation. Here's why Sony Pictures took the girl with the dragon tattoo in this new direction and why it failed.



Why Lisbeth Salander Was Turned Into James Bond

When The Girl in the Spider's Web began production in the fall of 2017, Sony had already lost distribution rights to James Bond, which expired with Spectre in 2015. The studio had been the 007 films' distributor since 2006's Casino Royale, and the four films starring Daniel Craig as Bond were wildly successful, grossing over $3-billion combined. However, a bidding war in spring of 2017 for the prized James Bond rights were won by Universal (for international distribution) and MGM/Annapurna Films (for domestic distribution). In light of losing 007, it appears like Sony decided to resurrect the Dragon Tattoo franchise, which had been dormant since David Fincher's high-profile film (which also starred Daniel Craig) underperformed in 2011, in a bid to craft their own, similarly-angled franchise.

It's understandable why Sony Pictures felt like they had a natural replacement for James Bond in the Lisbeth Salander films. Both franchises are based on best-selling books and both star loners possessed of unique skills who work in exotic, international locales. The fact that Lisbeth is a unique feminist heroine also gives her an edge over the venerable 007 franchise - which regularly receives demands that James Bond be recast as a woman, a change Bond's producers promise will never happen.

Since it had been seven years since Fincher's film, it seemed like a reboot turning Lisbeth into an action hero would instantly create a new international spy franchise and another James Bond. In fact, Sony leaned very hard into making sure The Girl in the Spider's Web hewed as close to two of their biggest successes, Skyfall and Spectre, as possible.


All The James Bond References In The Girl in the Spider's Web

The James Bond parallels in The Girl in the Spider's Web are glaringly obvious, starting with the villain, Camilla Salander, who essentially becomes Lisbeth's version of 007's arch-nemesis Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Christoph Waltz). Just as Spectre retconned Blofeld into Bond's adoptive brother and the "the author of all of [his] pain", Camilla reveals herself to behind a malevolent revenge plot to frame Lisbeth for igniting nuclear armageddon. This enmity goes back to their childhood when Lisbeth ran away from home, leaving Camilla behind to be abused for 16 years by their evil crime lord father. By snorting crushed amphetamines, Lisbeth is also able to shake off being injected with a mysterious toxin with no ill effects, just like Bond shrugged off Blofeld's neuro-chemicals during his attempted lobotomy.

But it's Skyfall, Sony's highest-grossing Bond film, that The Girl in the Spider's Web seems to duplicate the most: Lisbeth improbably rides her motorcycle across a frozen lake to evade police whereas, in Skyfall, Bond has a lethal fight in a frozen lake. Blomkvist tries to get information from a man with a mysterious tattoo who then removes his nose to show whole parts of his face missing, just as Skyfall's villain Silva (Javier Bardem) removed parts of his face in front of Bond and M (Judi Dench). Silva's organization and Camilla's Spiders display a mastery of technology and surveillance that even eclipses Lisbeth's and MI-6's. The biggest copy is Spider's Web's entire ultraviolent third act, which takes place at the dilapidated Salander family home, just like how Bond's final battle with Silva takes place at Skyfall, the Bond family's abandoned home. Lisbeth even burns down her house, and the memories it contains, just like Bond blew Skyfall up with explosives - a fiery severing of both of their links to their own origins.

By the end of The Girl in the Spider's Web, Lisbeth even has her own version of Bond's support team: in her tech supplier and fellow hacker Plague (Cameron Britton), she has her own Q (Ben Whishaw), plus she has an American ally, NSA agent Edwin Needham (Lakeith Stanfield), who becomes Lisbeth's Felix Leiter stand-in. Of course, Lisbeth retains the loyalty of Mikael Blomkvist, her version of Miss Moneypenny.


Why Lisbeth Didn't Work As A James Bond Replacement


Despite the basic similarities between the two characters, Lisbeth Salander is simply not James Bond - she is a very different icon. Craig's films have attempted to explore Bond's psyche, but at his core, 007 is a government agent who serves Queen and country above all else. Bond has certainly been through harrowing adventures, but even his experiences can't begin to compare with the lifelong abuse Lisbeth has endured. Salander is a survivor of the most horrific kind of rape and sexual abuse, and even prior to that, she spent her childhood institutionalized as a ward of the state. It was through her partnership with Blomkvist in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo that Lisbeth discovered her mission to help other women get revenge from their abusers. In fact, the callous way Bond has treated his sexual conquests could make him the kind of man Lisbeth would conceivably target.

However, while watching Lisbeth beat down thugs in is certainly thrilling and empowering, the cerebral goth hacker isn't someone who should be saving the world James Bond-style. The Girl in the Spider's Web's opening sequence showing her vigilante activities was a far better fit for her evolution since the first film than how she was later turned her into a substitute James Bond with requisite over-the-top action scenes and a crazy plot to blow up the world Lisbeth had to foil. Keeping Salander's scope smaller and more personal works better for her character - something the next two books by Steig Larsson and the Swedish film adaptations smartly focused on by fully exploring her past and the vast conspiracy targeting her.



The Girl in the Spider's Web also drastically pared down the S&M sexual violence that is prevalent in Steig Larsson's novels and in the prior films. This decision aimed to make Fede Álvarez's reboot more audience-friendly, yet for better or worse, this is a core aspect fans expect from the Dragon Tattoo franchise. It risks too much of a trade-off. Instead, in Spider's Web, Lisbeth was most interesting when the film focused on her skills at surveillance, investigation, and being many steps ahead of enemies who hold a personal vendetta against her. Ultimately, though, the girl with the dragon tattoo isn't a secret agent who serves any government or authority; Lisbeth Salander is at her best when she punishes men who hurt women, yet for all it claimed that, Spider's Web chose to drastically alter the scope and lose sight of that to its detriment.

What's Next For The Dragon Tattoo Franchise?

The Girl in the Spider's Web bombing in its opening weekend is a huge setback for the franchise, which was poised to continue the "new" adventures of Lisbeth Salander. The crowded November 9 release date pitting Lisbeth against The Grinch certainly didn't help the film's chances. A silver lining for the studio is that Spider's Web was made for a budget of only $43 million so it could still recoup its losses with international grosses and home video sales. But it's quite evident that even though Dragon Tattoo has its fans (who scoff at the changes Spider's Web made to its heroine), the franchise is nowhere close to James Bond's popularity, even with Sony Pictures trying to rework Salander into another 007. Overall, the film's failure leaves Lisbeth Salander's cinematic future in doubt once again.

All that said, the Dragon Tattoo franchise remains a well-known property around the world, and it's likely there will be another Lisbeth Salander movie. However, rather than adapt the next book, The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye, and make another Lisbeth-as-Bond adventure, perhaps a wiser move would be to pivot backwards and adapt Steig Larsson's second novel, The Girl Who Played With Fire, which is all about Lisbeth's past and her criminal father. After all, Spider's Web already set up Lisbeth's evil family, and refocusing on Salander's tragic history would allow them to resurrect Camilla, who was arguably the most intriguing (yet underserved) character in The Girl in the Spider's Web.

Whatever happens next, Lisbeth Salander is bound to return. Her fans only hope that the next film will leave the attempts to turn her into James Bond in the past and keep Lisbeth as the girl with the dragon tattoo they know and love.
__________________


B68 | F82 |///M | S55B | NAV | LED | Avant Garde | Toyo Proxes 4
JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

 

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:48 PM.


Design By: Miner Skinz.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.13.37
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright (c) 1993-2012, KCSR.org