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Unread 2016-11-17, 11:47 PM   #26
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2018 Toyota C-HR brings a dose of Scion to a new generation













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Toyota has no plans to leave behind the funky crossover segment, even though Scion is now closed. Enter the 2018 C-HR, which debuted in US-spec Thursday at the Los Angeles auto show.

We've seen the styling many times before, thanks to multiple concepts and more recently the production-ready variant at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show. The interior also remains the same as seen before, with the dashboard and controls slightly angled toward the driver.

While other parts of the world will have two engines choices to choose from – a 1.2-liter turbocharged unit and a hybrid model with a 1.8-liter four-cylinder motor – the vehicle will be sold, at least in the beginning, with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder in the US. The engine is matched to an all-new CVT and sends 144 horsepower and 140 pound-feet of torque to the front wheels. On paper, the C-HR lines up with the Honda HR-V and Mazda CX-3.

The C-HR hits dealerships next spring and will come in XLE and XLE Premium trims. Standard features on the XLE include a leather steering wheel, heated mirrors, dual-zone climate control, and an auto-dimming rear-view mirror. The XLE Premium adds heated front seats, blind-spot monitor, puddle lamps on the side mirrors that project "Toyota C-HR" onto the ground, and more. The CUV, regardless of trim, comes with a seven-inch touchscreen display and the automaker's Toyota Safety Sense P, which boasts radar cruise control, pedestrian detection, lane departure warning, and more, as standard.
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Unread 2016-12-14, 02:36 PM   #27
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Toyota C-HR to bank on design, driving dynamics to conquest customers







The Toyota C-HR. Hiroyuki Koba, general manager of the C-HR, says its polarizing design is key to Toyota's love-it-or-leave-it formula for turning heads and breaking the brand's reputation for boring cars. Photo credit: HANS GREIMEL


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TOKYO -- Toyota was late to the subcompact crossover party, but it wants to take a big bite out of the segment with the bold design and driving dynamics of its in-your-face C-HR.
And if the squat, muscular crossover looks too aggressive and wild, all the better.
Hiroyuki Koba, general manager of the C-HR, said its polarizing design is key to Toyota’s love-it-or-leave-it formula for turning heads and breaking the brand’s reputation for boring cars.
Toyota’s entry, which went on sale in Japan on Wednesday, aims to conquest more than the average 20 percent new-to-Toyota customer ratio achieved by its nameplates, Koba said.
Its distinct looks -- starting with is oversized wheels, bulging fenders and radically sloped rear window -- will get it noticed and help drive sales because market research shows design is the top priority of customers shopping in this segment, Koba said at a Tuesday launch event.
“If you like it, you love it. If you don’t like it, you never will,” said Koba, its chief engineer. “We are looking for customers who disliked Toyota before. We want to turn their heads.”
Toyota expects to sell 170,000 C-HRs a year globally, though Koba declined to give a breakdown for specific markets. The vehicle hits the U.S. next spring and will be sourced from Toyota’s plant in Turkey, which is expected to churn out 100,000 units a year.
“If you like it, you love it. If you don't like it, you never will,” says Koba.

A plant in Japan will manufacture another 70,000, mostly targeting the domestic market.
The C-HR goes up against early entrants in the fast-growing subcompact crossover segment, such as the Honda HR-V, Nissan Juke and Subaru Crosstrek. U.S. sales of subcompact crossovers surged 31 percent to 455,771 vehicles through November in a flat overall market.
But Koba said the C-HR’s responsive handling puts it more in the league of the Ford Focus and Volkswagen Golf. Indeed, the Japanese carmaker undertook early development of the C-HR in Europe to better tune its driving dynamics to Europe’s winding roads and high-speed highways.
Prototypes have been tested around Germany’s Nurburgring race circuit since 2013.
“It offers crisp clean driving like a hatchback,” Koba said.
The C-HR is being positioned as a global nameplate and will be sold in more than 100 markets. But Japan and Europe are expected to be the volume leaders, Koba said. Hybrid variants, using essentially the same system as in the Prius, will be offered in Europe and Japan.
The U.S. won’t get the hybrid for two reasons, Koba said. The first is that cheap gasoline prices make fuel-efficient hybrids a harder sell. The other is that the C-HR was initially planned as an offering for the now defunct, youth-oriented Scion brand, and a hybrid was deemed too pricey.
Now that it is being badged a Toyota, the company may reconsider that, Koba added.
The C-HR is the second nameplate, after the Prius, to ride on the Japanese company’s new modular Toyota New Global Architecture, or TNGA, platform. Most of its underpinnings are shared with the Prius, though Toyota tweaked the undercarriage and suspension in places.
Koba acknowledged that the company wanted to bring a subcompact crossover to market earlier to ride the boom. But Toyota had to wait until the TNGA platform was ready.
“We wanted to be somewhat earlier,” Koba said. “But because we were working in parallel with the TNGA platform development, there was some time required and there was a delay.”
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Unread 2017-03-08, 12:33 PM   #28
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2018 Toyota C-HR First Drive Review

Living in Two Different Worlds



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You can tell just by looking at it. The C-HR was supposed to be a Scion, right up until Toyota put the brand out of its misery. Like the rest of the survivors, it found asylum in Toyota, but it remains firmly a child of two worlds. As a result, it’s completely unsure of what it wants to be, and it shows.
Start with the name. C-HR stands for “Coupe-High Rider,” and it’s neither. The body side is styled to make it look like a coupe, with all the associated packaging drawbacks. The designers attempted to hide the rear door handles up near the roofline for a cool effect—but the location is inconvenient, especially for the children of the hip millennial families Toyota hopes will buy this thing. The kids won’t be able to see out of it, either, because like many a coupe, the rear side windows are tiny, up high, and way far forward of the rear seat, creating a cavelike environment in back. The interior also only comes in black, which doesn’t help.
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It’s not much of a high rider, either, being just 2 inches taller than a Yaris and only available in front-wheel drive. It has slightly less passenger space than a Yaris but a bit more cargo space.
View all 90 Photos
Read about the C-HR’s competitors in the Big Test comparison of 2015-2016 subcompact crossovers HERE.




Like its rival Nissan Juke, the C-HR will look cool and appeal to the kids. But without Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, the Toyota is something of a tough sell. Especially when you consider this brand-new product doesn’t have Toyota’s latest Entune infotainment system but rather an aftermarket-looking head unit with a similar user interface. More USB ports would help the case.
It’s not a techno wonder, but maybe the sporty handling could win them back. After all, it was developed on the Nürburgring. And despite its econobox roots, it really does handle tight turns quite nicely, with little body roll and excellent control. This TNGA platform is a wonderful advancement for Toyota’s vehicle dynamics. It goes around a corner much faster than you’d think, but nothing about the experience inspires you to drive the car hard. Performance without passion? Yes, it’s possible.
Responsibility lies at the feet of the powertrain, which is undersized and overstressed. The all-new 2.0-liter four-cylinder makes just 144 hp and 139 lb-ft of torque, which might be OK in a Mazda CX-3. But the front-drive C-HR weighs 300 pounds more than an all-wheel drive CX-3. How and why a vehicle this small weighs 3,300 pounds is a mystery, but regardless of where it comes from, it’s an albatross.









Along with the weight, there’s the matter of the CVT. Not all CVTs are bad these days, but this one is a throwback to when they were. In-gear acceleration, like passing, is painfully slow. If it hits 60 mph in less than 10 seconds, I’ll demand a recount. If you’re trying to find a hole in traffic, you’ll step on the gas, count two, listen to the engine wind up to 5,000 rpm, count another two, then feel the car begin to accelerate—slowly. On the plus side, it gears itself aggressively at a stop, so zipping around a busy city from stoplight to stoplight is no problem. As long as you don’t need to quickly dart around an 18-wheeler plodding along at 45 mph, the acceleration is perfectly adequate. That’s where Toyota expects most of these will live, and urban dwellers will find little to complain about.
Except maybe the noise. Wind noise, tire noise, engine noise, whatever the source, it’s rather loud inside the C-HR. At least the fuel economy is competitive at 27/31/29 mpg city/highway/combined, per EPA estimates.

View all 90 Photos
Then there’s the steering. It’s very quick for a crossover and a little heavy, which should impart a feeling of sportiness. It certainly changes direction quickly, but the steering has a dead spot on center then suddenly throws you into the curve when you turn the wheel past 5 degrees in either direction. Driving smoothly takes practice. You learn to make very small, smooth, and deliberate inputs to account for the dead zone.
Toyota attempts to increase the fun factor with a Sport mode—if you can unbury the command from the instrument cluster screen. It makes the throttle touchier and the steering heavier, but it doesn’t give it any more feel. The CVT is supposed to act like a seven-speed automatic, too, but it wasn’t noticeable.









It’s not all bad, though. The C-HR, even in its base form, is well equipped. Every C-HR gets the full-boat Toyota Safety Sense package of active safety features, including automatic high-beams, lane departure warning, lane keeping assistance, and automatic emergency braking with the ability to detect both cars and pedestrians. They also all get adaptive cruise control and a backup camera standard, though for some odd reason they put the camera image in the rearview mirror rather than on the also-standard 7.0-inch infotainment screen. The adaptive cruise control works in stop-and-go traffic, but you have to touch the throttle every time the vehicle comes to a complete stop, and even the shortest following-distance setting leaves plenty of gap for frustrated commuters to cut you off. Other sweet standard features: 10 airbags, dual-zone automatic climate control, Bluetooth, an electric parking brake with a hold function, 18-inch alloy wheels, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, sporty and comfortable bucket seats, and a cargo cover. All of that for just $23,460.
For about two grand more, you can step up to the Premium model, the only real option on the C-HR. With that, you get keyless entry and push-button start, heated seats, a blind-spot monitoring system, and rear cross-traffic alert.









Neither trim offers a sunroof, but you do get diamond impressions in the headliner to match other diamond-patterned interior panels, such as the kick plates and door trim.
The only other real option is the R-Code, which matches a white-painted roof with your choice of a red, blue, or aquamarine body, the latter of which is exclusive to R-Code models.
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Unread 2017-03-08, 12:34 PM   #29
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The 2018 Toyota C-HR is a bit of a contradiction. It seeks to appeal to younger buyers with futuristic rally-racer styling, but it’s missing the smartphone integration millennials demand. It was tuned on the Nürburgring, but it’s slow and passionless to drive. It carries all the disadvantages of a coupe body style and little of the functionality of a crossover. It is, however, an excellent value and will function very well for city dwellers who aren’t road warriors. The C-HR is trapped between two missions—trying to be a sports car and a rolling smartphone at the same time—and it achieves neither. At its heart, it’s the Corolla of crossovers, and for a lot of folks, there’s nothing wrong with that.













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Unread 2017-03-08, 01:00 PM   #30
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The front is horrid and the back looks like a copy/paste from a new civic.
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Unread 2017-08-31, 03:06 PM   #31
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Toyota teases C-HR Hy-Power hybrid concept for Frankfurt











The concept is said to hint at the future of Toyota's hybrid powertrain lineup across all core models.
Toyota has released a teaser image for the C-HR Hy-Power hybrid concept.





Penned by the company's European Design Center, the concept presumably previews a hybrid powertrain for the production C-HR and introduces a new trademark for the electrified powertrain.

"Its intention is to emphasize C-HR's emotional and powerful look, while hinting at future expansion of Toyota's hybrid powertrain line up within its core models," the company says.

The hybrid variant is expected to borrow powertrain technology from the fourth-generation Prius, which boasts a combined 121 horsepower and 106 pound-feet of torque from its gasoline/electric system.

Additional details are being kept quiet ahead of the C-HR Hy-Power's official debut in Frankfurt.
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Unread 2017-09-13, 10:49 PM   #32
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Toyota’s New C-HR Hy-Power Concept Offers More Bang, Adds Orange Details





The new Toyota C-HR Hy-Power concept has been unveiled and -as the name suggests- comes with more hybrid power and a brightly-colored exterior.

Toyota created the design study to explore the possibility of a higher powered hybrid version of the C-HR, since the regular C-HR Hybrid has proven to be massively popular with customers in Europe, attracting more than 75 percent of them.

Toyota’s designers cleverly avoided using any extra elements on the bodywork, working instead on “amplifying the inherent qualities of the production car’s design”, meaning new color combos, finishes and detailing.

The lower front lip spoiler, the area above the Toyota badge on the front of the car and the wheel arch trims are now finished in gloss black, with headlights, window frames and the 20-inch alloys finished in dark chrome. Striking contrast is provided by the ‘Burning Orange’ finish on the front pillars, door mirror housings and the accent bar within the headlamps.

A matching orange finish is also found on the lower front grille, with the concept’s roof wrapped in an also orange “diamond-cut” film. The interior follows the same theme on the dashboard, door cards and the leather quilted seats which featuring orange headrests and bolsters.

In a rather unusual move, Toyota hasn’t shared any details on the “higher powered” hybrid powertrain of the C-HR Hy-Power concept, only saying that it offers more power and performance than the regular 122hp hybrid version. What it does say however is that the company is planning to further expand its hybrid models, with details to be revealed in early 2018.

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Unread 2017-11-26, 10:16 PM   #33
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Quick spin: 2018 Toyota C-HR [Review]







Toyota's in the baby crossover game.
When Scion showed its C-HR Concept at the L.A. Auto Show in 2015, it was already widely speculated that Toyota's youth-focused sub-brand was not long for this world. Indeed, it was essentially just a matter of weeks before Scion's demise was confirmed by company executives. Fortunately, the nose job that made the C-HR Concept a Scion (rather than a Toyota, as it was shown overseas) didn't set the company back much in the R&D department. With all the proper badges slapped on it, the subcompact crossover was ready to go.
What is it?
As mentioned previously, the C-HR is a subcompact-based CUV based on Toyota's new global architecture platform (in this case, the small-car variant). It's powered by a 144-horsepower, two-liter engine mated to a continuously variable transmission. Unlike some crossovers in this segment (and Toyota's larger RAV4 compact), it's exclusively available with front-wheel drive.
What's it up against?
The C-HR competes with an ever-growing segment of baby crossovers, from Honda's HR-V to Mazda's CX-3 and everything in between. Most of its competitors are available with optional all-wheel-drive, a feature which Toyota's offering conspicuously lacks.
If a small footprint and utility matter more to you than ground clearance, the C-HR's cargo area is on par with most compact hatchbacks, such as Toyota's own Corolla iM, the Ford Focus Hatchback, Chevy Cruze Hatchback, Volkswagen Golf and others.
How does it look?
That the C-HR was intended to be a Scion in the U.S. market is no surprise. Like the aforementioned Corolla iM (also previously sold as a Scion), its styling is on the funky side. Our tester sports a contrast-color paint job on the roof (part of the "R-Code" appearance package), which gives it even more character.
It's a bit much, we'll admit, but we don't hate it. It's not as subtle as a Mazda CX-3 (which one could easily mistake for a regular old 3 Hatchback from a distance) or as cleanly chiseled as, say, a Buick Encore, but it's interesting in a good way. As busy as the design may be, it works better than the rather dowdy Honda HR-V's and looks less upright and ungainly than the Chevrolet Trax. All in all, we'll call that a win.
And the inside?
In here, it's plainly obvious that the C-HR was built with an entry-level customer in mind. There's little contrast in the trim and just about every piece is relatively smooth (and correspondingly hard) plastic. Touch points (including the arm rests and steering wheel) are much better, thankfully, and we like the texture on the C-HR's seats.
We found the in-mirror rear-view camera felt like a cheap dealer add-on rather than an OEM part, especially in light of the fact that a seven-inch infotainment screen dominates the area above the center stack. Why run the rear-view camera to a tiny display in the mirror when this huge piece of real estate sits essentially unused, blinking Bluetooth status updates rather than showing the surroundings?
There are a handful of other bizarre choices as well. The C-HR's auto high-beam toggle is a button located where you'd expect to find things like a cabin light dimmer or driver assist toggle switches. We were also puzzled by the metal-finished gear selector, which looks strangely out-of-place (aftermarket, even) in an otherwise very dark interior.



But does it go?
We had the C-HR for a long weekend in Maryland, giving us the opportunity to try it out both on the highway and around town. We didn't put enough miles on it to get a good sense of whether the efficiency-minded four-cylinder and CVT earn their keep in the mileage department, but we did get to try it out under some relatively diverse driving conditions.
Our first take-away was the C-HR's steering, which was quicker and more immediate than we expected. Many short-wheelbase vehicles don't behave nicely with steering this borderline-twitchy, but we didn't find ourselves needing to make excessive corrections to keep it going straight on the highway, so call this one a win.
The C-HR's driver aids seem to be up to the task of everyday driving. Our experience with its adaptive cruise control system was mostly positive, with its only black mark being an inability to quickly resume speeds after a leading vehicle clears the lane. That's not the fault of the system so much as a product of the C-HR's relatively humble power output and parasitic CVT.
We found the ride and handling struck a reasonable balance for a small crossover. Credit its fully independent rear suspension--a rarity in this class outside of other slightly-too-big-to-really-be-subcompact entries, such as the Subaru Crosstrek. However, there's no hiding the C-HR's short wheelbase or 18" wheels when things really get choppy; you'll feel it. An Avalon this is not.
Our other quibbles were few. We'd like to hear less wind noise (distinctly audible from the mirror/a-pillar at anything above about 30-35 miles per hour) and we'd like a slightly better response from the turn signal (We said quibbles, didn't we?). The too-quiet turn signal indicator tick and cheap-feeling stalk led to more than one instance of us hunting around in the cluster to make sure it had actually activated.
Leftlane's bottom line
The C-HR is a surprisingly sporty entry from Toyota in what will continue to be an evolving segment of the marketplace. It's cheap, but not a penalty box. We're puzzled by the absence of an all-wheel-drive option and the inclusion of a (rare for Toyota) CVT, but they don't detract too much from what seems to be a competent package.
2018 Toyota C-HR XLE Premium R-Code base price, $24,350; as tested, $26,794
Ruby Flare Pearl paint, $395; R-Code, $500; Carpeted floor mats and cargo mat, $194; Paint protection film, $395; Destination, $960





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Unread 2017-12-09, 11:38 PM   #34
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Toyota Says Lack Of AWD Is Hurting C-HR Sales




The Toyota C-HR went on sale in the United States earlier this year and it appears the model hasn't been quite as successful as the company was hoping.

Carsalesbase shows Toyota only sold 21,889 units since April and that's significantly less than rivals such as the Chevrolet Trax and Honda HR-V. Toyota's well aware of the situation as the company's North American executive vice president of sales, Bob Carter, recently told Wards Auto the lack of an optional all-wheel drive system is "hurting its sales potential."

The C-HR is one of the few crossovers that doesn't offer all-wheel drive and it will soon by joined by the Nissan Kicks. Nissan North America's vice president of product planning, Michael Bunce, doesn't think the Kicks will suffer the same sales problem as the C-HR as he expects the model will be popular in cities on both the east and west coast. As a result, the company expects to sell at least 50,000-60,000 Kicks annually.

Bunce went on to say the C-HR probably isn't doing as well as it could because it's expensive for its segment. As he noted, “In the U.S. there’s still a great correlation between size and price point" and the C-HR starts at $22,500 which is "relatively high."

The product planner went on to say the Kicks will cost less than $19,000 and customers who need all-wheel drive can always move up to the Rogue Sport which starts at $21,420 and offer an optional all-wheel drive system for an additional $1,350.
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Unread 2018-02-16, 12:49 PM   #35
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2018 Toyota C-HR Review: Fun And Funky, But Flawed






Cool styling isn’t enough to overlook the lack of technology and a cramped cabin.

– Miami, Florida
Verdict 6 / 10
The outrageous styling of the Toyota C-HR, paired with the utility of a CUV, should appeal to any millennial buyer from the get-go. It’s the perfect combination of cool and capable – at least on paper – and is arguably the first truly appealing product, design-wise, that Toyota has introduced since the 86 sports car.
That said, it’s a different story once you actually get behind the wheel. Toyota felt the need to reinvent almost every aspect of the C-HR in an effort to be unique, from the door handles, to the dash, to the center console. Especially confusing is the lack of all-wheel drive, an important feature in this segment. It’s kind of a mess, if we’re being brutally honest. But there are still some aspects about the C-HR that should appeal to buyers in this segment.
Pricing ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 8 / 10
With an MSRP of $24,383 as tested, the C-HR feels well priced for what you get. The base model starts at $22,500, which makes it slightly pricier than competitors like the Honda HR-V ($19,670) and the Mazda CX-3 ($20,110). But with standard features like Toyota Safety Sense – which includes pre-collision warning, lane departure assist, and radar-assisted cruise control – LED daytime running lights, and a 7-inch touchscreen display, it’s better equipped out of the box.
This particular test model, a base XLE trim, came with added features like Ruby Flare Pearl paint ($395), removable cross bars ($299), and carpeted floor mats and cargo mats ($194). Most of which felt like unnecessary add-ons.
Design & Exterior ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 6 / 10
The biggest selling point of the Toyota C-HR is the way it looks – the styling is unique and eye-catching, especially for the segment. That said, it really is a polarizing design, and people tend to be either strongly for or strongly against it. It’s not exactly the most functional design either: the interior is cramped, and all of the windows are hard to see out of – especially the rear. The back seats are big enough for two normal-sized people, but aren’t anything spectacular in terms of space. The low roofline could also leave your passengers’ heads bumped and bruised.
Interior & Comfort ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 5 / 10
The front seats of the C-HR are comfortable, and the materials throughout the cabin feel like a slight step up from what you’d expect out of a Toyota product at this price point. There’s nice leather trim on the steering wheel and gear lever, and unique stylized door panels that give normally cheap-feeling plastic a more premium feel. Piano black plastic surrounds most of the infotainment system, and more leather can be found on the center console and door armrests.
Interior volume won’t be the C-HR’s biggest selling point. Like the rival CX-3, Toyota’s focus is on fun-to-drive-ability more so than cargo room. Still, the seats fold down completely flat, and with 19.0 cubic feet of room behind the second row, the C-HR matches the Jeep Renegade and Chevrolet Trax almost exactly. But with just 36.4 cubic feet maximum, it falls well behind the Renegade’s 50.8 cubic feet, and even the Chevy Trax’s 48.4 cubic feet overall.
Technology & Connectivity ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 4 / 10
This isn’t a C-HR-specific problem; the infotainment systems on most modern Toyota products feel outdated. Only as recently as January has the automaker announced the inclusion of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, but 2018 products remain without it, which is a big turnoff for buyers in this segment. It also lacks navigation, even as an option, and satellite radio.
Admittedly, the system works fine for what it is – the touchscreen is responsive, and the options are laid out simply enough to use at highway speeds, but the interface hasn’t evolved with the times. The lack of CarPlay and Android Auto makes it one of only two in the segment, alongside the Mazda CX-3, without those popular features. At least the CX-3 comes with navigation.
Performance & Handling ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 5 / 10
The C-HR comes standard with three different driving modes: Eco, Normal, and Sport, each with different settings for throttle response and steering. The former two modes, combined with the 2.0-liter inline-four engine and continuously variable transmission (CVT), do a good job of pushing the CUV along, with only a small amount of droning from the transmission. In Sport mode, the C-HR springs to life more eagerly, holding the revs for longer and stiffening up the steering significantly. The only minor undoing is the lack of paddle shifters behind the steering wheel.
The C-HR is far more nimble than, say, a Kia Soul or Honda HR-V, thanks to its sporty steering input and high-revving CVT – and with limited body roll, it’s actually pretty darn fun at speed. You might not guess that the engine only delivers 144 horsepower and 139 pound-feet of torque. Just don’t expect the C-HR to be quick between stoplights; the CUV is painfully slow from a standstill.
Safety Features ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 6 / 10
The Toyota C-HR is one of the most well-equipped CUVs you can buy right out of the box. Admittedly you’ll have to dish out even more for blind-spot monitoring, which is only available in the XLE Premium package, but Toyota’s Safety Sense suite equips the C-HR with adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning with steering assist, lane-keep assist, automatic high-beam headlights, and a backup camera, all standard.
The biggest drawback to the styling of the C-HR is the visibility in the cabin, or rather, the lack thereof. The unique angles of the body make it difficult for the driver to see out – the A-pillar and C-pillar are both too large, the windshield is too raked, and the rear window is too small. The teeny, tiny backup camera located in the rearview mirror is particularly useless, and does more to distract the driver than it does to actually assist them.
Running Costs & Fuel Economy ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 6 / 10
Comparatively, the C-HR is less efficient than its closest non-hybrid competitors. With ratings of 27 miles per gallon in the city, 31 mpg highway, and 29 combined, the CH-R is nothing to sneeze at, but when considering the Honda HR-V (28/34/31), and even the Mazda CX-3 (29/34/31) both post better ratings, the C-HR falls below the top tier. A smaller turbocharged engine might do the CUV good, both in terms of efficiency and performance.
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Unread 2018-03-29, 12:30 PM   #36
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From Concept To Production: 2018 Toyota C-HR



Who would have thought Toyota had the guts for this.
Very few production cars today resemble their concept counterparts as much as the Toyota C-HR. Even the name of this subcompact crossover didn’t change when it reached production. Up until quite recently, Toyota was not exactly known to be a design risk take.But today some argue its stylists didn’t know when to lift the pen. So what if Toyota’s current design language is a bit polarizing? Something dramatic needed to happen to help the Japanese brand shed its conservative image once and for all.


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Its Lexus luxury brand has done the same, mostly successfully, with its spindle grille. Going for a dramatic look fits in very well with the subcompact crossover segment in general. Just look at the Nissan Juke. It’s no coincidence that funky-looking crossover kicked off this week’s series. At first glance it’s surprising to learn the C-HR is a production car at all given its wild lines. And yet initial data indicates it’s already a money-making success since hitting dealerships almost a year ago. But let’s back up a few years to 2014 when the C-HR Concept was revealed at that year’s Paris Motor Show.



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Built on Toyota’s TNGA global platform, the C-HR Concept also served as a styling exercise, mainly to show that a four-door subcompact crossover could look like it had only two doors. Hey, if it worked for Nissan, why not for Toyota? Only this time, Toyota had to push the design envelope even further than the competition. Toyota claims the concept had an expressive, diamond styling theme, full of sculpted surfaces inspired by precision-cut gemstones. Good proportions were vital, hence designers’ goal of removing mass from the overall volume while adding those powerful-looking front and rear wheel arches. The upper grille was given a floating “wing” graphic that flows around the vehicle’s front corners.


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The so-called streamlined headlamp clusters offer advanced lighting technology along with diamond-pattern detailing. There’s also an aero-inspired front spoiler. Out back, the glasshouse tapers down towards the body and there’s a prominent rear diffuser. The concept looks the most dramatic from the side, with those large 21-inch wheels providing even more style. Toyota called this its Keen Look design identity, and made it clear to the media and public it had every intention of putting the C-HR into production. An updated, more production-ready version of the C-HR Concept was revealed a year later at the 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show.


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The production version was revealed at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show while the North American version, which differs little from other market versions, came the following November at Los Angeles. Its designers, once again, reiterated they focused on a single theme, “Distinctive Diamond,” translated into a vehicle that’s muscular, sexy and edgy. By looks alone the C-HR is clearly not intended for off-roading, but rather for the urban lifestyle. But what does ‘C-HR’ even stand for? Coupe High-Rider. In place of the concept’s massive 21-inch wheels, the production C-HR offers 18-inchers wearing all-season rubber. The deep and curvy character lines and 3D shapes, however, remained intact.


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Those dominant wheel arches contribute to a powerful and wide stance hinting this is something fun to drive. To help hide the fact it’s really not a coupe, the rear door handles were relocated to the C-pillars, again something borrowed straight from the Nissan Juke. But that’s okay because it works just fine here as well. Buyers can also individualize it with a variety of unique exterior colors with a white-painted roof, side mirrors, and A-pillar. To help match its futuristic looks, Toyota figured it’d only make sense to power the C-HR with modern powertrain technology. Under its hood lies a 2.0-liter inline-four with 144 hp and 139 lb-ft of torque, with power sent to the front wheels through a new CVT.


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Interestingly, the hybrid version is not sold in the US, at least for the time being. In many ways, Toyota North America sort of lucked out with the C-HR. Originally, it was set to be branded a Scion, but since the brand was discontinued, a Toyota badge was used instead. It’s probably for the best because Scion had been living on borrowed time. Thanks to the C-HR, Toyota now has something to offer younger, urban buyers that’s not in the least bit bland. Is the C-HR a bit too much for some tastes? Yes, but a likely majority of them are older buyers. For Toyota, the long-term goal is to appeal to buyers when they’re young, and the C-HR is the ideal vehicle to have today.


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