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Unread 2019-10-22, 08:31 AM   #326
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mild83 View Post
But the ET at 11.3 would indicate a higher trap, no?
ET is the efficiency of the DCT + traction + true launch control

121mph is the horsepower



turbo cars are typically under rated because the SAE or similar testing process goes slowly through the rpms and produces a lot of heat in the process. With an OEM calibration timing is pulled based on hotter intake air temps, which reduces horsepower. If you took a super hot car to a 105* dyno room and ran it 25 times, you'd eventually drop to the SAE rated power range. If you just do ~3 pulls on a relatively cool car you'll exceed the SAE range.


this dyno was done w/ no tach pick up, they just tried to estimate a mph>rpm conversion setting in the dyno software - which is why they cared about gear ratios so much. It's 99% chance of being a dyno mis-calibration

121mph @ 3800lb = 525 crank hp
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Unread 2019-11-06, 06:12 PM   #327
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2020 Corvette C8 Is The Fastest Stingray Ever, Rockets From 0-60 MPH In 2.9 Seconds

Today has been a mixed bag for Corvette fans as Chevrolet has confirmed the 2020 C8 has been pushed back to February due to the UAW strike.


We’ll have more on that later, but the company is trying to push past the disappointing news by confirming detailed performance specifications for mid-engine sports car.
While Chevrolet has previously said the Corvette would be able to accelerate from 0-60 mph (0-96 km/h) in less than 3.0 seconds when equipped with the Z51 Performance Package, the company has now confirmed that task will take 2.9 seconds. The model will also be able to run the quarter mile in 11.2 seconds at 121 mph (195 km/h).


The standard Corvette Stingray isn’t much slower as the dash to 60 mph (96 km/h) takes three seconds flat. Interestingly, the car also runs the quarter mile in 11.2 seconds but finishes at 123 mph (198 km/h).




The differences are minor and this isn’t too surprising considering only 5 hp (4 kW / 5 PS) and 5 lb-ft (7 Nm) of torque separate the two cars. In base form, the 6.2-liter LT2 V8 engine develops 490 hp (365 kW / 497 PS) and 465 lb-ft (630 Nm) of torque. The Z51, on the other hand, has 495 hp (369 kW / 502 PS) and 470 lb-ft (637 Nm) of torque thanks to its performance exhaust system.
Besides giving detailed performance specs, Chevrolet highlighted the Corvette’s new engine and transmission. The former features a dry sump oil system with three scavenge pumps that ensure the C8 is the “most track-capable Stingray in history.” As Chevrolet explained, the lubrication system allows for exceptional engine performance even at lateral acceleration levels exceeding 1g. It also has a 25 percent increase in cooling capacity over the LT1.
The LT2 also breathes better than its predecessor as it features a low restriction intake and a 3.4-inch (87 mm) throttle body. Other notable highlights include new header manifolds and a camshaft with a 0.5-inch (14 mm) gross lift. Chevrolet says this “helps the combustion system take advantage of the extra flow capacity.”

Enthusiasts aren’t happy about the lack of a manual transmission, but Chevrolet said the eight-speed dual-clutch gearbox was designed to “put a smile on every driver’s face.” Fans will have to wait several more months to experience it, but the company said the transmission delivers “lightning-fast upshifts” and has low-end biased gear ratios for maximum acceleration.


Furthermore, Chevrolet confirmed the Corvette has a proprietary algorithm that can sense “spirited driving.” When this occurs, the transmission can “downshift early on hard braking, hold gears when lifting off the throttle and alter shifts points with lateral acceleration.” Assuming this happens when you want it to, the gearbox will increase enjoyment and avoid unnecessary shifting.


Last but not least, the company highlighted the process for using Launch Control. First, drivers need to put the car into Track mode and then press the traction control button twice. Once this occurs, the driver needs to fully depress the brake and accelerator pedals. They can then release the brake once 3,500 RPM has been reached.


PHOTO GALLERY

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Unread 2019-11-06, 09:16 PM   #328
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2020 Chevrolet Corvette Interior Looks Unique For A Reason

The new Vette's interior designer makes a strong case.
The all-new 2020 Chevrolet Corvette is unlike any of its predecessors for one key reason: it's mid-engine design. The engine is now behind the driver instead of in front of them. Although the overall small block V8 engine design remains (for now), the entire Corvette has been completely reengineered, and this goes for the interior as well. Compare the C8's interior to the C7's and you'll notice many, many changes, such as its low dashboard.
Gear Patrol recently chatted with Corvette interior designer Tristan Murphy about the need from the get-go for the C8 to have that low dashboard. "The whole point of [getting] that engine behind you is it allows you to have a much lower cowl…you no longer have to sit above the engine, and you can get these really great sightlines," Murphy said.


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"And that's what a mid-engine car does. The last thing we want to do was have this amazing downvision, then have this typical tall instrument panel. It was about, how do we change the game and how do we reconstruct a dashboard here to be as low and as thin as possible? That was the mission statement of the whole car."


One key point he mentioned is "low and thin." Take, for example, the air vents. The C8 "has the thinnest air vents in the production world," Murphy said. "We're 19 millimeters tall, and we had to invent that. Then we had to do a brand new HVAC system that controls that velocity [at that vent height]. Normal vents are usually about 36 to 40 millimeters tall, but every single millimeter that goes up the instrument panel, the dash has to go along, right?"





To compare, the Toyota Supra's center stack is about 30 millimeters tall, not including the screen. "Before you know it, [the dashboard] is almost an inch and a half or two inches taller because of those decisions of how you stack up audio and HVAC button controls."


Early on, Murphy and his team decided on the fighter jet cockpit layout that enables the controls to literally wrap around the driver. Murphy and crew also studied hypercar interiors like the LaFerrari and Porsche 918 Spyder in order to make the C8 "feel special… [and the need for drivers] to get inside this thing and be like, 'Holy shit.'"


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Unread 2019-11-08, 05:33 PM   #329
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How The 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Repurposes Brake Parts For Front Axle Lift

Looking at a cutaway of the new 2020 Chevrolet Corvette shows us a lot about how engineers packaged many of the components, and one item that stands out is an aluminum block in the middle of the front crossmember. At first glance, it appears to be an ABS module, but all is not as it seems.


Upon further examination, we find that the ABS block is much higher up in the car closer to the cabin, and our module below is actually there to control the front axle lift system.




This is a pretty interesting piece of technology that raises the front axle so it can cross speed bumps, curbs, steep grades and more. It’s a first for the Corvette. And what’s really neat is that it’s linked to GPS so in many cases the lift happens automatically. Read more about it here.



Although the module is not used for the brakes in this application, it does have some roots in braking systems. Chevrolet engineers explored multiple options for implementing front axle lift and decided that hydraulic was the way to go. Instead of sourcing new pumps or replicating what their competitors use they decided to use a block similar to what is used on ABS systems for some cars and just re-purpose it.



The motor inside the block is supplied by BWI and is a very common unit that is found in a variety of ABS modules around the world. A quick search shows that the motor is very popular for vehicles in Asia where BWI appears to have a large market. The body and connector for the electronics also appear to be common as shown in the BWI ABS unit illustration above.



This type of parts sharing likely further reduced costs and gives us an idea of just one of the areas that GM was able to find clever solutions to keep overall costs down.



While Chevrolet would not confirm which exact vehicles share that motor, we were able to find used parts that appeared to match from a wide variety of vehicles that ranged from stuff like the VPG MV-1 to the Lifan X60 crossover.


While some may balk at the idea of re-purposing such a part for a sports car, the idea here is actually pretty revolutionary as it reduces costs and provides for a mass-market compment to be used in a new way. This reduces the costs of manufacturing and should reduce replacement costs down the road.



The idea to use a BWI part in this location was pretty straightforward, according to a GM engineer I spoke to last month at Petit Le Mans. BWI also builds the dampers for the new Corvette which allowed them to design the whole system to work together. The dampers that are equipped for front axle lift have a chamber at the bottom that is connected to the hydraulic line that originates at the lift pump. Once the lift system is commanded hydraulic pressure is built into this chamber to raise the car. Once the front axle lift is activated, those chambers fill with fluid in around 2.8 seconds and raise the front of the car 40 millimeters—around 1.6 inches.


According to the engineer, no special fluids are required as the system is filled from the factory with standard DOT4 fluid that is available at any parts store. Since the system does not have to be opened up for any type of scheduled maintenance, there are no refills or bleeding required.



Brake fluid usually degrades due to heat so I asked if they had a chance to record any temperatures and if there was any potential for boiling. The engineer said they equipped their track tester with the axle lift type dampers and only saw the temperatures of the dampers rise to around 100 degrees Celsius, which is less than half of the boiling point of DOT4 fluid. So getting anywhere close to boiling the fluid is very unlikely.


They also took advantage of the data available on the CAN-BUS and interfaced the control module for the front axle lift with the GPS location data that the vehicle collects for the navigation system. Using that data they are able to add a unique element to the front axle lift by saving locations where the car needs to go up which should make it more convenient for owners that consistently visit locations that require it.


Right now, the car has to be moving at 24 mph or less to engage the lift, which is plenty for traversing speed bumps in an office parking lot. But the technology is there to use it at higher speeds, so maybe we’ll even see used it in some performance aspect in the future.
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Unread 2019-11-11, 07:51 PM   #330
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Why the LT2 is worthy to be the ‘jewel’ of the mid-engine 2020 Corvette

We get a closer look at the C8's 495-horsepower V8




PONTIAC, Mich. — Chevrolet lovingly refers to the LT2 in the 2020 Chevy Corvette as the “jewel” of the car. We don’t disagree. It’s a pretty engine, far prettier than any other base Small Blocks we’ve seen in Corvettes past. You can gaze upon the engine from the exterior of the car, too, so long as you haven’t bought the Convertible.
Chevy brought us to the GM Performance and Manufacturing Center in Pontiac, Michigan, to give us all the nitty gritty details about its “jewel,” and now we can share them with you. There’s a whole lot to discuss, so let’s get right into what Chevy did to make this engine worthy of living in the heart of the first mid-engine Corvette.
Despite similarities between the LT2 and the LT1, Chevy stresses heavily that “it isn’t the LT1.2. It’s the LT2.” Changing the name of something doesn’t always mean anything, but in this case, the new engine designation makes sense the more you look into it.
Everything started with the architecture of the car. Now that Chevy doesn’t have to worry about forward visibility over a big V8, it can take some liberties on how much space it’s using in the car. Of course, Chevy didn’t change the 6.2-liter displacement, but other things have changed. The intake manifold grew in height and volume, from 11.1 liters to 14.1 liters. All the intake runners are the same length as well, something that wasn’t geometrically possible with the LT1. This means more power at higher RPMs and general flow improvements — Chevy says it’s a 3 percent increase in performance over the old intake manifold.

The camshaft profile changed, as well. Exhaust valve lift is increased by 1 mm to 14 mm, making it exactly the same as the intake lift now. Additionally, Chevy says it increased both the intake and exhaust valve lift duration. These changes allow the added flow to be taken advantage of. This hasn’t resulted in a big, lopey cam sound on idle, though. Instead, Chevy says its new wide-range air-fuel sensor (WRAF) allows for improved idle stability to be smoother than even the LT1 was capable of. Apparently, you can have your cake and eat it, too.
Evacuating the exhaust gases is still massively important, and Chevy says it realized big gains in the LT2’s exhaust system. This system was a complete, ground-up redesign, for obvious reasons. New, fabricated four-into-one exhaust manifolds (that look like aftermarket headers) sweep upwards and into the pipes. The primary runners are “nearly identical in length,” measuring about 330 mm. Chevy claims a 1 percent increase in power over the LT1 header design.
New catalytic converters are further downstream. Chevy says it only uses one split-volume catalyst per bank now instead of the two-converter setup necessary with the LT1. The new WRAF allows for earlier light off of the catalyst, which ends up reducing tailpipe emissions by a whopping 25 percent. The single converter per bank setup also helps packaging and improves exhaust flow.
Chevy says it spent a great deal of effort and time perfecting the exhaust note you hear from the rear of the C8. It even went so far as to tell us they were willing to compromise on power if it meant a better noise coming from those quad exhaust tips. Trust us, the noise is magnificent in the way a Corvette should sound.

The LT1 had an available dry sump oil system, but the LT2’s is far superior. Chevy offered proof of this by saying it only managed to grenade one engine in the development process due to oil pressure loss, versus multiple LT1s facing their death in similar testing. What that means for owners is a more reliable lubrication system for track use.
Chevy says its testing indicated the dry sump system is capable of maintaining oil pressure at sustained lateral acceleration on track up to 1.25 g. You’ll be hard pressed to hit 1.25 g in a corner on any racetrack in a street car, and the only way you’d come close to that in the C8 is with stickier rubber than what Chevy fits at the factory. Far less oil than before is being thrown around and churned up with the revised system, and that’s ideal for track use. It also doesn’t need as much oil as the LT1’s dry sump system did. At 7.5 quarts of oil, it requires 2.25 quarts less, making the total system weight 3.3 pounds lighter.
Despite the C8’s LT2 being taller than the LT1, it sits lower in the car than before. Chevy managed to mount it 25 mm lower than the C7, improving the car’s center of gravity. And even though that Small Block is tucked a little further in there than before, you can still see gorgeous, painted rocker covers and attention to detail throughout the engine bay. The red rocker covers are especially noteworthy — the color is called Edge Red externally, but Chevy refers to them as “Venthan Red.” An engineer with the last name of Venthan designed them, but apparently the marketing team didn’t go for “Venthan Red” as the official name.

One last appearance item we’ll note is the addition of the Tonawanda pride badge. The original Small Block was built in Tonawanda, N.Y. (near Buffalo), and the LT2 is built there, too. Mark Reuss made a last-second decision to incorporate the retro badge onto the LT2 — it was originally used on Corvettes in the 1960s. We’re sure the good folks up in Tonawanda will love it.
So there you have it. The LT2 is capable of 495 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque with the Z51 package, and it’ll hit 60 mph from rest in 2.9 seconds. It’s tough to believe the base Corvette got that much faster overnight, but it did, and we can’t wait to start seeing it on the road once production starts in February 2020.

Featured Gallery2020 Chevy Corvette LT2 engine photos

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Unread 2019-11-12, 03:20 PM   #331
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Why Motor Trend's Dyno Test Of The 2020 Chevrolet C8 Corvette Revealed Huge But Wrong Power Numbers



Back in October, Motor Trend wrote that, during its dyno testing, a 2020 Chevrolet Corvette had made horsepower and torque numbers well above the rated 495 horsepower and 470 lb-ft. The publication concluded then that the car “produces more power than what Chevy claims.” But now in a new followed-up, the team admits that it conducted the testing improperly. Here’s why the figures were so high.



There are far too many factors involved in chassis dyno testing to take results at face value, which is why I hedged in my story about Motor Trend’s Corvette C8 dyno results, which ranged from 478 HP and 536 lb-ft of torque at the wheels to 561 HP and 515 lb-ft at the wheels. Motor Trend assumed a 15 percent drivetrain loss, and thus wrote that those numbers corresponded to roughly 562 HP, 630 lb-ft at the crank, and 660 HP and 606 lb-ft at the crank, respectively.


Clearly, that’s quite a big gap between runs, even if they were run in different gears. Plus, the output is well above the 6.2-liter LT2's official 495 horsepower, 470 lb-ft rating from the Society of Automotive Engineers, whose certification rules require very limited variance in horsepower and torque among production engines.
So, what went wrong? Well, for one, the dyno was set to all-wheel drive mode, which means it assumed the engine had to overcome more inertia than it really did. Motor Trend’s technical director Frank Markus breaks it down in the follow-up story:
Now we’ve learned that our dyno operator selected two dyno settings that were incorrect. One is a key parameter that had yet to be released for the C8 and so was estimated from C7 data. That is road-load horsepower at 50 mph. This factor incorporates friction and aero drag, and it can be measured empirically by conducting coast-down tests, but because dyno-testing the C8 was a last-minute fill-in to our schedule when Real MPG testing proved impossible on our last day with the C8, we had no opportunity to measure it. The dyno operators used 12.6, when Chevrolet has informed us that the correct factor for our Z51 should have been 15.4. But the bigger boo-boo was that the dynamometer was also set to assume all-wheel drive.
These two factors conspired make the dyno believe the Corvette’s powertrain was overcoming way more inertia than it really was, which led to the inflated results. Sadly, there’s apparently no way to virtually “rerun” the test in the computer with corrected parameters, so we simply must get another C8 back and run the test again.

Note that this aligns with what a representative from Mustang Dynamometer—the company that built the dyno that Motor Trend used—told me over the phone about what he thought may have contributed to the inflated numbers.
Markus then discusses in the follow-up story how his team analyzed the acceleration of two Corvettes that had undergone track testing, and used the figures to back out some “road dyno” figures. Assuming 15 percent drivetrain losses between the crank and wheels, Motor Trend determined based on the data that one Corvette seems to make roughly 500 horsepower and the other makes about 465 horsepower.
Markus suggests that there’s quite a bit of uncertainty in these “road dyno” estimates, and that really getting to the bottom of this will require more testing on a proper dyno. Ultimately, his conclusion hedges quite a bit more than the previous article’s confident claim that the red Corvette tested produces more power than Chevy claims. From Motor Trend:
For now, let’s just say we’re convinced our red test car was certainly making every bit of its rated output of 495 hp at 6,450 rpm and 470 lb-ft at 5,150 if not slightly more. Stay tuned as this saga continues.

Something seemed wrong about the previous story’s numbers, and indeed, now we know that it was wrong. I’m glad we’ve got a bit more context behind why.
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Unread 2019-11-14, 09:35 PM   #332
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Is This The Steering Wheel From The 2021 Corvette Z06?









We exclusively revealed the interior of the 2020 Corvette six months before the model was unveiled, and now it appears we’re getting a glimpse inside the 2021 Corvette Z06.


Posted on Reddit and noticed by The Drive, this picture show a handful of Corvette steering wheels that are missing their airbags. However, that’s not the most interesting bit as the steering wheels have carbon fiber inserts, a red center line marker and a unique identification plaque. We can’t make out what it says, but it appears to start with the letter Z.


This naturally raises suspicion that this could be the steering wheel from the Corvette Z06. We can’t confirm that, but the picture comes hot on the heels of a sketch depicting the cabin of the high-performance model.


The steering wheel doesn’t have much in common with the sketch as the latter suggested the wheel would have slimmer spokes, a sportier design and a leather-wrapped lower section. However, it’s important to remember it was simply a sketch and there are some similarities including a red center line marker, a Z06 badge at the bottom and a contrasting upper section that could have been carbon fiber.


Chevrolet hasn’t said much about the Z06, but the automaker recently confirmed the C8.R will have a naturally-aspirated 5.5-liter flat-plane crank V8 engine that produces 500 hp (373 kW / 507 PS) and 480 lb-ft (650 Nm) of torque. That’s barely more than the Corvette Stingray, but the engine was designed to comply with IMSA regulations.


Chevrolet hasn’t confirmed a version of the 5.5-liter V8 will find its way into the Z06, but we’ve heard that from our sources and the automaker admitted the “C8.R shares the highest percentage of parts between the production and race car than any previous generation.”
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