Mirror Finish Polishing ~ 1-816-529-6089 ~ sales@mirrorfinishpolishing.com ~ mirrorfinishpolishing.com For the best rate on home, auto, life or business/commercial insurance call me at 888-959-0955, cell 636-734-1310 or bricehazelwood@weiss-ins.com. Never Done Garage - donewhenimdead.com Peerless Automotive Reconditioning - 1155 W. Dennis Ave, Olathe Ks, 66061 - 913-893-1201 Mark H. Epstein ~ The Epstein Law Firm, LLC ~ 913-396-5123 Wilkes Automotive ~ wilkesautomotive.com ~ 246 Marion St, Olathe, KS 66061 ~ 913-254-7171 Skandalous Inc ~ www.skandalousinc.com DIY Auto Repair Inc ~ www.diyautorepairkc.com ~ 11509 Strangline Rd, Olathe KS 66062 ~ 913-226-3806 Your advertisement here! The Law Offices of Jeremiah Johnson, LLC ~ 104 E. Poplar, Olathe, KS 66061 ~ (913)764-5010 ~ www.kcatty.com - www.johnsoncountydui.com ~ jeremiah@kcatty.com Santa Fe Body, Inc ~ 8717 Lenexa Drive, Overland Park, KS 66214 ~ (913) 894-6090 House of Boost LLC Nude? HouseofHID.com - The #1 source for HID The Print Shop KC 816.200.6694 or Ryan@RMD-Photography.com the art of tyleR ~ http://tyleR.bigcartel.com ~ TYLERcoey.com ~ MUTTtoy.com ~ MUTTtoy@gmail.com W-K Chevrolet Buick Pontiac Cadillac GMC ~ 3310 W. Broadway, Sedalia, MO 65301 ~ 800-382-5088 ~ Cell 660-553-8928 ~ dustin@wkchevy.com ~ www.wkchevy.com

Go Back   KCSR - THE Kansas City Forum > General Forums > Business, Finance

Reply
Thread Tools
Unread 2014-03-05, 08:37 AM   #101
Justin 05 STi
 
Justin 05 STi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: foiling your fun
Posts: 4,735
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 4
Thanks (Received): 100
Likes (Given): 4
Likes (Received): 415
Dislikes (Given): 0
Dislikes (Received): 11
Default

Does anybody have a complete list of all the crypto-currencies out there? I can't keep up.
__________________
- Justin

Quote:
Originally Posted by Weather as a Force Multiplier: Owning the Weather in 2025
In 2025, US aerospace forces can “own the weather” by capitalizing on emerging technologies and focusing development of those technologies to war-fighting applications.
Justin 05 STi is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-03-05, 09:21 AM   #102
69Mach351
 
69Mach351's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: NE KS
Posts: 8,451
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 261
Thanks (Received): 231
Likes (Given): 1780
Likes (Received): 1700
Dislikes (Given): 37
Dislikes (Received): 44
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Casey L View Post
People gotta fuck up a good thing. If everyone wasn't a greedy jackass, bitcoin could have been really cool.
You are putting too much faith in humanity. People will work hard to get rich, and others will find ways to steal it.

People don't like all of the strings attached to standard currency, but some of it is there to protect people too.
69Mach351 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-03-06, 09:50 AM   #103
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default

CEO of bitcoin exchange found dead in Singapore


  • Photo By Rick Bowmer/AP
    FILE - This April 3, 2013 file photo shows bitcoin tokens in Sandy, Utah. The Tokyo bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox that filed for bankruptcy protection blamed theft through hacking for its losses Monday, March 3, 2014, and said it was looking into a criminal complaint.

1 of 21











SINGAPORE (AP) — The CEO of a virtual currency exchange was found dead near her home in Singapore.
A police spokesman said Thursday that initial investigations indicated there was no suspicion of "foul play" in the Feb. 26 death, meaning officers do not suspect murder.
The spokesman said police found 28-year-old Autumn Radtke, an American, lying motionless near the apartment tower where she lived.
Police have so far classified the death as "unnatural," which can mean an accident, misadventure, or suicide.
Radtke's company, First Meta, said it was "shocked and saddened by the tragic loss."
First Meta allows users of virtual currencies such as bitcoin to trade and cash out the currencies. It is one of several such exchanges.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-03-06, 09:53 AM   #104
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default

The Guy Who Invented Bitcoin Is a Reclusive Oddball (Surprise!)


Bitcoin, like all great fantasies, has a compelling creation myth: one Satoshi Nakomoto existed on the internet just long enough to give birth to everyone's favorite cryptocurrency before disappearing for six years. Theories abounded as to the man's true identity. No one could track him down. That is, until Newsweek did just now.
It turns out, according to the Newsweek report, that Satoshi Nakomoto is not an alias for Sinichi Mochizuki, or Wei Dai, or a shadowy European computer collective. Satoshi Nakomoto is Satoshi Nakomoto, and he lives in California and likes to play with trains.
In fact, it turns out, there's not all that much to say about Nakomoto other than that he seems like a pretty unassuming guy who'd rather be left alone. If you want to read the story of how the Intrepid Reporter tracked him down, that's all here (spoiler: emails and phone calls!). But the basics are that Nakomoto is a 64-year old former defense contractor with six kids, a rumpled fellow who'd rather be left alone with his elaborate train models and (assumed) piles and piles of Bitcoin money. Honestly, wouldn't you?
The bigger story, in fact, might be the insane blowback that's been brewing over on Reddit, where commenters are aghast that Newsweek had the temerity to report on a person's identity.
Expand
That's right! The best way to keep the fourth estate in check is threatening their lives. How else will they learn to be afraid of their jobs? You'll find similar (though less violent) reporter-shaming in the comments over at Newsweek.
Anyways, there you go. Even if Satoshi Nakomoto isn't who you thought he was, he's who we really should have expected all along. [Newsweek]
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-03-07, 02:57 PM   #105
Justin 05 STi
 
Justin 05 STi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: foiling your fun
Posts: 4,735
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 4
Thanks (Received): 100
Likes (Given): 4
Likes (Received): 415
Dislikes (Given): 0
Dislikes (Received): 11
Default

More on the story above.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nati...icle-1.1713869

Quote:
The 64-year-old man reportedly sitting on a stash of around $500 million in Bitcoins denied having anything to do with the currency’s creation.
Dorian Prentice Satoshi Nakamoto told the Associated Press over the course of a two-hour interview Thursday that the first he’d ever heard of Bitcoin was three weeks ago when his son said a reporter for Newsweek had contacted him.
“I got nothing to do with it,” he said repeatedly.
“How long is this media hoopla going to last?”
Following Newsweek’s story revealing “the face behind Bitcoin” Nakamoto said he was bombarded with phone calls from the media. Journalists waited outside of his modest home in Temple City, Calif.
Nakamoto, a native of Beppu, Japan, took particular issue with a key part of Newsweek’s article, in which he tells a reporter “I am no longer involved in that and I cannot discuss it."
He claimed to have not said the quote.
"I'm saying I'm no longer in engineering. That's it," he said of the exchange. "And even if I was, when we get hired, you have to sign this document, contract saying you will not reveal anything we divulge during and after employment. So that's what I implied.

"It sounded like I was involved before with Bitcoin and looked like I'm not involved now. That's not what I meant. I want to clarify that," he said.
The reporter of the story, Leah McGrath Goodman, stood by the conversation and her conclusion that Nakamoto was the creator of Bitcoin.
“It’s mystifying to me,” she said on “CBS This Morning.”
“His family told me he would be cagey or deny it.”
Nakamoto did confirm that other details in the article were correct. He said he was born Satoshi Nakamoto and later added Dorian Prentice to his name. He admitted he had worked as a defense contractor.
Since Bitcoin’s debut in 2009 mystery has surrounded the creator — or creators — of the currency, identified only as Satoshi Nakamoto. Prior to Newsweek’s article the name was thought to be a pseudonym.
Nakamoto said he believes someone either came up with the name or specifically targeted him to be the fall guy for the currency's creation.
Newsweek pulled together its thesis on the creator's identity by matching Nakamoto's name, educational history, career, anti-government bent and writing style to the alleged creator of Bitcoin.
The virtual money has become increasingly popular among techies, libertarians, criminals and investors because it allows for exchanges across borders without involving banks, credit card issuers or other third parties. The value of a Bitcoin has fluctuated wildly. In December a single Bitcoin reached an all-time high of $1,200. It was worth around $665 Thursday. The nearest Nakamoto has come to working on a financial system, he said, was a project for Citibank with a company called Quotron, which provided real-time stock prices to brokerage firms.
Nakamoto said he worked on the software side for about four years starting in 1987.
"That had nothing to do with skipping financial institutions," he said.
But he didn’t deny that he had the ability to develop a complex online currency.
“Capability? Yes, but any programmer could do that,” he said.
And this photo is just asking for a meme.

__________________
- Justin

Quote:
Originally Posted by Weather as a Force Multiplier: Owning the Weather in 2025
In 2025, US aerospace forces can “own the weather” by capitalizing on emerging technologies and focusing development of those technologies to war-fighting applications.
Justin 05 STi is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-03-07, 04:29 PM   #106
DIYAutoRepair
**Sponsor**
 
DIYAutoRepair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 4,829
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 25
Thanks (Received): 192
Likes (Given): 71
Likes (Received): 1301
Dislikes (Given): 1
Dislikes (Received): 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin 05 STi View Post
And this photo is just asking for a meme.

__________________
DIY Auto Repair
Fully equipped service bay rental by the hour
We also offer full service automotive repairs along with paint and bodywork
Visit us at http://diyautorepairkc.com/
or call (913) 226-3806

Favorite car from the past (73 Pinto)
Post Thanks / Like - 1 Thanks, 1 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Thanks Prolific thanked for this post
Likes ItalionStallion888 liked this post
DIYAutoRepair is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-03-21, 11:09 AM   #107
Justin 05 STi
 
Justin 05 STi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: foiling your fun
Posts: 4,735
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 4
Thanks (Received): 100
Likes (Given): 4
Likes (Received): 415
Dislikes (Given): 0
Dislikes (Received): 11
Default

It seems Mt. Gox should just stick to trading cards.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/m...0000-bitcoins/

Quote:
Defunct Bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox has found nearly a quarter of the bitcoins it previously reported missing in an old digital file.
The Tokyo-based exchange filed for bankruptcy last month after 750,000 of its customers’ bitcoins and 100,000 of its own bitcoins went missing.
In the course of reviewing its books, the exchange claims to have stumbled on 200,000 bitcoins (worth about $119 million) in an online wallet that had not been used since June 2011 according to a document released Thursday.
Bitcoins are virtual coins-not real coins. And bitcoin wallets are digital files storing the code that allows users to access their bitcoins.
Mt. Gox found the lost wallet on March 7 then reported the discovery to attorneys and moved the bitcoins to offline storage.
The discovery reduces the number of “missing” bitcoins that led to the Mt. Gox shutdown from 850,000 to 650,000.
Also on Thursday, a Chicago U.S. District Court judge presiding over a class action against Mt. Gox gave the plaintiff’s lawyers permission to track 180,000 bitcoins they say were transferred piecemeal into accounts held by Mt. Gox executives.
The Bitcoin community was abuzz with speculation that Mt. Gox was behind the mysterious transfer of 180,000 bitcoins on March 7. Mt Gox’s discovery of the lost wallet with almost the same amount on that same day has further raised suspicions.
“Today in court we got relief … specifically to track the 180,000 bitcoins, which we’ve been monitoring. Hours later, Mt. Gox claimed it “found” these bitcoins … it appears Mt. Gox realized we were close and decided to acknowledge that it owned these 180,000-200,000 bitcoins,” Steven L. Woodrow, a partner at law firm Edelson,” told Reuters. Edelson is representing Illinois resident Gregory Greene who was unable to withdraw his bitcoins from his Mt. Gox account when the exchange abruptly shut down on February 7 . Not long after, Mt. Gox filed for bankruptcy in both Japan and the U.S.
Created in 2009, Bitcoin is a popular virtual currency traded anonymously online without banks acting as middlemen. It isn’t tied to any country or controlled by a central bank, but it can be cashed in for dollars and other official currencies.
__________________
- Justin

Quote:
Originally Posted by Weather as a Force Multiplier: Owning the Weather in 2025
In 2025, US aerospace forces can “own the weather” by capitalizing on emerging technologies and focusing development of those technologies to war-fighting applications.
Justin 05 STi is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-03-21, 01:03 PM   #108
Dave B
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Creating DaveBisms
Posts: 11,886
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 15
Thanks (Received): 132
Likes (Given): 24
Likes (Received): 998
Dislikes (Given): 4
Dislikes (Received): 63
Default

How can anyone put faith in this "currency".
Dave B is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-03-25, 03:53 PM   #109
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Bitcoin Is Property, Not Currency, in Tax System: IRS



A bitcoin retail shop in Hong Kong on Feb. 28, 2014. Photographer: Philippe Lopez/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. government will treat Bitcoin as property for tax purposes, applying rules it uses to govern stocks and barter transactions, the Internal Revenue Service said in its first substantive ruling on the issue.
Today’s IRS guidance will provide certainty for Bitcoin investors, along with income-tax liability that wasn’t specified before. Purchasing a $2 cup of coffee with Bitcoins bought for $1 would trigger $1 in capital gains for the coffee drinker and $2 of gross income for the coffee shop.
The IRS, faced with a choice of treating Bitcoins like currency or property, chose property. That decision could reduce the volume of transactions conducted with the virtual currency, said Pamir Gelenbe, a venture partner at Hummingbird Ventures, which invests in technology businesses.


“It’s challenging if you have to think about capital gains before you buy a cup of coffee,” he said.
Charles Allen, chief executive officer of BitcoinShop Inc., an online marketplace, said he’d like to see the IRS reconsider its decision as virtual currencies develop.


“The implications this decision will have on the Bitcoin ecosystem are far reaching, and will be burdensome for both individual users of Bitcoins, Bitcoin-focused business and for the general adoption of virtual currencies,” he said, adding that Bitcoin users will adapt to the rules.
Technological Breakthrough

Bitcoin, the most popular digital currency, emerged from a 2008 paper written by a programmer or group of programmers under the name Satoshi Nakamoto. The Bitcoin network uses a public ledger to record transactions made under pseudonyms, a technological breakthrough that allows purchases and sales without using a trusted third party, such as Visa Inc. or Western Union (WU:US) Co.
Powerful computers that record the transactions and guard against double-spending the same currency generate new Bitcoins, a process referred to as mining. Mining has made some early Bitcoin adopters wealthy in dollar terms.


Others bought into the currency in early 2013, before its price rose more than 50-fold to peak at $1,200 in early December. A Bitcoin was worth $584.35 at 4:02 p.m., New York time, according to the CoinDesk Bitcoin Price Index. That’s less than 0.3 percent below today’s high.
Stock Investors

The IRS ruling means Bitcoin investors will be treated like stock investors. Bitcoins held for more than a year and then sold would face the lower tax rates applicable to capital gains -- a maximum of 23.8 percent compared with the 43.4 percent top rate on property sold within a year of purchase.
“The Internal Revenue Service’s guidance today provides clarity for taxpayers who want to ensure that they’re doing the right thing and playing by the rules when utilizing Bitcoin and other digital currencies,” Senator Thomas Carper, a Delaware Democrat, said in a statement.


For investors with losses, U.S. tax law allows taxpayers to subtract capital losses from any capital gains. They can also subtract as much as $3,000 of capital losses a year from ordinary income.
If Bitcoin were treated as a foreign currency, ordinary -- not capital gains -- tax rates would apply. Losses would be easier to deduct, however.
Capital Gains

As with stocks, Bitcoin dealers will be subject to different rules that wouldn’t allow for capital gains treatment.


Bitcoin miners will have to report their earnings as taxable income with a value equal to the worth on the day it was mined. If they mine as part of a business, they would have to pay payroll taxes as well.
The IRS will require information reporting similar to how the tax agency receives notification of stock transactions and payments to independent contractors.
“The danger is the creation of an electronic black market, similar to the cash economy,” Joshua Blank, a tax law professor at New York University, said in a December interview. “That’s what the IRS wants to avoid.”
The ruling takes effect immediately and covers past and future transactions and tax returns. The IRS said in the notice that it may offer relief from penalties to people who engaged in transactions before today and can show “reasonable cause” for underpayments or failure to file.
The ruling comes fewer than three months after National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson said the IRS should issue guidance to taxpayers on digital currency transactions.
“It is the government’s responsibility to inform the public about the rules they are required to follow,” Olson, who runs an independent office within IRS, wrote in her annual report to Congress in January. “The lack of clear answers to basic questions such as when and how taxpayers should report gains and losses on digital currency transactions probably encourages tax avoidance.”
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-03-25, 04:41 PM   #110
ItalionStallion888
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Olathe
Posts: 35,335
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 184
Thanks (Received): 260
Likes (Given): 2189
Likes (Received): 1601
Dislikes (Given): 68
Dislikes (Received): 73
Default

haha nice
ItalionStallion888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-09-30, 02:47 PM   #111
Justin 05 STi
 
Justin 05 STi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: foiling your fun
Posts: 4,735
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 4
Thanks (Received): 100
Likes (Given): 4
Likes (Received): 415
Dislikes (Given): 0
Dislikes (Received): 11
Default

The FTC is after the local company Butterfly Labs.

Burn in is a good thing, but profiting from it is another story.

http://www.bizjournals.com/kansascit...gy%29&page=all

Quote:
Butterfly Labs Inc. has been taking consumers' money to build Bitcoin mining machines and then using the machines to turn a profit before shipping them, say three former employees.
Those employees have submitted sworn statements in the Federal Trade Commission's lawsuit against Leawood-based Butterfly Labs. They say the company used a "burn in" process where they would use the machines that customers had already purchased to generate valuable Bitcoins before shipping them out.
"At times, we would have machines burning in for two days before shipment, in order to generate additional Bitcoins," said one former employee. "If we reached the end of the day without additional machines ready to replace them, we held back shipment to keep them burning in all night, and then would ship them the next day."

Butterfly Labs has previously denied those claims, saying they were "irresponsible and false."
The statements at least appear to confirm what many consumers suspected: that extensive shipping delays were exacerbated because Butterfly Labs was using the equipment for its own gain.
The machines Butterfly Labs produces are used to mine Bitcoins, a form of digital currency. Instead of a physical coin, Bitcoin is a string of digital numbers that makes it identifiable.
In 2009, an anonymous Internet user "buried" the coins in a complex mathematical puzzle. Other users can solve blocks of that puzzle and unlock the Bitcoins.
However, each time a new block of Bitcoins is unlocked, the mathematical problem becomes more and more complicated. Bitcoins could originally be unlocked using standard computer processing power, but as the problems became more complex, higher-powered machinery became necessary.
Butterfly Labs creates that machinery. It has built its business on a preorder model, in which customers send in money for machines that are not yet built.
However, the company has been plagued by delayed shipments of those machines from the outset. When customers received them months later than expected, they were often outdated and could no longer keep up with the increasingly complex Bitcoin puzzles. Many customers say they never received their machines at all and struggled to obtain refunds.
Two federal lawsuits have been filed against the company: one class action and one from an individual consumer.
Those cases accuse the company of taking customers' money without delivering on the promised product.
Martin Meissner, who filed in the individual suit, says he preordered a machine for $60,000 that, at the time of purchase, would have netted him 150 Bitcoins every day. By the time he filed the lawsuit in January, that machine would unlock just one Bitcoin a day, he said, and he would be unable to recoup the $60,000 investment.
That suit hinted at the possibility that Butterfly Labs was using the equipment to turn a profit before shipping it out.
However, one employee said that every machine would undergo a "burn in" process to "test" the machine.
"At the time I started working at Butterfly Labs, I was aware that the company had made statements to consumers that its bitcoin mining machines were tested on the bitcoin testnet, which meant that the machines would not produce any bitcoin value while being tested," the employee said in his statement. "From the time I started, I observed that the machines were not in fact tested on the testnet. Instead, I found that they were mining with the machines on the bitcoin network."
The FTC stepped in on Sept. 23, obtaining a temporary restraining order to shut down the company and appoint a receiver.
Lawyers for the FTC are currently in negotiations with lawyers for Butterfly Labs about whether the court should allow the company to reopen as the lawsuit moves forward.
"Butterfly Labs intends to defend our business and our nascent and promising industry," the company said in a statement following the FTC shutdown. "The government wants to shut Butterfly Labs down, and we are not going away without a fight to vindicate bitcoin, our company, and our employees. Our continued focus is our customers and finding a way to continue to deliver products and processing refunds for those who have requested them."
Jim Humphrey of Polsinelli PC and Braden Perry of Kennyhertz Perry LLC are representing Butterfly Labs.
__________________
- Justin

Quote:
Originally Posted by Weather as a Force Multiplier: Owning the Weather in 2025
In 2025, US aerospace forces can “own the weather” by capitalizing on emerging technologies and focusing development of those technologies to war-fighting applications.
Justin 05 STi is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-09-30, 02:49 PM   #112
Justin 05 STi
 
Justin 05 STi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: foiling your fun
Posts: 4,735
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 4
Thanks (Received): 100
Likes (Given): 4
Likes (Received): 415
Dislikes (Given): 0
Dislikes (Received): 11
Default

Also, this is just hilarious.

http://www.kansascity.com/news/busin...le2295832.html

__________________
- Justin

Quote:
Originally Posted by Weather as a Force Multiplier: Owning the Weather in 2025
In 2025, US aerospace forces can “own the weather” by capitalizing on emerging technologies and focusing development of those technologies to war-fighting applications.
Justin 05 STi is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2014-09-30, 03:54 PM   #113
DIYAutoRepair
**Sponsor**
 
DIYAutoRepair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 4,829
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 25
Thanks (Received): 192
Likes (Given): 71
Likes (Received): 1301
Dislikes (Given): 1
Dislikes (Received): 25
Default

I know people that worked there. It is true they would mine Bitcoins with customer machines and were so far behind in shipping them that the machines would be worthless when the customer received them.

No surprise.
__________________
DIY Auto Repair
Fully equipped service bay rental by the hour
We also offer full service automotive repairs along with paint and bodywork
Visit us at http://diyautorepairkc.com/
or call (913) 226-3806

Favorite car from the past (73 Pinto)
DIYAutoRepair is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-02-07, 01:58 PM   #114
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8kua5B5K3I
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-02-07, 05:06 PM   #115
vindianv
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 472
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 6
Thanks (Received): 8
Likes (Given): 7
Likes (Received): 24
Dislikes (Given): 0
Dislikes (Received): 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JDLM View Post
Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8kua5B5K3I
Just watched that yesterday... Fucking crazy...
vindianv is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-02-07, 05:08 PM   #116
BuddyLee
 
BuddyLee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lenexa, KS
Posts: 28,615
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 24
Thanks (Received): 255
Likes (Given): 61
Likes (Received): 1926
Dislikes (Given): 4
Dislikes (Received): 35
Default

Absolutely fascinating. Sad that someone like you or I can't mine for ourselves at a rate that would be acceptable.
__________________
XBL: Buddyl33
PSN: KC_Buddyl33

BuddyLee is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-12-08, 09:46 PM   #117
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default

This Australian Says He and His Dead Friend Invented Bitcoin





A monthlong Gizmodo investigation has uncovered compelling and perplexing new evidence in the search for Satoshi Nakamoto, the pseudonymous creator of Bitcoin. According to a cache of documents provided to Gizmodo which were corroborated interviews, Craig Steven Wright, an Australian businessman based in Sydney, and Dave Kleiman, an American computer forensics expert who died in 2013, were involved in the development of the digital currency.
Wired reported this afternoon that Wright and Kleiman were likely involved in creating Bitcoin. Gizmodo has been following a similar trail for weeks, one that in recent days has included face-to-face confrontations with Wright’s business partners in Sydney and interviews with Kleiman’s closest associates in Palm Beach County, Florida. Gizmodo also obtained confirmation from on-the-record sources that Wright claimed on at least two occasions that he and Kleiman were both involved in the creation of Bitcoin.
In early November 2015, Gizmodo received a series of anonymous tip emails from someone who claimed to not only know the true identity of Satoshi Nakamoto, but who also claimed to have worked for him. “I hacked Satoshi Naklamoto [sic],” the first message read. “These files are all from his business account. The person is Dr Craig Wright.” What followed was a package of email files apparently pulled directly from an Outlook account belonging to Craig Wright, an Australian academic, computer engineering expert, and serial entrepreneur with a litany of degrees and corporations to his name.

Last year, Wright publicly announced his plan to establish the “world’s first Bitcoin bank.” Wright’s LinkedIn page lists him as the CEO of DeMorgan Ltd, a company whose website describes it as “focused on alternative currency, next generation banking and reputational and educational products with a focus on security and creating a simple user experience.” Among DeMorgan’s subsidiaries, also listed on its website, are C01n, a Bitcoin wallet company; Coin-Exch, a Bitcoin exchange; and Denariuz, the aforementioned Bitcoin bank, and one of the top supercomputers in the world.

Several of the emails and documents sent to Gizmodo point to a close relationship between Wright and Kleiman, a U.S. Army veteran who lived in Palm Beach County, Florida. Kleiman was confined to a wheelchair after a motorcycle accident in 1995, and became a reclusive computer forensics obsessive thereafter. He died broke and in squalor, after suffering from infected bedsores. His body was found decomposing and surrounded by empty alcohol bottles and a loaded handgun. Bloody feces was tracked along the floor, and a bullet hole was found in his mattress, though no spent shell casings were found on the scene. But documents shared with Gizmodo suggest that Kleiman may have possessed a Bitcoin trust worth hundreds of millions of dollars, and seemed to be deeply involved with the currency and Wright’s plans. “Craig, I think you’re mad and this is risky,” Kleiman writes in one 2011 email to Wright. “But I believe in what we are trying to do.”
Writing about Satoshi Nakamoto, the Bitcoin originator’s pseudonym, is a treacherous exercise. Publications like the New York Times, Fast Company, and the New Yorker have taken unsuccessful stabs at Satoshi’s identity. In every instance, the evidence either hasn’t added up or those implicated have issued public denials. And then there was Newsweek, whose 2014 story “The Face Behind Bitcoin” is easily the most disastrous attempt at revealing the identity of Satoshi. The magazine identified a modest California engineer, whose birth name was Satoshi Nakamoto but who went by Dorian, as the creator of Bitcoin. The story resulted in a worldwide media frenzy, a car chase, and—after Dorian’s repeated denials and legal threats—a great deal of embarrassment for Newsweek.

All of which means that the real Satoshi Nakamoto is still out there. And although Bitcoin has yet to upset the free market and establish the crypto-libertarian monetary utopia that its boosters once anticipated, the currency doesn’t appear to be going away: its users span the globe, with some analysts predicting 5 million worldwide by 2019. Bitcoin isn’t just some cryptographic niche. It’s an outrageous, brilliant phenomenon concocted by either a single subversive genius or a group of them. The digital currency went from being worth fractions of a penny in 2009 to $1,200 per coin just four years later, built on a network that makes wiring money anywhere as simple as sending an email, and that aims to singlehandedly render the entire global financial system obsolete. If Satoshi Nakamoto revealed himself to the world, he (or they) would be lauded as one of the greatest living minds of computer science—and the target of incessant, global scrutiny.

Craig Wright is not modest. On the website of Panopticrypt, one of his many companies, Wright describes himself as “certifiably the world’s foremost IT security expert.” In a May 2013 blog post titled “Morning Manifesto,” Craig proclaims to himself and the world:
I will make a solution to problems you have not even thought of and I will do it without YOUR or any state’s permission! I will create things that make your ideas fail as I will not refuse to stop producing. I will not live off or accept welfare and I will not offer you violence. You will have to use violence against me to make me stop however.
And at an October 2015 panel discussion with fellow Bitcoin experts (including Nick Szabo, long suspected by many as being the real Satoshi), Wright is asked to introduce himself. “[I do] a whole lot of things that people don’t realize is possible yet,” he replied. When asked by the moderator for clarification, Wright said that “I’m a bit of everything...I have a masters of law...I have a masters in statistics, a couple doctorates, I forget actually what I’ve got these days.” When asked how he got involved in Bitcoin, Wright pauses before replying: “uhh, I’ve been involved in all of this for a long time...I try and stay...I keep my head down.”
Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdvQTwjVmrE

That’s all circumstantial evidence. But the hacked emails and other documents, if authentic, show Wright making repeated claims to being Satoshi Nakamoto over a period of years starting in 2008, before Nakamoto published the now-legendary white paper introducing the world to Bitcoin.

The most persuasive evidence from the apparently hacked account is a message dated January 8th, 2014, which shows Wright emailing three colleagues from satoshi@vistomail.com, the email address that Nakomoto used to regularly communicate with early Bitcoin users and developers. In this thread, with the subject line “Fear of the future,” Satoshi@vistomail.com strategized about lobbying Australian Senator Arthur Sinodinos on the matter of Bitcoin regulation:


The email includes a signature with the name Satoshi Nakamoto and a phone number that belongs to Craig Wright. The reply-to field, which determines where responses to the message will be sent, lists an email address that, according to Google, belongs to Craig Wright. Also included in the cache of messages is this reply from Andrew Sommer, a partner at Sydney-based law firm Clayton Utz, which represented Wright at the time the emails were exchanged:

The hacker-tipster also included multiple PDF files that contain what appear to be a transcript and of a meeting about Bitcoin regulation between Wright, his attorney, and the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), as well as the minutes of a subsequent meeting of the ATO and Wright’s attorney. Wright appears to have been trying to persuade the Australian government to treat his Bitcoin holdings as currency, as opposed to an asset subject to greater taxation. Without this regulatory move, his business interests would be scuttled. During an interlude in one such meeting, Wright makes an oddly casual admission of his identity as Satoshi (highlighting added):

A request to confirm the authenticity of the document sent to Auscript, the transcription service whose logo appears at the top of the file, was denied on the basis of company policy. A request sent to the ATO was also denied on the basis of state confidentiality.

Multiple phone calls to Wright suggest that the material is, at the very least, not fabricated: In an initial call placed in November, he said he “couldn’t talk about” the documents we’d received, or the suggestion that he is Satoshi Nakomoto. On a subsequent call, in which lines from his purported emails were read back to him, an audibly unsettled Wright asked “how did you get that?” and stated “you shouldn’t have that.” He also confirmed that the people CCed in the first email were his attorney, accountant, and a coworker at one of his companies, DeMorgan Ltd. After those two calls, Wright stopped answering the phone, did not respond to emails, and made his Twitter account private.
Andrew Sommer, the attorney, refused to comment on the contents of the email or meeting transcripts, but did confirm that Wright was his client.

Contacted by phone, Wright’s ex-wife Lynn recalled her husband working on Bitcoin “many years ago,” but noted that he “didn’t call it Bitcoin” at first, but rather “digital money.” She also confirmed Wright’s friendship with Dave Kleiman: “I knew Dave...I knew they were friends and they talked about stuff, different things that were happening in the geek world...half the time he was taking I wouldn’t listen, hence the ex.” When asked specifically if Wright was the inventor of Bitcoin, Lynn replied “I’m not going to comment on things that we talked on.”

Ramona Watts is Craig Wright’s wife, a director at his company DeMorgan, and a recipient of Wright’s apparent email from Satoshi@vistomail.com. Reached by Gizmodo at their home in an moneyed suburb north of Sydney and asked about Wright’s role in creating Bitcoin, Watts at first only smiled, shook her head, and began to close the door. When asked if Wright was the inventor of Bitcoin, she smiled coyly again and shut the door.


When reached at his apartment via intercom and asked whether he’d ever received an email from Craig Wright using Satoshi Nakamoto’s email address, John Chesher was Wright’s accountant, a recipient of his Satoshi email, and was present at one of the ATO meetings. Reached at his home and asked about Wright’s role in creating Bitcoin, Chesher responded, “I might’ve...that was a year ago.” When asked if he had ever told the Australian Tax Office that Wright was in possession of a Satoshi-sized Bitcoin sum, he replied, “I may have.”
Ann Wrightson, a former employee of Wright’s who was also present at an ATO meeting, confirmed to Gizmodo that the meetings took place. She noted that she has cut all ties with Wright and Watts and is much happier for it: “Personally, he’s a nice fella, but, um, business-wise, I don’t believe he’s… He’s not a model to aspire to.” We asked Wrightson directly whether Wright had invented Bitcoin, and she demurred: “I’d prefer not to actually incriminate himself or incriminate myself...I’m sure if you’re a reporter, you can find other people to answer that for you.”


When a Gizmodo reporter visited the office of DeMorgan, Wright’s firm, Ramona Watts attempted to steer employees away from speaking to him, as seen above.

A purported email from March 28, 2008, months before Satoshi Nakomoto published the white paper that laid out the Bitcoin framework, appears to show Wright divulging the idea of a “new form of electronic money” to Kleiman for the first time. “I need your help and I need a version of me to make this work that is better than me,” the sender wrote, seemingly presaging the Satoshi persona.
Several years later, after Bitcoin’s value had exploded and the currency had permeated mainstream consciousness — and months before online accounts associated with Satoshi Nakomoto went dark — Wright wrote to Kleiman, with apparent fatigue, about the secrecy around his identity: “I cannot do the Satoshi bit anymore,” he wrote. “They no longer listen. I am better as a myth.”

The hacker also provided a PDF file of what appears to be an unfinished draft of a legal contract between Wright and Kleiman forming a secret Bitcoin trust in the Seychelles, a notorious tax haven in the Indian Ocean. The contract shows Dave Kleiman in receipt of 1,100,111 bitcoin, to be repaid to Craig Wright on January 1, 2020. Several reports, including an oft-cited technical analysis by Bitcoin expert Sergio Demian Lerner, estimate Satoshi Nakamoto’s legendary Bitcoin fortune at around 1 million BTC — a figure that nearly matches the amount in the Seychelles trust. It also lists five PGP keys — files that are used to establish encrypted lines of communication over email — that will be used to manage the trust. Searching for those keys in a public database reveals that one belongs to Wright, one belongs to Kleiman, and two belong to Satoshi Nakamoto.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-12-08, 09:46 PM   #118
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default


The contract also contains a clearly incomplete sentence fragment and several other strange details and inconsistencies. On June 9, the date on the document, one bitcoin was valued at roughly $31, meaning that the million-bitcoin cache would have been worth about $31 million U.S., but the document values the sum at just $100,000. The contract also claims that Wright is facing bankruptcy. According to Australian public records, Wright filed for personal insolvency in 2006 and was denied, but records make no reference to an insolvency petition in 2011.
The contract stipulates that if Kleiman should die, “Dr Wright will be returned shares in the Tulip trust and company 15 months after my death at his discretion.” Perhaps most bizarrely, it includes a similar stipulation for Wright’s death, bequeathing all holdings to Ramona Watts, his wife and colleague, minus a sum that would be used “to show the ‘lies and fraud perpetrated by Adam Westwood of the Australian Tax Office,” an Australian government employee whom he blamed for an unfortunate regulatory ruling against one of his Bitcoin-related companies.


In the contract, Kleiman also vows not to divulge “the origins of the satoshin@gmx.com email,” an email account used by Satoshi Nakamoto to publish the research paper announcing Bitcoin the world.
Patrick Paige and Carter Conrad, who run a Palm Beach County business called Computer Forensics, LLC,in which Kleiman was also a partner, formed their own suspicions about Satoshi’s identity after receiving a string of bizarre communications from Wright following Kleiman’s death in 2013.
Days after their friend and partner died, Paige and Conrad sent an email about his passing to a group of associates who may have only known Kleiman through a computer screen. He was rendered paralyzed from the chest down by a motorcycle crash while working for the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Department in 1995, and spent the final years of his life hospitalized with a deadly infection of the bacterium MRSA. Against his doctors’ recommendations, Kleiman left the hospital and returned to his home after nearly three years of treatment in 2013, Paige and Conrad said. The infection stopped his heart and killed him just weeks later.
Kleiman’s hospitalization only exacerbated what was already an isolated, sedentary lifestyle. “That motherfucker was on the computer nonstop,” said Paige, meaning that many of Kleiman’s relationships were strictly digital, and those friends wouldn’t be immediately aware of his death.

Among the recipients of that 2013 email was Craig Wright, a man whom Paige and Conrad understood to have a casual working relationship with their late friend. Wright and Kleiman had authored a paper together five years earlier on the mechanics of overwriting hard drive data, and they corresponded sometimes about other technological esoterica. So it was a surprise when, days after sending the email, they came across a mournful video about Kleiman on Wright’s YouTube channel. In the video, Wright narrates footage from Kleiman’s various TV appearances, growing increasingly emotional. By the end, Wright is audibly choking back tears. “I’m proud to say I knew Dave Kleiman,” he concludes. “I’ll miss you, Dave. You were my friend, and I’ll miss you.”

Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGmZ7v3TB2Y

Paige didn’t know what to think of the video, but it wasn’t a total shock that Kleiman had maintained such an intense and largely secretive bond with a peer in a different hemisphere. Stranger, however, was a document that Paige and Conrad received in their business mailbox several months later, which bore an Australian return address and informed them that their late partner was no longer legally affiliated with a company called W&K Info Defense Research. The name was totally unfamiliar to both men, and, because the notice didn’t seem to require any action from them, they ignored it.

According to public records, W&K was founded in Palm Beach County in 2011, with Dave Kleiman as its registered agent and Kleiman’s home address as its place of business. In 2014, after Kleiman’s death, it was reinstated as an LLC with a new registered agent, a new place of business, and Coin-Exch, one of Wright’s companies, listed as an “authorized person.” A document purporting to show minutes of a meeting between Wright’s attorney and the ATO, which was provided to Gizmodo by Wright’s apparenthacker, also makes reference to W&K. In the minutes, Wright’s accountant John Chesher calls W&K “an entity created for the purpose of mining Bitcoins,” and states that Wright and Kleiman founded the company together.

The document also shows Chesher speaking about Wright’s spectacular Bitcoin fortune and indicating that Kleiman may have amassed a similar amount. It reads in part:
Quote:
Craig Wright had mined a lot of Bitcoins. Craig then took the Bitcoins and put them into a Seychelles Trust. A bit of it was also put into Singapore. This was run out of an entity from the UK. Craig had gotten approximately 1.1 million Bitcoins. There was a point in time, when he had around 10% of all the Bitcoins out there. Mr Kleiman would have had a similar amount. However, Mr Kleiman passed away during that time.
According to Jeremy Gardner, a longtime Bitcoin investor and co-founder of the College Cryptocurrency Network, it is doubtful that anyone but Satoshi could’ve amassed Bitcoin holdings of that size: “I don’t think anyone comes that close, honestly.” However, Gardner also doubts that even Satoshi would still have that many coins:
Quote:
The only person who could really have a million, and I imagine it’s much less than that, if any at all, is Satoshi. Anyone else who ever came close to owning that much, which I don’t believe ever happened, has long since liquidated a substantial portion of what they held (as the value of their holdings would have have gone up well over 250x).
The only thing zanier than Satoshi Nakamoto’s fabled Bitcoin vault would be the thought of another person possessing “a similar amount”—unless the stockpile was being held in some sort of secret monetary trust.
The next communication that Paige and Conrad received from Wright was stranger still. Emails provided to Gizmodo, the authenticity of which were confirmed by Paige and Conrad, show that in February 2014, 10 months after Kleiman’s death, Wright emailed the pair to tell them about a mysterious project he’d been working on with their friend. As part of this undertaking, Wright wrote, Kleiman had mined an enormous amount of bitcoins—an amount “too large to email.” Wright asked them to ensure that Kleiman’s computers were safe, and to check whether their hard drives contained wallet.dat files, the pieces of software that contain bitcoins and their owners’ account information. On a subsequent phone call with Wright, a baffled Paige asked for more information about the partnership with Kleiman. After that, he said, Wright assumed a clandestine tone. “Can I trust you?”
According to Paige, Wright eventually told him that Kleiman was the creator of Bitcoin. Later, he clarified that the cryptocurrency was invented by a group of people which included Kleiman. If that was true, Kleiman was likely sitting on a fortune when he died in April 2013—even if he were in possession of only half of Satoshi’s fabled million-bitcoin stockpile, that would have been worth about $65,000,000 at the time of his death. Wright made clear to Paige that he wasn’t after the money—he only wanted to make sure that it made its way into Kleiman’s estate and didn’t sit gathering dust in a digital vault.
Paige was stunned by the idea that his friend had achieved such an amazing feat, but when he considered it further, it didn’t fall apart entirely. Paige regularly refers to Kleiman as a genius in conversation, and his expertise in computer security aligns with the skill set that would have been needed to build—or at least contribute to—the bitcoin protocol.
Still, there were major questions. Another 2014 email provided to Gizmodo shows Paige telling Wright that Kleiman mentioned Bitcoin to him just once, and this month said he doesn’t recall the digital currency coming up any other time in his daily conversations with his partner. And according to those who knew him well, Kleiman needed money badly—his house was under foreclosure and he spent nearly three years in a VA hospital before he died. If Dave Kleiman were Satoshi Nakamoto—or one of several Satoshis—wouldn’t he have cashed out at some point?
Shyaam Sundhar, a computer security professional who coauthored an academic paper with Kleiman and Wright in 2008, doubted and expressed dismay at the idea that either man was involved in Bitcoin’s creation. “Our conversations has only been pertaining to HDD project,” he responded to an inquiry via email, referring to their research on hard drive data. “I would hope that what you have stated is mere rumors, since I have never heard any such thing about Craig or Dave.”
Paige and Conrad left the matter unresolved, and Wright stopped calling and emailing them after he made contact with Kleiman’s brother, the executor of Kleiman’s estate. “We knew one day a reporter would come calling,” Paige said. “But we left it at that.”
In November, after being contacted by Gawker, Paige emailed Wright to ask whether he planned to release any information about Kleiman’s—and by extension, his own—involvement in creating Bitcoin. “Not yet. We are in the process of finalising some of the research. I was hoping we could be at the point of release before the reporters started sniffing,” Wright responded. He added in a later email, “When it all comes out, there is no way Dave will be left out.”
While he was alive, Kleiman kept an aluminum-encased USB drive on his person at nearly all times. If there really is a cache of Kleiman’s bitcoins or anything else linking him to Satoshi, Paige said, “I guarantee that drive has some shit in it.” According to Paige, when Kleiman died, his brother, Ira Kleiman, took possession of it.

Ira Kleiman declined to speak on the record about whether he is in possession of his brother’s hard drives. Described by acquaintances as guarded and private, Ira Kleiman also refused to meet with a reporter in person or speak over the phone, opting instead to send dozens of cagey and cryptic emails and SMS messages in an exchange that lasted several days. He claimed that after his brother’s death, Wright contacted him and told him that he and Dave Kleiman were involved in creating Bitcoin, and also alleged to possess documents provided to him by several sources that might corroborate the information provided to Gizmodo by Wright’s apparent hacker. However, Kleiman declined to provide any concrete information about those documents or their sources, and would not answer when asked if he believed that Wright had been telling him the truth.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-12-08, 10:01 PM   #119
mild83
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: cabrini green
Posts: 14,057
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 910
Thanks (Received): 330
Likes (Given): 6277
Likes (Received): 2704
Dislikes (Given): 128
Dislikes (Received): 129
Default

cliffs?
mild83 is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-12-09, 04:46 PM   #120
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Craig Wright, The Man Who Claimed He Invented Bitcoin, Has Erased Himself






As soon as Gizmodo began its investigation into evidence that shows Craig Wright, an Australian academic and serial entrepreneur, claimed to have invented Bitcoin, he started to cover his tracks. After Gizmodo and Wired published separate stories yesterday, Wright’s digital existence has almost completely vanished.

Three days before Gizmodo’s story went up, our correspondent in Sydney approached the tony (if a bit unkempt) suburban home shared by Craig Wright and Ramona Watts, his wife and director of his umbrella company DeMorgan Ltd. When asked about Wright, Watts refused to provide anything but a coy smile. On two separate occasions after that visit, our Australian reporter waited outside the Wright/Watts residence for several hours from dawn to late morning — on one occasion, cars were parked in the home’s driveway, though no one would answer the door. Yesterday, hours before our story was published, those cars were gone and there were no signs of life.


About twelve hours later, reports in The Guardian and Reuters said that Australian federal law enforcement had swarmed the home, rummaging through the belongings inside with particular attention paid to an adjacent garage. Wright’s offices at DeMorgan were also raided:
Three police workers wearing white gloves could be seen searching the garage, which contained gym equipment.
A man who identified himself as the owner of the house, Garry Hayres, told Reuters that Wright and his family had lived there for a year, and were due to move out on Dec. 22 to move to Britain.
Hayres said that Wright had a “substantial computer system set-up” and had attached a “three-phase” power system to the back of the house for extra power.
Police personnel at Wright’s office in nearby Ryde wore shirts tagged “Computer Forensics”. A fellow business tenant at the building, who declined to be named, said Wright had not been seen there in the past week.
The whereabouts of Wright and Watts are unknown, but a neighbor reached by a Guardian reporter makes it seem like they could be on their way out of Australia by now: “A neighbour said a huge container arrived about a month ago, followed by a small remover’s truck in the first week of December.”
Wright’s substantial digital presence is also almost entirely gone. His Amazon review profile, including a curmudgeonly review of Digital Gold: The Untold Story of Bitcoin, is still online. But Wright’s main blog, gse-compliance.blogspot.com, has been deleted entirely, though Gizmodo still retains a full archive of his writings. In it, Wright chronicles (across a span of six years) everything from the joy of the outdoors, to the pains of getting broadband internet in the countryside, to the intricacies of computer cryptography, and the grandeur of his own ego. It was an obelisk built to Craig Wright, and now it’s gone.
His (active, pugnacious) Twitter account is gone:

Wright’s other Google-related accounts on YouTube and Google+ have also been deleted completely, meaning we’ve lost the several inexplicable videos Wright had uploaded of himself going to town on a rowing machine:

Among others.
Gone too is Wright’s personal Facebook account, where he went by the name “Prof. Faustus,” perhaps a reference to the academic of German legend who made a pact with Satan in exchange for infinite knowledge.
His rowdy Quora account, however, is still here for the time being:



But why, if Dr. Craig Wright is one of the greatest living minds in cryptography, why would he flee his own home and shy away from global attention? Maybe he feared media scrutiny (or violent Bitcoin thieves). Or maybe he’s a con man behind one of the longest, most elaborate scams in recent history: transcribed meetings with Wright’s attorney and the Australian Tax Office (ATO), if authentic, suggest that Wright was fighting for favorable conditions under which to repatriate an enormous sum of Bitcoins. If the ATO had reason to believe an Australian citizen was squirreling away hundreds of millions of dollars out of reach of the tax authority, they would not be pleased. If the Australian police had reason to believe he was attempting to deceive the government as part of a plan to evade taxes, they would be doubly displeased — maybe even enough to tear up his house.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-12-09, 05:34 PM   #121
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default

The Strange Life and Death of Dave Kleiman, A Computer Genius Linked to Bitcoin's Origins




About two weeks before his grisly death, there was a change in Dave Kleiman. The formerly generous and lively computer forensics expert became confrontational and bitter. Around that time, Kleiman left the Veteran’s Affairs hospital where he’d been a patient, and called his close friend and business partner Patrick Paige to let him know. “They’ve decided to release you? That’s great,” Paige remembers asking.


“No,” Kleiman responded. “I told the doctors to go fuck themselves.”



Dave Kleiman was an Army veteran, a paraplegic, and a computing wizard occasionally consulted by national TV networks for his expertise in computer forensics and security. According to a monthlong Gizmodo investigation published yesterday, Kleiman may also have been deeply involved with Bitcoin. Documents and on-the-record interviews obtained by Gizmodo and Wired in separate investigations show that Craig Wright, an Australian CEO whose home and office were raided hours after the stories were published, repeatedly claimed in private that he and Kleiman were part of Bitcoin’s creation.



If that’s true, Kleiman seems to have refrained from accessing the very large sum that he would have presumably been entitled to as one of the currency’s architects. When he died, his Palm Beach County home was in foreclosure, and he never moved from the Miami VA Medical Center to a cushier hospital. Who was Dave Kleiman, and why in the world didn’t he cash out?


Kleiman was born in 1967, and, according to an obituary, was adopted by Louis and Regina Kleiman of Palm Beach Gardens sometime after that. (Regina Kleiman is deceased, and Louis, now 94, did not respond to repeated contact attempts.) He told friends that he’d been interested in computers and technology as a child. But even to Paige, who calls Kleiman his best friend, his early life was something of a mystery.


In 1986, Kleiman began serving in the U.S. Army as a helicopter technician. He returned home from the Army in 1990 and began working for the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office several years later. His training officer was Patrick Paige, with whom he later founded a business called Computer Forensics, LLC, in 2012. The men were fast friends. Kleiman gave Paige his first computer, a DOS machine that required command-line input to operate, and would visit Paige at his home to help his daughter access games with it before the two went out on patrol.


“Why the fuck do you do this job, with the knowledge you have?” Paige remembers asking of Kleiman while they worked. It was the early 1990s — the personal computer revolution was underway, and Kleiman’s talent could have yielded a much larger paycheck than what the sheriff’s office was offering. Kleiman always responded that it was his dream to work in law enforcement.


Then there was the 1995 accident, which left Kleiman physically handicapped and wheelchair-bound, and seemed to intensify his interest in computing. (It also didn’t seem to temper his joie de vivre: photos from after his paralysis show Kleiman skydiving with a wild grin on his face and two thumbs pointed defiantly into the air.) He briefly stayed on with the sheriff’s office, working in computer forensics, before leaving to pursue similar work as a freelancer in the private sector.



Over the years, Kleiman’s reputation as a specialist grew. When he attended conferences, said Carter Conrad, the third partner in Computer Forensics, LLC, he was known as “Dave Mississippi” for the seemingly endless string of three-letter certifications that appeared after his name, which recall the singsong mnemonic device for spelling the state’s name. He appeared on CNN and ABC News and coauthored books about perfect passwords, security threats to businesses, and software arcana. As far as security went, Kleiman practiced what he preached: Paige and Conrad recall watching him type in 40- and 50-character passphrases to access his devices and files, and his home wireless network was so secure that Paige found it difficult to get work done while there. “Dude, I can’t load the page,” he said at his office this month, imitating his conversations with Kleiman. “I can’t run this script!”


In the early 2000s, Kleiman began contributing to computer security mailing lists such as those maintained by securityfocus.com and metzdowd.com, the latter of which was also used by Satoshi Nakamoto in the early days of Bitcoin.



In late 2010, a friend went to Kleiman’s home to check on him, and found that Kleiman had fallen in the shower and was unable to get up. That friend called fire rescue, and Kleiman was taken to a nearby hospital. For the rest of his life, because of sores that had become infected with MRSA, Kleiman would leave medical treatment centers only occasionally, usually to assist Conrad and Paige on a job. Otherwise, the pair would bring disks for examination on their regular visits to their friend, and he would plug away at them when he could. After surgeries, of which he had several, Kleiman was known to return to his computer immediately and begin working.


Satoshi Nakamoto presented the framework behind Bitcoin in a paper submitted to the Metzdowd list in 2008, and the first iteration of its software in 2009. If Dave Kleiman truly helped create it, the work would have happened before his hospitalization and the creation of Computer Forensics, LLC, when he was working as an independent contractor. An email provided to Gizmodo seems to show Wright asking Kleiman for help with the paper just months before it was published. “I need your help editing a paper I am going to release later this year. I have been working on a new form of electronic money. Bit cash, Bitcoin...” it reads. “You are always there for me Dave. I want you to be a part of it all.”
Conrad is more skeptical than Paige that their partner was one of the minds behind the internet’s greatest mystery, but both men are adamant that he had the skills to pull it off and the discretion that would have been needed to keep it a secret. The descriptor that Conrad used most frequently in our conversations about Kleiman was “compartmentalized”: he kept the separate parts of his life separate, and if you weren’t already in on his business, he wouldn’t be likely to tell you about it. The descriptor that Paige used most frequently was “genius.”


Kleiman’s exit from the Miami VA hospital in 2013 marked the beginning of what Paige refers to as his “unabomber period.” He holed up in his home and refused most contact from outsiders, including formerly close friends. He was profoundly physically unwell. At one point, he told Paige that he was shivering, fighting off a fever, but would continue to work through it. On another occasion, he said he would call the police if Paige continued calling to check up on him.


Less than a month later, Dave Kleiman was found dead in his home. According to reports provided by the Palm Beach County Medical Examiner Office, the scene of Kleiman’s death was gruesome. His body was decomposing, there were wheelchair tracks of blood and fecal matter, open bottles of alcohol, and a loaded handgun next to him. A bullet hole in his mattress would seem to suggest suicide or foul play, but no ammunition casings were found, meaning he might have fired his gun and cleaned up sometime before dying. The official cause of death is listed as natural, and Conrad remembers hearing that the MRSA had stopped Kleiman’s heart.


The squalor surrounding their partner’s death and final days is the biggest sticking point for both Paige and Conrad about the idea that Kleiman was involved with Bitcoin. Though he never asked for money, both men regularly wrote Kleiman checks in hopes of keeping him afloat after his conditioned worsened.



The documents provided to Gizmodo include what appears to be an unfinished draft of a trust contract showing Wright entrusting Kleiman with 1.1 million bitcoins in 2011. It’s a sum worth hundreds of millions of dollars, but according to the contract, the money was to be returned to Wright down the road. Kleiman’s sense of honor may have kept him from accessing money that he didn’t believe was truly his, even in the direst of circumstances, Conrad said.



While he was alive, Kleiman kept a heavy-duty USB drive on his person at all times. Paige believes it might have been made by the brand Corsair — which boasts that its products are encased in “an anodized aircraft-grade aluminum housing.” If he really did possess a Satoshi Nakamoto-level fortune, it may have been sitting on that drive.



According to Paige, that drive was passed to Kleiman’s brother Ira, who declined to speak on the record about whether he possessed it. But even if the bitcoins were there, recovering them wouldn’t be nearly as simple as pulling files from an ordinary USB drive. Kleiman, the consummate security buff, locked down everything he owned with encryption strong enough that even his security-savvy partners doubt they’d be able to crack it. “If you told me there was a million dollars on Dave’s computer in this room, I wouldn’t even bother trying to look for it,” Paige said. “It would be a waste of time.”
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-12-11, 04:39 PM   #122
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default

The Mystery of Craig Wright and Bitcoin Isn't Solved Yet







On Tuesday, Gizmodo and Wired published the results of separate but parallel investigations into documents that suggested a new candidate for the identity of Satoshi Nakamoto, the pseudonymous creator of Bitcoin. In emails and documents shared with both publications (by an individual who identified themselves to Gizmodo reporters as a hacker) Dr. Craig Wright, an Australian academic and serial entrepreneur, appears to take credit for Bitcoin’s creation in several instances dating back to months before the cryptocurrency was first introduced to the world in 2008. “I need your help and I need a version of me to make this work that is better than me,” Wright appears to write in a 2008 email to Dave Kleiman, an American computer forensics expert who died in 2013. That email is one of several documents in the trove linking both Wright and Kleiman to Bitcoin’s creation.




Since our story was published (along with subsequent profiles of both Wright and Kleiman) things have only gotten weirder. Wright’s home was raided by police due to an investigation by the Australian Tax Office that’s reportedly unrelated to Tuesday’s articles. Wright himself has pretty much disappeared. And several outlets have done even more digging to try and figure out whether Wright and Kleiman were, in fact, closely involved in creating Bitcoin.

Some of those pieces have been excellent. Several of them revealed valuable information about Wright in particular that merits close examination. Few, if any, acknowledge that outside of the document dump, Craig Wright has been telling people for over a year that he was involved in creating Bitcoin. None have proved anything conclusive about whether he was telling the truth. Below, briefly, is the collected evidence that he wasn’t:
  • We now know, thanks to Sarah Jeong at Motherboard, that a set of PGP keys (referenced in the apparent draft of a trust agreement wherein Wright hands off 1.1 million bitcoin to Kleiman) seem to be backdated — created after 2008 and then modified to give the appearance of an earlier origin date.
  • In a similar vein, several reporters have uncovered evidence that Wright was drafting something of a digital revisionist history: he appears to have modified blog posts and social media accounts to insert references to Bitcoin where none had previously existed.
  • A sharp-eyed reader also noted to Gizmodo that according to registration information, a domain shown in one of Wright’s apparent emails to Kleiman was created months after March 2008, the date on the message, which could indicate a forgery. (The URL—“information-defense.com”—appears on a list of domains pending expiration in May 2008, pointing to the likelihood that its registration lapsed and was later renewed, which would explain the discrepancy.)
  • Charles Sturt University, where Wright claimed on his LinkedIn account to have obtained a PhD, said in a statement that he received two Master’s degrees but not a doctorate. And the existence of two supercomputers that Wright’s company, Cloudcroft, claimed to own, is under question.
  • Finally, two days after the articles were published, an email appearing to originate from a known Satoshi account was posted to the bitcoin-dev mailing list. “I am not Craig Wright,” it read. “We are all Satoshi.” But as the Guardian andothers have pointed out, the likelihood that that email was forged is not small.
All of the above are great reasons to question and dig further into Wright’s apparent link to Satoshi Nakamoto. Other supposed proof against the connection—such as the opaque claim that his “intellectual signature” does not match Satoshi’s, by a Cornell professor who claims to know a stronger candidate for the Bitcoin creator’s identity—is far less convincing.


If Craig Wright was not in fact involved in the origin of Bitcoin, the likeliest explanation for the documents provided to Gizmodo and Wired is that they were carefully forged with the intent of making it seem like he was. But what the forgery theories tend to leave out is that Wright himself has claimed repeatedly to be one of Bitcoin’s inventors. In 2014, roughly 10 months after Dave Kleiman’s death and nearly two years before the documents were leaked to Gizmodo, he reached out to Kleiman’s brother and business partners to tell them that he and Kleiman were among the creators of the cryptocurrency. A February 2014 comment on a TechCrunch post about Bitcoin indicates that Kleiman’s 94-year-old father had also received information about his son’s apparent involvement with the invention. Furthermore, Wright’s ex-wife Lynn recalled to Gizmodo that he was working on and talking about “digital money” many years ago.


Craig Wright acts in the manner of someone who either believes that he invented Bitcoin or badly wants someone else to believe it, and he’s been acting that way for a long time. If he is not Satoshi, what’s going on here? Either Wright was conning someone into believing that he was the inventor, and the leak was engineered by his enemies, or he engineered the leak himself in some bizarre attempt at self-promotion.
Scenario 1: The long con and the extortion plot

Was the leaker, as put forth by a cryptocurrency insider who claimed to have been in contact with Wright’s friends and family, an anonymous extortionist with a vendetta against Wright? It’s absolutely possible—the leaker provided very little information about their identity to Gizmodo and stopped responding to emails days after first reaching out—but that possibility is not an effective argument against the leak’s authenticity.



If Wright were being targeted by someone with a cache of fake documents, he had many opportunities to argue his case and failed to take them. Over the course of a month, Gizmodo reporters had two telephone conversations with him, sent him several emails, and showed up multiple times to his home and place of business. He was evasive throughout and made no attempt to correct the line of questioning connecting him to Satoshi Nakamoto. If he were being targeted by someone with a cache of real documents, his behavior is fully understandable. By its nature, blackmail tends to work best when the information you have is true.
Scenario 2: The self-leak

That leaves us with the idea that Wright faked the documents himself, either because he wanted to con someone into thinking he was Satoshi or because he had deluded himself into believing that he was. Chris McCardle, an attorney who has been battling Wright in court for years, characterized him recently as someone who was living in “his own fantasy world.” “I don’t know whether Craig Wright started Bitcoin,” McCardle added to the Australian, “but I *believe Craig Wright believes he started Bitcoin.”


If Wright is running a hoax himself, it is an incredibly elaborate one that’s taken him years to carry out. It would mean that when he called Kleiman’s closest associates, who were likely still mourning his death, he was setting up a revelation to journalists that would not arrive for another 21 months. He would have instructed his ex-wife to tell reporters that he’d had a longstanding interest in digital money, and his associates to withhold simple information that could clear his name of any Satoshi connection.


The closest thing in the document dump to a smoking gun—an apparent email from Wright using satoshi@vistomail.com, an account known to belong to the Bitcoin inventor—was sent to Ramona Watts, Wright’s wife and business partner; Andrew Sommer, his lawyer; and John Chesher, his accountant. If the email is real, it should be easy to verify its authenticity by checking their inbox archives. If the forger wanted to ensure that his fakes were difficult to disprove, why wouldn’t he make the recipient Dave Kleiman, whose email accounts presumably became inaccessible forever when he died in 2013?


It seems clear from the raids on his home and office that Wright is in some sort of real trouble with Australian tax collectors. Falsely placing himself at the center of one of our era’s greatest mysteries would be a strange gamble for a man who you’d think would want to keep a low profile.
As both Gizmodo and Wired acknowledged in our original reports, there are many unanswered questions about Craig Wright, and no unassailable proof that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. But none of those questions come close to disqualifying him, either. Each of the scenarios for Wright’s apparent Bitcoin involvement is stranger than the last, and none of them adds up completely. And if the evidence uncovered in our investigation were the product of a deception, the scale of the lie was, as Wired put it, “practically as ambitious as bitcoin itself.”
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2015-12-12, 01:18 AM   #123
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Bitcoin miner KnC is planning another four-week datacenter build-out

When KnCMiner takes delivery of a new generation of bitcoin mining chips, it wants them up and running as quickly as possible


A technician maintains bitcoin mining rigs in KnCMiner's datacenter in Boden.
Credit: KnCMiner


Four weeks: That's how long Swedish bitcoin mining company KnCMiner takes to build a new datacenter, from breaking ground to beginning operations.

"The longest part is signing the agreement," CEO Sam Cole said Friday, announcing plans for another 20MW datacenter in the Swedish town of Boden, part of the "Node Pole" technology cluster near Lulea where Facebook built one of its most energy-efficient datacenters.

One reason for the speed is that KnC doesn't have to worry about air conditioning. The Node Pole is on the edge of the Arctic Circle, where cooling can be as simple as opening a door.

It's barely six months since KnC announced its last datacenter, which is already up and running.

KnC employs a continuous construction process for its datacenters: Staff began installing and powering up the first racks while contractors were still bolting together prefabricated parts for the adjoining section.
The ground hasn't been cleared for the next one yet -- "There are trees there now," Cole said -- but he's confident it will be ready by March, or perhaps February -- four weeks after the chips are delivered for the machines that the datacenters will house.

"In our game, timing is everything," he said.

KnC's game is bitcoin mining, the process of validating successive blocks of data in the blockchain, the distributed ledger used to record bitcoin transactions, by calculating a cryptographic hash. Miners are rewarded with bitcoins for each block successfully validated, which means the more processing power they can apply to the task, and the more efficiently they can operate it, the greater the reward.
As demand grew for mining capacity, or the computing power dedicated to processing the blockchain, KnC hit on the idea of developing custom chips to speed up the hashing operation. It combined these application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) into mining rigs and sold them to would-be bitcoin miners, then later began hosting and operating the rigs itself. Earlier this year it introduced a new generation of mining chips built with a 16-nanometer, 3D FinFET production process more often used to make high-performance ARM processors for mobile phones.
Bitcoin mining is a numbers game. The bitcoins that can be won aren't "free money," as there's a capital cost involved in building the equipment, whether you have one processor core working on it or millions, and operational costs, primarily electricity.


Miners seek to optimize the performance of their rigs, measured in hashes per second, and reduce their energy consumption. When KnC takes delivery of a batch of new, more efficient ASICs, it wants to get them up and running as soon as possible.

The new datacenter, like the last one, will have a power consumption of 20MW, but Cole won't say how many hashes per second it will perform.

"The hashing capacity is commercially sensitive," he said, and depends on many factors, including the design of the mining chips and the quality of the batch used.

The computing resources dedicated to bitcoin mining worldwide have a capacity of about 633 petahashes per second, and about 5 percent of those resources are controlled by KnC, according to blockchain.info, which provides statistics on bitcoin transactions.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2016-05-02, 08:55 AM   #124
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Craig Wright Reveals Himself as Bitcoin Creator Satoshi Nakamoto



Image: AP The Australian businessman Craig Wright has published a blog post in which he claims to be Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto.

Wright shared these claims with three media outlets (the BBC, The Economist, and GQ) along with technical demonstrations designed to prove that he is the person who developed the concepts on which Bitcoin is built. The BBC claims that he has “provided technical proof to back up his claim using coins known to be owned by Bitcoin’s creator.”
Late last year, Gizmodo was provided with a cache of documents linking Craig Steven Wright, who was at the time based in Sydney, with the development of the digital currency. Dave Kleiman, an American computer forensics expert who died in 2013, also appeared deeply involved in Bitcoin’s creation, although his role was unclear based on the documents Gizmodo received and our subsequent reporting.

In a blog post on his website, Wright now explains:
[A]fter many years, and having experienced the ebb and flow of life those years have brought, I think I am finally at peace with what he meant. If I sign Craig Wright, it is not the same as if I sign Craig Wright, Satoshi...
Since those early days, after distancing myself from the public persona that was Satoshi, I have poured every measure of myself into research. I have been silent, but I have not been absent. I have been engaged with an exceptional group and look forward to sharing our remarkable work when they are ready.
Satoshi is dead.
But this is only the beginning.
His florid admission references the Jean-Paul Sartre quote: “If I sign myself Jean-Paul Sartre it is not the same thing as if I sign myself Jean-Paul Sartre, Nobel Prizewinner.”
After Gizmodo and Wired published stories about Wright last year, he quickly removed much of his digital presence from the internet. He now appears to have become a little less shy.
People closely involved with Bitcoin—including economist Jon Matonis—have told the BBC that they believe Wright’s claims to be accurate.
The Economist, however, approaches the news with a little more caution. After reviewing documents and interviewing Wright, it explains that he “could well be Mr Nakamoto, but that important questions remain. Indeed, it may never be possible to establish beyond reasonable doubt who really created bitcoin.”
Attempts to unmask the creator of Bitcoin in the past have proven unsuccessful. The New York Times, Fast Company, and the New Yorker all tried and failed before last December. Though perhaps the biggest foul-up was by Newsweek, which claimed in 2014 that Dorian Nakamoto was the man behind the crypto-currency. He wasn’t, though his birth name was Satoshi Nakamoto.

Documents linking Wright to Bitcoin, along with a public admission of his alter-ego and a demonstration of technical proof, certainly seem to be the most compelling evidence so far about the true identity of Satoshi Nakamoto. Speaking to the BBC, Wright explained why he’d chosen to reveal himself:
“I have not done this because it is what I wanted. It’s not because of my choice... I really do not want to be the public face of anything... I would rather not do it. I want to work, I want to keep doing what I want to do. I don’t want money. I don’t want fame. I don’t want adoration. I just want to be left alone.”
Intriguingly, he refused to tell The Economist where the name “Satoshi” comes from, explaining that “some things should remain secret.” Even if Wright is definitely the father of Bitcoin, then, there are some things we may never know.
Correction 8:50 am: An earlier version of this post incorrectly suggested that cryptographer Hal Finney told the BBC that Wright’s connection to Bitcoin was legitimate. Only economist Jon Matonis did.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 2016-11-30, 11:10 PM   #125
JDLM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lenexa
Posts: 156,959
Post Thanks / Like
Default

Bitcoin Exchange Ordered to Give IRS Years of Data on Millions of Users






Photo: Getty
On Wednesday, a federal judge authorized a summons requiring Coinbase, America’s largest Bitcoin service, to provide the IRS with the records of every user who traded on the site between 2014 and 2015. Covering the identities and transaction histories of millions of costumers, the request is believed to be the largest single attempt to identify tax evaders using virtual currency to date.


As a so-called “John Doe” summons, the document targets a particular group or class of taxpayers—rather than individuals—the agency has a “reasonable basis” to believe may have broken the law. According to The New York Times, the IRS argued that two cases of tax evasion involving Coinbase combined with Bitcoin’s “relatively high level of anonymity” serve as that basis.

“There is no allegation in this suit that Coinbase has engaged in any wrongdoing in connection with its virtual currency exchange business,” said the Justice Department on Wednesday. “Rather, the IRS uses John Doe summonses to obtain information about possible violations of internal revenue laws by individuals whose identities are unknown.”






In a statement, Coinbase vowed to fight the summons, which the company’s head counsel has previously characterized as a “very, very broad” fishing expedition.
“We are aware of, and expected, the Court’s ex parte order today,” wrote a Coinbase spokesperson on Reddit. “We look forward to opposing the DOJ’s request in court after Coinbase is served with a subpoena.”
In 2014, the IRS released a notice clarifying that virtual currencies like Bitcoin are property and subject to tax laws as such. Among other things, this means taxpayers are required to report profits made through trading them as taxable income.
__________________

AW|E90|ZSP|ZPP|2XA|NAV|HID| ///M | BMS |JB4 | VRSF



JDLM is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

 

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:31 AM.


Design By: Miner Skinz.com
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.13.37
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright (c) 1993-2012, KCSR.org