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Unread 2018-02-07, 12:47 PM   #1
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Default Congrats to Space-X and Elon Musk



Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB_nEtZxPog

SpaceX has done it again.

The pioneering rocket firm just pulled off the unexpected, and carried out what appears to be a seamless first-ever launch of its massive new rocket, called Falcon Heavy.

That makes SpaceX, the game-changing company helmed by billionaire Tesla CEO Elon Musk, the owner of the world's most powerful operational rocket.
Falcon Heavy took flight Tuesday around 3:45 pm ET from Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
"I'm still trying to absorb everything that happened because it's still kind of surreal to me," Musk told reporters after the launch.


Thousands of onlookers in Florida could be heard cheering on the company's livestream, which was viewed by about 3 million people.
In the run up to launch, it wasn't at all clear that the rocket would work.
"People [came] from all around the world to see what will either be a great rocket launch or the best fireworks display they've ever seen," Musk said in an interview with CNN's Rachel Crane Monday.

The rocket's smooth takeoff wasn't the only stunning thing about this launch.
In a never-before-seen feat, SpaceX also managed to guide at least two of the Falcon Heavy's first-stage rocket boosters to land upright back on Earth. They cut back through the Earth's atmosphere and landed in unison at a Kennedy Space Center landing pad.
"That was probably the most exciting thing I've ever seen -- literally ever," Musk said.
The third booster was supposed to land on a sea-faring platform called a droneship -- but just as it was about to land, the livestream cut out. Musk confirmed after the launch that the booster crashed.
On board the rocket that's now headed deeper into space is Musk's personal Tesla (TSLA) roadster. At the wheel is a dummy dressed in a spacesuit. Musk said in December the car would play David Bowie's "Space Oddity" on repeat. Cameras on board the car show it cruising by Earth, which appears as a big blue orb in the background. Musk plans to send the car into orbit around the sun.
He announced last year he planned to put his car on the inaugural Falcon Heavy flight. When asked on Twitter why he wanted to throw away a $100,000 vehicle, he replied, "I love the thought of a car drifting apparently endlessly through space and perhaps being discovered by an alien race millions of years in the future."

Tuesday's success marked a huge step forward for a company that's already managed to shake up the rocket industry with its groundbreaking technology.
The company made the world take notice when it proved it can safely return first-stage rocket boosters to Earth with its Falcon 9 rocket, which the company has used for more than 40 missions dating back to 2012.
Those rockets have a single first-stage booster, and SpaceX has safely recaptured them after 21 Falcon 9 launches.
Now, SpaceX routinely puts used boosters back to work. In fact, the inaugural Falcon Heavy flight actually used two pre-flown Falcon 9 boosters (the center booster was new.)
Reusing hardware is part of SpaceX's plan to drive down the cost of launches.
Before SpaceX came along, companies just discarded rockets after each mission.
Note the Falcon Heavy is not the most powerful rocket in history. That honor belongs to NASA's Saturn V rocket, which was used for the Apollo moon landings and was retired in the 1970s.
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Unread 2018-02-07, 12:49 PM   #2
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I am curious what the effects of space will have on that car.
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Unread 2018-02-10, 10:14 PM   #3
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Unread 2018-05-01, 10:22 AM   #4
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Space
Image Source: John Raoux/AP/REX/Shutterstock


Boeing makes a fool of itself by calling out SpaceX, saying the Falcon Heavy just isn’t big enough







When SpaceX launch its Falcon Heavy rocket earlier this year, it earned the title of “most powerful operational rocket.” That little “operational” modifier is pretty important, since nothing has yet to surpass NASA’s own Saturn V rocket which ferried astronauts during the Apollo missions in the 1960s and 70s. Still, it seems SpaceX’s significant accomplishments have caught the eye of competitor Boeing, who is now going on the offensive and calling out the Falcon Heavy as being too small.
Boeing, which is currently under contract with the US government to develop the SLS (space launch system) rocket platform for NASA, is still years away from the first iteration of its hardware, but the company is bullish on the idea of it being the answer to the world’s deep-space exploration quandary. The company is touting the yet-to-be-built rocket as the “most powerful rocket ever built,” but as Ars Technica points out, that claim is tenuous at best.




Not long ago, Boeing launched a website called Watch Us Fly which highlights the goings-on at the company. It’s equal parts “behind the scenes” and navel gazing, but the company’s writings about SpaceX, NASA, and its own SLS rocket platform are particularly interesting. The company cites NASA commentary regarding the Falcon Heavy’s ability (or inability) to deliver deep-space capabilities.
“The Falcon Heavy launch turned heads in February, but SpaceX’s rocket is a smaller type of rocket that can’t meet NASA’s deep space needs,” Boeing writes. “Once the Boeing-built SLS is operational, it will be the most powerful rocket ever built.”
That sounds like an innocent bit of horn-tooting, but it’s not entirely true. Like SpaceX’s own rocket hardware, Boeing’s SLS is being built in different configurations, with the earliest rockets being the most modest in terms of power. The first version of the SLS is expected to be capable of hauling 70 metric tons into low-Earth orbit (LEO), compared to the Falcon Heavy’s current 64 ton mark, but well shy of the 118 ton capabilities of the Saturn V,
Eventually a 105 ton variant is expected to be built, which will indeed be the most powerful operational rocket, if nothing has surpassed it by that point, but still shy of the “most powerful rocket ever built” title by a decent margin. At a much later, yet-to-be-forecasted date, an SLS rocket capable of taking 130 tons into LEO is planned, but that’s so far away that it’s hardly even worth considering at this point.
On top of all of this, NASA’s current budget woes mean that exploring beyond Earth’s moon is still little more than a dream. The agency is currently shooting down all talk of a manned Mars mission, and deep space exploration is essentially out of the question for the foreseeable future. Whether Boeing is willing to acknowledge any of this is anyone’s guess, but it’s worth considering the facts when making such bold claims.
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Unread 2018-05-01, 10:50 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by BuddyLee View Post
I am curious what the effects of space will have on that car.
Not much probably. (In the short term) give it several decades and I'm sure radiation along with going from 250° in the light to -250° in the shade, will break it down bit by bit, with the exception of the frame and motor.
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Unread 2018-09-18, 10:56 AM   #6
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Elon Musk unveils first tourist for SpaceX 'Moon loop'




Elon Musk's company SpaceX has unveiled the first private passenger it plans to fly around the Moon.

Japanese billionaire and online fashion tycoon Yusaku Maezawa, 42, announced: "I choose to go to the Moon."
The mission is planned for 2023, and would be the first lunar journey by humans since 1972.

But it is reliant on a rocket that has not been built yet, and Mr Musk cautioned: "It's not 100% certain we can bring this to flight."

The announcement was made at SpaceX's headquarters in Hawthorne, California, on Tuesday.




The company said the flight on board the Big Falcon Rocket (BFR) - a launch system that was unveiled by Mr Musk in 2016 - represented "an important step toward enabling access for everyday people who dream of travelling to space".

Earlier on Twitter, Mr Musk had already hinted that the passenger would be from Japan.



Mr Maezawa made headlines last year after paying $110.5m (£85.4m) for a painting by the late artist Jean-Michel Basquiat at an auction in New York.
The art enthusiast said on Monday he would invite six to eight artists from around the world to join him on the trip.
"They will be asked to create something after they return to Earth. These masterpieces will inspire the dreamer within all of us," he told reporters.
New rocket for a new mission

Only 24 humans have visited the Moon - all of them Americans; 12 of them landed on the moon. Nasa's Apollo 17 in December 1972 marked the last time humans landed on the moon, or went beyond low Earth orbit.
Mr Maezawa will not land on the moon. He will travel on what is called a "free return trajectory", which will bring his BFR ship back to Earth after it has gone around the far side of the satellite.

Yusaku Maezawa 前澤友作
✔@yousuck2020






I choose to go to the moon, with Artists. #dearMoon https://dearmoon.earth
8:55 PM - Sep 17, 2018


In 2017, Mr Musk announced that he would be sending two paying passengers on a loop around the Moon - which was to have launched as early as this year.
At the time, SpaceX was to have used its heavy-lift Falcon Heavy rocket and the crewed version of the existing Dragon capsule.
But in February this year, Mr Musk said SpaceX would concentrate on the BFR for future crewed missions.
The BFR has never flown, but Mr Musk has released some technical details about it. The rocket is expected to stand 118m high and have a diameter of 9m.
By comparison, the Falcon Heavy is 70m tall and consists of a central rocket core surrounded by two boosters, each with a diameter of 3.66m.



unveiled new artist impressions of the BFR and the spaceship which will carry passengers around the Moon.
It appeared to confirm some design changes to the spaceship, including three large fins near the back and a black heat-shield on the craft's underside.
Eventually, the BFR should be able to lift a whopping 150 tonnes into low-Earth orbit - that is more than the US Saturn V rockets that lofted the Apollo spacecraft.
The SpaceX founder has attracted some uncomfortable headlines of late - he recently smoked marijuana during a webcast with a US comedian.
Shares in Tesla have had a turbulent time after the entrepreneur said in a tweet last month that he wanted to take the carmaker private. He abandoned the idea about two weeks later.

The lawsuit brought by Vernon Unsworth, who helped with the rescue of 12 Thai teenagers from a flooded cave in July, seeks $75,000 (£57,000) in compensation and an injunction against Mr Musk to stop further allegations.
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Unread 2018-11-17, 10:51 PM   #7
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SpaceX receives FCC green-light to launch 7,500 internet satellites



The company has now received permission to launch nearly 12,000 satellites to power its global internet service.

SpaceX has received approval from the Federal Communications Commission to launch a constellation of more than 7,500 satellites.


The company has already received permission to launch more than 4,400 satellites. The network of nearly 12,000 orbiting transceivers will be used to power a global wireless internet service.


The FCC has also promised to streamline its satellite licensing rules, creating a single license for space stations and related earth stations to eliminate redundancies in the two separate licensing processes.



"Taken together, these changes are intended to ensure that the United States remains the most desirable country in the world for licensing and operating satellites," said FCC chairman Ajit Pai.


Tesla's proposed constellation represents a massive increase in total satellites orbiting the Earth. A Union of Concerned Scientists analysis suggests there are only 1,886 operational satellites in orbit, though there is a much higher number of non-operational objects.


The FCC has also launched a review of rules designed to mitigate the accumulation of orbital debris, whether non-operational satellites or objects used to launch satellites. The proposal aims to consider the changes in satellite technologies, primarily the proliferation of low-cost small satellites and large constellations with thousands of individual satellites.


Altogether, the various FCC filings suggest SpaceX is not facing any overt resistance to its launch plans but may still have more work to convince regulators that its massive constellation will not pose a threat to other satellite operations.
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Unread 2019-02-12, 12:55 AM   #8
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SpaceX launch: Starman trackers warn Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster will CRASH into Earth

ELON Musk’s Tesla Roadster and its Starman pilot risk crashing into the Earth, astronomers have warned as the SpaceX launch marks its first anniversary


The unusual SpaceX payload, which blasted off on February 6, 2018, is now barreling through space beyond the orbit of Mars. The Tesla Roadster and its pilot were chosen as a dummy payload for the maiden launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. Elon Musk, the mastermind behind the extravagant rocket launch, argued at the time a deadweight payload of metal blocks would have been simply too boring. Now, one year on from the launch, a study of Starman’s trajectory around the Sun put the cherry-red sports car on a potential collision path with Earth.

According to orbital dynamics experts Hanno Rein, Daniel Tamayo and David Vokrouhlicky, there is a significant possibility of SpaceX's Starman crashing into Earth or Venus.

In a joint research paper, published under the title of The random walk of cars and their collision probabilities with planets, the scientists predicted Starman’s journey over the next few million years.

The space experts found Earth, Venus and the Sun are the three most likely crash targets for Starman.
Collisions with Mercury and Mars are the least likely scenario as is Jupiter’s gravity catapulting the car out of the solar system.



But even with the terrifying outlook in mind, the odds of Starman crashing into the planet anytime soon are pretty slim.

The scientists gave Starman safe a six percent chance of hitting the Earth in the next one million years.

They also predicted a 2.5 percent chance of the sports car crashing into Venus in the same time frame.

Professor Rein said: “Although we are not able to tell on which planet the car will ultimately end up, we’re comfortable saying it won’t survive in space for more than a few tens of millions of years.”

In the study, the scientists said the Tesla sports car will make a close approach of the Earth within the first 100 years of its launch.

When this happens, the SpaceX spacecraft will come as close as the Moon.

The study reads: “Using an ensemble of several hundred realisations we were able to statistically determine the probability of the Tesla colliding with the Solar system planets on astronomical timescales.

“Although some of the orbits experience effects due to mean-motion and secular resonances criss-crossing the NEA space, the orbital evolution remains initially dominated by close encounters with the terrestrial planets, in particular Earth, Venus and Mars.

“About half of our 15 Myr integrations result in a collision with the Earth, Venus, and the Sun.”

Over a period of 15 million years (Myr) there is a 22 percent chance of Starman hitting Earth and 12 percent chance of it striking Venus.

There is, however, also the distinct possibility Starman will not be around long enough to see the Earth up-close ever again.

Due to the violent and hazardous nature of space, Mr Musk’s sports car is most likely crumbling to pieces under the weight of intense space radiation.



Sports cars, unlike actual spacecraft, are not typically designed to withstand the forces of nature at play in the vacuum of space.
Space radiation is different from the kinds of radiation we experience here on Earth
NASA
William Carroll, a chemist at the University of Indiana, explained: “All of the organics will be subjected to degradation by the various kinds of radiation you will run into there.”

According to space agency NASA, space beyond the protection of Earth’s atmosphere is filled with charged particles and cosmic rays emanating in all directions.
Because of this problem, humans cells in particular, are at risk of breaking down and causing all sorts of health complications.

NASA said: “Space radiation is different from the kinds of radiation we experience here on Earth.

“Space radiation is comprised of atoms in which electrons have been stripped away as the atom accelerated in interstellar space to speeds approaching the speed of light – eventually, only the nucleus of the atom remains.

Space radiation is made up of three kinds of radiation: particles trapped in the Earth’s magnetic field; particles shot into space during solar flares; and galactic cosmic rays, which are high-energy protons and heavy ions from outside our solar system.

“All of these kinds of space radiation represent ionizing radiation.”
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Unread 2019-09-30, 06:46 PM   #9
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SpaceX’s New Mars Rocket Protoype Looks Like a Giant Missile



Click here to read the full article.
Elon Musk isn’t giving up his dream of reaching Mars. And over the weekend, he unveiled the spaceship prototype that he hopes will help get us there.


On Saturday, the tech titan showed off the towering, grain silo-like Starship for the first time in front of a group of space enthusiasts and reporters at the Space X build and launch facility Boca Chica Village, Texas. He also announced that within the next month or two the shiny steel rocket will be launched to an altitude of 12 miles before returning to earth on one piece, according to The New York Times.


“It’s going to be pretty epic to see that thing take off and come back,” Musk said while animations of Starship landing on the moon and Mars showed at the event. He also said that he hoped the rockets first orbital flight would take place in the next six months.


Unlike its predecessor, the 68-foot Falcon 1, the Starship prototype measures 164-feet-tall and 30-feet in diameter. When combined with the Super Heavy, its booster stage, the full rocket will reach a height of 387 feet and will be able to carry 220,000 lbs. of cargo into orbit. According to the Times, that’s as powerful as the Saturn 5 rocket that took astronauts to the moon in 1969.


Starship is just the latest addition to SpaceX’s growing lineup of reusable launch vehicles. Musk has said he feels that it is a key step in making space travel like air travel for people. According to Reuters, he also said he hopes that the rocket will take humans to space sometime in the next year. Last year, it was announced that Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa had purchased an around-the-moon trip that’s scheduled to take off in 2023.


If that sounds aggressive, it’s worth noting that Musk is prone to setting over-ambitious timelines for his many projects. NASA, in particular, is annoyed at the company for being a “year behind schedule” in delivering on its promise to transport astronauts to the space station via its Crew Dragon capsules. Here on Planet Earth, the Tesla pick-up truck Musk has been teasing for two years failed to come out this summer and won’t be here until November, at the earliest.


As excited as Musk is about SpaceX’s progress, the people of Boca Chica Village, many of whom can see the rocket ship from their yards, seem decidedly less enthusiastic about the whole situation, according to the Times. As you might expect, Musk has a plan for that. To offset community ire and any potential danger from testing the rockets, SpaceX has sent letters to 26 residents offering to buy their homes for three times their value. The company has said it wants an answer within two weeks and was not willing to negotiate.
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Unread 2019-10-04, 02:49 PM   #10
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All About SpaceX's Ambitious New Starship



I’m very excited about the SpaceX Starship, mostly because it represents the first spacecraft being designed for general-use space travel that goes beyond Earth orbit, and, well, that’s exciting. Currently, SpaceX has built a rough steel full-size prototype called Starship Mark 1, which they plan to launch in a suborbital test flight soon, and an orbital flight soon after. It’s impressive as hell, but it’s important to remember it’s still basically just a shell with fuel tanks and engines. Here’s what else needs to happen.

The Mk1 prototype has three Raptor engines, with the final design to have six, and the massive Super Heavy rocket booster sporting 37 engines, arranged in rings, somewhat like the doomed Soviet L1 moon rocket.



Starship is an impressive beast: 160 feet tall, 30 feet in diameter, capable of hauling over 100 tons into orbit. That makes it the biggest rocket since the mighty Saturn V moon rocket, and the largest, most powerful rocket currently in development.
The Starship spacecraft itself will be the largest fully reusable spacecraft system ever, and, in plan at least, should prove to be a far more flexible system than the Space Shuttle, humanity’s only other reusable crewed spacecraft to date.
Musk thinks he can get the Mk1 to orbit quite quickly:
“This is going to sound totally nuts, but I think we want to try to reach orbit in less than six months.”
In case you’re wondering what SpaceX thinks a launch, orbital refueling, and booster recovery will look like from their Boca Chica, Texas spaceport, they’ve thoughtfully animated a little video showing everything:


Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzFQJUzoUvM


Keeping very much on-brand for SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, the timetable from the first prototype to a full, crewed mission is surprisingly short. SpaceX has booked a lunar-flyby flight of the Starship, with a passenger list of six to eight artists (and likely at least two qualified crew) for 2023.


It’s mostly an empty shell, with engines, fuel tanks, and some control systems. This makes complete sense for a first prototype and is an absolutely necessary step that all spacecraft go through, but there’s a hell of a lot more that has to be done before Starship will be ready for a human crew.


Life support for a crew as large as the Starship is planned to be able to support is no joke, as Musk has suggested that the ship will be capable of carrying around 100 passengers.



There has never been a life support system that can accomodate that many people. The International Space Station generally supports six crew at a time, though a record of 13 people have been together at once (a few times, it seems), as you can see in this group photo here from STS-131 and Expedition 23 to the ISS in April of 2010:




So, the Starship will need a system capable of handling nearly 10 times that amount of crew. Oxygen, CO2 scrubbing, waste management and water reclamation, thermal management, the whole deal. For potential trips of multi-month durations, as Musk wants to send these things to Mars.


And that’s not even addressing the needs for heat shielding for re-entry, micrometeoroid protection, radiation protection, food storage and preparation, insulation, sleep systems, exercise systems, and so on.


While most of these problems are well-understood, we’re still talking about implementations at scales never attempted before, and it seems that every crewed spacecraft does some amount of re-invention to fit its own needs.



All I’m saying is that what we’re seeing here is very preliminary, but still very cool and extremely ambitious. I’m not the only one who’s wondering about this, but I do have an idea about how SpaceX could get ahead if it really wanted to hit the 2023 artists-to-the-moon date.
SpaceX could cheat if it manages to develop a viable cargo-only version of the Starship, which would not need complex life support systems, and instead placed the crew in multiple Crew Dragon capsules, inside the cargo area of Starship.




Additional consumables like oxygen and water and other supplies could be added as well, along with a source of power for the capsules, but this could allow such a flight, as early as possible, without having to develop the necessary systems for Starship.


Of course, the crew wouldn’t be thrilled, as they’d be crammed into the relatively cramped capsules instead of the vast, airy Starship interior they’d been promised.
Crew Dragon has a roomy interior for an orbital ferry capsule, but it’s only intended for use for a few days at a time.


Realistically, that’s the only way I can actually see Starship carrying crew by 2023—by carrying already-developed crew capsules as cargo. I’m hopefully confident that SpaceX will get there before too long, but I think we’re looking at the normal Musk pattern of overpromising here.
Still, none of that should detract from what an exciting idea this is. I hope they pull it off.
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Unread 2019-10-18, 02:48 PM   #11
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SpaceX begins construction of its next-generation Starship rockets

Aerial video shows the gleaming rockets coming to life.




Elon Musk, Twitter


SpaceX's next-generation rocket, the Starship, is 50 meters long and powered by three Raptor engines, creating a whopping 12,000 kN of thrust. It is designed to haul large amounts of cargo and eventually passengers into space, for missions to the moon and potentially to Mars and beyond as well. After unveiling the design for the Starship Mk 2 last month, and also revealing an ambitious timeline for getting the craft into orbit, construction of three of the rockets has begun.






As reported by CNBC, aerial video of the company's facility in Cocoa, Florida shows gleaming towers of stainless steel which will become the rocket bodies. You can also see sets of rings on the ground stacked in doubles ready to be installed onto the rockets. The footage was captured by aerial photographer John Winkopp.


Something went wrong. Please make sure you added the video correctly.

Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChXMhSmqYqs


In addition to the two rockets being constructed at this facility, SpaceX is building a third Starship at its facility in Boca Chica, Texas as well. During the presentation of the Starship design, CEO Elon Musk revealed the company's plan to begin suborbital testing of the Mk 2 within one or two months, building on the progress made with the Starhopper prototype.
If testing of these Mk 2 rockets goes well, the company could begin construction on a Mk 3 version as early as next month.
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