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Unread 2017-12-21, 12:37 PM   #1
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Huawei President: We Will Sell Our Flagship Phone in the US Through Carriers Next Year



In early August of this year, a report surfaced that claimed Huawei would sell a flagship device through AT&T. That would be a major step for the China-based company that has been tiptoeing here for some time, but this week when speaking to ABC News, Huawei’s president, Richard Yu confirmed the company’s plan.
During this conversation, Yu said, “We will sell our flagship phone, our product, in the U.S. market through carriers next year. I think that we can bring value to the carriers and to consumers. Better product, better innovation, better user experience.”
While the news in general is exciting, we still don’t know exactly which carrier(s) will carry the Huawei device. As for which device Yu is referring to, that’d be the Mate 10, one of Huawei’s latest smartphones announced back in October.
We expect to hear much more about this during CES next month, so stay tuned.
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Unread 2018-03-22, 10:43 AM   #2
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Report: Best Buy Cuts Ties With Huawei

The move is a blow to Huawei, given that Best Buy was one of its only retail partners in the US

Word has it that Huawei has lost one of its only friends in the US: Best Buy.
CNET on Thursday reported that the big box electronics retailer has decided to cut ties with the Chinese smartphone giant. The news outlet, citing an unnamed source, reported that Best Buy "has ceased ordering new smartphones from Huawei and will stop selling its products over the next few weeks."
In a statement to PCMag, Huawei said it "values the relationship it has with Best Buy" and all of its other retail partners. "As a policy, we do not discuss the details of our partner relationships," the company added.
Best Buy's official statement on the matter is similarly vague: "We don't comment on specific contracts with vendors, and we make decisions to change what we sell for a variety of reasons," a Best Buy spokesperson told PCMag.

On Twitter Thursday, GlobalData analyst Avi Greengart called the decision "devastating for Huawei" given that Best Buy was its "sole U.S. physical retail distribution channel for its phones."

A handful of US retailers, including Best Buy, opened pre-orders for Huawei's latest flagship smartphone, the Mate 10 Pro, in February. Meanwhile, US carriers like AT&T and Verizon decided not to sell the handset, reportedly due to pressure from the US government. Huawei came under scrutiny from Congress in 2012 about potentially spying for the Chinese government, which it denies vehemently. Since then, the company has faced trouble finding a foothold for its phones at carriers, which control the vast majority of US phone sales.

In its statement to PCMag today, Huawei said its products are sold "by 46 of the top 50 global operators," adding that it has "won the trust and confidence of individuals and organizations in 170 countries around the world."
"We are committed to earning that same trust with US consumers and making our products accessible in as many ways as possible," Huawei added.
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Unread 2018-04-30, 07:49 AM   #3
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Report: Huawei Developing Alternative To Android

Huawei’s relationship with the US has gone from tough to almost non-existent in the past six months. And now with threats that it could no longer be able to use Android itself, Huawei has reportedly begun developing its own alternative to Android. This is according to a post out of the South China Morning Post. Now Huawei has not actually lost its license for using Android, but ZTE – another Chinese smartphone maker – has almost lost its license. Which is forcing other companies from China to step up and make sure they cross their T’s and dot their I’s. But Huawei is making sure that if tensions between China and the US heat up even more, that it has a fallback plan.

Android is the most popular platform in the world for smartphones, but other companies have been working on their own operating systems in the past few years. Samsung has spent a good amount of cash and R&D on its own Tizen platform, though it hasn’t really taken off yet, and now there’s reports that Huawei is doing the same. Huawei’s operating system hasn’t yet seen the light of day, and while there’s no known reason why, it’s most likely because there’s not enough third-party app support, and/or because it’s not as mature as something like Android and iOS. Huawei’s co-founder was the one that set this plan in motion, though this isn’t the first time Huawei has been reportedly working on its own OS, as it actually began this back in 2012, but was shelved shortly after.


Huawei has had a tough few months in the US, and the Trump Administration has undoubtedly made it tougher for companies like Huawei to make it in the US. With ZTE possibly losing its license to use Android, it wouldn’t be a surprise if that also happened to Huawei. Two companies that are being pushed out of the US for different reasons, but both are China-based. The US and China are in the midst of a trade war, and these could be two casualties of that trade war. Huawei has not been public about this operating system just yet, but it likely won’t until it’s ready to go, and that’s only if they are revoked from using Android in the future.
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Unread 2018-04-30, 07:53 AM   #4
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A Standoff Years In The Making

Huawei’s issues with Washington and its inability to launch a large-scale business in the United States have been widely reported in recent months, but the Chinese tech giant’s stateside troubles started long before AT&T was pressured to drop its intentions to carry the Mate 10 Pro early this year. Huawei has been on the federal government’s radar for nearly a decade now, but to understand what its latest defeat in the U.S. means, one has to look at the past, as the Huawei has been present in the States since 2001 and has been clashing with lawmakers, regulators, and other companies for the majority of its time here.

First legal troubles and the NSA’s “Operation Shotgiant”


Shortly after Huawei started collaborating with U.S. companies at the turn of the century, the now-telecom giant found itself in legal troubles. In 2003, Cisco Systems accused it of copying its router and network switch source code, thus infringing on its patents. The lawsuit in question was dropped in mid-2004 as part of a settlement that some interpreted as Huawei’s de facto admission of guilt, with the defendant agreeing to modify the source code of its devices. Almost nine years later, Huawei reflected on that episode as a non-story, with its SVP Charles Ding saying that “at that time, Huawei provided our source code of our products to Cisco for review and the results were that there was not any infringement found and in the end, Cisco withdrew the case.” That claim didn’t sit well with Cisco SVP General Counsel Mark Chandler who referred to it as a false “interpretation,” having said he won’t even bother with trying to explain the case on his own but will simply present relevant excerpts from the 2004 settlement. The redacted parts of the document he ended up publishing directly point to Huawei being found guilty of infringement during the investigation of Cisco’s claims, not in the context of some obscure patents but in the sense that it literally used copy-pasted source code from Cisco’s routers. Huawei never responded to Chandler’s request to “set the record straight” and publish the final report of a neutral expert commissioned during the probe that prompted it to settle the lawsuit instead of going to court. The development also made Huawei a powerful enemy which ended up committing significant resources to lobbying against the company with both U.S. regulators and legislators, the Washington Post reported in late 2012.

The NSA started spying on Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei and Chairwoman Sun Yafang in early 2009 as part of “Operation Shotgiant,” according to a 2014 report from Der Spiegel, with the outlet citing unpublicized documents leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden. An NSA unit is said to have infiltrated Huawei’s network and obtained a list of 1,400 of the company’s customers and a broad range of documentation detailing its internal practices such as engineering training and even protected product source code, as well as an extensive email archive, with the spying team’s ultimate conclusion being that Huawei poses a “unique” threat to the U.S. Among the harvested emails were those from Ren and Sun, as per the same report. “We currently have good access and so much data that we don’t know what to do with it,” one NSA official wrote in the leaked document. The NSA’s hack was aimed at determining whether Huawei is already capable of intercepting communications as part of so-called SIGINT (signals intelligence) activities but the leak didn’t clarify whether any firm evidence of the thereof was found.

Even if Huawei wasn’t actively working on spying on its customers through its equipment, the NSA wanted to determine if it would be able to discover backdoors into its devices on its own. “Many of our targets communicate over Huawei produced [sic] products, we want to make sure that we know how to exploit these products,” one leaked memo reads. The FBI and a White House intelligence coordinator are said to have supported the operation. At the time, Huawei spokesman Bill Plummer said that if the report was true, “the irony is that exactly what they are doing to us is what they have always charged that the Chinese are doing through us.” The official also added that if such spying activities took place, it should be clear that Huawei “is independent and has no unusual ties to any government and that knowledge should be relayed publicly to put an end to an era of mis- and disinformation.”

Capitol Hill-backed accusations of ties to Saddam’s regime

In mid-August of 2010, eight Republican Senators including current U.S. Attorney General Jefferson Sessions authored a letter addressed to the offices of the Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of Commerce, Director of National Intelligence, and Administrator of General Services, arguing against Huawei’s reported bid to become one of Sprint Nextel’s network equipment suppliers. Allowing that project would have posed “substantial risk for U.S. companies and possibly undermine U.S. national security,” the lawmakers wrote, pointing to the firm’s “concerning history.” Among other things, the Senators referenced reports that Huawei used to supply telecom equipment to Saddam Hussein’s regime in Iraq, thus possibly conducting a violation of UN trade sanctions. That same network gear may have been used by the regime’s armed forces “which routinely fired on U.S. military aircraft,” the letter reads, concluding that “Huawei should be prohibited” from doing any kind of business with Washington and other public entities in the U.S.

The Senators said they have “been informed” of Huawei’s preferential status in China, claiming that the company is the preferred provider of products and services of the People’s Liberation Army, thus being extremely close to Beijing even though it technically isn’t a state-run firm, albeit one that was founded by a former deputy director of the PLA’s engineering corp. Huawei enjoyed a similar privileged status with China’s embassies around the world, as per the same letter citing unnamed sources. The communication itself marks one of the first official acknowledgments of Huawei’s IP issues on the part of stateside officials, specifically referencing the 2003 episode with Cisco described above as evidence that the Chinese firm has little regard for international law and patents, a sentiment that’s still nurtured by the U.S. government to this date.

The Senators also described Huawei’s PLA ties as worrying in the context of “China’s well documented [sic] focus on developing cyber warfare capabilities,” citing numerous media and intelligence reports from Australia, India, France, and the United Kingdom. The widely reported loans Huawei was given by the Chinese government allowed it to undercut its competitors and may have even been the basis for the company’s Sprint Nextel bid, the letter reads, calling for added regulatory scrutiny of the technology giant’s operations and — once again — a concentrated effort aimed at preventing Huawei from doing business in the U.S. on any significant scale. Following the agreement of the $20.1 billion SoftBank merger in 2013, Sprint and its new Japanese parent vowed not to use any Huawei-made equipment going forward, House Intelligence Committee chief Mike Rogers told The Washington Post in late March of the same year.

Update [April 25, 2018]: As one source pointed out to AndroidHeadlines, the accusations laid out against Huawei in regards to its alleged imports to Iraq were most likely false and possibly even purposefully misrepresented in the public; As explained in the findings of Sydney-based academic Colin Hawes, the company that was actually involved in supplying the Iraqi regime with telecom equipment was called Hua-Mei (translates to “China-America”) and was a joint venture of one American firm and China-based Galaxy New Technology “controlled by Chinese military personnel” which wasn’t related to Huawei in any manner. The confusion appears to be stemming from a reporting error first committed by The Wall Street Journal Asia nine years prior to the aforementioned allegations being laid out by U.S. lawmakers in an official capacity.

The 2011 investigation request that backfired, Abraham Lincoln quotes, and 2012 suicide analogies

In early February of 2011, Huawei USA Chairman Ken Hu sent an open letter to the U.S. government in which it denied all previous spying and security allegations made against the firm, having invited a comprehensive investigation of its corporate operations in order to clear its name. The letter itself was sent in response to Huawei’s blocked acquisition of American server company 3Leaf and was written in a narrative style unconventional for corporate communications, citing everyone from Barack Obama to Abraham Lincoln. “The values of democracy, freedom, rule of law and human rights in the U.S. are the very values that we at Huawei respect, advocate, and live by,” Hu wrote, without clarifying whether he speaks in the name of Huawei USA or Huawei’s global operations given how he was also serving as Deputy Chairman of Huawei Technologies at the time, which is a role that he still fills as of today.

At the time, the Chinese company said that a Washington-led and extremely thorough review of its business is the only way to get the federal administration to trust it, a notion which a Capitol Hill committee later referred to as correct as part of a report detailing the findings of the investigation in question. Those findings were published in early October of 2012, having been disclosed in a congressional report that still pointed to Huawei as a potential national security threat and also encompassed ZTE to which it attached the same label. “The Committee remains unsatisfied with the level of cooperation and candor provided by each company,” U.S. regulators wrote, having said Huawei wasn’t “forthcoming” when it came to providing evidence it isn’t controlled by the Chinese government which the U.S. has never considered an ally, at least not in the context of the communist People’s Republic of China which was only recognized by President Jimmy Carter on January 1, 1979.

The same report also mentioned accusations that the company isn’t adhering to U.S. “legal obligations or international standards of business behavior,” citing interviews with current and former Huawei employees. The legislators said they will refer those concerns to the government for further investigation. The congressional committee acknowledged its findings aren’t concrete evidence of any wrongdoing on ZTE or Huawei’s part but concluded that the “risks associated with Huawei’s and ZTE’s provision of equipment to U.S. critical
infrastructure could undermine core U.S. national-security [sic] interests.” As a result, U.S. legislators recommended the government to continue viewing Huawei’s network equipment “with suspicion” and strongly encouraged private companies to keep “long-term security risks” in mind when considering purchasing its network equipment. “Huawei, in particular, must become more transparent and responsive to U.S. legal obligations” if it hopes to have any chance of doing large-scale business in the country, the report concluded. Huawei’s 2011 investigation request meant to clear its name in the eyes of the U.S. government hence largely backfired. The 3Leaf deal was never completed and the Santa Clara, California-based company immediately went out of business after filing for bankruptcy.

“This was a small deal, but it was a way to teach Huawei a big lesson,” CKGSB Professor of Strategy Teng Bingsheng said at the time, adding that 3Leaf’s technology Huawei was interested in “wasn’t particularly sensitive” but that Washington wanted to clearly communicate the telecom giant “has to play by the rules” if it wants to do any business in the country, regardless of the scale it’s aiming for. Huawei said it’s disappointed with the development at that time, pointing to the September congressional hearing of its SVP Charles Ding who said accepting and Beijing-issued request to provide China with information on its U.S. customers would be nothing short of a “corporate suicide.” Committee Chairman Mike Rogers wasn’t convinced by that and other answers provided by Ding, having said he’s also “a little disappointed” with the outcome of the hearing due to numerous “inconsistencies,” concluding that he was “hoping for a little more transparency” on Huawei’s part.

A week after the publication of the October 2012 report that claimed Huawei remains a national security threat, Reuters reported that the 18-month investigation ordered by President Obama’s White House yielded “no clear evidence” that Huawei is in any way spying on behalf of Beijing or has done so in the past, having provided previously undisclosed details on the matter. The probe labeled the company as a security threat due to a number of vulnerabilities discovered in its networking gear, as per the same source. The report didn’t clarify where the security flaws discovered by investigators were thought to exist by design, i.e. were intentionally left in the infrastructure for someone like China to exploit, or if their presence was simply an oversight. “We knew certain parts of government really wanted [Huawei to be found guilty of spying]… we would have found it [the evidence] if it were there,” one source involved in the investigation told Reuters at the time. Regardless of Huawei’s intentions, the reviewers were highly concerned about the aforementioned security flaws, of which there were said to be many. “We found it [Huawei’s source code] riddled with holes,” one insider who participated in the investigation said, adding that Huawei’s programming appeared to have been much more vulnerable than network device software from the firm’s rivals. The Chinese company repeatedly denied such accusations, claiming its offerings aren’t more susceptible to hacking attacks than those of competing vendors and adding that any security flaws discovered in its solutions are always addressed in a timely manner and will continue being handled as such in the future.

The White House-ordered probe is understood to have encompassed exhaustive interviews with representatives of close to 1,000 companies who purchased networking equipment from Huawei in the past, with two sources cited by Reuters claiming Washington wasn’t as concerned about Huawei spying for China in the past as much as it was worried about the company’s ability to do so in the future, undetected and undisturbed. “If the Chinese government approached them, why would they say no [to spying for Beijing], given their system,” rhetorically asked ex-CIA analyst Chris Johnson at the time. That sentiment combined with Huawei’s past dealings with Beijing outlined above didn’t just carry over to the coming years but arguably became more pronounced as time went on, with the U.S. becoming more adamant to take concrete legislative measures preventing Huawei’s stateside growth ever since.

Obama’s 2013 bill and that time when Huawei told a four-star general “it’s time to put up or shut up”

One such move was made in late March of 2013, less than half a year after the publication of the congressional report which labeled Huawei as a national security threat despite discovering no evidence of foul play. Back then, President Barack Obama signed a funding bill that both prevented a government shutdown and introduced a provision requiring an in-depth review of any Chinese technology that any given federal agency considers purchasing. Such probes would be aimed at determining the risk of “cyber-espionage or sabotage” posed by systems from companies “that are owned, directed, or subsidized” by China. According to Stewart Baker, former Department of Homeland Security official who served under President George Bush, the provision was aimed at fighting off China’s growing influence in the tech segment and was targeting all companies from the Far Eastern country, Huawei included.

In the summer of the same year, former CIA and NSA chief Michael Hayden told the Australian Financial Review (archived version of the page, original deleted between March 13 and April 1 of 2015 for unknown reasons, AFR hasn’t responded to a clarification request) that Huawei poses a significant security risk to both the U.S. and Australia, adding that intelligence agencies in the West have evidence that the company already provided Beijing with “sensitive” information regarding “foreign telecommunications systems” in whose deployment it participated. The comments given in mid-July of 2013 marked the first occasion on which any Western government official — former or current — said there’s hard evidence implicating Huawei as one of China’s spies. Huawei Global Security Officer John Suffolk dismissed the remarks as “defamatory” and called for Hayden and anyone else who agrees with him to present the supposed spying evidence publicly. “It’s time to put up or shut up,” Suffolk said in a statement provided to China’s Sina.

General Hayden remained adamant “it’s simply not acceptable for *Huawei to be creating the backbone of the domestic telecommunications network, period.” The four-star General was leading the NSA over a six-year period ending in 2005, after which he had a three-year stint as the head of the CIA. He wasn’t with the Maryland-based agency at the time it allegedly conducted Operation Shotgiant. Australia itself blocked Huawei from bidding for its national broadband network buildout contract in 2011, with Hayden’s AFR interview implying that decision was a wise move on Canberra’s part.

Corporate espionage lawsuit from T-Mobile

T-Mobile sued Huawei in 2014 over alleged misappropriation of its trade secrets stemming from corporate espionage, having accused the company of stealing the design for “Tappy,” a robot it created in 2007 to test touchscreen performance of smartphones. The wireless carrier said the theft happened in 2012 and 2013, with two Huawei employees taking pictures and components of the robot while visiting one of the firm’s facilities in Bellevue, Washington. The case saw T-Mobile drop all Huawei-made devices from its portfolio, went to trial a year later, and ultimately resulted in a loss for Huawei, with the company being found guilty of misappropriation in mid-2017, albeit without any “malicious” intent being proven. As a result, Huawei ended up paying only $4.8 million in damages instead of half a billion dollars T-Mobile originally demanded.
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Unread 2018-04-30, 07:53 AM   #5
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2017, the year of behind-the-scenes work

Save for the resolution of the T-Mobile lawsuit, Huawei had no direct U.S. confrontations in 2017, but last year was important for the company’s stateside operations in the context of how it was meant to set the stage for its grand American smartphone launch of 2018, the one that never ended up happening; after offering some value-oriented models through Amazon and Best Buy, and its subsidiary Honor doing the same in previous years, the company introduced its first Android flagship officially aimed at the U.S., having unveiled it in the form of the Mate 9 in early 2017 (the international model was announced in late 2016). Without backing from a major wireless carrier, the handset didn’t set any sales records in the States and is still being offered by both Best Buy and Amazon as of April 2018. Still, a quiet U.S. year didn’t necessarily mean a bad one for Huawei, a company that at this point endured close to a decade of questionings and fending off what it repeatedly deemed were groundless allegations about its ties to China. That state of affairs is likely what prompted it to make a bold move and come closer than ever to agreeing to a retail partnership with a major mobile service provider in the country; while 2017 was a relatively quiet year for Huawei in terms of consumer-facing announcements in the U.S., it was one of its busiest to date in regards to behind-the-scenes work that went into funneling its stateside ambitions.

AT&T and Huawei agreed to collaborate on a smartphone launch in principle no later than early August of 2017, The Information reported at the time, citing sources that claimed the duo will finalize their retail agreement once they address all “technical hurdles” and specify “the commercial terms” of releasing the upcoming Mate 10 series through the second-largest wireless carrier in the U.S. The partnership would have given Huawei a major entry point in the country where two-thirds of all annual smartphone sales go through mobile service providers. Later that month, Huawei said it’s cutting its U.S. workforce by approximately two-percent, which amounted to some 20 positions, though the move isn’t believed to have been related to its rocky relationship with Washington. The OEM said as much, having confirmed its stateside business isn’t going anywhere despite a small number of reports speculating the opposite.

While the negotiations with AT&T reportedly dragged on longer than expected and were still described as being in early stages as of mid-December, Huawei’s bold attempt may have given courage to Xiaomi, another ambitious OEM from China with less Beijing-related baggage, Bloomberg reported in late 2017, claiming the Chinese startup also approached AT&T regarding a potential retail partnership and adding that both Huawei and Xiaomi are also in the process of negotiating a similar agreement with Verizon, the nation’s largest wireless carrier. Later that same month, Huawei Consumer Business Group Yu Chengdong (Richard Yu) told ABC News that the company will launch its 2018 Android flagships through “U.S. carriers,” implying talks with numerous operators aren’t just in the works but have essentially progressed to the point of no backing down. For the first time in a long while and following nearly a decade of enduring hostilities from Washington, Huawei’s stateside prospects were finally looking up…

So close, yet so far away in 2018

… and then 2018 came. While no new reports on a potential Verizon partnership emerged in the meantime, the AT&T deal was widely expected to be officially announced at CES 2018 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Reports from January suggested that’s precisely what was to be the case, except the January 9 announcement never happened because AT&T backed off at the last minute, The Wall Street Journal reported, leaving Huawei’s Yu on its own on to give what some perceived as one of the most emotional speeches made in the history of the 50-year-old trade show, also the world’s largest happening of its kind. On January 9, Yu spent some 25 minutes detailing the new Mate 10 lineup on stage at CES 2018, then ended up going off script for the next five minutes, effectively confirming reports about the unexpected collapse of the AT&T deal, referring to the development as “a big loss” for both Huawei and the American people. “Consumers don’t have the best choice” following early 2018 developments because “everybody knows that in the U.S. market over-90 percent of smartphones are sold by carrier channels,” Yu said in Las Vegas.

In the immediate aftermath of the AT&T episode, Republican House Representatives Michael Conaway and Liz Cheney introduced a bill meant to block the U.S. government from using Huawei and ZTE-made network equipment. Less than a month later, another two Republicans — Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton and Florida Senator Marco Rubio — presented a similar bill, with their initial draft being aimed at preventing all federal agencies from “procuring or obtaining, renewing or extending a contract to obtain or procure, or entering into a contract with” any telecom company that uses any kind of technology from Huawei and ZTE, as well as any entity believed to be owned or otherwise controlled by China. The “Defending U.S. Government Communications Act” has yet to be voted on by the Senate, after which it will also have to pass through the House of Representatives, both of which presently have a Republican majority. China hasn’t reacted to the February bill but said the January one will harm Beijing-Washington relations,

A week following CES 2018, Reuters reported that Capitol Hill is still pushing AT&T to cut all of its other ties to Huawei, signaling it isn’t pleased with just preventing the firm from selling its smartphones to American consumers on a significant scale. Shortly afterward, Verizon ended all talks over a potential partnership with Huawei as well, Bloomberg reported in late January, claiming the country’s largest wireless carrier also caved in to pressure from Washington.

This February, six U.S. intelligence chiefs including directors of the FBI, NSA, and the CIA warned the American public against buying Huawei devices, claiming the firm’s smartphones could be used for spying. FBI Director Chris Wray testified that “any company or entity that is beholden to foreign governments that don’t share our values” shouldn’t be allowed to play an important role in the stateside telecom sector, especially at a time when contemporary communications are gradually being integrated into every aspect of people’s everyday lives as is now the case with the advent of 5G. The top intelligence officials said they personally wouldn’t use Huawei devices nor would they recommend them to anyone, having reiterated those claims in the context of ZTE-made products.

Later that same month, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull received warnings from both the FBI and NSA not to use Huawei’s equipment for deploying 5G networks in the country less Canberra risks having its critical infrastructure breached, AFR reported. While Australia’s aforementioned decision to block Huawei’s NBN tender offer in 2011 stood, the country’s second-largest telecom firm Optus said it will collaborate with the Chinese firm on 5G deployment in early February, having later dismissed the security concerns about Huawei by stating it rigorously tests all equipment provided to it. As things stand right now, the company’s experimental 5G network will launch in Australia in early 2019 despite the protests from the U.S. intelligence community. Besides Australia, the U.S. has recently been warning its other allies such as South Korea and Canada to stay clear of Huawei’s equipment, whereas Bell Canada, Orange, and even the Christian Democratic Union of Germany came in Huawei’s defense several weeks prior to that development, joining the company in its claims that the U.S. never presented the global public with any credible evidence that Huawei does China’s bidding and spies for Beijing.

In the meantime, Yu took to Barcelona, Spain-based MWC 2018 to once again criticize Washington for blocking Huawei due to what he believes is fear that the company is technologically superior to its U.S. rivals, with the OEM’s SVP and communications head Chen Lifang distancing the firm from its CEO’s comments following that episode. “It’s not right to blame the other party for not accepting us, we can only try harder, maintain our openness and transparency and wait until the other party is willing to communicate,” Chen said in a statement provided to South China Morning Post in late February, indicating the tech giant may be looking to change its approach to handling the issue and begin that transition by having Yu tone down his comments of the matter. Regardless of whether that was the plan, the CEO’s silence didn’t last for long.

Following those developments, Best Buy decided to give up on Huawei-made products in their entirety, according to reports from late March, with industry sources claiming the retailer will only continue selling the firm’s offerings while its existing stock lasts, adding that its Huawei inventory is likely to be depleted by the end of spring, if not sooner. While some industry watchers interpreted the alleged decision as Best Buy’s attempt to score some PR points while dropping Huawei is supposedly seen as a patriotic thing to do in the United States, the development may have also been related to accusations that the Chinese phone maker solicited fake reviews of the Mate 10 Pro on Best Buy’s website a month earlier. The phone maker firmly denied that notion and attributed it to “an internal miscommunication,” having claimed that one of its community managers wrongly asked for Best Buy reviews from beta testers as part of a post published in a private Facebook group instead of asking for direct feedback on the device. Huawei-made products can still be purchased from Best Buy as of early April and neither party has confirmed the widespread claims about their relationship ending that were separately reported by Reuters, CNET, and CNN, with all three citing sources familiar with the situation.

In an emailed statement provided to CNET in late March, Yu said Huawei remains committed to earning the trust of U.S. consumers and regulators in spite of “groundless” accusations, having once again delivered a more aggressive corporate message than the one his colleague Chen sent in late February. All suspicions raised by the U.S. in this and previous years “are quite frankly unfair,” Yu said. According to the firm’s consolidated financial report for 2017, its Americas unit shrunk by 10.9-percent over the course of the last year, and while Huawei largely attributed that decline to a spending decrease in Latin America, it would have presumably been able to combat it if the U.S. was more acceptive of its wireless offerings. Its inability to enter the stateside smartphone market with a high-end product sold by a carrier is a massive blow to its global ambitions, with recent research from GfK noting that despite the fact North America accounted for less than 14-percent of global phone sales in 2017 in terms of moved units, its share of global revenue was closer to 18-percent over the same period. In other words, the average selling price of handsets in North America is significantly larger than in most other markets, amounting to $417, only behind Western Europe ($446) and Developed Asia ($645). For added context, the population of developed parts of Asia amounts to just over 243 million, whereas Western Europe has just under 400 million people, as per 2016 data. With close to 326 million nationals as of last year, the United States is hence one of the world’s largest flagship smartphone markets, hence representing one of the most attractive opportunities for Huawei’s P and Mate lineups if it wasn’t for regulatory issues.

The Federal Communications Commission is now looking to limit the use of its Universal Service Fund with the goal of avoiding any scenario in which such resources are utilized to support companies which may pose a national security risk to either the U.S. communications networks or its telecom supply chain, the agency said late last month as part of a release that was widely interpreted as targeting Huawei and ZTE despite the fact that it directly references neither. Earlier this year, Congress is already said to have asked the FCC to investigate Huawei’s stateside ambitions but it’s presently unclear whether the regulator’s March proposal is related to that request which was initially reported by Bloomberg but never confirmed.

Some analysts are now speculating Huawei’s recent statements about not giving up on the U.S. won’t amount to much in practice, predicting the company will almost certainly shift its resources to Europe which has historically been much more receptive of its products. As the Shenzhen-based tech juggernaut already pledged to invest over $4 billion in the UK, those predictions are already standing on some factual ground. A Reuters-conducted analysis of Huawei’s recent financial disclosures also shows the tech giant is apparently rethinking its U.S. lobbying efforts and is now looking to promote its brand in a less direct manner, i.e. by lowering the amount of cash it spends on actual lobbyists and refocusing on sponsoring telecom events, competitions, and similar happenings. While that strategy shift may not result in decreased spending on corporate promotions and could even have an opposite effect, it should and already is lowering Huawei’s financial commitments that must be disclosed as lobbying in accordance with applicable laws. Huawei’s U.S. future now appears to be less clear than ever, especially as the firm is now understood to be conducting layoffs “across the board” in the country and has even parted ways with its long-time Washington-based advocate and external affairs chief William Plummer.

AndroidHeadlines reached out to Huawei for comment on its long history of issues in the U.S. detailed above and will update this timeline with any response it receives.
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Unread 2018-07-03, 10:33 AM   #6
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Huawei cable could have compromised US military secrets



It's likely that US military and intelligence agencies had input into the decision by the Turnbull government to deny landing rights for the Huawei cable. BeeBright
A serving US cyber warfare officer has indicated military data was at risk of being compromised if China's Huawei was allowed to build an internet cable from the Solomon Islands to Australia.
Lieutenant Commander Jake Bebber of the US Navy said the $137 million cable, which is now being funded through Australia's aid budget, would have been a significant strategic asset for China, allowing it to access and disrupt military and civilian communications.
"The US would have been concerned about China laying that cable," he said via phone from Norfolk, Virginia.
"The fact that so much data would have traversed Chinese-made infrastructure certainly was an issue."

Duncan Lewis, director-general of ASIO, has been warning boards of continuing trade disruptions. Andrew Meares
Mr Bebber's comments suggest the US military and intelligence agencies had input into the decision by the Turnbull government to deny landing rights for the Huawei cable, before pledging to fund its construction.
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In mid-June the government confirmed this decision with Foreign Minister Julie Bishop saying the Pacific Islands needed infrastructure options other than those funded by China.
Mr Bebber, who served four years with US Cyber Command and is currently a cryptologic warfare officer, said Australia was "right to be concerned" about Huawei.
These concerns are likely to receive further publicity in the coming weeks if the government takes the advice of its security agencies and bans Huawei from providing equipment for Australia's soon-to-be-built 5G mobile networks.
This is likely to trigger a further round of tensions in the bilateral relationship, which is already at a historical low over Australia's foreign interference laws and tough stance on Beijing's territorial expansion in the South and East China Seas.


High-level warnings

In an effort to warn the business community that further trade disruptions are likely in the near-term, Australia's top spy and diplomat have been briefing business on the Turnbull government's position.
As The Australian Financial Review reported on Tuesday, Duncan Lewis, director-general of the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO), and Frances Adamson, secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, have been briefing boards over recent months.
They have warned of continuing trade disruptions, while seeking to explain why the Turnbull government has taken a harder line than previous administrations on China.


One senior company director present during a briefing said there was also an unspoken message the government's position on China would be undermined by criticism from the business community.
"Don't give us such a hard time," was the general message according to the person.
Despite efforts by the federal government to mute criticism of its China policy, one of its most outspoken critics is former trade minister Andrew Robb, who served under former prime minister Tony Abbott.
In a speech to the Minerals Council of Australia, Mr Robb advocated for Australia to pursue a more independent foreign policy and not get caught in the middle of a power struggle between China and the US.


He said the rise of China and India were inevitable and the US needed to find a way to share power in the region.
"Unfortunately, the United States appears yet to accept this inevitability, with both sides of the political aisle in Washington endlessly focusing on 'containment' of China – a futile and counterproductive approach in my view," Mr Robb said.
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Unread 2018-07-06, 03:01 PM   #7
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Huawei Says The FCC Has No Authority To Block Its US Ambitions


Huawei argued the Federal Communications Commission has no authority to block its ambitions in the United States, having written as much in its latest remarks sent to the regulator. The move was made in response to the FCC’s March proposal to bar government agencies from using the Universal Service Fund to purchase telecom equipment from Chinese companies based on national security concerns. The agency’s vote on the matter is illegitimate because the proposed change is outside of the FCC’s statutory authority and the fund itself isn’t meant to finance any hardware or software relevant to national security in the first place, Huawei claims.

The Shenzhen, Guangdong-based consumer electronics manufacturer also used its latest correspondence with the FCC as yet another opportunity to reiterate its arguments against any national security allegations made against its operations in the past, maintaining it’s a privately owned entity that was never embroiled in any kind of spying scandals and isn’t any more prone to being controlled by the Chinese government than U.S. companies are likely to be influenced by Washington. Skeptics previously doubted Huawei‘s ownership claims due to its traditionally close ties to Beijing and the fact that its actual ownership structure is opaque, being based on shares that can only be owned by Chinese nationals for the duration of their employment with the firm.
Huawei’s long history of issues with stateside regulators, lawmakers, and companies prevented it from doing large-scale business in the country so far and only became more complicated in recent times due to its attempt to strike a retail partnership with AT&T in early 2018. Its joint 5G R&D efforts with Sprint’s parent SoftBank are now also drawing additional scrutiny to the wireless carrier’s proposed merger with T-Mobile, whereas its smartphones are unlikely to be picked up by any stateside network operator in the near future.
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Unread 2018-08-14, 09:41 AM   #8
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Bill Banning Federal Use Of Huawei, ZTE Tech Signed By Trump

President Trump on Monday signed the latest annual edition of the U.S. defense bill, with the legislation securing $716 billion for security policy funding and loosely banning the federal use of technologies from Chinese hardware manufacturers Huawei and ZTE. Section 889 of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 prohibits the use and procurement of “covered telecommunications equipment or services” in certain scenarios, with the bill later clearly stating any equipment created by Huawei and ZTE falls under that technology category.

While the ban isn’t absolute, it prevents heads of federal agencies from entering into contracts or renewing old agreements to utilize Huawei and ZTE’s solutions in a way that would position them as “essential” component of any government system. Likewise, the executive branch of the federal government is prohibited from awarding critical contracts to any private company that relies on ZTE- and Huawei-made tech in a significant manner, as per the same law. The bill doesn’t go into more details on the matter, leaving the intricacies of its enforcement up for interpretation across the federal government. Industry watchers previously suggested that even a soft ban like this one is likely to discourage federal agencies from ordering Huawei and ZTE’s technologies for any purpose moving forward.
While the development was largely anticipated, ZTE still managed to avoid the worst-case scenario as a previous draft of the defense budget act included a provision that would have reinstated its denial order issued by the Commerce Department over trade embargo violations in April. The seven-year ban on the purchase of American technologies threatened to bankrupt China’s telecom juggernaut in a matter of months but ended up being lifted earlier this summer, whereas the more aggressive anti-ZTE provision was removed from the defense act last month. Huawei itself has a long history of issueswith the U.S. government and was repeatedly accused of posing a national security risk due to its close ties to Beijing, which is a notion that the company described as baseless on numerous occasions.


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Unread 2018-08-31, 11:20 AM   #9
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Huawei Guilty On Five Counts Of LTE Patent Infringement In The US



Chinese electronics giant Huawei Technologies and its stateside unit Huawei Device USA have been found guilty on five counts of patent infringement earlier this week, with the District Court for the Eastern District of Texas ordering it to pay $10.5 million to PanOptis, a Plano-based intellectual property creator. The firm alleged patent infringement on a number of its LTE technologies in October, claiming Huawei used the telecommunications solutions without paying to license them.

The infringements manifested in a wide variety of Android smartphones capable of communicating with 4G LTE networks that Huawei manufactured in recent times, according to the complaint. The Mate 9, PH Lite, and Nexus 6P were specifically listed by the listed by the lawsuit as being evidence of patent infringement on Huawei’s part. The technologies in question fall under the standard-essential category, meaning PanOptis was required to license them under fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory (FRAND) terms. That’s precisely what the plaintiff claims it did, having argued it held talks with Huawei on at least ten occasions over a two-year period before the complaint was filed. PanOptis said it provided Huawei with FRAND licensing terms and reiterated its willingness to cooperate with the company on several occasions, claiming that good faith wasn’t returned.
It’s presently unclear whether Huawei will appeal the first-instance verdict, though that seems like a probable scenario. The firm has already been accused of patent infringement and even trade secret theft on several occasions in recent history, with its issues in the U.S. being complex and widespread. Huawei’s ambitions to launch a large-scale smartphone operation in the country have been crippled by the American government with this year’s iteration of the annual defense bill that prevents federal contractors from relying on the company’s equipment, with major mobile service providers reportedly also facing pressure to avoid carrying its devices in the future.

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Unread 2019-02-04, 09:53 AM   #10
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US accuses Huawei CFO of fraud and company of stealing from T-Mobile



Two indictments unsealed


The United States Justice Department has charged Huawei with a series of federal crimes, the latest turn in an American crackdown on the embattled tech company.
In one of two indictments unsealed today, Justice Department prosecutors accuse Huawei employees, including chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, of fraud. According to prosecutors, Huawei misrepresented its relationship with an Iranian affiliate, allowing it to continue its work with banks and officials despite American sanctions.

The Department has also accused Huawei of violating the law by stealing intellectual property from T-Mobile. According to prosecutors, Huawei violated confidentiality agreements with T-Mobile by stealing information on — and even a physical piece of — a robot used to test smartphones.

Huawei, the largest telecommunications equipment company in the world and a major purveyor of smartphones globally, is a success story in China, but has faced intense scrutiny in the US. Officials have repeatedly raised concerns that Huawei technology could be used by the Chinese government for espionage, a claim the company has denied.
In a statement, a Huawei spokesperson said prosecutors had declined a request to meet about the charges. “The Company denies that it or its subsidiary or affiliate have committed any of the asserted violations of U.S. law set forth in each of the indictments, is not aware of any wrongdoing by Ms. Meng, and believes the U.S. courts will ultimately reach the same conclusion,” the spokesperson said.

The charges will further escalate tension over Chinese tech companies operating in the US. Lawmakers have already banned government use of Huawei and ZTE technology, and Huawei’s CFO is currently being held in Canada, facing extradition to the US. In all, the Justice Department unsealed nearly two dozen charges against Huawei and affiliates today, accusing them of crimes including bank fraud and obstruction of justice.

At a press conference, FBI Director Christopher Wray characterized the company’s actions as “brazen and persistent.” Huawei did not immediately respond to a request for comment

Update, 9:30 AM ET: Includes statement from Huawei spokesperson.
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Unread 2019-02-10, 08:09 PM   #11
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President Trump expected to sign executive order banning Chinese network equipment





Huawei has been in hot water lately — governments around the world are banning its network equipment, it allegedly tried to steal technology for 'diamond glass' screens, and its CFO has been charged with wire fraud and conspiracy. A report from Politico claims that the White House is preparing to sign an executive order that would ban U.S. carriers from using Chinese telecom equipment, including products from Huawei.
The report claims that President Trump is expected to sign an executive order, possibly as soon as this coming week, that would ban the use of Chinese telecom equipment by U.S. carriers. The ban would primarily target Huawei and ZTE. Sources told Politico that the White House wants the executive order signed before this month's Mobile World Congress, which starts on February 25 in Barcelona.
Both the U.S. White House and Congress have been trying to ban networking infrastructure from Chinese companies for months. First, it was set to be included in the 2019 national defense budget, then a bipartisan group of lawmakers wrote up the 'Defending U.S. Government Communications Act' (which is currently in committee), then the White House started drafting an executive order.
Government officials are mainly targeting Huawei and ZTE's network infrastructure business, so the sale of phones and tablets to U.S. consumers would likely not be affected.
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Unread 2019-02-18, 07:36 PM   #12
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New report shows the lengths to which Huawei has gone to copy Apple

An engineer for the China-based smartphone maker Huawei recently sent a photo of some product design material to an Apple supplier. The Huawei engineer’s note gently prodded the supplier to “suggest a design you already have experience with,” but the supplier didn’t play ball.

In case it’s not obvious from reading that, that encounter is reflective of the many ways Huawei has allegedly tried to copy and outright steal Apple trade secrets — an effort the US government outlined in detail in a series of criminal charges against the company that were unveiled last month. A new report today from The Information adds to the mix, reporting details of encounters like the one above, as well as another involving a meeting between Huawei engineers working on a smartwatch and representatives of a component supplier.

During that particular meeting, The Information reports, the Huawei engineers teased promises of making a big order from the supplier while also trying to suss out specs related to the Apple Watch’s heart sensor. They asked the supplier to estimate how much such a sensor costs, suggesting a roundabout probe into the economics around certain Apple products. “The Huawei engineer attended the supplier meeting with four Huawei researchers in tow,” The Information’s report notes. “The Huawei team spent the next hour and a half pressing the supplier for details about the Apple Watch, the executive said.

“’They were trying their luck, but we wouldn’t tell them anything,’ the executive said. After that, Huawei went silent.”

Per Macrumors, encounters like that one reflect “a pattern of dubious tactics” on Huawei’s part to try and score technology from China-based suppliers that work for Apple. “According to a Huawei spokesperson,” the site reports today, “the company has not been in the wrong: ‘In conducting research and development, Huawei employees must search and use publicly available information and respect third-party intellectual property per our business-conduct guidelines.'”

However, “Huawei’s information gathering program led to incidents like the Huawei engineer probing a supplier for Apple Watch details, as well as Huawei copying a component of the MacBook Pro. Specifically, the company built a connector for its MateBook Pro that was just like the one used in Apple’s MacBook Pro from 2016, allowing the computer’s hinge to be thinner while still attaching the display to the logic board.”







Huawei approached several suppliers, the site goes on to report, and provided them with schematics like Apple’s, “but most recognized the part and refused to make it for Huawei. The company told The Information that it requires suppliers to uphold a high standard of ethics and that it doesn’t seek or have access to its competitor’s confidential information. Eventually, Huawei found a willing supplier and the connector was built into the MateBook Pro.”
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Unread 2019-02-20, 12:48 AM   #13
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Huawei founder strikes defiant tone in interview, says the US ‘can’t crush us’

In his first interview since the arrest of his daughter in December, Huawei’s until-now reclusive founder struck a defiant tone in response to questions from the BBC — with the billionaire businessman promising the news service that there’s “no way the US can crush us.”


“The world cannot leave us because we are more advanced,” Ren Zhengei told the BBC, adding that “Even if (the US can) persuade more countries not to use us temporarily, we can always scale things down a bit.


“If the lights go out in the West, the East will still shine. And if the North goes dark, there is still the South. America doesn’t represent the world. America only represents a portion of the world.”






It was his first such interview in recent months and something of a defiant response in the wake of continued US pressure on allies to shun Huawei products and technology. It also comes just two months after Ren’s daughter, Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou, was arrested in Canada at the behest of US authorities over a litany of fraud-related accusations.


The US in recent weeks also made public a series of criminal charges against Huawei, which many Western governments like the US assume is a de facto arm of the Chinese government. In response to that point, Ren has granted his first TV interview with an American journalist which will air on Wednesday during CBS This Morning, with Ren offering this response to the show’s co-host Bianna Golodryga when she asked if Huawei works with the Chinese government:
“For the past 30 years,” he said, according to pre-released notes from CBS about the interview, “we have never done that, and the next 30 years to come, we will never do that.”


What about the government adding backdoors into your products, perhaps without your knowledge?


“It is not possible,” Ren replied. “Because across our entire organization, we’ve stressed once and again that we will never do that. If we did have that, with America’s advanced technology, they would found that already. So that proves we do not have it … Hypotheses are not evidence. Evidence is based on facts. If you have doubts or concerns, it’s normal.”


Such public interactions may be starting to have at least a small effect in the company’s favor. In recent days, for example, British intelligence officials seemed to break from their US counterparts, offering that they suspect they’ll be able to manage any cybersecurity concerns while using Huawei products like its 5G equipment.






Huawei is also pressing forward with its business plans, despite the spate of bad news:
Rules were made to be rewritten. Paris, 26.03.2019. #RewriteTheRules #HUAWEIP30 pic.twitter.com/hFzZI3pVYr
— Huawei Mobile (@HuaweiMobile) February 19, 2019
The company will be unveiling its 2019 P30 Android phones at an event in Paris next month, as the tweet above and teaser video reveals.
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Unread 2019-03-05, 12:18 AM   #14
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Huawei reportedly plans to sue US government over ban






Huawei’s already proven that a ban in the world’s second largest smartphone market won’t hamper its rapid success, but the company still won’t go down in the States without a fight. Word is that the consumer electronics giant is planning to unveil a lawsuit against the U.S. government later this week.



That news comes via two anonymous sources reported in The New York Times this morning. The reported impending suit is pushback against longstanding bans in the States that have barred the company’s equipment from infrastructural projects ahead of a nationwide push into 5G. It’s also made the nation’s carriers and retail stores wary of stocking Huawei products.


The suit is reportedly set to be filed in the Eastern District of Texas — the location of Huawei’s U.S. headquarters, as well as a notorious haven for patent trolls.


U.S. officials have long recommended against using Huawei devices over alleged ties to the Chinese government. On Friday, meanwhile, the Canadian DOJ allowed an extradition case against Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou to proceed after her arrest in Vancouver late last year. Those charges stem from allegations that the company circumvented sanctions on Iran.



Earlier today it was announced that Meng was filing a civil suit in the country, alleging that authorities didn’t advise her of her constitutional rights prior to questioning and detaining her.



We’ve reached out to Huawei for comment on the suits.
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Unread 2019-03-06, 09:57 PM   #15
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China's Huawei sues the US, claiming it shouldn't be blocked from selling to federal government

  • Huawei is suing the U.S. over a law that bans government agencies from buying the Chinese technology giant's equipment, claiming the legislation is unconstitutional.
  • The lawsuit focuses on a provision in a law known as the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).
  • It comes after Meng Wanzhou, Huawei's CFO, filed legal proceedings against Canadian authorities alleging they arrested, detained and searched her in violation of her constitutional rights.





Huawei is suing the U.S. over a law that bans government agencies from buying the Chinese technology giant's equipment, claiming the legislation is unconstitutional, as the company goes on the front foot following months of political pressure.
The lawsuit, which was filed on Thursday local time, focuses on a provision in a law known as the National Defense Authorization Act. Section 889 of that legislation prohibits executive government agencies from procuring telecommunications hardware made by Huawei and another Chinese firm, ZTE. Both companies are explicitly named in the act.
But lawyers for the world's largest network equipment maker by revenue, argued that the provision in the NDAA is against the U.S. Constitution.
Huawei has faced intense pressure from President Donald Trump's administration, which claims the company's equipment could be used for espionage by the Chinese government. The tech giant is also facing criminal charges from the Justice Department, which has accused it of stealing trade secrets and skirting U.S. sanctions on Iran. The U.S. government has also tried to persuade allies against using Huawei gear.
Top executives, including the company's founder, have repeatedly denied the allegations that Huawei is a security risk, while the company has also been carrying out a major public relations push to change its image. The Chinese firm is now going on the legal offensive.



Lluis Gene | AFP | Getty Images
Visitors pass in front of the Huawei's stand on the first day of the Mobile World Congress in Barcelonaon on February 27, 2017 in Barcelona.

Huawei is suing the U.S. over a law that bans government agencies from buying the Chinese technology giant's equipment, claiming the legislation is unconstitutional, as the company goes on the front foot following months of political pressure.
The lawsuit, which was filed on Thursday local time, focuses on a provision in a law known as the National Defense Authorization Act. Section 889 of that legislation prohibits executive government agencies from procuring telecommunications hardware made by Huawei and another Chinese firm, ZTE. Both companies are explicitly named in the act.
But lawyers for the world's largest network equipment maker by revenue, argued that the provision in the NDAA is against the U.S. Constitution.
Huawei has faced intense pressure from President Donald Trump's administration, which claims the company's equipment could be used for espionage by the Chinese government. The tech giant is also facing criminal charges from the Justice Department, which has accused it of stealing trade secrets and skirting U.S. sanctions on Iran. The U.S. government has also tried to persuade allies against using Huawei gear.
Top executives, including the company's founder, have repeatedly denied the allegations that Huawei is a security risk, while the company has also been carrying out a major public relations push to change its image. The Chinese firm is now going on the legal offensive.



Huawei argues that the provision in the NDAA in which it is explicitly named is really a "bill of attainder" — wherein a legislative act pronounces a specific individual or group guilty of some offense and punishes them without due process. That's forbidden by the U.S. Constitution. The company's lawyers also argued that Section 889 is unlawful because it violates Huawei's right to due process, meaning the firm cannot hear the evidence against it and fight that in court.
Huawei's legal team is essentially arguing that, by including the provision in the legislation and banning the company's sales to federal agencies in law, Congress is unconstitutionally acting as a judiciary.
The federal district court where the lawsuit is filed will make a decision on whether Huawei's lawsuit will hold. Either side — Huawei or the U.S. government — can appeal that decision. A court has the power to invalidate a part of legislation without ripping apart the entire law. So, in theory, Huawei could get Section 889 thrown out.
Huawei will be hoping that by getting Section 889 of the NDAA scrapped, it could open the door for conversations with the U.S. government.
Glen Nager, lead counsel for Huawei and partner at Jones Day, claimed Thursday to CNBC that the American law is "hurting Huawei's customers in the United States."
"It's damaging Huawei's reputation and it's limiting the ability of Huawei to provide its innovative products, including 5G, to consumers in the United States," he added. "Huawei hopes that it can engage in a constructive conversation with the president and his administration over how to bring these innovative technologies and Huawei competition to the United States while providing full assurance of security for the United States of America."
Huawei has long argued that its absence from the U.S. market will hamper competition in the next generation of mobile networking technology — a claim that experts have contested.
The technology firm is also fighting fires on other fronts. Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, the daughter of founder Ren Zhengfei, was arrested in Canada in December and was accused of breaking U.S. sanctions against Iran. She faces extradition to the U.S. But the CFO's lawyers are now suing Canadian authorities, alleging they arrested, detained and searched her in violation of her constitutional rights.







Huawei's lawsuit against the U.S. bears some similarities to a case in 2018 involving Russian cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab. In September 2017, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security ordered government agencies to stop using Kaspersky software, alleging it could be used for espionage by Russia. The ban was later ratified in law.
Kaspersky filed two lawsuits against the government with one claiming the move amounted to a bill of attainder. The two lawsuits were thrown out by a judge in May and Kaspersky also lost an appeal later in the year.
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Unread 2019-03-14, 11:48 PM   #16
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Huawei developed its own operating systems in case it’s banned from using Android and Windows





Prepared for the worst


Illustration by William Joel / The Verge Huawei has developed its own proprietary operating systems, and it’s ready to implement them in case its US legal battle leads to a ban on the export of US-made products and services like Android and Windows.
“We have prepared our own operating system, if it turns out we can no longer use these systems, we will be ready and have our plan B,” Huawei executive Richard Yu shared in a recent interview with Die Welt. Huawei began working on an Android replacement as early as 2012 when the US opened an investigation into Huawei and ZTE, according to the South China Morning Post, and it was still developing the system in 2016. The announcement of its “plan B” operating system comes at a time when Huawei is ensnared in an ongoing legal battle with the US, which could result in the company being banned from receiving exports from the US. If it comes to that, Huawei says it will be ready.
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Recently, Huawei sued the US in response to a ban that prevents its tech from being used in “federal networks, effectively also preventing major government contractors from using Huawei equipment,” according to a report from The Verge’s Colin Lecher. Huawei’s suit states that the US “unconstitutionally singled out Huawei for punishment” and that a ban on Huawei would put America behind other regions in the race to build out 5G networks.
Yu shared that Huawei would “prefer to work with the ecosystems of Google and Microsoft,” but that it’s ready to switch over to its in-house operating system should the legal climate worsen. Since Huawei makes the Kirin processors found in most of its smartphones, it would be in a much better position to weather a ban than ZTE, which suffered a three-month ban in 2018. That prevented ZTE from using Google’s Android operating system and from receiving exports from US companies to develop its smartphones.
Even though it says it’s ready with an OS replacement for its computers, Huawei would need to find new hardware partners since it relies on Intel processors in its Windows laptops. With Intel and Qualcomm off the table and MediaTek processors generally reserved for cheaper, low-performance devices like Chromebooks, Huawei may need to start developing its own laptop-grade processors.
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Unread 2019-05-20, 12:22 PM   #17
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Intel, Qualcomm, and other suppliers blacklist Huawei, putting businesses in imminent danger





Since the Department of Commerce added Chinese manufacturer Huawei to its 'Entity List,' thus limiting its ability to import U.S.-made products, we've seen some of the company's most important supplier relationships take a hit. Alphabet may have been the vendor with the highest profile as many of Huawei's Android products rely on software services from Google. But chip producers, including one in Germany, have also had to limit their ties to the telecommunications company.

Lumentum, which makes optical networking equipment, announced today that it would comply with the Entity List and end shipments to Huawei. In so doing, the company has revised its revenue estimates for the current quarter down by $30 million or 7% from its original forecast.
Memory supplier Micron has also confirmed it is not supplying Huawei at this time.
Bloomberg reports from sources that Intel, Qualcomm, Xilinx, and Broadcom will stop supplying Huawei indefinitely. Nikkei is also reporting that Qorvo and Western Digital have cut ties. Their products go into Huawei's smartphones, laptops, servers, and networking equipment.
The import ban is also having an effect on international companies that manufacture parts in the United States. Sources have told Nikkei that German semiconductors company Infineon has ceased shipments of certain products to Huawei. An Infineon spokesperson later said that the company is able to adapt its supply chain to continue working with the Chinese firm. Meanwhile, Switzerland's ST Microelectronics is considering its risk and may decide to follow suit sometime this week. Other companies assessing their positions include Japan Display, TSMC, and Toshiba Memory.
The manufacturers that supply to all of these Huawei clients are likely to experience a knock-on effect with fewer orders due to the immediate non-viability of a major upstream client.
Nikkei also reports that Huawei has built a cache of U.S.-sourced components that may last anywhere from 6 months to a year. The company has also pledged to maintain software updates for all of its Android devices. Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei told the media on Saturday that the company will be able to survive without supply from the U.S.

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Unread 2019-05-20, 01:08 PM   #18
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[COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.87)]Following Huawei’s placement of the U.S. Entity List which prohibits U.S. companies from doing business with Huawei without a specific license, Google announced that is had revoked its Android license from Huawei which cuts off its access to Google Play for new devices and security updates outside of what eventually gets rolled out to AOSP.[/COLOR]
[COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.87)]While this is devastating news for Huawei, the company has released an official statement, promising continued support for its current customers.[/COLOR]
Huawei has made substantial contributions to the development and growth of Android around the world. As one of Android’s key global partners, we have worked closely with their open-source platform to develop an ecosystem that has benefitted both users and the industry. Huawei will continue to provide security updates and after-sales services to all existing Huawei and Honor smartphone and tablet products, covering those that have been sold and that are still in stock globally. We will continue to build a safe and sustainable software ecosystem, in order to provide the best experience for all users globally.
[COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.87)]What’s important to note in Huawei’s statement is that it specifically calls out devices “that have been sold and that are still in stock globally,” implying that Huawei still does not have a plan for future devices like the Honor 20 Pro which will make its debut tomorrow in London. [/COLOR]
[COLOR=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.87)]Huawei is currently the second largest smartphone maker, but its position in the marketplace will likely suffer if it’s not able to quickly find a solution that will appease the U.S. government and allow it to renew its Android license with Google.[/COLOR]
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Unread 2019-05-20, 05:05 PM   #19
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US lifts Huawei ban, but only temporarily and in a limited scope








The internet became hysterical over the weekend when it was reported that Google was cutting tieswith Huawei thanks to new government regulations. After a day of speculating the future of the company and its products, the Department of Commerce has given Huawei a temporary license to maintain its current products (via Reuters).
Huawei’s limited license is only in effect through August 19, 2019, and allows the company to work with U.S. corporations to support current customers. The Shenzhen-based company will be able to maintain business relationships with Google, Intel, Qualcomm, and others to release software updated to existing hardware.
This 90-day general license is also good news for some smaller regional U.S. networks that rely on Huawei’s infrastructure. Two regions that were already affected by the company’s ban were rural areas of Wyoming and Oregon.
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What does the Huawei ban mean for your Huawei or Honor phone? (Updated)




The limited license does not mean that all is well between Huawei and the U.S. government. The temporary license only allows the Chinese company to maintain devices that are already on the market. This means that while Huawei can still release security fixes to its smartphones, the company would be unable to release new devices running Android or relied on technology sold or licensed by U.S. companies.
If the relationship between Huawei and the U.S. doesn’t change, the full restrictions of being placed on the country’s Entity List will go back into full effect.






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Unread 2019-05-24, 03:11 PM   #20
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Huawei is banned from using SD cards in future devices

The company is now barred from the SD Association.
Things just keep getting worse for Huawei. The company was barred from being a member of the SD Association, the trade group responsible for standardizing SD and microSD cards. The change in status means that Huawei will no longer be able to offer official SD or microSD support in its devices, including phones and laptops.




The SD Association confirmed to Engadget that Huawei was dropped from the trade group in order to comply with recent orders from the US Department of Commerce. Last week, the government agency placed Huawei and 70 of its affiliate companies on its "Entity List," a decision that signifies the government believes Huawei may be undermining American interests. It also makes the company ineligible to receive items or funding without government approval. That, in addition to the executive ordersigned by President Trump that bans the sale and use of telecommunications equipment from companies that pose "unacceptable" risks to national security, has placed Huawei in a significant bind.
Huawei told Android Authority that its customers will be able to continue purchasing and using SD and microSD cards with its products for the time being. It's not clear how the move will affect the company's future phones and devices, but Huawei has been moving away from the format in favor of its own "Nano Memory Cards."
Being dropped by the SD Association is certainly a blow to Huawei, but it's a relatively small one given some of the other hits the company has taken in the last week. Google suspended Android support for the company's phones and chipmakers Intel, Qualcomm and AMD have cut off supplies to the Chinese tech maker.





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Unread 2019-06-24, 08:07 PM   #21
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Huawei Sues US Over Telecommunications Gear Seizure

Huawei has been tossed to and fro in the current Trump Ban over the US-China Trade War, but you'd be wrong to assume the corporation isn't fighting back. The latest response from Huawei concerns the Chinese corporation suing the US over the seizure of its telecommunications gear in the lawsuit Huawei vs. US Department of Commerce, 19-cv-1828, U.S. District Court, District of Columbia (Washington).


Huawei's US unit sent some telecommunications equipment over to a California lab for testing back in July 2017. Once the equipment was tested, it was in route to China when the US seized the equipment in Alaska to see if it needed an export license. Huawei says it provided all the necessary information it was asked to regarding the equipment, and that it was discovered Huawei didn't need an export license according to the US Export Administration Regulations. That was twenty months ago, as the equipment has still not been returned to Huawei and allowed to be exported back to China.


This latest lawsuit from Huawei is not surprising, considering the current political situation between the US and China. Recently, Huawei has been blacklisted by the US Government, with American companies and allies being told not to do business with Huawei. That includes selling mobile components such as processor chips, antennas, modems, and so on. Huawei's President has said that the company will lose $30 billion over two years as a result of the Trump Ban, so in such a situation, the Chinese OEM has decided to fight back with economic warfare of its own.


Huawei's lawsuit over telecommunications gear is likely not a lawsuit over principles or morality; it is merely a lawsuit designed to frustrate the US Government into backing down from the Trump Ban and the current Trade War. After all, it has been twenty months; surely Huawei didn't forget about the seizure of its telecommunications gear only to remember it at such a convenient time, right?


Apart from the economic warfare of its telecommunications seizure lawsuit, the Shenzhen-based corporation has demanded that Verizon Wireless pay $1 billion in 5G patent royalties due to Huawei's 15% standards-essential 5G patent stake in the upcoming wireless network.


Huawei is the top smartphone maker in China, soaring above other rivals such as Xiaomi in the mobile space. To offset its financial loss, Huawei said that it will do what it can to gain 50% market share in China over the next year. Android OEM Xiaomi, to combat Huawei's rise, has pledged an additional $725 million to its retail operations in order to see its profit rise in China. Huawei's popularity in China and its ties to the Chinese Government have placed it at the center of this political war between two powerful countries.
The Trump Ban has seen Huawei blacklisted, its Android license revoked by Google, its smartphones taken off retail shelves in the US, and currently, its phones prevented from shipping to America. Additionally, companies like Qualcomm, that make processor chips, and even ARM, a British entity that relies on American patents to run its business, have abandoned the company -- though Qualcomm, Intel, and even Google have spoken up for Huawei and pleaded with the government to back down from the current ban. Huawei invested $11 billion a year into the US for mobile components, these companies say, money that they will lose if the ban against Huawei continues.
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Unread 2019-07-15, 02:10 PM   #22
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The Huawei fallout continues: ‘Hundreds’ of US layoffs, plus yet another OS name

It doesn’t seem like things will be back to normal for Huawei anytime soon, despite President Trump last month seeming warm to a reprieve for the Chinese tech giant. But not only is Huawei still shut out from buying parts it needs from the US and still banned from selling its phones here — the firm is also reportedly planning to move ahead with ‘hundreds’ of US layoffs at its Futurewei Technologies research subsidiary.




Additionally, the company is still sorting through how to move forward with a new mobile operating system for its handsets, with Huawei presumably soon to be cut off from using Google’s Android OS. Huawei has registered a trademark for — and been publicly talking up — its forthcoming Hongmeng mobile OS, but the company has also just filed a trademark in Europe for the name “Harmony” that would encompass an operating system for mobile devices as well as computers.

More on the new OS name in just a second. News of the layoffs, meanwhile, comes via The Wall Street Journal, which reports that Huawei will allow some Chinese employees of Futurewei (which operates a number of research labs around the US including in Texas and California) to relocate back to China in order to stay with the company. Likewise, some employees have already been notified they’ll be cut loose, and additional layoffs may still be planned.
The news is certainly not surprising, given that the status quo is apparently going to remain in place between the US and Huawei until the US and China resolve their trade differences.
Now, as far as Huawei’s plans for eventually replacing Android on its devices — Somewhat confusingly, there are now actually three names for a Huawei mobile OS floating around at the moment. Those names are Hongmeng, Ark OS and now it’s just been reported by Dutch tech news site LetsGoDigital that Huawei has filed for a trademark with European officials for the OS name “Harmony.” The site reports that Huawei’s application falls under the Class 9 trademark category which includes the description: “mobile operating systems; computer operating systems; downloadable operating system programs.”
Not much else is revealed about Huawei’s plans here, so it could be that these all refer to the same OS, just different names for different regions of the world. The company’s leaders have been saying publicly they’d prefer to stick with Android and not be forced to fall back on a new OS of their own making. However, Google is currently under a temporary license to keep supplying Huawei phones with Android updates, but that license expires in mid-August. Meaning, there’s not much sand left in the hourglass for Huawei to figure out what it’s going to do next along these lines.
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Unread 2019-07-29, 03:06 PM   #23
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Huawei ban reportedly killed an Assistant-powered smart speaker



Huawei has not had a great 2019. Just a few short years ago, the company was gearing up for a big push in North America. Then, the political climate got downright chilly for Chinese firms. Now, Huawei is facing down a technology trade ban that threatens to cut it off from US suppliers. The Information reports that one casualty of the dustup was an Assistant-powered smart speaker from Huawei.

According to unnamed sources within Huawei, Google and the Chinese company had spent a year working on the speaker project. It was expected to be a major rollout for Huawei, which hoped to sell the device online in many markets, including the US. The project stopped dead when the US government added Huawei to its "entity list." That prevents US companies from exporting technology to Huawei without specific approval, so many of its partners pulled back.
There were signs earlier in the summer that Huawei could get a reprieve beyond the initial 90-day delay, but nothing has come of that yet. Even if Huawei gets off the entity list before it feels the full impact, it's unlikely this alleged smart speaker will ever see the light of day.
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Unread 2019-08-09, 06:50 PM   #24
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US reportedly stalls on giving Huawei suppliers special licenses to export


Huawei and its U.S.-based suppliers remain on eggshells as the Trump administration has yet to issue special permits allowing domestic companies to ship product to the Chinese tech manufacturer — this is going on as Huawei's temporary reprieve from an Commerce Department import ban is headed into its last week. Now, there's word from Bloomberg's sources that the White House is stalling on approving the permits.

It's suggested that the delay is in reaction to the Chinese government's decision to stop importing U.S. agricultural goods. Recent negotiations between the two nations had been contingent on the U.S. making concessions in its demands for tech business and China upping its farming imports.
In May, the Trump administration prompted the Commerce Department to ban Huawei from importing U.S. products by placing it on its Entity List. The company was granted a 90-day license to resume imports — a move seen as the U.S. allowing the company to reorient its supply chain. However, we later learned of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross's intentions to let suppliers apply for special permits to work with Huawei and that, as of last week, 50 companies had applied for the permissions.
President Donald Trump said last week that he still wants businesses that make non-sensitive products to trade with Huawei.
Without any sign of extension, Huawei's import reprieve is set to expire on August 19. Furthermore, Trump is set to sign a new 10% tariff on $300 billion of Chinese goods on September 1. And even though he has said that Huawei is isolated from the trade talks, it seems that the conversation around the company's trustworthiness will have to be continued.
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Unread 2019-08-09, 06:52 PM   #25
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Huawei reveals HarmonyOS, its cross-platform Android replacement with a Fuchsia-like architecture


Huawei has been caught in the middle of the US-China trade disagreements, with the US restricting the company from accessing its market and incorporating American technology into its products, like Android. While the US administration decided to soften its tone towards the Chinese technology producer and allow it to work with US partners again, the company is still hanging in limbo. That's probably one reason among others why Huawei has been rushing to have a replacement ready. The company has announced its open-source HarmonyOS during its developer conference today. For now, it's mainly meant to run on devices other than smartphones.

Huawei says Harmony's Fuchsia-esque microkernel architecture allows the OS to run on a wide array of form factors like smartwatches, smart home devices, and TVs, while having better security than Linux-based systems. Developers can code in their preferred languages such as C/C++, Java, and Kotlin and translate their apps with Huawei's own ARK compiler. Through a "shared developer ecosystem," cross-platform development should be easily achievable. In contrast to Android, Harmony OS is built with a "Deterministic Latency Engine" that reduces input and animation lag by allocating system resources according to some real-time load analysis.


While the company claims it could switch from Android to HarmonyOS within one or two days, it says it has decided to stick with Google's OS for its smartphones because of its existing partners. Still, this assertion could very well be read as a threat should the US decide to restrict trade with Huawei again. Other than that, the company is hard at work to reduce its dependency on Google for its Android devices. It introduced a Play Services alternative called "HMS Core,” providing APIs for apps to hook into without resorting to Google. By distributing its own core services, Huawei lays a foundation that allows it to easily transfer Android apps to its own OS should its access to US software be revoked again.
The first devices to receive HarmonyOS will be TVs later in 2019. Over the next three years, the company plans to introduce the OS to more devices. For now, HarmonyOS will be China-exclusive, although Huawei wants to make it available internationally later.
I, for one, would greet another contender in the smartphone OS game, but it remains to be seen how successful HarmonyOS proves to be. After all, it could turn out to be another Tizen, Samsung's potential Android alternative that mainly lives in its smartwatches and TVs at the moment.
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